Today in the Dauphin Herald – October 16, 1919

Accidentally Killed

A telegram from Edmonton this week stated that Thos. Watson, tinsmith, had been accidentally killed. Deceased was for a number of years in business in Dauphin and only returned during the summer from overseas.

District Chairmen of Victory Loan

Fork River – Owen Pruden
Ethelbert – G. Tymchuk
Makinak and Ochre River – J.N. Campbell

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Oct. 13.
Rev. E. Roberts was a recent visitor in the district. We are glad to have a minister once more of the right type.
The 15th is the day se by the Grain Growers of Manitoba to make their political drive. Our two branches in this district have arrangements made for this date and it will be a holiday among the farmers. Everyone is prepared to do his bit.
Frank Sharp has left for Winnipeg and he is likely to require two tickets for his return trip. The life of a bachelor on the farm is not what it is cracked up to be.
Mr. Speers, a returned soldier, is the new teacher appointed for the Bicton Heath School.
A meeting will be held at Volga on the 15th for the purpose of organizing a branch of the Grain Growers association. Messrs. E. Marcroft, Thos. Toye and Emmett will be present.
James Laidlaw tells your correspondent that he has discovered a new plan to shoot wolves. Jim is nothing if not original.

Fork River

The Returned Soldiers’ Committee are giving a dance in the Orange Hall on Friday evening, Oct. 17th, for those of our boys who have returned. It is hoped that all (or as many as can do so) the people of the district will turn out and give the boys the time of their lives – and enjoy themselves.
The baseball committee have turned in $61 to help the Returned Soldiers’ Fund, making $96 in all. This is in accordance with the promise made when raising funds to equip the ball team. The banquet to be given will be a success, sure, if everybody turns our and does his or her share. The ladies are asked to co-operate with the committee in making it something to be remembered. The date will be announced later.
M. Levin, of the White Star elevator, fell from the upper part of the building on Friday and was rather badly injured. He was taken to the Dauphin Hospital.
O. Stonehouse, who has spent the summer at Oak River, has returned home.

Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair

The following is a list of the prizes awarded all the Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Fair:
Foals – 1st Thos. Miller, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd B. Hunt.
Beef calf – 1st Stanley Benner, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd Ben Suchett, 4th Percy Carlson.
Dairy calf – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd W. Williams, 3rd W. Thomson, 4th Tony Bayko.
Pair of pigs – 1st James Richardson, 2nd Danny Wilson, 3rd Ernest Hafenbrak, 4th Steve Bayko, 5th Stanley Benner, 6th Densil Carlson, 7th Percy Carlson.
Lambs – 1st Ivor Humphries, 2nd Fred Solomon, 3rd Danny Wilson.

POULTRY
White Wyandottes – 1st Ben Suchett, 2nd Harriet Richardson.
Barred Rocks – 1st Densil Carlson, 2nd D. McEachern, 3rd Bob Williams, 4th W. Williams, 5th Albert Yanoski.
Buff Orpingtons – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Tony Bayko.
White Leghorns – 1st N. Suchett, 2nd Si. Benner.
Brown Leghorns – Harold McLean.
Any other variety – 1st Steve Bayko, 2nd Annie Bayko.

GRAIN
Sheaf of wheat – 1st B. Suchett, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Sheaf of oats – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Percy Carlson.

GARDENING
White potatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Lawrence White, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Rose Sawinski, 5th Minnie Lundy, 6th Amos Carlson, 7th Densil Carlson, 8th Harold McLean.
Coloured potatoes – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Pereski, 5th Minnie Karaim.
Beets – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Lawrence White.
Onions – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mary Semecheson.
Cabbage – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Mary Attamanchuk, 3rd Mary Toperansky, 4th Minnie Karaim, 5th Victoria Rudkavitch, 6th Rosie Sawinski.
Tomatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Joe Nowosad.
Corn – 1st J. Pakylo, 2nd Sofie Bayko, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Cauliflower – Minnie Karaim.

COOKING
Bread – 1st Margaret White, 2nd Anna Pereski, 3rd Zoe Shiels, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Minnie Karain, 6th Rosie Sawienski, 7th Sofie Bayko.
Plain cake – 1st Bernice McLean, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mildred Carlson, 4th Dave Nowosad, 5th Minnie Karaim, 6th Zoe Shiels, 7th Dan McEachern.
Cookies – 1st Lulu Thomson, 2nd Birdie Stonehouse, 3rd Vila Rowe, 4th Kate Williams, 5th Mildred Carlson.
Fruit cake – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Vila Rowe.
Buns – 1st Zoe Shiels, 2nd Lulu Thomson, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Bernice McLean.

SEWING
Sewing – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Pearl Reid, 3rd Mary Briggs.
Dust cap – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Beatrice Rowe.
Towels – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Annie Philipchuk, 4th Edith Naraslaski.
Darning – 1st Edna Hafenbrak, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Goldie Suchett.
Middy blouse – 1st Annie Bayko, 2nd Anna Pereski.
Nightgown – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Edith Yaraslaski, 3rd Ellen Roblin, 4th Mildred Carlson.
Doll sheets – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Apron – 1st Minnie Karaim, 2nd A. Bayko.
Corset cover – Edith McLean.
Dress – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Minnie Karaim, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Handkerchiefs – 1st Vila Rowe, 2nd Beatrice Rowe, 3rd Birdie Stonehouse.
Table centre – 1st Edith Yaralashi, 2nd Annie Philipchuk, 3rd Edith McLean.

CANNING
Wild fruit – Sofie Bayko.
Peas – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Viola Rowe.
Beans – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Zoe Shiels.

Wood working:
Exhibition chicken coop – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Ben Suchett.
Essays – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Edith McLean, 4th W. Williams, 5th Sofie Bayko.
Lower grades – 1st W. Thompson, 2nd Mike Barclay, 3rd Stanley Benner, 4th Nat Suchett, 5th Densil Carlson.
Writing:
Progress – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Viola Rowe, 3rd Irene Bailey, 4th Blanche Hunt.
Exercise book – 1st Ellen Roblin, 2nd Rosie Sawenski.
Special in writing – 1st A. Janowski, 2nd L. Zapletnic, 3rd N. Muzyka.
School work:
Basket – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Edna Hafenbrak, 3rd D. McEachern, 4th Lulu Thompson, 5th Alice Dewberry.

Sifton

Notwithstanding the fact that it rained off and on most of the day the Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair, held at the Wycliffe School, was a success and the exhibits, though leaving much to be desired in some lines, were a district improvement over the previous year. Miss. St. Ruth and Chas. Murray, local agricultural representative, acted as judges. The general quality of the school exhibits was high. A good program of sports was keenly contested. Much praise is due the committee for their work, and especially to the manager, Mr. Bousfield, principal, and Mr. Winby, manager of the Bank of Commerce, who acted as secretary. It is quite evident that a very much increased exhibit in this fair will be shown next season by the surrounding schools and there is no reason why this should not be made the most important fall fair of the northern part of the province.
A progressive whist drive, box social and dance are to be held in the Wycliffe School house on Friday, the 21st inst., the proceeds of which are for the relief of the destitute of the Baltic provinces. These people, from all accounts, are in sore straits and it is up to us all in our comparative plenty to contribute liberally. It is reported that black brand is worth two rubles a lb. in that part of Europe and cats and dogs, where available are being bought at fancy prices for meat.
Principal F.L. Bousfield has been invited as a delegate to the important educational convention to be held at Winnipeg next week.
Blackleg is doing away with numbers of young cattle. Many straw piles have rotted from the rain and the present outlook for stock owners is not bright.
The odds are even now on an immediate freeze up or some hot weather climate extraordinary.
A great many cattle are being shipped out. Our one pen stock yard requires enlarging at once.
This village has made wonderful strides of late. There are four elevators, the Bank of Commerce is completing a handsome brick and stone building and F. Farion will build a large brick block in the spring. Sifton serves a large territory and with the large amount of land broken last season should with a normal crop easily market over a quarter million bushels and ship a hundred carloads of stock.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – July 10, 1919

Police Court Cases

P.M. Hawkins, Presiding
On information laid by Constable Coleridge, John Goik appeared before the police magistrate on the charge of “non-registration under Alien Enemy Act.” He was found guilty and fined $10 and $5 costs. Urko Chorny also appeared on the charge of “removing without permit under Alien Enemy Act.” He was found guilty and fined $10 and $9 costs or 30 days hard labor. Urko elected to take the 30 days.
On information laid by Chief Bridle several boys were assessed $2 and costs each, for bicycle riding on sidewalks.
Wm. Bell faced the magistrate on Monday on two charges. First, that of “driving a motor while intoxicated,” second, for “having liquor I place other than private dwelling.” On the first charge he was fined $25 and $5 costs, and on the second count he was assessed $200 and $5 costs.

