Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 5 – 1912, 1918

1912 Dec 5 – Fork River

Miss M.B. Nixon left for Winnipeg, for a weeks visit among friends.
Miss Muriel Alterton, of Mossey River, and Miss Grant, of Pine View Schools attended the convention at Dauphin.
Mrs. Geo. Shannon and Mrs. Kennedy returned from a visit to Winnipegosis.
Wm. King expressed to E. Walker, of Dauphin, a trio of Mammoth Bronze turkeys for breeding purposes.
Fred Cooper, W. Williams and T. Shannon’s threshing outfits are busy these days.
D.F. Wilson, F.B. Lacey and J. Seiffert, members of the council, returned from a week’s trip to the Municipal Convention at Winnipeg.
Miss Lizze Clark returned to Dauphin after spending a few days at her home.
Mr. Monington, of Neepawa, is staying with J. Robinson for the hunting season.
Duncan Kennedy has received two shipments of pure bred Plymouth Rocks from Portage la Prairie last week and is now in the market with pure bred roosters.
Joe Lockhart was elected trustee for Mossey River School for the coming term in place of Wm. King, who retires this term.
Looking over the Herald we notice the annual statement of receipts and expenditures for ten months of the municipality of Mossey River. Just the same old two by four statement. Why not publish in book form in detail like Dauphin. Our council seems to be behind the times in this respect. Year after year we are asking for this to see where our money is expended and this year we cannot see where any of it has been expended on the roads.

1912 Dec 5 – Winnipegosis

The annual school meeting was held in the school house on Monday, a large number of ratepayers being present. Messrs. Grenon, Whale and Thomas were elected as trustees for the coming year and Mr. Shear continues as sec.-treasurer. Mr. Hulme’s engagement is for the year. The master of a new school to be erected was discussed. The lots have already been secured, as we hope it will not be long till they are build on.
Rev. H.H. Scrase remained in town from Sunday’s service till Tuesday.
Harry Grenon is preparing to open a business in the late Hudson’s Bay post.
The Misses Paddock had a party last night to entertain Miss Hazel Coffey who has been visiting the Misses Whale while Mr. and Mrs. Whale made a trip to Dauphin.
We are pleased to see certain patients are able to be out again.
The young people’s enjoyment on the lake will be curtailed since the snow has come.
A few of the men from the fishing camps took advantage of the recent glistening ice to make a trip back to town, an enviable one “on their steely feet so bright.”
Mrs. Bradley has enjoyed a most delightful visit from her sister, Mrs. Armstrong. Miss Charlotte accompanies her aunt back to Portage.
Mr. and Mrs. Hippesley, of South Bay, have returned from a trip to Dauphin. Regret is felt at the probability of their moving West to B.C.
A visit to Mrs. Johnston’s home would assure anyone of the benefit on illness to be gained by sojourning there.
Miss Hayes reports an interesting convention held in Dauphin.
Hunters are arriving in town in pursuit of the fleet footed game of the woods.

1918 Dec 5 – Blew Out His Brains

Telesphore Gagnon, who resided with his two sons at Valpoy, 15 miles northeast of Ste. Rose, committed suicide last week by blowing out his brains with a shotgun. Gagnon lost his wife a year ago, and also suffered lose to his property by fire. These matters preyed on him until his mind became unbalanced and led him to commit the rash act. He was 60 years of age.

1918 Dec 5 – Had Arm Amputated

Thos. Switzer, who resides in the Sandringham district, had the misfortune to accidentally discharge his rife, the bullet entering his left arm. He was brought to the hospital, where it was found necessary to amputate the arm below the elbow.

1918 Dec 5 – Major Barker Critically Ill

A cablegram from France to Mr. G. Barker at the end of the week states that the condition of his son William is critical.

1918 Dec 5 – Military Funeral

Pte. Wilbur Olsob, of the 226th Batt., who died of influenza, was accorded a military funeral, he arrangements being in the hands of the G.W.V.A. The funeral cortege assembled at 2.30 p.m. at Farrell’s undertaking parlours on Friday afternoon, where a service was conducted by Rev. J.A. Haw, who also officiated at the graveside. About 50 members of the association, under command of Capt. Scrase, attended. Lieut. Clark and Sergt. Chambers were in charge of he firing party.

