Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 14 – 1911, 1916

1911 Sep 14 – Political Meetings at Fork River

Glen Campbell held a meeting at Fork River on the 8th inst., which was well attended and much enthusiasm shown. There was no Government speaker and the Grits were conspicuous by their absence.
On the night of the 11th, Mr. Cruise held his meeting supported by Messer. McKinstry and McDonald, and quite unexpectedly Mr. Campbell turned up just before the meeting began. The Orange Hall was well filled as the Conservatives of Fork River were not afraid to hear both sides of the question for they did not know that Glen would be at the meeting. Had they not attended Mr. Cruise’s meeting would have been a small one.

1911 Sep 14 – Fork River

Mr. A. Harvey, an old timer who still owns property in this district, is on a visit to Mr. S. Bailey and renewing acquaintances.
T.N. Briggs’ threshing outfit arrived on Tuesday’s train and is guaranteed to thresh anything in sight from pumpkins to gerkins.
Reciprocity seems to have upset even the clerk of the weather, as we are having very poor harvest weather and a slight tinge of frost.
Mr. Glen Campbell held a meeting in the Orange Hall on the 8th, which was well attended. There were over 100 farmers and a large number of ladies present. Mr. Campbell spoke on reciprocity from a farmer’s standpoint in a plain telling way. His arguments were convincing and plainly showed the audience the reciprocity pact in its true colour and that it would be to Canada’s disadvantage. Mr. Cruise was invited bout did not put in an appearance.
Mr. Forbes of Rivers, has been in the district a few days looking over the land. He is well satisfied with Fork River and is likely to invest in a farm.
The following are a few reasons why the scribe cannot support Cruise, the non-resident candidate and why he objects to the Laurier Government. Look them over and see how few of the ministers retain public confidence. Has there ever been anything worse than Mr. Pugsley in public life in Canada. The corruption exposed in his department exceeds the McGreevy scandal during the Conservative regime. Sir Wilfred has not retired Pugsley as Sir John Thompson retired Langevin. A commission of Liberals has declared the Marine Department under Mr. Broduer, corrupt from end to end, yet he has been retained and now goes not he Supreme Court Bench. The administration of the Militia Department has been as bad as any. The printing bureau scandals have been covered up. The Oliver charges were sidetracked by the dissolution of parliament, notwithstanding pledges given by the Government upon which an adjournment was secured. Sir Wilfred Laurier made the late Mr. Prefontaine, his minister of Marine, when he knew he was corrupt. In fact he had a national reputation for corruption. But Sir Wilfred gave him one of the big spending departments. Mr. Fielding allowed the Farmers’ Bank to open its doors when he had abundance of evidence that it was a crooked organization from its very inception. Look over the ministers in the Laurier Government as it appeals for supper in 1911 and compare the administration with that of 1896 and see how are they mighty fallen. What a descent from Sir Oliver Mowat to Pugsley; from Sir Louis Davis to Broduer; from Sir Henri Joly to Oliver. Sir Wilfred does not want such a comparison to be made. He has introduced the reciprocity issue to cover up the corruption of his colleagues. The Press would try to persuade farmers to vote for the Grit candidate and put back into power Laurier and the most corrupt Government in existence. They might fool a few Jackdaws. The scribe’s advance is turn them out and try a new broom which in our experience always sweeps clean.

1916 Sep 14 – Fork River

P. Zack, of Winnipeg, has purchased the stock of J.S. Nowosad and intends carrying on the business. Mr. Nowosad has accepted a position with the A.T. Co., Winnipegosis.
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Sergant, of Kamsack, and late of Dauphin, are spending a short time with Mr. and Mrs. W. Coultas on the Fork River.
Miss Pearl Wilson is teaching the Pine View School for the present.
On Sunday morning Mrs. Archie McMillian passed away after a period of illness. Deceased was one of the old settlers. The last three years the family resided at Kindersley, Sask. Of late Mrs. McMillian has been residing with her daughter, Mrs. C.E. Bailey.
The harvest home festival services in All Saints’ Church were well attended and the services were interesting throughout. The church was tastefully decorated for the occasion with flowers, fruit and vegetables and those who took part deserve credit. Mr. Butler preached his farewell sermon. He left for Wycliffe College on Monday to take up his studies. His departure is regretted.
Rain has delayed thrashing operations.
The duck pond opposite the post office is increasing in area. There should be good shooting when the season opens.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 7 – 1911, 1916

