Today in the Dauphin Herald – June 26, 1919

The Great Strike Over

The greatest strike in the history of the country is virtually over. The sympathetic strike has been declared off and hundreds of the strikers have returned to work and others are returning as fast as places can be found for them.
The staff of the Dauphin Telephone Exchange all returned to work on Wednesday, and the local trains are scheduled to run again. Most of the men, if not all, are expected to be back at their places in the shops by the end of the week.

Winnipegosis

The Great War Veterans’ Association held a successful picnic at the baseball grounds here on June 20th. The program of sports was attractive and drew a large crowd of visitors. There were foot races for men, women and children. Fast and slow horse races were also held. There was other variety with the hop.-step and jump race, the running jump and the tug of war. Fork River won the football game and Winnipegosis won the baseball game. Each team got a prize of $25, and both games were spirited and hotly contested.
Mrs. E.A. Morrison, after spending a few months holiday with her daughter, Mrs. E. Cartwright, has departed for her home in Kerrobert, Sask.
Hugh Armstrong was a business visitor in town last week.
Mrs. Geo. Spence has left for Winnipeg to meet her husband who is returning from overseas after over two years military service.
Miss M. Olsen, who has been nursing C. Burrell, left on Tuesday for her home in Winnipeg.
R. Montgomery, auditor for the Armstrong Trading Co., is in town for a few days on business.
The season is very dry here and rain is badly needed.
The strike in Winnipeg is making conditions awkward and the town is having trouble in getting mail and freight.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – February 27, 1919

Winnipegosis

The regular monthly meeting of the Home Economic Society was held Friday evening, February 21st. There was a good attendance, splendid papers were given by Mrs. Bradley and Ms. Morrison on “What Constitutes Happiness or what is the Secret of a Happy Life?” and “Why Women Should Vote.” Complete arrangements made for the society library to open Saturday afternoon, March 1st. All particulars concerning the circulation of the books can be had from the librarians, Mrs. Bradley and Mrs. Ummel, or from the secretary. The next meeting will be held March 21st, when Dr. A.E. Medd and C.H. Dixon will be the speakers of the evening.
The Dramatic Society will produce early in March a three act farce entitled “The Arrival of Kitty.” Kitty is a very captivating person, and the things that happened when she arrived were very diverting and as represented by the Dramatic Society are sure to be entertaining.
Mr. C.H. Dixon returned on Saturday from Dauphin, where he was in attendance at court.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – February 6, 1919

Cold Weather

After January furnishing us with a delightful brand of weather. February started in with a falling temperature. The Government thermometer registered as follows: Monday, 10 below zero; Tuesday 19 below and Wednesday 5 below.

The Great Air Battle of Major W.G. Barker

(By Mrs. Thos. Playford)

Among the deeds that have been done
By airmen brave and skilled,
This last great air feat of the war,
With wonder all has filled.

O’er Mormal fores, all alone,
One brave aerial knight,
Flew searching for the British troops,
Or foe air craft in sight.

He soon espied a German plane;
Attacked it then and there,
And soon the enemy machine
Was broken in the air.

But still another hostile craft
Was coming very nigh,
Just then the young Canuck was stunned,
A shot had pierced his thigh!

But soon the major was alert,
There, in the dangerous spot,
For fifteen Hun planes now came near,
To fire the deadly shot.

But the brave boy his shots did fire,
So deftly and so well,
That though against such odds he fought
Three of the foe craft fell.

But he another wound received,
And fainted clean away,
But again he mastered his machine,
And did once more hold sway.

He flew at one great hostile craft,
It fell, but in his pride.
Just then his left arm, bruised and smashed
Hung useless by his side

With one hand left to steer and shoot,
While foes the air did fly
Those watching saw and held their breath,
At that cool, deadly skill.

Some minutes longer in the air
He played the awful game,
Put out of action two more for fair,
Then to the earth he came.

Our boy! Who nigh on sixty plane;
Single handed fought that day,
Now lies a sorely wounded lad
In Rouen far away.

And all who watched him on that day
So nobly act his part,
That he’ll soon recover from his wounds
Is hoped by each brave heart.