1918 Dec 5 – Rural Nominations

MOSSEY RIVER
Reeve – T.B. Venables, F.B. Lacey, J.D. Robertson
Ward 1 – J. Yakavanka
Ward 3 – E.A. Marcroft
Ward 5 – J. Namaka

1918 Dec 5 – Victoria Cross for Barker

Major Wm. G. Barker has been awarded the highest honour possible for distinguished service at the front, the Victoria Cross.
Other Dauphin boys who have been decorated, include:
Military Cross – Lawrence Shand
Military Medals – Stuart R. Widmeyer (deceased), G.A. Jackson, Geo. F. King, N. Chard, A. Douglas and J. Fletcher

1918 Dec 5 – Fork River

Mrs. M. Angus has returned to Winnipeg after spending two weeks with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Craighill.
Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Brewer are patients in the hospital at Dauphin.
W. King, I.H.C. agent, has just finished a warehouse in which to store implements.
Mr. and Mrs. W. Northam have taken up their residence in the parsonage for the winter.
H. Swartwood, of Dauphin, was a recent visitor in our midst.
Sid Frost has left for Rathwell. Before leaving Wm. King, on behalf of Sid’s many friends here, presented him with a valuable violin and case in recognition of his services in a musical way.
Wm. Williams was a Dauphin visitor on Tuesday.
F.B. Lacey, T.B. Venables and J.D. Robertson are the nominees for the reeveship.
The Fork River, Mossey River and Pine View Schools are still closed.
Several of the hunters have returned. Which one shot the steer?

Pte. N. MacCauley, of Winnipegosis, was among the returned soldiers from overseas this week.

1918 Dec 5 – Winnipegosis

A special peace thanksgiving service was held in the Union Church on Dec. 1st. The church was well decorated with flags of the Allies, and was packed to overflowing. The hymns were of a joyful, patriotic and military character, and were heartily sung. The Rev. A.E. Hook conducted the service and took on his subject, “Trusting in God.” He gave a vivid description of the terrible struggle which had lasted over four years, and spoke of the murmurings which had sometimes arising during the war. People had doubted if there was a God and if there was he was not a righteous God. The termination of the war, however, had vindicated God as a righteous God. He said that we had many things to be thankful for because of the war. He mentioned principally that drink and practically been abolished and that nations had been awakened into prayer in a manner they had never done before.
The ban, which had closed down all public gatherings during he epidemic of influenza, was lifted last week and there are no cases in town, though there are a few in the rural districts.
The first load of fish from the lake arrived in town on Tuesday. The fishing has been delayed somewhat on account of the mild weather, but the prospects of a large catch are good.
D. Roy Grenon skated into town today from Waterhen, a distance of over 25 miles.
Winnipegosis reports over two crowns to its credit in the Victory Loan Drive.
Two carloads of wheat were shipped out of town this week.
The fishermen have started to put up ice for summer use.
The collectors report that subscriptions to the Mercantile Sailors’ Fund are coming in well.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 22 – 1913

1913 May 22 – Baran Executed

Portage la Prairie, May 20 – John Baran at one minute past eight o’clock this morning paid the death penalty in the yard of the Portage la Prairie jail for the murder of Constable Rooke. He walked to his death without a murmur and without even an expression of regret for his deed, and three-quarters of an hour after the drop on the scaffold he was buried in the corner of the jail yard in quick lime, no friends having made claim to his body. Baran spent a sleepless night, dozing off for a few minutes at a time, and at 7:30 this morning asked for his breakfast, which consisted of porridge, eggs, toast and coffee.
He did not eat it with a relish and was left quietly alone for his last meal. It was just 7:55 when Deputy Sheriff Muir read the death warrant to the condemned man, and preparations for the march to the scaffold was then begun.

1913 May 22 – Boy Lost

On Saturday last Mrs. Alex. Genik, who lives on the Drifting River north of Ashville, sent her seven year old son out for some wood. That was the last time he was seen. Search parties have since been organized and the country roundabout scoured, but no trace of the boy has been found. It is feared that he has been drowned.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 8 – 1913

1913 Jan 8 – Boy Fell from Balcony

Mrs. Jas. Gardiner and her three year old son of Kelwood, were calling at the Canadian Northern hotel late Sunday afternoon. They were upstairs and the boy finding the door leading to the front balcony open went out on it. Boy like, he started climbing on the railing to amuse himself. Once he got on top of it and losing his balance fell to the steps below, a distance of fifteen feet. Bystanders instantly picked the boy up and took him into the hotel. A physician was sent for and on examination it was found his leg was broken, but otherwise he appeared to have escaped injury. The child was removed to the hospital and the fracture limb set. He is doing splendidly and will soon be around again. It was a miraculous escape.