Saturday July 19th, Peace Day

Saturday, July 19th, has been proclaimed Peace Day, and a statutory holiday.

Fork River

Miss Ina and Stella Briggs left for their homes in Southern Manitoba to spend the holidays.
Pte. Miller has returned from overseas and is visiting at the home of his father, Charles Miller.
Pte. Merko and his war bride have arrived from overseas and are visiting with friends here.
Max Gashina has returned from overseas and is visiting at his home before going north to homestead.
The members of the Purple Star L.O.L. will hold their 17th annual basket picnic on July 12th at Fork River. Sports of all kinds.
The late heavy rains have proved of immense benefit to the district. The crops now promise well.
The auditor’s report is now in the hands of the clerk and will be perused with much interest. The ratepayers are entitled to know how the business of the municipality is conducted, and the council should let its light shine so that all may see its good work.
The question of the hour: “Are we to have the new school?” It is up to the ratepayers to say yea or nay.

Mossey River School Exams.

Results of exams: Examinations at Mossey River School No. 999:
Grade VII—Blanche Hunt 77.
Grade VI—Louise Rowe 63.
Grade V, Sr—Viola Rowe 76, Willie Thompson 73, Lorne Shannon, Gordon Atkins.
Grade V, Jr—Beatrice Rowe 79, Pearl Reid 67, Irene Bailey 65, Mary Briggs 64, Verna Reid 62, May Shaw 56.
Grade III—Lulu Thompson 87, Bernard Hunt 84, Percy Shannon 75.
Grade II—Ivy Hunt 92, Danny Wilson 69, Ivor Humphries 63, Alvin Bailey 59.
Grade I—Horace Thompson, Courtney Humphries, Albert Shannon.
Grade I, Jr—Charlie Rowe, Clara Pearson, Walter Pearson, Reggie Wilson.
K.E. Briggs, teacher.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 28 – 1912

1912 Nov 28 – Fork River

The annual meeting of Mossey River School, No. 999 will be held at D.F. Wilson’s office on Monday, Dec. 2nd at 10 o’clock, for the closing of the year’s business and electing a trustee.
C. Clark spend Sunday at Dauphin among friends.
Rec. H.H. Scrase returned from a few days visit among his parishioners at Winnipegosis.
Wm. Parker, of Winnipegosis, accountant for the A.T. Co., spent a short time at the Co.’s store on business.
Several of our citizens collapsed the other morning and on investigating it was caused by trying to meet the train which arrived five minutes ahead of time from Dauphin, which was an unheard of thing before in this burgh. We trust they will keep it up instead of keeping the farmers in the cold two or three hours every day as heretofore.
Mr. Darroch, of Dauphin, was here for a short time on business.
Miss Olive Clark left for a short vacation among friends at Dauphin.
Mrs. Humpherys and family, of Dauphin, are staying at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. D.F. Wilson. They have the sympathy of the people of this community in their said bereavement in the death of Mr. Humphreys, who was held in ugh esteem in by all who knew him here.
Dr. Medd, of Winnipegosis, attended a hurried call to the home of Willis Miller of Mowat and we are pleased to hear Mrs. Miller is improving. The Dr. is under the impression that paying a night call over the new grade on the south road is equal to passing through a cyclone. As Dunk is used to travelling the north road and did not put the break on in time, things were well shaken before taken according to prescription for one.
The Orangemen of Purple Star, L.O.L., 1765, will have a grand masquerade ball on Dec. 13th, in the hall. Grand march at 9 o’clock. Supper provided. Admission tickets, gentlemen $1.00. Everybody welcome.
Nomination for reeve and councillors for the year 1913 will be held in the Municipal hall, Winnipegosis, on Tuesday, Dec. 3rd, between the hours of one and two, for Mossey River Municipality.

1912 Nov 28 – Sifton

The late fine weather has done much to help out conditions in this part of the country. Many farmers now have all the feed they will require.
From present indications it looks as if the output of wood this winter is going to be large.
General regret is felt here at the departure of Coun. Ogryslo for Dauphin. He’s a good councillor and a good fellow.
The question now is frequently asked, “Who is going to be our new councillor?” The names heard mentioned are John Kennedy, P. Wood and several of our prominent Galician residents. We hope it will be a good man as there is much work to do in Ward 6 the coming year.
With the crop not as good as usual the lower price of grain is more severely felt. It is becoming to be generally regarded that mixed farming is the sure and safe way to succeed. Batter, eggs and livestock find a good market all the time.
$1.00 pays for the Herald from now until the end of Dec. 1913.

1912 Nov 28 – Winnipegosis

The Christian League topic for this week is given out as “Anticipation.” A correspondent deems it permissible to remark, that, if it would retrace its steps and board the public it would perhaps more quickly realize its object and be in less danger of being overtaken by the ego.
The Card Circle last week entertained a guest, Mr. Wilson, of the Western Fancy Goody Co., who was delayed in town. Clem Bradley was somewhat consoled for his recent unlucky play in Dauphin, by winning fat prize in the first home game.
The entertainment intended to be given by the W.A. on the 6th. Dec. has to be postponed till the 20th, owing to the advent of a moving picture company for the first week of December, and a masquerade ball to be held in Fork River on the 13th.
The teachers are to attend the Dauphin convention, and Mrs. Ketcheson and Miss Bardley will ail themselves of a holiday in good company.
The school being closed for a week gives the children a chance of revelling in pond skating though minus 5 (sense).
The lake is new frozen over.
Miss Evelyn Burrell, who has been quite ill from the effects of a severe cold is able to be up again, but is still under the doctor’s case.
J.P. Grenon has returned.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 14 – 1912

1912 Nov 14 – Fork River

Rev. C.M. Littler, of Durban, who had chug of this mission a short time, is the gust of Wm. King, church warden, for a few days, renewing old acquaintances here and at Winnipegosis.
D.F. Wilson returned from spending the week’s end at Dauphin.
Mrs. F. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, is spending a short time with her daughter, Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Mr. O’Callagan, the company auditor, and D. Kennedy left for a trip to Sifton on business.
Mr. Rowe of Neepawa was here and rushed up two cars of stock in a short time and left with them for Saskatchewan.
Miss N.B. Nixon, who has been teaching school near Kamsack all summer, returned home from a short stay with her sister, Mrs. A. Rowe.
Miss Grace Little has returned after spending a few weeks with her friends in Winnipeg.
Sam Bailey left for a trip to Neepawa on business.
Sandy Munro, dredge master, and Willis Miller returned home having laid up the dredge for winter at the harbour at Snake Island.
The ladies of the W.A. of All Saints’ Church held a meeting at the house of Mrs. S. Bailey when considerable business was transacted. Mrs. F.B. Lacey, Oak Brae, was elected vice-president in place of Mrs. A. Cameron, who resigned, and other business and work was laid out for the coming winter with the object of raising funds for the parsonage which is to be started next summer.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 5 – 1914

1914 Nov 5 – Had Face and Arms Badly Burned

Mrs. Bradley and her young daughter, Charlotte, of Winnipegosis, were badly burned on Hallowe’en night by the explosion of a spirit lamp. With a number of others they were seated in a locked room around the lamp telling ghost stories. The lamp had been filled to overflowing and when ignited exploded, burning Mrs. Bradley severely about the face and hands. In the excitement the key to unlock the door could not be found and the door had to be broken open before medical aid could be sent for.

