Today in the Dauphin Herald – February 12, 1920

Fined $200

On Tuesday, the 10th, Inland Revenue Officer J.A. Hall made a raid on certain parties at Winnipegosis suspected of illegal whiskey manufacturing. A quantity of mash and large still were discovered and as a result E.D. Philibelt appeared before P.M. Hawkins on Wednesday and was fined $200 and costs.

G.W.V.A. Notes

Comrade R.B. Maxwell, vice-president of the Dominion Command, was a visitor at last Thursday’s meeting. He came to Dauphin for the purpose of explaining some aspects of the reestablishment proposals, with which many members of the association and the general public are unfamiliar. Comrade Maxwell proved to be an instructive and entertaining speaker, and his address was very much appreciated.
At the next regular meeting, which will be held on Thursday, Feb. 19th, the course of action with regard to acquiring permanent quarters for the association will be decided upon.

Oil Boom

Oil has been discovered on the farm of Mr. McKay across Lake Dauphin, sec. 16, tp. 28, range 18, and for the past two or three days there has been a rush at the Dominion Lands office to enter claims.

Fork River

A very pleasant time was spent Friday evening, February 6th, in taking a trip around the world. All parties having gathered at the Union Station, Fork River, first special train left at 8 o’clock and each 20 minutes thereafter. First stop was made at China, where the guests were treated to all the dainties China can produce, also the costumes and customs of the people were a great treat to all. Next stop was made at India, where all were treated with the greatest courtesies by the natives and came away with a great impression of the people, also the fare they had to eat. Last stop was made at Japan where the tourists were feasted with all the delicacies of that wonderful nation. They were struck by the beauties of the quaint little people and advise that the missionaries have done a great work there. On arrival back in Canada the homesick people were given a grand reception by those at home and gave a pleasant account of their trip. The reception consisted of songs by Rev. Roberts, music by Mrs. Little, recitation by Mrs. Lockwood, also instrumentals by the Russell boys, and Miss Ina Briggs. The nice sum of $58 was made by the United Church of Canada.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – July 3, 1919

Case Transferred to Winnipeg

The case of the Armstrong Trading Co. vs. J.P. Grenon and J. McInnes, which was among the list of King’s Bench cases here, has been transferred to Winnipeg. This has been done for the benefit of the counsel who are all Winnipeg residents. The case starts today (Thursday).

Great War Veterans Hold Big Celebration

Fortune smiled on the Great War Veterans on Tuesday. Their first celebration was a splendid success viewed from all standpoints. The weather was ideal, and the crowds the largest that ever visited the town. Between four and five thousand people were on the Exhibition grounds in the afternoon. There was not a hitch to mark the day’s program.
The parade in the morning attracted much attention and favorable comment was heard on all sides on the many and varied representations in the line of march. There were cars decorated with flags without number, and it appeared as if every boy and girl in the town carried the colors.

Verdict for Mrs. Haley

Mrs. Jos. Haley has secured a verdict for $10,000 in the count at Saskatoon against the Canadian National Railway for the death of her husband. Joseph Haley was killed at Hawke’s spur, a mile west of Hudson’s Bay Junction in the fall of 1918 by being caught between a loading platform and a freight car. Action was instituted in the province of Saskatchewan owing to the accident having occurred there. The case came to trial at Saskatoon on June 25th, when judgment was given for $10,000. Bowman, McFadden & Caldwell represented the plaintiff.

Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River on Tuesday, June 10th, Coun. Yakavanka absent. The minutes of last meeting were read and adopted.
Communication were read from the solicitor re Bowlen judgment; Fred Wenger, account against ward 2; the teacher of South Bay S.D.; W.H. Paulson re taxes; three applications for the position of road commissioner; Bank of Nova Scotia re line of credit; Dept. of Public Works re road across 3-31-18; Geo. Lvon re wood on road; the estimates of Mossey River S.D., and a largely signed petition from ratepayers in south-east corner of the municipality and Lawrence municipality praying for a road on boundary line.
Hunt-Namaka – That a grant of $250 be made to the Fork River agricultural society.
Marcroft-Paddock – That after hearing the circumstances the taxes on the se 2-31-19 be allowed to stand over till the coming December, and that the penalty on them be cancelled.
Hunt-Reid – That a grant of $150 be made to the Returned Soldiers’ committee for the purpose of giving a banquet to returned soldiers.
Marcroft-Reid – That the secretary obtain designs of monuments from the different marble works with a view to erecting a monument to the memory of all Mossey River soldiers who were killed in the war.
Marcroft-Namaka – That Coun. Hunt and Reid be a committee to select, stake out and authorize the use of a nuisance ground for Fork River.
Hunt-Reid – That a grant of $10 be made to the South Bay Boys and Girls’ club.
Hunt-Namaka – That a special meeting of the council be held at Fork River on Saturday, June 14th.
Reid-Namaka – That Mrs. Domeric be refunded the taxes of 1918, with the exception of the special school tax.
Reid-Namaka – That the reeve and sec.-treasurer be a committee to deal with matters regarding the council chamber at Winnipegosis.
Marcroft-Namaka – That the account of Coun. Reid ($22) for letting and inspecting work be printed.
Marcroft-Paddock – That the auditor’s report be printed.
Reid-Namaka – That the accounts of the meeting of Jan. 7th, March 5th, and those of today, as recommended by the finance committee, be passed.
Bylaws were employing the collector at $5 per day when instructed to go out by the reeve and sec.-treasurer, appointing James Bickle road commissioner, and repealing the bylaw making the councilors road commissioners. Also authorizing a vote of the ratepayers of Mossey River School District, No. 999, on a $12,000 debenture bylaw.
The council then adjourned.

Fork River

A gang of men are engaged building a new elevator. This will make the second elevator at this point.
Gus. Andrus, Jim Parker and G. Lacey have invested in tractors and are busy turning over the soil.
The heavy rain of Saturday gave the hand a good soaking and the crops are greatly befitted by it.

Mossey River School Report

The following is a list of pupils who were successful in the recent mid-summer exams:
Grade VII—Honors; Bob Williams. Pass; Ben Shuchett.
Grade VI—Nathan Shuchett, David Nowasod.
Grade V—Honors; Arthur Jamieson.
Grade IV—Mildred Carlson, Amos Carlson, Bill Williams, Sofie Beyko.
Grade III—Goldie Shuchett, Edna Hafenbrak, Earnest Hafenbrak, Donald McEachern, Tony Beyko.
Grade II—Birdie Stonehouse, Roy Dewbury, Allie Dewbury, Steve Nowasod, Jack Puchaylo.
Grade I sr—Kate Williams, Milo Carlson, Peter Zerba.
Class A—Clarice Carlson, Mary Stefishon, Tommy Hafenbrak, Cornie Chipley.
Gertrude M. Cooper, teacher.

Winnipegosis Public Schools

Grade IV to Grade V—Honors; Theary Frederickson, Benjamin Ketcheson, Lawrence Marchenaki. Pass; Gladys Cartwright, Jos. Mikit, Clara Hubble, Alexina Dumas, Charlie Adam, Mary Langlois, Harry Whale, Muriel Snelgrove, Rae Spence.
Primary to Grade II—Pass; Olive Shears, Vera Wills, Christine Schaldemose, Glen Dunby, Marie Loire, Hugh Johnson, Elizabeth Bradbury, Brynhildur Bjornsson, Grace Campbell, Bert Hubble, Chas. Spence, Harriet McLeod, Paul Lemchuk.
T. Tozer, Teacher.