Dauphin’s brave boy has laurels won
From our Allies o’er the sea,
But for this great deed of valor done
He got the prized V.C.

And when he comes back home again
Having won so much renown
Won’t be proudly welcome by
Dauphin, his native town!

And while, at home, his parents wait
The coming of their boy,
All hearts that love the Maple Leaf,
Heard of his deeds with joy.

And when she had this story heard,
Of daring, skill and pluck,
Old England bowed her head and said,
“God bless our young Canuck.”

And when in after years we read,
In history, song and story,
Of man a great heroic deed.
That won both fame and glory.

Of all the deeds of airmen brave,
Not many will compare
With this fight of our Major hold,
Knight-errant of the air.

Dauphin, Jan. 31st, 1919.

Fork River

Wm. Williams has left for Lake Winnipegosis, where his new timber limit is located. He intends commencing operations on the limit this winter. C. Bugg and W. Tuck went with him.
Miss H. Lacey has returned from a week’s visit in Winnipeg.
Mrs. D.F. Wilson and daughter, Miss Pearl, have left on a trip to the coast.
Owen Pruder, of the Northern elevator, has returned from a business trip to Winnipeg.
A number of cars of baled hay have been shipped from this point this winter. A good price has been realized. This is an industry that might be greatly developed.

Winnipegosis

A delightful old-fashioned evening party was held in the Rex Hall on Wednesday, Jan. 29th, under the direction of Miss McArthur, in aid of the Red Cross Society. Many old-time dresses were resurrected, and especially winning was Mrs. Shears in a costume representing Dickens’ Mrs. Sarah Gamp, Mr. Shears caused many a laugh as Mr. Pickwick. Mrs. Steele, the Misses Grenon, Mrs. (Dr.) Medd, Mrs. Morrison, Mrs. Campbell (of Sifton), Miss Paddock, Mrs. Ummell and many other ladies in old-time dresses made one feel they had stepped back fifty years. Mrs. A. Snelgrove had her hair dressed in a pretty Victorian fashion, while many other styles made one think of the Middle Ages. Everyone was delighted with the violin selections rendered by Mr. Shears and Mrs. Campbell. We would also like to thank Mrs. Medd, Miss Arnason, Miss Macarthur, the Misses Grenon, Mrs. F.S. Giggins and Mr. Wills for their help with the program. The ladies on the refreshment committee also deserve great credit. A dance finished up a most successful event.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 29 – 1910

1910 Sep 29 – Buried in Well

Kamsack, Sask., Sept. 25 – A funeral service, attended by circumstances that are unique in the history of Canada, took place Saturday on the farm of John Bowes, sixteen miles south of here. At the top of a 73 foot shaft that had been sunk for a well and at the bottom of which lay the remains of Elwer Olson, aged 35, of Yorkton. Rev. J. Morrison conducted a service for the dead. The shaft has been closed up and the body will remain for ever in the deep and improvised grave. Hansen was overcome by gas in the well and attempts to recover the body were fruitless.

1910 Sep 29 – Died from Burns

Miss Mabel Gunn of Makinak, aged 28 years, died Tuesday from burns received last week through an accident in handling coal oil. The young lady was trying to squelch a blaze on the floor with a rug, when her clothing caught on fire, and before it was put out she received terrible burns.
The unfortunate lady lingered nearly a week and everything possible was done to relive her suffering.
The funeral to the Makinak cemetery took place Wednesday.
Miss Gunn was favourably known throughout the Dauphin district, being one of Makinak’s earliest residents and having, with her sister, run a boarding house there for years. Her demise is keenly felt by the citizens of that community.

1910 Sep 29 – Fork River

Mrs. Comber left here for her home in Selkirk last week.
Mr. Frame from Treherne has been visiting friends here.
On Sunday Sept. 18th, Mrs. E. Morris gave birth to a little girl.
Quite a large congregation attended the Harvest Festival Service at Winnipegosis last Sunday night when a special sermon was preached by the Rev. H.H. Scrase.
Car loads of wheat are being shipped from this point.
Tom Toye’s youngest child died last week and was buried at Winnipegosis. The burial service was taken by the Rev. H.H. Scrase.
Cattle buyers are busy in this district. Quite a number of cattle have been sold lately and shipped to Winnipeg.
Fleming Wilson from Dauphin paid us a visit last week.
Harvest Festival Service will be held at the English Church on Sunday evening, October 9th, at 7.30.