1914 Nov 5 – Ethelbert

Arthur Whish is wearing a broad smile these days. It’s a bouncing girl.
John Dolinsky’s two boys are being tried at Portage la Prairie this week for shopbreaking.
K.F. Slipetz is a busy man these days making out marriage licenses and taking in taxes.
Wm. Murray, truant officer, paid our school a visit last week and rounded up a few delinquents. One man was brought before F.M. Skaife for refusing to send his two girls to school and was fined $50 and costs, sentence being suspended. The two girls are now attending school.
Financially, Ethelbert district is as well of as any part of the country. The wood industry is one of our chief resources. The farmers are getting in better shape all the time. It is true we have gone a little slower than some other parts, but we are not feeling the “stringency” quite so bad either.
“How are collections?” Henry Brackman, our merchant prince, says they are good.

1914 Nov 5 – Fork River

Mrs. Sam Reid and daughters, have returned from a two weeks’ visit to Winnipeg.
Willis Miller, of Mowat, is nursing a broken arm caused by coming in contact with a separator belt in motion. Hard luck Willis.
D.F. Wilson has returned from a few days’ visit to Dauphin. He is still a member of the cane brigade.
Coun. Lacey had a tussle the other day with a fire set out by some careless person. The department has promised to appoint a fire guardian here next season, as one or two of these fire fiends around in this neighbourhood want making an example of.
Mrs. F. Cooper and daughter have returned from a week’s visit with friends in Dauphin.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, is a frequent visitor here of late.
Some one the other day was asking for a remedy to keep ponies from destroying flour and other articles left on the station platform. We would suggest either a herd law or dynamite.
Aubrey King, who was laid up a week from a kick from a horse, is able to follow the plough again.
The tax sale here was a tame affair.
Quite a consignment of firearms and ammunition arrived here lately and the Fork River brigade are practicing hard, some with tin and others with glass targets don’t you know.
The Winnipegosis orator and Coun. Toye attended the council meeting in this burgh on Thursday. Nothing serious happened other than a sort of weary feeling after such a display of talent.
Nurse Tilt is home on the farm for [1 line missing].
Hallowe’en has passed and the mischief-makers surely did the grand. They had a surprise in store for the warden of All Saints’ Church on Sunday. He found the church had been broken open and a large roll of page wire fencing standing up inside the alter rails and before the bell could be used for service he had to climb into the belfry and left an iron gate off and unwind a few yards of sacking. The Methodist Church received a similar visit. Are we living in a Christian land? The minister’s gigger at Winnipegosis was pulled to pieces and carried away so a team had to be hired so the services at other points could be held. Can anyone show us where the fun is in tampering with our churches? Is nothing sacred?

1914 Nov 5 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. McInnes and son went to Dauphin in Monday.
J.P. Grenon left on Monday for Port Arthur.
Mrs. Bradley was quite badly burnt by a gasoline explosion at her home a few days since.
Our bustling little town by the unsalted sea is generally noted for something. I think we hold the record for the number of police magistrates hat have been appointed during the past few years. A good second is the number of police constables. The latest is the appointment of Donald Hattie, our genial blacksmith, to the position of constable. Whose arm, I would like to ask, is stronger and grasp firmer than the brave Donald’s. Offenders beware, arouse not the sleeping lion as you will find a strong combination in the law and Donald when they go together.
Dan Hamilton, auctioneer, was here on Wednesday and sol the effects of the estate of the late Richard Harrison. Truly the voluble Dan is some auctioneer, and can get the last dollar out of an article. It is as good as a side show to hear the running comments of Dan. I heard the running comments of Dan. I heard one fellow remark he should have been a preacher.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 16 – 1913, 1919

1913 Oct 16 – Boy Killed

A sad accident happened near Ashville on Friday, when Michael, the 12 year old son of Joseph Sosnowski, who lives near Valley River, was run over by the engine of Winters’ threshing outfit and instantly killed. The boy was following the engine round and jumping on and off it securing rides. At the time the accident happened the boy was standing on it when it suddenly started, throwing him under one of the big wheels which passed over his body instantly killing him.

1913 Oct 16 – Fork River

Bert Cooper left for Winnipeg and expects to spend a few months there on business. D.F. Wilson returned from a trip south on important business. Mrs. D. Robinson, of Mowat Centre, is on a visit to friends at Neepawa, in company with her grandson, Mr. Monnington, who after paying a visit here left for his home. Thos. Toye, councillor for ward 5 is making an inspection trip. The annual children’s service will be held in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock, on Oct. 19th. Parents are requested to come and bring the little ones and help make this a hearty service. All are cordially invited. The first fall of snow fell on Friday and stopped threshing for a day or two. This week will about wind up the threshing. Fred. Cooper and W. Northam, returned from a rip to the Lake Town on business. Things are quiet there, most of the fishermen having left for the winter fishing at different points up the lake. Mr. Elliot, the new Methodist student for this mission, who is living at Winnipegosis, is visiting among his people here. T.N. Briggs, municipal road contractor, is busy making the dirt fly. We notice that municipal toothpick has managed to get across the track and the postmaster’s Plymouth Rocks are using it to pick their teeth with after it has been laying all summer on the platform. Mike says up to the present he wondered what it was got for. There are several buyers around rustling up cattle this fall. We have been informed that Harry Little has been appointed bailiff in the absence of W. Stonehouse. John Reid, of Sifton, paid us a visit on Sunday and Mr. Williams returned with him for evening service at that point.

1913 Oct 16 – Sifton

A new house not quite completed, belonging to J.G. Gillies, was burned last week. The origin of the fire is a mystery. Wasyl Felix Marantz returned on Saturday night from Dauphin, where he attended the Jewish service.

1919 Oct 16 – Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair

The following is a list of the prizes awarded all the Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Fair:
Foals – 1st Thos. Miller, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd B. Hunt.
Beef calf – 1st Stanley Benner, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd Ben Suchett, 4th Percy Carlson.
Dairy calf – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd W. Williams, 3rd W. Thomson, 4th Tony Bayko.
Pair of pigs – 1st James Richardson, 2nd Danny Wilson, 3rd Ernest Hafenbrak, 4th Steve Bayko, 5th Stanley Benner, 6th Densil Carlson, 7th Percy Carlson.
Lambs – 1st Ivor Humphries, 2nd Fred Solomon, 3rd Danny Wilson.

POULTRY
White Wyandottes – 1st Ben Suchett, 2nd Harriet Richardson.
Barred Rocks – 1st Densil Carlson, 2nd D. McEachern, 3rd Bob Williams, 4th W. Williams, 5th Albert Yanoski.
Buff Orpingtons – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Tony Bayko.
White Leghorns – 1st N. Suchett, 2nd Si. Benner.
Brown Leghorns – Harold McLean.
Any other variety – 1st Steve Bayko, 2nd Annie Bayko.

GRAIN
Sheaf of wheat – 1st B. Suchett, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Sheaf of oats – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Percy Carlson.

GARDENING
White potatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Lawrence White, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Rose Sawinski, 5th Minnie Lundy, 6th Amos Carlson, 7th Densil Carlson, 8th Harold McLean.
Coloured potatoes – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Pereski, 5th Minnie Karaim.
Beets – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Lawrence White.
Onions – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mary Semecheson.
Cabbage – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Mary Attamanchuk, 3rd Mary Toperansky, 4th Minnie Karaim, 5th Victoria Rudkavitch, 6th Rosie Sawinski.
Tomatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Joe Nowosad.
Corn – 1st J. Pakylo, 2nd Sofie Bayko, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Cauliflower – Minnie Karaim.