1911 Sep 7 – Fork River

Pathmaster Briggs and his gang are busy laying a sidewalk from the post office to the station and stores, which is quite an improvement this muddy weather.
Mrs. H.H. Scrase and son returned from Dauphin after a two weeks’ visit.
The C.N. Ry. is building a stock yard here. We sincerely hope they will provide a raft to float them over the ditch to the shoot.
Mr. McLeod is busy buying cattle and shipping a car a week.
Mr. J.M. Littler returned from Gilbert Plains on Wednesday.
Mr. Glen Campbell, M.P., will hold a meeting in the Orange Hall on Friday night, September 8th.

1916 Sep 7 – Fork River

Mr. Ducker, engineer, was here for a few days inspecting roads and bridges.
Mrs. Dobson, of Winnipeg, returned home after a two weeks’ visit with Mrs. Cameron on the Mossey River.
Mr. E. Hunter, of Severn Bridge, Ont., is visiting his brothers, Harry and Tom Hunter at Lake Dauphin.
Mr. Joe McMillian, of Lac du Bonnett, returned home after a few days’ visit to his mother at Mrs. C. Bailey’s.
Mr. Hawkins, P.M. of Dauphin, and Mr. McCaul, of the Bank of Commerce, spent a short time touring the district in a motor lately.
Mr. W. Williams started thrashing on the farm of John Mushoski.
The heavy rain on Saturday night has stopped the harvesting and thrashing a couple of days.
Rev. Mr. Price, of Swan River, and rural dean of Dauphin, held Holy Communion and baptismal service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon, which was well attended. He left in the evening for Winnipegosis.
The annual Harvest Festival service will be held in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock on September 10th. This will be Mr. Butler’s farewell sermon as he leaves for Wychiffe College, Toronto, on Monday. A cordial invitation to all to come and take part in this service.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 27 – 1912

1912 Jun 27 – Fork River

Mrs. C.E. Bailey left for a visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Archie McMillian at Kindersley, Sask.
H.H. Benner, who has been municipal clerk during D.F. Wilson’s absence has left for Dauphin, where he has become a real live real estate agent.
Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy, of the Armstrong Trading Co., returned after spending a few days among friends at Dauphin and Ochre River.
Wm. King returned after spending a week visiting at Roblin, Togo and Gilbert Plains. He states that several of the Dauphin brethren accompanied him to the L.O.L. county meeting at Robin, which was decided a success. Ten members were exalted to the Royal SScarlet Degree and arrangements made for the 12th July celebration. The annual county meeting will be held in the town of Dauphin.
William Coultas is all smiles; the reason, “it’s a girl, don’t you know.”
The Orangemen of Fork River will hold their tenth annual basket picnic on July 5th. Everybody welcome. A good programme of sports, etc. Dance in the hall in the evening. Come and have a good time.
Mrs. John Robinson and family have left on a visit to friends at Gladstone.
Mr. Falconer, Government weed inspector, passed through here lately on his way to Winnipegosis.
On, where, oh, where is the Winnipegosis football team that claims to have won so comfortably on the 24th. It was a close shave. The latest report is that they are waiting for a supply of air pumps as the farmer boys have the wind.
Ed Morris and Archie McKerchar were visitors from the Lake Town lately.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 18 – 1914

1914 Jun 18 – Off for Camp Sunday

The 32nd Manitoba Horse leave on Sunday night for camp at Sewell. The Dauphin troop will go ?? strong this year. There are expected to be 2000 men all told at the camp. Moving pictures will be one of the sources of entertainment.
The officers of the Dauphin troop are as follows:
Major G.C.J. Walker
Captain H.K. Newcombe
Lieutenants E. Manby, M.F. Wilson, L. Shand, E.P. Millward
Regiment S.M., A.C. Goodall
Squadron S.M., Fistches
Sergeants T. Coghlan, G. Fraser, T.D. Massy, Alguire
Corporals W. Cede, H. Wade, Alguire, Chard
The ??? party consisting of C.N.S. Wade, Frank ???, cook, and Private W. ??? have on Thursday night for the camp.