1910 Sep 29 – Sifton

Mr. F.E. Nex of Whitemouth, is visiting his father-in-law, Mr. Ludwig Zarowoney. Fred bicycled from Winnipeg to McCreary, where he boarded the train.
Rev. Sabourin was in Winnipeg last week on business.
School Inspector Walker of Dauphin, inspected the village school on Tuesday last.
Miss A. Griffith of Fishguard, Eng., is visiting her brother-in-law, Mr. W Carr.
Mr. and Mrs. W. Barrie have just returned home, after a couple months visit to his parents in “ye auld Scottish hielands” near Aberdeen. Bill reports a vey pleasant trip.
Theo. Stefanik of Winnipeg, addressed a large open air gathering here on Wednesday of last week in the interest of the community. Mr. Rawson of Dauphin was noticed in the gathering.
Charl Holinski is about completing the building of his new home. A fireside gathering is expected to initiate the new house when finished, so no doubt Mr. Jordan of Dauphin will be likely called upon to send up the necessary for the occasion, which is usually quite in evidence at such times.
Mr. and Mrs. T.A. Kitt and son of Valley River, visited Sifton on Sunday.
Miss Bessie Wilson of Fork River, is visiting her sister, Mrs. Paul Wood.
Mr. W. Carr went to Winnipegosis on Saturday on business.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 28 – 1913

1913 Aug 28 – Broke His Leg

John Coleen, of Red Deer Point, Lake Winnipegosis, broke his leg on Tuesday by falling out of a wagon. He was brought to the hospital here on Wednesday by Dr. Medd.

1913 Aug 28 – Ethelbert

Peter Pundy was arraigned before Magistrate Skaife last week charged by George Marantz with plastering manure over he windows of his store. He was found guilty and the fine and costs amounted to $31. There is talk of Pundy appealing the case.
Wheat cutting is going ahead with all possible speed. The bulk of the crop will be cut by Saturday night.
The Ruthenians have organized a Conservative association with a good membership. The following are the officers elected: Sam Hughes, M.P.P., Honorary President; N.A. Hryhorczuk, President; P. Kuzyk, Vice; K.F. Slipetz, sec.-treasurer and organizer.

1913 Aug 28 – Fork River

Mr. and Mrs. J. Clemens of Dauphin, spent a short time renewing old acquaintances last week.
Mr. Morrison, of the Canadian Oil Co. of Winnipeg, was busy here taking orders for gasoline and oil.
Our weed inspector is busy these days. One of our farmers was mulcted to the tune of twenty-five dollars and costs. We are informed another man at Winnipegosis was put to the trouble of having a gang of men cutting down a common weed for sow thistle. This weed business seems a complicated proposition and needs handling very carefully. The enforcing of the act has become a necessity here.
We are informed that a new fruit store is in operation. Opposition is the life of trade we are told.
Fred. Storrar returned from Winnipegosis, where he had charge of a booth during the picnic and reports a swell time.
Mrs. McEacheron and son, Donny, are spending, a few days with her sister, Mrs. E. Morris, at Winnipegosis.
In the absence of the constable last week we hear the lady suffragettes held a successful meeting and everything passed off quietly till they meet again.
Mrs. Kennedy and family and Miss A. Godkin returned from Winnipegosis, after spending a week at that point among their numerous friends.
Quite a number took in the trainmen’s picnic to Winnipegosis and report having a good time there.
James McDonald returned from a two weeks’ visit among friends in the south and is looking hearty and has resumed charge of the express automobile.
Picture to yourself Main Street east in our little burgh where night after night a band of from twenty to forty head of cattle laying around till there is not room to pass between them and the dwelling houses with a team and the aroma that arises with a hot sun beating down on it every day. Again, a benighted traveller crossing over in the dark and landing in one of those pyramids dedicated to the memory of cowology. A voice calling to be helped out and a pillar of brimstone and fire arises blazoned with it, to the downfall of those who put the herd law out of existence. Is it not a disgrace to a civilized community to put up with such a state of affairs.
Mrs. W. King returned from a short stay at Winnipegosis with her daughter, Mrs. E. Morris, during the illness of her little son who died last week.
The Rev. Mr. Roberts held service in the Methodist Church on the 24th.
The Rev. Mr. Wosney will hold service in All Saints’ English Church every Sunday at three in the afternoon till further notice.
The first car of fish of the season passed through here from Lake Winnipegosis last week.
A large assortment of vegetables is shipped from this point which is sampled by the stock running at large to the discomfort of the shipper.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 2 – 1914