COOKING
Bread – 1st Margaret White, 2nd Anna Pereski, 3rd Zoe Shiels, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Minnie Karain, 6th Rosie Sawienski, 7th Sofie Bayko.
Plain cake – 1st Bernice McLean, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mildred Carlson, 4th Dave Nowosad, 5th Minnie Karaim, 6th Zoe Shiels, 7th Dan McEachern.
Cookies – 1st Lulu Thomson, 2nd Birdie Stonehouse, 3rd Vila Rowe, 4th Kate Williams, 5th Mildred Carlson.
Fruit cake – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Vila Rowe.
Buns – 1st Zoe Shiels, 2nd Lulu Thomson, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Bernice McLean.

SEWING
Sewing – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Pearl Reid, 3rd Mary Briggs.
Dust cap – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Beatrice Rowe.
Towels – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Annie Philipchuk, 4th Edith Naraslaski.
Darning – 1st Edna Hafenbrak, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Goldie Suchett.
Middy blouse – 1st Annie Bayko, 2nd Anna Pereski.
Nightgown – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Edith Yaraslaski, 3rd Ellen Roblin, 4th Mildred Carlson.
Doll sheets – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Apron – 1st Minnie Karaim, 2nd A. Bayko.
Corset cover – Edith McLean.
Dress – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Minnie Karaim, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Handkerchiefs – 1st Vila Rowe, 2nd Beatrice Rowe, 3rd Birdie Stonehouse.
Table centre – 1st Edith Yaralashi, 2nd Annie Philipchuk, 3rd Edith McLean.

CANNING
Wild fruit – Sofie Bayko.
Peas – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Viola Rowe.
Beans – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Zoe Shiels.

Wood working:
Exhibition chicken coop – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Ben Suchett.
Essays – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Edith McLean, 4th W. Williams, 5th Sofie Bayko.
Lower grades – 1st W. Thompson, 2nd Mike Barclay, 3rd Stanley Benner, 4th Nat Suchett, 5th Densil Carlson.
Writing:
Progress – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Viola Rowe, 3rd Irene Bailey, 4th Blanche Hunt.
Exercise book – 1st Ellen Roblin, 2nd Rosie Sawenski.
Special in writing – 1st A. Janowski, 2nd L. Zapletnic, 3rd N. Muzyka.
School work:
Basket – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Edna Hafenbrak, 3rd D. McEachern, 4th Lulu Thompson, 5th Alice Dewberry.

1919 Oct 16 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Oct. 13.
Rev. E. Roberts was a recent visitor in the district. We are glad to have a minister once more of the right type.
The 15th is the day se by the Grain Growers of Manitoba to make their political drive. Our two branches in this district have arrangements made for this date and it will be a holiday among the farmers. Everyone is prepared to do his bit.
Frank Sharp has left for Winnipeg and he is likely to require two tickets for his return trip. The life of a bachelor on the farm is not what it is cracked up to be.
Mr. Speers, a returned soldier, is the new teacher appointed for the Bicton Heath School.
A meeting will be held at Volga on the 15th for the purpose of organizing a branch of the Grain Growers association. Messrs. E. Marcroft, Thos. Toye and Emmett will be present.
James Laidlaw tells your correspondent that he has discovered a new plan to shoot wolves. Jim is nothing if not original.

1919 Oct 16 – Fork River

The Returned Soldiers’ Committee are giving a dance in the Orange Hall on Friday evening, Oct. 17th, for those of our boys who have returned. It is hoped that all (or as many as can do so) the people of the district will turn out and give the boys the time of their lives – and enjoy themselves.
The baseball committee have turned in $61 to help the Returned Soldiers’ Fund, making $96 in all. This is in accordance with the promise made when raising funds to equip the ball team. The banquet to be given will be a success, sure, if everybody turns our and does his or her share. The ladies are asked to co-operate with the committee in making it something to be remembered. The date will be announced later.
M. Levin, of the White Star elevator, fell from the upper part of the building on Friday and was rather badly injured. He was taken to the Dauphin Hospital.
O. Stonehouse, who has spent the summer at Oak River, has returned home.

1919 Oct 16 – Sifton

Notwithstanding the fact that it rained off and on most of the day the Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair, held at the Wycliffe School, was a success and the exhibits, though leaving much to be desired in some lines, were a district improvement over the previous year. Miss. St. Ruth and Chas. Murray, local agricultural representative, acted as judges. The general quality of the school exhibits was high. A good program of sports was keenly contested. Much praise is due the committee for their work, and especially to the manager, Mr. Bousfield, principal, and Mr. Winby, manager of the Bank of Commerce, who acted as secretary. It is quite evident that a very much increased exhibit in this fair will be shown next season by the surrounding schools and there is no reason why this should not be made the most important fall fair of the northern part of the province.
A progressive whist drive, box social and dance are to be held in the Wycliffe School house on Friday, the 21st inst., the proceeds of which are for the relief of the destitute of the Baltic provinces. These people, from all accounts, are in sore straits and it is up to us all in our comparative plenty to contribute liberally. It is reported that black brand is worth two rubles a lb. in that part of Europe and cats and dogs, where available are being bought at fancy prices for meat.
Principal F.L. Bousfield has been invited as a delegate to the important educational convention to be held at Winnipeg next week.
Blackleg is doing away with numbers of young cattle. Many straw piles have rotted from the rain and the present outlook for stock owners is not bright.
The odds are even now on an immediate freeze up or some hot weather climate extraordinary.
A great many cattle are being shipped out. Our one pen stock yard requires enlarging at once.
This village has made wonderful strides of late. There are four elevators, the Bank of Commerce is completing a handsome brick and stone building and F. Farion will build a large brick block in the spring. Sifton serves a large territory and with the large amount of land broken last season should with a normal crop easily market over a quarter million bushels and ship a hundred carloads of stock.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 18 – 1912

1912 Jul 18 – Wm. Hall Killed

William Hall, foreman of the bridge and building gang of the Canadian Northern railway, was killed 15 miles west of Melfort, on Friday by being thrown from his motor car and run over. Just how the accident occurred is not definitely known. There was a pike pole on the motor at the time and it is supposed to have slipped catching in the belt, stopping the car suddenly and throwing him over in front on the track. The wheels of the car then passed over his head and shoulders. He was at once picked up and found to be in an insensible condition. This was about 3:30 in the afternoon. Later he was conveyed to the Melfort hospital and a doctor procured, but the injuries received were of such a serious nature that he succumbed at six o’clock.
The news of the accident cast a shadow of gloom over the town, as deceased was one of the early residents and an old employee of the railroad. He leaves a wife and seven children to mourn his untimely taking off, and they have sympathy of all in their hour of sorrow.
The funeral took place on Sunday under the direction of the Oddfellows, of which society the late Mr. Hall was a member. The service at the Methodist church was conducted by the Rev. A. Chisholm and E.A. Webb, chaplain of the I.O.O.F. lodge. The following were the pallbearers: Geo. Leach, J. Law, R. Lilly, S. Code, J.A. Ball, and R. Smith.

1912 Jul 18 – Fork River

Sam Hunter left for Sever Bridge, Ont., where he intends spending a few days at his old home.
The collector for the International Harvester Co., paid a visit to D. Kennedy, agent, in connection with business.
Harry Little is taking in the fair at Winnipeg.
Mrs. Willis Miller and family, of Mowat Centre, left for Dauphin for a few days’ visit.
S. Briggs and Mr. Culverhouse returned from Dauphin after a few dies vacation there.
D.F. Wilson left for Winnipeg late on Friday.
Purple Star L.O.L., 1765 returned from Dauphin after taking in the celebration there on the 12th, which was one of the largest and most orderly gatherings in the history of Dauphin and everyone was satisfied with the way they were used while there. Great credit is due to the boys of Coronation L.O.L. and the citizens of Dauphin, who worked hard to make it a successful day. The yellow boys are all right.
Miss Gertie Cooper and friend are spending their holidays with Mr. and Mrs. Fred Cooper.
Peter Ellis, who has been at Kamsack for the last two months, has returned for a few days.
John Stark of Kamsack, one of our old-timers, is spending a few days here renewing acquaintances.
E. Munroe, of Brandon, is spending a few days with his sister, Mrs. A. Hunt.
Mr. Noble, of Winnipegosis, held service in the Methodist Church on Sunday.
S.S. was held in All Saints as usual and no service. That comes of taking too long a view of Fairview.
D. Kennedy was a visitor to Sifton a few days ago.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 28 – 1914

1914 May 28 – Accident on the Lake Road

A bad accident occurred on Monday evening to a party coming home from the lake. A culvert, just east of Caldwell’s old farm, has a plank broken out, and some one had stood a piece of cordwood in the hole; this the team shied at and swerved off the road throwing the while party into the ditch, the vehicle coming on top of them. Miss Nellie Whitmore, one of those in the rig. was badly hurt in the foot, and it will probably be a few days before she will be able to be around again. Several others were badly scratched and shaken up. This culvert has been broken for some days and should certainly have been repaired before now, being a road so frequently used.