Grade IV jr. to Grade IV sr.—Honors: John Marchenski, Rose McAuley. Pass: Agnes Burrell, Mary Chermak, Margaret Sanderson, M. Mapes, Albert Dumas, Sarah Klyne, Mary Richard, Donald McAuley, Violet Groff, Wm. Mapes, Olivina Langlois, Blennie St. Matt, Jessie Paddock, Jas. Richard, Hilliard Denby, Beverley Scchaldemose.
Grade III to Grade IV—Pass: Jos. Ponliot, Daisy Walmsley, Frank Wallace, Myrtle Snelgrove, Lawrence McDonell, Martha Sanderson, Wall. Pouliot, Ralph McAuley.
Following is a list, in order of merit, of successful pupils in the recent yearly examinations in Winnipegosis public schools:
Grade VII to Grade VIII—Pass: Tina Marchenski, Margaret Robinson, Ernest Needham.
Grade VI to Grade VII—Honors: Margaret Magnusson, James Brown, Kathleen Dempsey, Margaret McAuley, Charlotte Bradley. Pass: Paul Rudiak, Grace Whale, Cecil Paddock, Frank Needham.
Conditional—Alice Mapes, Harvey McAuley.
Grade V to VI—Honors: Mary Marcuenski, Evelyn Groff, Svava Frederickson, Charlotte Adam, Addie Ketcheson, Gordon Rognvaldson, Edith Hubble. Pass: Muriel Burrell, Annie Denby, Archie McLellan, Amelia Adam, Hjalmtyr Thorarinsson, Jos. Schaldemose.
Grade V Jr. to Grade V Sr—Honors: Leo Magnusson. Pass: Harvey Grenon, Verna Denby, Esther Hechter, Evolda Whale, Felix Magnusson, Gifford Campbell, George Campbell.
M. McMartin, Teacher.
Leith McMartin, Teacher.

Grade II to Grade III—Honors; Fred Magnusson, Jennie Ogryzlo, Margaret McLellan, Annie Dubinak, Stearnie Fredrickson, Stephen Zawrich, Alvina St. Godard, Sarah Alex, Mary Lyons, Myrtle Clarkson, Roderick St. Matt, Jos. Hechter, Mark Brown, Annie Zuk, Alex Klyne, Uric Lavergna. Pass; Wm. Wallock, D’Elroy Pouliot, Medos Langlois, Wm. Flamand.
Conditional: Ernest Seiffert, Bruce McAuley, Florence Paddock.
Grade I to Grade II—Honors: Viva Burrill, Lilian Bilenduke, Mary Kruchek, Donald Morris, Iva Whale, Vera Rognvaldson, Dolly Morris, Annie Marchenski, Armand Langlois, Nora Demery, Keitcha Snelgrove. Pass; Chas. Kachoe, Roderick Klyne, Dan McKay, Stephen Ogryzlo, John Semchuk, Fred St. Matt, Jos. Vermette, Helen Fiddler.
L. Levites, Teacher.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 12 – 1912

1912 Sep 12 – Arm Broken in Runaway

A spirited team belonging to Geo. Lampard ran away on Wednesday afternoon. The driver, Thos. McKay, was thrown out of the rig and had his left arm broken.

1912 Sep 12 – Infantry for Dauphin

A movement is on foot in town to organize a military regiment. A preliminary meeting was held in Harvey & Bowman’s office on Monday evening, when Dr. Walker was appointed chairman and L. Shand secretary. It is proposed to have four companies if possible. A public meeting will be held shortly at which Col. Steele will be the speaker and afterwards officers selected.