1914 Jul 2 – Damage by Hail Storm

A heavy ran storm accompanied by hail visited the Mountview district on Tuesday afternoon. The strip touched by the hail was a narrow one and only two farms were struck.
W.G. Lock last 45 acres of wheat and 15 of oats. Crop insured.
Jas. Scarff last 40 acres wheat and 20 oats. Not insured.
Mr. Lock had only insured his crop a few days before the storm and only received his policy from Winnipeg on Wednesday.

1914 Jul 2 – Latest From Sewell Camp

Sewell Camp, June 30.
The Sergeant-Trumpeter mounted a new steed on Tuesday and we were treated to a great display of fireworks from the horse’s heels, the sergeant’s tongue and also eventually from the part of his pants which struck the ground after a while. For a minute or so he was hear saying, “Going up! Going up!” When he struck the ground, Sergeant-Major Fletcher was heard to say, “Coming down, I fiddler.” Highfield after four days’ rest has still a stiff neck.
The boys look very smart in their new Indian service helmets, which were presented to us alone (the 32nd) as a distinction for our work last year. The boys are proud of them as they should be.
Someone caused an uproar on Sunday. He said the camp was being attacked by Suffragettes. On closer examination they proved to be Cameron Highlanders.
Our shoeing smith thought he would ride the Sergeant-Trooper’s broncho, but changed his mind at the same time as the broncho.
It takes Dave Cox to ride the bronchos and round-up the runaways.
We will leave here on Friday morning arriving at Dauphin in the evening.
Our regiment was inspected on Saturday by the honourary colonel, Dr. Roche.
We turned out on Saturday morning at 4.30 a.m. for shooting on the range. Major Walker very conveniently was absent having a blister on his heel, so stayed in bed.
The Ashville boys are a first-class bunch of rifle shots.
The Dauphin squadron has been nicknamed “The Devil’s Own,” and they are worthy of it.
Red noses are the fashion. It is the fault of the occasional sunshine, not the grog.
On galloping off the field two regiments collided, resulting in a bad smash, one man getting his collarbone broken and two others disabled.
Our boy troopers, Gordon Walker, Gordon Batty and Roy Wade, are constantly being court-martialled by Squad Sergeant-Major, for unsoldierly conduct; not being on parade at 5.30 a.m., catching gophers before cleaning up their tent, etc.
Our cook put up some fine apple pies, things which are comparatively unknown here. We have an idea that Frank Beyette can have his job every year if he likes.
We have had a number of lady visitors up to now, among whom was Mrs. Walker and little daughters.
We wonder what it is that makes the boys sit down so slowly and gently. Having had some ourselves they have our sympathy.
H.H. Allan, the photographer, came down here this year and he is doing roaring business.