1914 May 28 – Sad Death of Baby

Mr. and Mrs. C.F. Smith, who reside a few miles southwest of town, came in Thursday night last to attend the baseball match. They brought their four months’ old baby boy with them. After the match they started for home and reached the house of Mr. Wm. B. Miller, which is just two miles from their farm. They spent a short time at Mr. Miller’s and left for home. At this period the baby was alright, and was on the mother’s breast for a short time afterwards. On reaching home, Mr. and Mrs. Smith discovered, to their horror, that the baby was dead. The child was healthy and there can be but two explanations for its death. One is that it had partaken heartily and choked to death, or, that it was smothered.

1914 May 28 – Winnipegosis

Capt. Dugald McAulay attended the liberal convention at Gilbert Plains last week. He says he heard more about gas and oil than he did about politics while at the western village.
The Standard Lumber Co. will have a task gathering up the logs that drifted about when one of its rafts broke up some time ago. Under the new regulations of the department it is now necessary to pick up timber which is cast about in this way.
J.P. Grenon and Frank Hechter were Dauphin visitors this week.
Petitions are being circulated for signatures to have our little burg incorporated. The move is in the right direction as it is time we cast off our swaddling clothes, that is, if we are ever going to do it.
A meeting was held on the 23rd inst. for the purpose of organizing a lacrosse club, the following officers being elected.
Hon. President – James McGinnis
President – J.P. Grenon
Vice – Jos. Mossington.
Captain – Ned McAulay.
Committee – Harvey Watson, Archie McKerchie Alex Bickle, W. Denby, Sid Coffey, J. Lariviere.
It is understood that Winnipegosis will be represented with a team in the Northern League

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 22 – 1913

1913 May 22 – Baran Executed

Portage la Prairie, May 20 – John Baran at one minute past eight o’clock this morning paid the death penalty in the yard of the Portage la Prairie jail for the murder of Constable Rooke. He walked to his death without a murmur and without even an expression of regret for his deed, and three-quarters of an hour after the drop on the scaffold he was buried in the corner of the jail yard in quick lime, no friends having made claim to his body. Baran spent a sleepless night, dozing off for a few minutes at a time, and at 7:30 this morning asked for his breakfast, which consisted of porridge, eggs, toast and coffee.
He did not eat it with a relish and was left quietly alone for his last meal. It was just 7:55 when Deputy Sheriff Muir read the death warrant to the condemned man, and preparations for the march to the scaffold was then begun.

1913 May 22 – Boy Lost

On Saturday last Mrs. Alex. Genik, who lives on the Drifting River north of Ashville, sent her seven year old son out for some wood. That was the last time he was seen. Search parties have since been organized and the country roundabout scoured, but no trace of the boy has been found. It is feared that he has been drowned.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 11 – 1912

1912 Apr 11 – Mossey River Council

Meeting of the Council held in the Council chamber, Fork River, Wednesday, March 27, 1912, all member present.
The minutes, having been read were adopted as read on motion of Coun. Nicholson, seconded by Coun. Seiffert. Carried.
Nicholson-Robertson – That this Council donate ten bags of flour to Sefat Mochka and that Councillors McAuley and Seiffert be requested to see that the same is delivered. Carried.

COURT OF REVISION
McAuley – Hunt – That protests No. 10, No. 12, No. 16 and No. 17, respectively, be lowered from $880 assess to $800; and that in protest No. 15 the assessment be lowered from $800 to $720. Carried.
McAuley – Nicholson – That all other protests remain as they are. Carried.
McAuley – Seiffert – That W.H. Paddock’s assessment be changed from 150 acres to 100 acres. Carried.

REGULAR BUSINESS
McAuley – Nicholson – That the taxes of John Frend, N.E., 1-29-20, be reduced by $40. Carried.
Nicholson – McAuley – That the taxes on N.E. 25-29-20 be reduced rom $82.25 to $22.24, owing to taxes having been charged on abandoned homestead. Carried.
Seiffert – Hunt – That Wm. Walmslay be asked to move his house off the public streets of Winnipegosis at once. Carried.
Sieffert – Robertson – That the Health Officer at Winnipegosis be asked to see that all back-yards and out-houses are cleaned up at an early date. Carried.
Sieffert – McAuley – That Wm. Hunking be asked to see that all cattle and horses be kept off the sidewalks in Winnipegosis; also that all parties found driving over the same be prosecuted. Carried.
Sieffert – Robertson – That Peter Saunders be appointed pound-keeper for Winnipegosis for the year 1912, in the place of Archie Stuart, resigned. Carried.
McAuley – Hunt – That the accounts of T.R. Nicholson ($11) and F.B. Lacey ($15.75) be passed. Carried.
McAuley – Robertson – That sections 3 and 4 of dog by-law No. 84 be amended as follows: That the words “sleigh dogs” be struck out and the words “all dogs in village of Winnipegosis” be interred in their place. Carried.
Nicholson – Robertson – That J.A. Snelgrove’s account of $77.47 for tamarack piling and stringer, be paid, and that $15 be deducted from the same in payment for cable. Carried.
Hunt – Sieffert – That the council procure six comfortable chairs for the Council chamber at Fork River, and that the clerk be instructed to get the same without delay. Carried.
Nicholson – Robertson – That Panko Solomon be instructed to furnish material and build fence at the north end of sec. 1-29-19; all posts for same to be sound tamarack, to be placed 1 rod apart, and 3 wires to be used. Carried.
McAuley – Robertson – That the Council now adjourn to meet again at Winnipegosis at call of Reeve. Carried.
H.H. Benner,
Sec.-treasurer, pro tem.

1912 Apr 11 – Ethelbert

Mrs. A. Willey is visiting Ethelbert during Easter and is visiting Mrs. A. McPhedran.
Miss Shaw, of Gilbert Plains, stayed a day at James Miller’s on her way home to the Plains.
Mrs. A. Clark is visiting her parents and nursing her mother. Mrs. Skaife, who has been seriously ill for the last month.
Taking advantage of the fine weather Mrs. Skaife is now able to take short walks.
Both Catholic Churches are having their usual Easter services, and the attendance at both are good.
The Union Church of Ethelbert members invited Mr. Smith Jackson to preach the Easter sermons. Special Easter hymns were provided by the choir all of which went well. Mr. Smith Jack spoke in the afternoon basing his remarks upon Paul’s words to Timothy, “Lay Hold on Eternal Life,” and he gave a powerful and sympathetic exposition of his subject. There was also a quartet “The Portals of Glory” rendered by the following: Mrs. A. Phedran, soprano; Mrs. A. Clark, contralto; R. Skaife, tenor; and Kenneth McLean, basso. It is needless to say all did well and the music, which was accompanied by Miss Ella May was rendered with harmony and precision. In the evening Mr. Jackson spoke from Revelations and took for his Text “He that Overcometh,” and again gave a good and impressive discourse. The musical numbers were also well rendered and included a duet, “Go Home and Tell,” Mrs. C.F. Munro taking the soprano and Mrs. A. Clark the contralto. The voices blended together well, and it was a treat to hear such music. There was a good attendance of hearers at both services, and the general verdict was that the services had even very successful and reflected credit on all concerned. There are also Evangelistic meetings being held at John McLean’s by Evangelists Howard and Fleming May. The old story is being proclaimed to good audiences. The meetings will be continued on Tuesday and Wednesday nights this week.
Everybody is decked out in Easter holiday attire, and the village has quite a festive appearance and all seem disposed to make the season one of general rejoicing.
The snow has nearly all gone. Spring is with us in earnest and soon every one will be busy turning over the land and preparing for a bumper crop.
I almost forgot to say we have got a new police magistrate, so now the people will be able to spend their money at home. Patronize home industries is a good motto far all.