1914 Jun 18 – Ethelbert

Court of revision will be held here Wednesday, 17th inst., with Judge Ryan presiding.
The old McLean flourmill is being overhauled and rebuilt. Another story will be added. The Kennedy Mercantile Co. now own the mill.
The school accommodation is now over taxed, the outcome of this will be that a new building will have to be erected, or an addition built. How would it do to have a consolidated school, and build an up-to-date building. Ethelbert is going to grow, let us anticipate the future.
Principal White is in Dauphin this week with five scholars writing on entrance, grade IX and grade X. The following are the pupils: Entrance, Jessie McMillian and Ben Brachman; grade 9, Maggie Wager and Willie Masticub; grade 10, Wsldmar Masticub.
The crops are looking well, but rain is now needed.
F.K. Slipets, our municipal clerk, is building a new house.
On Thursday night last there was a baseball match between the married and single men. The benedicts won by a nice margin. Ethelbert has some good ball material and will be heard of during the summer when they get more practice.
A petition is in circulation with the object of having the C.N.R. move their station at this point. The location of the building is such that it makes it very inconvenient for passengers and the public to reach it, having to cross the sliding to reach it. It is expected that the company will comply with this reasonable request.
N.A. Hryhorenznk, general agent for the International Harvester Co., went to Dauphin on Monday.

1914 Jun 18 – Fork River

Frank Hafenbrak spent a few days in Dauphin last week. While away he purchased a team of mares with foals at foot.
D. Kennedy was a visitor to Dauphin last week.
Wm. Murray, of Dauphin, provincial auditor, is staying with Clerk Wilson while auditing the municipal books.
W. King has returned from a trip to Winnipeg on municipal affairs. He reports the crops are looking well along the line.
Nat Little was unfortunate in losing one of his valuable brood mares last week.
A. McDonald is busy these days on the road from the A.T. Co. Ltd.
Cap. Coffey, of Dauphin, paid this burgh a visit in his automobile last week.
The boys got busy last week and organized a football club. The first game of the season was played on Saturday night between Mowat and Fork River, which ended in a draw.
John Angus, of Winnipegosis, spent the weekend here and is of the opinion this is the most restful place he has stuck in his travels. There are several others believe so, too.
Mr. Atkinson, of Prince Albert, has rented the Chase farm and is busy seeding it with barley.
Gen. Neil, of Rainy River, has returned to Mowat experimental duck farm for the summer.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 7 – 1914

1914 May 7 – Escaped in Male Attire

Woman at station on Tuesday Night Dressed in a Man’s Suit – Who was the Woman?
When court was called on Wednesday morning there was a surprise when Chief Bridle gave out that Mrs. Murphy had left town and would not appear to answer the charge of attempting to commit suicide.
How the woman managed to get away is now what is puzzling the police as she was supposed to be in bed at home sick and the trains were being closely watched.
But there is a possible explanation of how the escape was effected. On Tuesday night a woman dressed in a man’s suit was observed on the station platform by several who were there. So sure was the conductor of the train that the supposed man was a woman that he offered to be the cigars with an acquaintance that such was the case. The disguise was very good but the woman, whoever she was, evidently forgot one essential in her make-up, which was a source of much amusement to the bystanders.

MRS. MURPHY HEARD FROM.

This (Thursdays) morning the Herald received a little from Mrs. Murphy, the postmark being Winnipeg, May 6th. In this letter she says that “she has to thank the liars of Dauphin for the trouble they have caused her.” She further remarks that after it is too late she has had her eyes opened and warms other women to beware and not believe liars as she did until it is too late to mend the damage done.