1913 Jan 8 – Fork River

S. Monington, who has been spending a few weeks with J. Robinson in the Mossey, returned home to Neepawa for the holidays.
Frank Bailey, of Winnipeg, and Edwin King, of Prince Albert, spent the holidays at their respective homes.
Miss Weatherhead, teacher of Mossey River School, returned to her duties on Monday.
On the night of the 23rd a Christmas tree and concert were given under the auspices of All Saints’ S.S. and W.A. The Hall was tastefully decorated with flags and bunting and was a credit to the committee in charge. There was a large turnout, the hall being crowded. W. King was chairman. The programme consisted of songs, drills and recitations and great credit is due the ladies of the W.A. and Miss Weatherhead for the way the children performed their various parts. E. Williams, minister in charge, distributed the prizes to the pupils. W. Davis substituted for Santa Claus and was kept busy with his assistants distributing presents to the little folks. At the close, Miss Eva Ellis and Joe Nowsede, on behalf of the teachers and pupils of the S.S., presented Mr. King, superintendent and Warden, with a valuable gold fountain pen, which came as a surprise and was very much appreciated by Mr. King who thanked them for their kindness. Bags of candies and fruit were then distributed among the kiddies and everyone claims they had the time of their life. We take this means of thanking all those who took part in helping us making it a success. After supper the young folk took charge of the hall and tripped the light fantastic till the wee sma’ hours.
Mr. and Mrs. D.F. Wilson and family spent Christmas with Mr. and Mrs. Paul Wood, at Sifton.
Peter Ellis, of Kamsack, is spending the holidays with his family here.
We are sorry to hear that Mr. Isaac Hafenbrak is seriously ill in the Dauphin Hospital. The members of his family have the sympathy of this community and we trust he will soon be around again all right.
The annual ball of New Year’s night, under the auspices of the members of Purple Star, L.O.L., No. 1765, was a success. The music was supplied by Kitt Bros., of Sifton, Messrs. Mooney, of Valley River and Mr. Watson and Mrs. Paddock of Winnipegosis. J. Frost and A. Hunt were the floor managers. There was a large turnout. Sifton, East Bay, and Winnipegosis were well represented. County Master W. King and Bro. H.J. Woods, of Dublin Bay, gave short addresses after supper. Bro. Woods also gave us some good Irish songs. From the Grand March at 9 o’clock till the “Home Sweet Home” waltz at 6 o’clock in the morning the dance went with a swing. The members of 1765 appreciate very much the presence of many friends who came from a distance, to assist in having a good time.

1913 Jan 8 – Winnipegosis

Miss Molly Hechter has concluded a visit to her brothers, leaving for Winnipeg.
Four teams loaded with fish fell through the ice on the 28th, while the teams were negotiating a crack, but fortunately there were no causalities and everything was recovered the following morning.
Captain Jack Denby, late commodore of the Mossey River squadron, arrived from up the lake on Friday, looking very happy and prosperous, reporting great time among the fishermen.
Joe Alex, our peripatetic vendor of commodities to outlying districts, had a nasty experience on the lake six miles from home on Friday night, white it was snowing and very dark, his horses getting out of hand and bolting for home. He reckons, and so do other reasonable persons, that a beacon of some kind should be placed at the mouth of the river to give a line of direction on the town as in trying to strike the river on a dark night is like driving into a black wall. At any rate, it would help to advertise the place by letting people in the East know that there is a little rising town in the West that will come into its own some day.
Mr. King, the newly elected reeve, paid a visit to thank his adherents for their kind support and, of course, promised to do something.
George Cunliffe has been appointed magistrate in place of Mr. Parker, and his selection for the post appears to give general satisfaction.
John I. Matthews, from the old country, is spying out the land in this district and evidently wishes to put a few thousand into real estate and as he professes to have great knowledge regarding this question, no doubt he will make good.
Mr. Hulme, schoolmaster, and Miss Hayes, schoolmistress, returned from their vacation on the 5th.
Curling was in full swing on the night of the 5th, being the first game of the season. Mr. Barbour, a promising recruit, should, under the tutorship of Donald Hattie, come to the front in one of the ensuing Bon Spiels.
Mr. Hunkings, our indefatigable chief constable, has been busy lately collecting evidence and prisoners at the different reserves in connection with the illicit sale of liquor, and as a result Mr. Akbar and Paul Samaty, with two Indians, were dispatched to Winnipeg under the charge of Supernumerary Constable McKercher. Akbar was fined $200, or two months and Samaty, $100 or one month. The first named paid up and was pleased to use his return ticket, while Samaty will have a nice little holiday at the Government’s expense.
There are several more cases pending, the worthy magistrate having ordered a remand.