1912 Apr 11 – Fork River

Mr. Briggs, teacher of the Mowat School, is visiting Dauphin this week.
P. Ellis is leaving this week to take up a position at Miles’ store, Kamsack.
Rev. H.H. Scrase was a visitor at W. King’s last Monday.
A magic lantern show entertainment was given by Mr. McCartney at the Orange Hall last Thursday. Some very nice pictures were shown, consisting of the Passion of our Lord. Owing to the bad roads only a small attendance turned out.
The farmers are getting ready for ploughing. Quite a lot to be done in this district.
Mrs. Rice from East Bay has been visiting Mrs. Cameron’s, Mowat.
Fleming Wilson and Paul Wood paid Fork River a visit on Tuesday.
G. Shannon, F. Cooper and R. Rowe were visitors to Dauphin on business.
Mr. Walker of Dauphin, is around inspecting Mossey River, Mowat and Pine View Schools.
Edwin King returned home from a week spent in Winnipeg and states that the trains going west are crowded with new comers. Lots of room here for them.
Mrs. T. Shannon returned from visiting friends in Dauphin.
Mrs. Comber and daughter arrived here from Selkirk and are staying with Mrs. McQuay for the present.
Miss Gertie Cooper and Miss Clark came up from Dauphin and are spending the Easter holidays at the homes of their parents.
Our Mowat friend of the Press invites the scribe to see these documents which is unnecessary as we have some of his documents covering the last six years, also his savings for the Press for about eight years and when we sum them up her reminds us of a Biblical charade who betrayed his friend and master. What a pity he seems to have these spells worst coming on spring. We sincerely hope he will be recovered in time to plant his onions.
The Hon. Joseph Lockhart returned from spending some time in the south and is looking as healthy as ever.
Mrs. R.M. Snelgrove, who has spent some time with Mrs. F. Chase in Dauphin, returned home Tuesday.
There are lots of wild geese on the wing, to judge from the reports it is harder on the ammunition that the geese.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 11 – 1915

1915 Feb 11 – Death Under Suspicious Circumstance

Coroner Culbertson held an inquest on the remains of Pawlo Jura, which were found in the Duck Mountain, at Ethelbert on Wednesday. The verdict of the jury was that Jura came to his death under suspicious circumstances, and the jury request that further investigation be made. Wm. Barrie was foreman of the jury.

1915 Feb 11 – Selected to Fill Vacancies

The following twenty-five volunteers left on Friday for Winnipeg, where they will fill vacancies on the corps there caused by illness and death:
A. Wilson, R.D. Reeve, J.E. Welsh, T.M. Ray, J. Armstrong, W.C. Miltchell, R. Smith, P.E. Millard, W. Donaldson, W.E. Ridley, W.J. Hill, W. Miller, J.S. Blundell, W. McDonald, J. Nochol, W.J. Wallace, A. Baldwin, T.L. Rodway, I. Osman, B. Dilworth, R.E. Richards, P. Cowley, P. Boam, I. McGlashin, W. Munro.

1915 Feb 11 – “Winged Animals” at Ashville

R.J. Avison, the well-known farmer of Ashville district, was in town on Wednesday. He report people seeing aeroplanes and other “winged animals” in that part. From what we know of the people of that thriving district they would not be content to let other places get ahead of them in “seein’ balloons,” or anything else.

1915 Feb 11 – Mossey River Council

Meeting of the council held at Fork River, Monday, Feb. 1st, 1915. Councillor Hechter absent.
The clerk swore in the newly elected councillor for Ward 6, li. S.B. Reid.
The minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted as read.
Hunt-Yakavanka – Confirming by laws No. 107, sec.-treas. by-law.
Bickle-Yakavanka – Confirming by-laws 21 and 196, councillors’ fees and mileage.
A by-law appointing Dr. Medd health officer, at a salary of $50.00 was passed.
Hunt-Reid – That the councillors be instructed not to expend Ward appropriations or other funds on the municipal boundary roads without consulting the council.
Reid-Yakavanka – That the councillors Hunt, Bickle and Hechter be finance committee for 1915 and the Coun. Hunt be chairman.
Hunt-Bickle – That Councillors Reid, Yakavanka and Namaka be Public Works committee and the Coun. Reid be chairman.
Yakavanka-Namaka – That Councillors Reid, Hunt and Bickle be bridge committee and that Councillor Reid be chairman.
Communications were read from the Deputy Municipal Commissioner, the Red Cross Society, S. Hughes, M.P.P., Professor Black, the solicitor, the Rural Municipality of Dauphin and Ochre River municipality.
Hunt-Reid – That the secretary write the Municipality of Ochre River and express this council’s willingness to cooperate in the matter of a convention of the Northern Municipalities and that the reeve and Councillor Hechter be a committee to take up the matter.
Bickle-Reid – That a grant of ten sacks of flour be made to Siefat Mcushka and that the clerk purchase the flour where it can be obtained at the lowest price.
Namaka-Reid – That the accounts as recommended by the finance committee be passed.
Hunt-Reid – That if material and work can be obtained at a few months time the bridge committee be authorized to finish the boundary bridge between sections 5 and 6, tp. 29 rge. 18.
Bickle-Yakavanka – That the key of the council chamber at Winnipegosis be delivered to W.H. Hunking and that he keep the place in good condition and be responsible for the same.
Bickle-Hunt – That the reeve be appointed to go to Winnipeg and interview Mr. Hughes, M.P.P., and the Minister of Public Works regarding a grant to the Municipality for 1915.
Hunt – Reid – That W.H. Hunking be authorized to purchase two padlock and two pairs of blankets for use in the Winnipegosis lock-up.
A by-law was passed cancelling certain taxes.
Hunt-Namaka – That the council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the reeve.

1915 Feb 11 – Fork River

Mr. Shannon and daughter arrived from the east and are visiting at the home of Mr. Thos. Shannon, son of Mrs. Shannon.
Mr. Nat Little has returned from a trip to Brandon.
Mrs. Geo. Tilt is spending a few days on the homestead.
Mr. Wm. Russell has returned from Kamsack and is visiting at the house of his parents.
Ed. Morris and Max King have returned from their winter’s fishing up the lake and report a good season’s work.
L.E. Bailey, county secretary, and W. King, C.M., have returned from attending the L.O.L. annual meeting at Dauphin. Mr. King has filled the county master’s chair for five years and retired from that position satisfied that the order in the country is in a good healthy position.
There was a surprise party Friday night, the neighbours taking possession of the home of Mr. C.S. Bailey on the Mossey River. The visitors had a good time judging by the time they got home in the morning.
Mr. Steele, of Bradwardine, arrived here and has taken over this mission and will hold service on February 14th at Winnipegosis at 11 a.m., Fork River at 3 p.m. and Sifton at 8 p.m.
Mr. Green, lay reader of All Saints’ Anglican Church, Fork River, leaves for Winnipeg this week. He has been pining for the Sunny South and we wish him a pleasant journey to a warm climate.
A very pleasant time was spent by the young folks the other night at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Reid.
Mr. Wm. Howitson has been under the weather for the last week. We trust he will soon recover as this burgh will sure go broke without “Scott” to stir us up.
Mrs. K. McAulay and children, of Winnipegosis are visiting at the home of Mrs. P. Ellis.