1914 Jul 2 – Fork River

A. Cameron and F.B. Lacey, of Mowat, have returned from a trip to Dauphin.
Vote for Sam Hughes, the farmer, and you won’t make a mistake.
Miss Gertrude Cooper has returned from Dauphin and is with her parents on the Fork.
Mrs. Attwood, of Towell, Indiana, and her mother, are spending the summer months with Mrs. W. Davis on the farm.
Mrs. Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, is a visitor at the home of D.F. Wilson on the Mossey.
Messrs. J. Robinson and H. Hunter have put a three-horse power gasoline engine in their new boat. The water should fly now.
Several of the electors from her attended the Conservative meeting at Winnipegosis on Wednesday night. The speakers were Mr. Shears, and Mr. Grenon. The meeting was well attended. We hope to go again in the near future.
The Orangemen of Fork River have arranged for a grand celebration here on Monday, July 13th, when they will be a good programme of sports. The hall will be free to the public in the evening for a dance. All are cordially invited to come and have a good time. There will be a church parade at 3 o’clock on Sunday afternoon, the 12th.
On Saturday afternoon a Conservative meeting was held in the Orange Hall. W. King, president, presided, Mr. Sam Hughes have an account of his four years stewardship as member for Gilbert Plains, which was very satisfactory and well received. Hon. Hugh Armstrong, Provincial Treasurer, followed and gave a very satisfactory account of the financial standing of the province, which showed that the business was in good hands under the Roblin government.
Mr. Clopeck, of Winnipeg, addressed the Ruthenians for a short time and was well received. The hall was crowded and he gallery was taken possession of by a large number of ladies. Everything passed off quietly. It was a most successful meeting of the kind ever held in Fork River.
Mr. Green, late Liberal member for North Winnipeg, was here a short time Monday and later left for Winnipegosis accompanied by N. Little.
H. Woods, of Dublin Bay, was a visitor here on Saturday night attending the committee which is arranging for the Orange picnic.

1914 Jul 2 – Winnipegosis

Coun. Frank Hechter went to Winnipeg on Monday in connection with the good roads movement. He was joined by some of the delegates from the other municipalities at Dauphin.
Mrs. Kenneth McAulay, and children, and her sister, Miss Smith, left for Kamsack on Monday.
The big political guns, Hugh Armstrong and Sam Hughes left for Dauphin on Sunday.
Capt. Coffey returned on Sunday to Dauphin with his automobile, taking with him several of the politicians.
R. Morrison has finished the foundation for the new school.
Mrs. T. Johnston returned on Monday from a visit to Dauphin.
Mrs. W. Johnson and Mrs. McIntosh, of Fort William, are visiting with Mrs. Johnston.
The big political meeting on Saturday night was held in the new Rex Theatre. This building seats over 300 and a great many were obliged to stand during the speaking.
The weather has been rather on the cool side for boating and the usual umber of crafts are not seen on the lake. With the warm weather of July many will seek cool breezes of the water.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 30 – 1913

1913 Jan 30 – Constable Rooke Shot
CONDITION CRITICAL

Thursday Jan. 30th, 11:30 a.m. – Constable Rooke’s condition critical, but he is holding his own well considering the wound is of such a dangerous character.

Constable Chas. Rooke was seriously shot Sunday by John Baran. A Galician, whom he was attempting to arrest, and is now in the general hospital. Mr. Rooke left early Sunday morning, taking a livery team and driver to arrest John Baran, who lives some twenty miles southwest of town, in the municipality of Gilbert Plains.
Baran has been giving considerable trouble of late and had deserted his wife, who has been a public charge for several years and was living with another woman at his farm in the Riding Mountain.
In driving out Sunday morning Rooke left his team at a neighbour’s a mile from Baran’s, and proceeded on foot accompanied by J. Tomaski, his driver, expecting that he would be able to approach and capture his man without giving him the alarm and perhaps escaping in the woods. After carefully approaching the house he rapped on the door but was told by the woman, who came to a window, that Baran was not at home. Rooke then proceeded to affect a forcible entrance, when three shots were fired in rapid succession through the door, the weapon used being a rifle.
The first shot struck the officer in the left breast over the heart.
His driver attempted to assist him to walk back to where the team was left, but after proceeding a short distance was compelled to leave him and hasten on for his team. Returning, with the assistance of the neighbour, he conveyed the wounded man to this neighbour’s house, but had to leave him there as he could not stand the jolting of the cutter. The driver drove down the mountain about nine miles to the home of H. McCorvie, who has a telephone, and summoned medical aid from town.
Upon receiving advice Dr. W.J. Harrington at once drove out, using all possible haste and getting a fresh team at McCorvie’s. A sleigh was fitted out in which to ring the injured man to the hospital and followed the doctor out.