1914 May 7 – Met Instant Death

Maurice Frobisher and his brother arrived a short time ago from St. Norbert, Man., and took up homesteads at Asham Point, in the Ste. Rose district. On Saturday last the two brothers were going by ox team to Ste. Rose. Maurice was sitting in the back end of the wagon holding a rifle, when it accidently discharged, the bullet entering his arm, passing to his jaw and came out at the back of his head. Death was instantaneous.
Dr. Harrington was telephoned for and went to Ste. Rose. After learning the circumstances be decided that an inquest was not necessary.
Deceased was 40 years of age and unmarried.

1914 May 7 – Prairie Fire Does Damage

Prairie fires were running southwest of the town in the Mayflower and Spruce Bluff districts on Friday and Saturday. A dwelling on the farm of Arthur Bule, near the Mayflower School, was burned. A. Maynard lost a quantity of hay and other settlers suffered minor losses.

1914 May 7 – Ethelbert

Seeding has been going ahead actively and much of the wheat has been ???. The recent rain held things up for sure.
Very little wood is now being shipped out, still there are always a few cars moving.
Business is a little on the quiet side of late. Our burgh is becoming quite an egg expecting centre, many cases being shipped out weekly.
Wm. Morray, truancy officer, is visiting schools in our municipality. He is very busy going from one farmer to another making them send their children to school. On account of his visit the school trustees of Ethelbert S.D. have to provide more accommodation for the children that are of school age and who must attend. The people are satisfied with the action of the government in this move and will assist the officer in every way in enforcing the law.

1914 May 7 – Fork River

R. Corbett and his assistant returned to Winnipeg after taking the levels for draining a township and a half and laying out the road to Winnipegosis.
The English Church concert held in the Orange Hall, May 1st, was a very successful one. Our critic here admits it the best. A large number came from Sifton and put on a dialogue, which, to say the least was a laugh maker from start to finish. It pleased everyone. Our Winnipegosis friends were out in force and helped materially and that with the help of Fork River contingent a good evening’s entertainment was enjoyed. An excellent super was provided by the ladies. After supper several hired the hall for a dance and splendid music was supplied by Mr. Russell and sons.
Contractor Briggs is busy these days trying to make Main Street passable. Next thing we know Councilor Richardson will be putting down the balance of the sidewalk and all will be rosy.
John Clemens and family have left for McCreary, where they will reside in the future.
W. King has been appointed registration clerk for the northern portion of Gilbert Plains constituency. He starts in on the 12th of May at Winnipegosis.
Richard Harrison and E. Bickle, of South Bay, were visitors here at the council meeting during court of revision.
The dwelling house of J. McDonald caught fire last week. Captain Wilson and the fire brigade were soon on the ground. There was very little damage done.
Mr. McMillian, of Cyprus River, is a visitor at the home of A. Cameron of Mowat.
Our Mowat friend states they have put a bell and tower on the Mowat School house and yet they forgot to put a foundation under it. Of course, our friend usually does things different from others, which accounts for his being in a kicking frame of mind. He goes on to state the folks he sends to take his mail out, take all the way from one day to a week and the sometimes longer before he gets his mail back. What a shame. We trust he got the paper which contained the write up of how his pet government let the contractors mulet the people out of forty million dollars in building the Transcontinental Railway. Say, F.B. don’t get sore over our convention at Gilbert Plains. Have you forgotten the fuss you made with your friends here and up north because they wanted a share of the swag when you carried the chequebook and had to take a holiday for a few weeks in Winnipeg. You were not missed a bit. Have the common decency to keep in your own backyard, as we believe the glass in our house is of better material than yours and as in the past you can’t afford to indulge in stone throwing.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 4 – 1912