1915 Feb 11 – Sifton

Jas. McAuley, the Massey-Harris collector, was in our midst last week.
Messrs. Baker and Kitt were visitors in town last week from Ethelbert, where they are drilling a well for the grist mill, and report that they are 105 feet down and no water, but we trust that by this time they have struck good supply of water.
The Catholic mission held a sacred concert on Sunday evening, which proved a great success.
The grist mill is running very steady these times.
Mr. Paul Wood received a carload of oats on Monday, which he is offering for sale, so there should not be a shortage of feed for a time now.
William Ashmore’s team took a jolly party of Siftonites out to a dance at West Bay School given by Mr. J. Adams. All report having a good time.
Business has been very quiet of late but we are looking forward to brighter times.

1915 Feb 11 – Winnipegosis

Mr. and Mrs. A. Meston returned last Friday from Minnesota.
Miss Jane Paddock, returned home from the west and says, “there is no place like the old burgh.”
James Fleming, from the Pas, spent the weekend with friend at South Bay.
Mammie Bickle entertained a few of her little friends at a birthday party.
Mrs. T. Morton, of Quill Lake, Sask., is visiting her son. Will, who has been very ill. We wish him a speedy recovery.
Tom Sanderson returned from the north last week.
Frank Hechter is a visitor to Mafeking this week.
Mrs. Theo. Johnston entertained ten of the pioneer ladies of Winnipegosis at a delightful tea in honour of Mrs. F. Morton, of Quill Lake.
Curling is the order of the day. A grand bonspiel is on. “Stoop her up,” is the by-word.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 4 – 1915

1915 Feb 4 – Remains Found

Some time last fall Paulo Jura, a one-armed young Ruthenian, disappeared at Ethelbert. An investigation was held but no trace of the young man could be found. He went out shooting with another young man named Timothy Nakonectiny, and at the time and considerable money on his person. Recently his remains were found in the Duck Mountain, but the flesh had just about all disappeared from the bones. His clothes, however, were identified. No trace of the money could be found.
Detectives are now again investigating the case.
Nakonectiny, Jura’s companion, has disappeared from the district.

1915 Feb 4 – Third Contingent Complete

The 110 men allotted to the Dauphin district to be raised for the Third Contingent has just about been enrolled, the number now reaching 106. Taken altogether the men are a fine lot and compare favourably with the first that enlisted here. The following is a summary of the nationality of the men:

Canadian 37
English 43
Scotch 20
Welsh 1
American 3
South Africa 1
Danish 1

CANADIAN.
J.D. Munson, single. (Jack Devereux Munson, 1895, 424039)
G. Prieur, single. (Gabriel Prieur, 1896, 425219)
A.A. Day, single. (Arthur Archibald Day, 1896, 424013)
J.E. Welch, single. (John Edward Welch, 1891-1916, 74199)
C.W. Shaw, single. (Charles Wallace Shaw, 1875-1916, 424037 or A/24015)
W.C. Mitchell, single. (William Charles Mitchell, 1885, 74202)
I. Zufelt, single. (Isaac Zufelt, 1891, 425518)
H.W. Gardiner, single. (Hugh William Gardiner, 1894-1916, 424020)
J. Gallant, single. (Joseph Gallant, 1892-1916, 424019 or A/24019)
B.A. Whitmore, single. (Burton Alfred Whitmore, 1890, A/24250)
H.L. Pearson, single. (Harry Lindley Pearson, 1896, 425194)
J. Payne, single. (John Payne, 1892, 424066)
F.W. Clark, single. (Francis William Clark, 1890, 424671)
C.J. Ivens, single. (Charles John, xxx-1917, 424952)
G. Wildfong, single. (Gordon Wildfong, 1892, 424079)
S. Day, single.
J. Hicks, single. (John Hicks, 1895, 154745)
A.E. Arnold, single. (Albert Edward Arnold, 1895-1916, 424002 or A/24002)
P.E. Chard, single. (Percy Edwin Chard, 1896, 424657)
J.A. Justice, single. (James Amos Justice, 1896, 424028)
H.W. Minish, single. (Herbert Whitfield Minish, 1893, 424061)
G. Stewart, single. (Garfield Stewart, 1895-1916, 425364)
H. Bidak, single.
C.C. Stacey, single. (Clarence Crozier Stacey, 1896-1916, 425349)
J.E. Wells, single. (Joseph Edward Wells, 1889, 424076)
J.E. May, married.
J.J. Troyer, single. (Joseph James Troyer, 1887, 425428)
J.A. McLean, single.
J.S. Willis, single.
Jas. E. Cain, single. (James Edward Cain, 1894, 154744)
John Ball, single. (John Ball, 1895, 424539)
Edward Gordon, single. (Edward Gordon, 1893, 425870)
J.M. Crossland, single. (John Marshall Crossland, 1887, 154737)
Victor Lavalle, single.
John R. Levins, married. (John Richard Levins, 1880, 424033)
L.A. Campbell, single. (Lorne Alexander Campbell, 1879-1916, 460743 or A/60743)
Henry C. Batty, single. (Henry Charles Batty, xxx-1916, 424320)

ENGLISH.
A. Grove, single.
W.F. Percy, single. (William Freeman Percy, 1886, 425202)
P.E. Millard, single. (Percy Edward Millard, 18781916, 74190)
A.H.G. Whittaker, married. (Albert Henry Guilym Whittaker, 1891-1916, 424077 or 424245)
A.G. Sanderson, married.
Wm. Coleman, single. (William Coleman, 1876, 424688)
R. Smith, single. (Richard Smith, 1889, 74196)
F. Clark, married. (Frank Clark, 1883, 424009)
J.S. Blundell, single. (James Stuart Blundell, 1893-1916, 74201)
A.J. Middleditch, married. (Albert John Middleditch, 1892, 425078)
J.W. Thompson, single. (John Walter Thompson, 1891, 424072)
Ivo Osman, single. (Ivo Isman, 1892, 74204)
T.L. Radway, single.
H. Marchant, single. (Harry Marchant, 1891, 424194)
G.J. Dickason, single. (George James Dickason, 1887, 424035)
P. Cowley, married. (Paul Cowley, 1886, 74186)
G. Burkett, married. (George Burkett, 1870, 154735)
J.A. Hurst, married. (J Arnold Hurst, xxx, 424339)
T.W. Swannell, single. (Frank Walton Swannell, 1893-1918, 425389)
C. Recknell, single. (Cuthbert Bradshaw Recknell, 1890, 425232)
F. Pexton, single. (Fred Pexton, 1887, 424067)
A. Wood, single. (Arthur Wood, 1897, 424375)
A.E. Weeks, single. (Arthur Edward Weeks, 1880-1917, 425472)
C.P. Webb, single. (Charles Peter Webb, 1895, 424374)
W. Weeds, single. (Walter Weeds, 1894, 424371)
A. Baldwin, single. (Andrew Baldwin, 1889, 74184)
W.E. Ridley, single. (William Ernest Ridley, 1891, 74205)
R.E. Richards, single. (Robert Edmond Richards, xxx, 74207)
R.W. Watson, single. (Robert William Watson, 1891-1917, 424075 or 24229)
F. Pickup, single. (Frederick Pickup, 1893, 424068 or A/24068)
T. Pedley, married. (Thomas Pedley, 1878-1918, 425197)
A. Spence, married.
J. Gomme, single. (John Gomme, 1890, 424021)
C. Heather, single. (Charles Robert Heather, 1887, 424896)
B. Cheesmore, single. (Benjamin Cheesmore, 1887-1916, 424327)
W.J. Hill, single. (William James Hill, 1880, 74189)
P. Boam, single. (Percy Boam, 1883-1916, 74185)
T. Brown, single.
Herbert Townson, single. (Herbert Townson, 1896, 425426)
R.C. Crowe, single. (Roland Charles Crowe, 1897, 424012 or A/24066)
H.F.B. Percival, single.
Wm. J. Hickman, married. (William James, 1881, 424910)
F.L. Pearce, single.
Benj Dilworth, married. (Benjamin Dilworth, 1884-1916, 74187)