WAS NOTORIOUS CHARACTER

Baran is a notorious character. He had been sent to jail two years ago for assaulting his wife. Baran deserted her and was living with another woman and his wife has to be supported as a charge on the town. It was only two years ago that Constable Rooke drove thirty-three miles in the coldest day of January, through a storm, in order to rescue Baran’s two little children, who were reported to be destitute and starving to death. These children were committed to the Winnipeg Children’s Aid Society by Magistrate Munson. Baran was summoned to appear before the magistrate for the non-support of his wife and children, and having disobeyed the summon, the magistrate issued a warrant and it was this warrant that Constable Rooke was endeavoring to arrest Baran on when he was shot.

THE INQUEST

The inquest on the death of the Baran baby, who was shot Monday by the police posse which went to the Galician settlement, was held, on Tuesday in the town hall. Evidence was taken from Dr. Ross, Chief of Police Bridle, F. May, W. Evans, W. Knight, E. Turland and Fred Little, members of the posse who did the shooting. The evidence produced showed that the child was killed almost instantly, the bullet passing through the body, causing a shock and hemorrhage.
The following jurymen were empanelled: Geo. King, foreman; Thos. Shaw, N. Taylor, E. Batty, H.F. Caldwell, D. Sutherland, T. Jordan, J.F. Neeley, R.G. Ferguson, F. Copeland, F.J. McDonald, H.R. Morrison.
After viewing the remains of the child and hearing the evidence, they returned the following verdict: –

VERDICT OF JURY

“We, the jury empanelled to take evidence as to the death of the baby Baran, on Jan. 27th, find that the baby came to his death by being shot with a rifle in the hands of one of the posse under Chief Bridle, organized for the purpose of arresting John Baran, suspected of having shot Constable Rooke, and the death of the baby, while regrettable, was purely accidental under the circumstances and we attach no blame to any member of the posse.”

1913 Jan 30 – Woman Placed Under Arrest

Annie Chisyk, who is a patient in the hospital suffering from a bullet wound, was formally placed under arrest on Wednesday, charged with shooting Constable Rooke. Her trial was set for Feb. 4th.

1913 Jan 30 – Fork River

Mr. W. Murray, Municipal Auditor, has been here auditing the books of Mossey River Municipality and it has been a busy week for Clerk Wilson.
Wm. Northam, who has been spending a few months at Weyburn, Sask., returned home last week.
Fred Storrar and William Johnston returned from the north end of the lake and report the fishing not to good lately as some of the men are off work.
Dunk Kennedy and John Richardson attended the Masonic banquet at Dauphin and report a good time.
Fred Cooper has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Wm. King returned from a two weeks’ trip west on business.
The cordwood has been coming in lively of late and the place looks like a wood camp; wood bring piled on all the streets.
At the inter-diocesan examinations of the Church of England Sunday School, Mrs. H.H. Scrase teacher of All Saints’ S.S. was sixth place in first class work, securing a diploma and book. Mrs. C. Bradley, of Winnipegosis, passed with first class diplomas as teacher of Winnipegosis Anglican S.S. We congratulate these ladies.
Wm. Parker was at the Armstrong store on business Thursday and Friday.
Mr. Cockerill of the Peabody Company, was a visitor at Dunk Kennedy’s on Saturday.
Howard Armstrong’s nephew has arrived on a visit from Ontario.
J.W. Johnston has moved up with his family to the hatchery on Lake Winnipegosis and Miss Eva Storrar accompanied them for a visit.
Sandy Munro was a weekend visitor at home on Saturday and Sunday.
Billie Coultas is sporting around with a new cutter these days and seems right in line with the Educational Department in the speeding line and guarantees to take the curves safely.
We must ask our readers to excuse the want of news last week as our correspondent was off for a week’s trip and our motto is while we are alive we will crow.
Service will be held in All Saints’ Anglican Church Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock, February.