1912 Apr 4 – Fork River

Duncan Kennedy has been appointed a commissioner for taking affidavits for use in the courts of the province.
Mr. Jangerman, who has been homesteading east of the Mossey, left for Dauphin with his family for a few months.
Mr. and Mrs. J. McAuley of South Bay, were visitors at D. Kennedy’s.
Mr. Combers of Selkirk, a relative of Capt. D. McLean, arrived here with a car of settlers’ effects and intends farming in this vicinity.
Mr. and Mrs. J McMillian and family who have been spending the winter here, have left for the west.
J. Seiffert of Winnipegosis, was here attending Court of Revision and Council meeting.
The bridge gang of the Canadian Northern Railway are busy fixing bridges in this vicinity.
Purple Star, L.O.L., 1765, held their general meeting on Thursday night last. A. McKerchar, J. Bickle and Martin, Winnipegosis, and W. Weir of Dauphin, visited the lodge and an interesting evening was spent.
The heaviest fall of snow of the season occurred on Friday, and puts an early spring out of the question. The horses and cattle are looking fairly well considering the long winter.
Our Mowat friend of the Press evidently declines our advice. We wish to tell him that we had a short conversation with the Dr. as he wished. The Dr. did not seem to be ??? all over the scribe’s health ?? not be a benefit to the public ??? health officer would take a trip ??? to the vicinity of Oak Brae and investigate the nuisance there, and have it removed as soon as possible before the hot weather sets in.
What has been become of the Fork River correspondent to the Press? Did he get snowed under as he has not been heard of lately. He must have gone across the herring pond for those letters that never arrived. Quite a fake.
Our friend Jimmy Johnston stole a march on the boys. We congratulate him and his bride and wish them a long life and a happy one. So say all.
A. Cameron is a visitor to Dauphin this week.
The council meeting held last week went off quiet well.
A nice little children’s party was held at the home of Mrs. Scrase, when Mr. McCartney gave a magic lantern entertainment. The pictures shown consisted of St. Paul’s Cathedral, Japan and Jessica’s first Prayer. When this was over the children had candies, cakes &c. and played all kind of games. At 10 o’clock they all went home after having enjoyed themselves.
Mr. McCartney returned from visiting friends at Grandview.

1912 Apr 4 – Sifton

The roads are very poor where Galicians live. They are not doing their share to advance these country places. There is a marked difference in the roads where English speaking people live. One hears that Canadians and English settlers give their time and their horses gratis for so many days each year to “grade” the roads. The Galicians are unwilling to help in any way unless they get from $1.50 to $2 daily. They, however, use the roads that others make. This is unfair! We need extra laws and to have them enforced. If a man does not help the country that helps him and he at “loggerheads” with the community in which he dwells he ought to leave the country. We have too many such in Canada now. They take all they get and hinder all progress to wit, the effort to get money for bridges in the municipality, etc.
The school at Sifton is making great progress under Capt. A. Russell. Sifton is fortunate in getting such an able man. He has an average of 59, a far from easy task daily instructing them. He must be congratulated in one feature especially the teaching of patriotism and love for the country. The exercising of his thoroughbred stallion keeps his health up. “Bunkus” is the pride of the place.
Nurses Goforth and Reid do excellent work at Sifton. They are always busy, and work on so untiringly in caring for Galicians. Not all the heroes work along the plaudits of the crowd. Many heroes work on unknown by the many. We wonder if Galicians are grateful enough for the services given them in these hospitals.
The mill formerly owned by Messrs. Kennedy & Barrie is now being run by Galicians.

1912 Apr 4 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Munro, who has been working for the Presbyterian Church in Winnipegosis, South Bay, Fairville and Sifton, for the Winter, closed his ministry last Sunday, March 31. He had large attendances at his closing services at each place, including people of all denominations. Attendances were favourable right through the winter. He never before experienced such a beautiful winter. He leaves soon for Saskatchewan Presbytery, where he takes up work for the Summer months.
The Presbyterian Church at Winnipegosis voted in favour of union unanimous all but two. Some did not vote. Those who voted against union and those who did not vote have the greatest standing in the church. At the closing service, which was a united one, Mr. Munro urged union for Winnipegosis even if organic union failed to be realized.