SCOTCH.
T.M. Ray, single. (T.M. Ray, xxx, 74206)
W.J. Wallace, single. (William John Wallace, 1895, 74200)
W. McDonald, single. (John Elliott McDonald, 1882, 424064)
Wm. Donaldson, married. (William Donaldson, 1885, 74188)
J. Nicol, married. (James Nicol, 1884, 74194)
J. Armstrong, married.
T. Latta, single. (Thomas Latta, xxx, 424031 or A/24136)
J.A. Craig, married.
A. Wilson, single. (Allan Wilson, 1895, 74198)
I. MacGlashan, single. (Isaac MacGlashan, 1885, 74193)
Wm. Miller, single. (William Miller, 1883-1916, 74191)
J. Alexander, single. (John Alexander, 1890, 425896)
R. Morrice, single. (Robert Morrice, 1892, 424343)
J.A. Whyte, single. (Joseph Alexander Whyte, 1893, 424078)
Wm. Lyon, single. (William Lyon, 1883, 424034)
R.L. Adams, single. (Robert Lawson Adams, 1896, 424001)
Wm. Munro, single. (William Munro, xxx, 74192)
Thos. Martin, single. (Thomas Martin, 1892, 424046)
N. McLeod, single.
T. Woodhouse, single. (Thomas Woodhouse, xxx, 425906)

WELSH.
E. Burnett, single. (Edwin Burnett, 1896, 424323)

U.S.A.
E. Engebretson, single. (Elmer Rudolph Engebretson, 1890-1918, 424015)
Wm. Madden, single. (William Madden, 1878, 424341)
C.B. Shales, single. (Chester Berdell Shales, 1896, 622436)

TRANSVAAL S. A.
H.E. Lys, married. (Hugh Ernest Lys, 1875-1876, Capt.)

DENMARK.
A. Peterson, single.

1915 Feb 4 – Fork River

Mr. Nat Little and daughter, Miss Grace, have returned from a two weeks’ trip to Rochester, Minn.
Mr. W. Walmsley was in town last week.
Archdeacon Green spent a few days in Dauphin on church business last week.
W. King county Orange master, is away on his annual tour among the various lodges and expects to return to Dauphin in time for the annual county meeting to arrange business for the coming term.
Wm. Northam, one of the standby subscribers of the Herald at Fork River, sends in the following verse when remitting his subscription. We take it that Mr. Northam intends the lines as a warning to delinquents:
He who doth the printer pay
Will go to Heaven sure some day;
But he who meanly cheats the printer
Will go where there is never winter.

1915 Feb 4 – Winnipegosis

Five men are working on the dredge fitting her out for the summer.
A large number of the fishermen are back in town again, and things are moving a little faster than usual.
J.W. McAulay was a visitor to Dauphin on Wednesday to attend the trainmen’s ball.
Dancing is one of the chief pastimes in this town. Lately, hardly a week goes by without one or two dances being held. A surprise dance was given at the home of Hos. Grenon on Friday last and another dance on Tuesday night in the Rex Hall.
Will Morton, station agent, whose life was despaired of, is getting better.
Mr. and Mrs. Ravelli, left on Wednesday for Portage la Prairie, where they will enter the employ of Hugh Armstrong.
Mrs. Theo. Johnson was a visitor to Dauphin on Wednesday.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Litwyn on the 28th ult., a son.
Mrs. (Dr.) Medd returned on Monday from a visit to Winnipeg.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 9 – 1913

1913 Jan 9 – Engineer Wm. Bowman Killed

Engineer Wm. Bowman, who was running for Engineer Wm. Graham on No. 4 train was killed in the Winnipeg yard on Saturday afternoon last. The train reached Winnipeg safely from Dauphin and Mr. Bowman was running to the roundhouse light when another engine ran into the tender, smashing it and driving the tender into the cab with such force that the boiler was injured in such a way that the steam escaped and scalded Bowman so badly that he expired on the spot.
Jack Cobb, the fireman, escaped through the cab window without suffering any injury.
Engineer Bowman was well-known in Dauphin and sympathy is felt for the family in their great sorrow.

1913 Jan 9 – Frozen to Death

Tuesday was Christmas according to the Galician custom and there was the usual festivities on that day and the following two days. John Kuruk, a Galician about 45 years of age, imbibed freely on Tuesday and Wednesday and on the later day he lay down at the C.N.R. tool house near the bridge and (Thursday) morning was found there frozen to death.
Deceased came from Austria about three years ago and has been working on the railway as a section man. He leaves a wife and two grown-up sons.

1913 Jan 9 – Suffered Bad Cut

Mrs. E.H. Walker was carrying a crock in her hands on Tuesday at the farm three miles south of the town when she slipped and fell. The crock broke and one of the pieces cut a bad gash on her left wrist. An artery was severed and she bled freely for quite a time. A phone message hurriedly brought Dr. Culbertson to the scene when the wound was dressed and Mrs. Walker brought to the hospital. It is expected she will be out in the course of a day or two.

1913 Jan 9 – Fork River

Mr. French, of Grandview, is spending a few days with Mr. and Mrs. J. Clemens.
W. Williams has taken his outfit out to his limits east of Lake Dauphin.
Frank Bailey left for Winnipeg after spending his New Year’s holidays with his parents on the Mossey.
Miss M. Nixon left for Findlay, having accepted the position of teacher in that district.
Miss Bessie and Miss Pearl Wilson left on a visit to friends at Sifton.
Professor S. Biggs returned to Dauphin after spending Xmas week among friends.
M. Sturdy, assistant manager of the A.T.Co. store, left on a short vacation. We wish him a good time.
Edwin King, who if with the C.N.R., was a visitor at the home of his parents lately.
Mrs. Willis Miller, of Mowat, who has been under the doctor’s care at Winnipegosis, has returned home.
The C.N.R. surveyor paid a visit and took the measurement of the elevator here.
Mr. Howatson, from Winnipegosis, is relieving Mr. Sturdy at the Armstrong Trading Co. for a few days while Mr. Sturdy is on holiday.
The annual meeting of Purple Star, 1775 was held on Tuesday, Dec 31st. The auditors’ report was most satisfactory, showing a balance in hand, after meeting all expenses for 1912.
The following officers were elected for 1913.
W.M. – Bro F.F. Hafenbrak
D.M. – Bro. W.J. King
Chaplain – Bro. H.H. Scarse, re-elected
Recording Secretary – Bro. W. King, re-elected
Financial Secretary – Bro. C.E. Bailey, re-elected
Treasurer – Bro. C. Bailey, re-elected
D. of C. – Bro. F. Cooper, re-elected
Lecturer – Bro. A Hunt
Dept. Lecturer – S.B. Reid
1st Committeemen – Edwin King, re-elected; C. Clark
Committeemen – J. Frost, Joe Bickle, J.E. Morriss, S.B. Munro, J.C. Bickle
Installation of officers at next regular meeting.

1913 Jan 9 – Winnipegosis

The Standard Lumber Co.’s mill is closed for the season.
The Armstrong Trading Co. has started their snow-plow with ten teams on its first trip up the lake to haul down fish.
Alex McArthur’s steam engine invention is also on a trip for the same purpose.
J.P. Grenon made a trip to Winnipeg on Saturday on business.
There was no Anglican Church service last Sunday owing to the recent storms impeding velocipede transition.
The Christian League held their social evening at the home of Mrs. J.J. Burrell last week. A very enjoyable time is reported.
Mr. Noble has returned to Dauphin to continue his studies after spending a week here visiting his adherents.
Mr. Malley returned on Saturday to Winnipeg.
The school was opened on Friday by Miss Hayes on account of Mr. Hulme not returning till Saturday.
Inspector Charles White has been away to Waterhen.
Miss Bradley has returned to Winnipeg to pursue her studies at St. Mary’s Academy.
Mrs. Bradley last Saturday received a letter from a Greek lady of Athens giving an account of the war raging in the Balkans. The letter was dated Dec 12th.