1912 Sep 12 – Ethelbert

The awful thunderstorm, and the great rain of Wednesday has left things in very bad shape here, and unless we have a spell of fine weather the prospects are none too good.
K. McLean is still improving and is able to be up and about, but he is still very weak and thin.
All the material and engine for the elevator are on the ground, but as yet no signs of the builders. They will have to get a hustle on.
There were two cases before R. Skaife on Saturday. Mrs. J. Rewniak asked that her husband, J. Rewniak, be bound over to keep the peace and be of good behaviour for twelve months. The evidence went to show that John had been persistently ill-treating her ever since their marriage over two years ago, and that he had very recently threatened to shoot her father, an old man who is close on seventy, with the handle of a hay fork twice on the arm, making it black because he tried to protect her. He was bound over to keep the peace and be of good behaviour for twelve months or forfeit $100.
The next case was a mixed up affair. Marko Dubyk sold a pig to N. Tkatchzuk, for five dollars, the pig to be delivered as soon as possible. Marko brought the pig to town, met some friends; they went and had drinks together, and entrusted the pig to Olexa Stassuk, to take to Tkatchzuk, but instead he took it home. Then he have it to S. Basaraba, who put it in his stye, and kept it for some weeks. Ultimely Olexa asked $3 for Tkatchzuk, and he should have his pig. This Tkatchzuk refused to give, but instead he wanted the pig, and $5.50 as a sort of fine for them keeping the pig. The case was decided as follows: Basaraba was ordered to take the pig to Tkatchzuk, and without any compensation for the feed of the pig. O. Stassuk had to pay the costs of the court, as his share of the fun, and Tkatchzuk as told that it was only the magistrate who had the privilege of extracting penalties.
Later Rewniak wanted the magistrate to order his wife to go back to him, but he was advised to treat her kindly in future, and then perhaps she might go back. But Maru says no, never.
The station has got the name “Ethelbert” printed in bold letters at both ends of the building, so that all who run can read.

1912 Sep 12 – Fork River

Sydney Howlett, of E. Million, spent a few days here and took a trip to Winnipegosis on business.
Garent Lacey has returned home after a few months vacation south looking for a high spot.
“Bishop” McCartney took a trip to Winnipegosis hunting his carriage. “Bejiggered if they get it again,” says the Bishop.
Nat Little has returned from a week’s visit to the States.
Our Mowat friend seems surpassed to see a gasoline boat about the size of a coffee pot, go from Winnipegosis to Lake Dauphin and return, and pats himself on the back, as its the dredge that did the trick. Why good sized boats loaded with freight passed up and down the Mossey, fifteen and twenty years ago.
Mrs. Wm. King who has been visiting at Vancouver and California. She says the Fork looks more like home.
D. Kennedy has purchased another “gee gee” for his delivery wagon. Just see the dust fly.
Duck shooting is the order of the day. It’s hard on the feathers.
Rev. H.H. Scrase has returned from a visit to Dauphin and Sifton.
Thomas Shannon has been treating fall wheat for the farmers for seed and several have commenced sowing it.
We are informed some one is looking for a schooner to find the levels after the storm and he is not alone. There’s schooners and schooners.
Lost or strayed, the minutes of three or four council meetings.
Teacher, “What is it Tommy.” “Dad says we will get them all right if we had an assistant. We must not expect too much after such an electric storm. It’s so depressing.”
John Clements and family of Dauphin, arrived to take off his crop in the Chase farm.
Nat Little has put on a new wagon for delivering cream at the station.
The planer has started up again, and Billy Williams is making the shavings fly.

1912 Sep 12 – Sifton

Stephen Kosy’s stable was struck by lightening last Thursday. There were in the stable, a team of horses, harness and fifty hens. Fortunately the horse broke the board and ran out but the harness and hens were burned. Stephen had his stable insured.
On the same date Hnat Skarnpa’s stable was burned, lightening being the cause.
The harvest has been checked for a few days by bad weather.
Four of our well-known citizens have formed a company and will build a big store. Our Fedor of Blue Store does not like to see any more stores in own. He would rather buy out Pinkas and have the while business to himself.
The rumour is abroad that in a short time some of the Ruthenians intend to organize a co-operative store. Building is to begin next week.
Thos. Ramsay is busy building a new postoffice and boarding house.
Paul Wood has bought three lots in block one from Nicola Haschak.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 26 – 1910

1910 May 26 – Sentenced to Three Years

John Demoria, the young half-breed who was arrested by Constable Hunking at Dauphin last week for housebreaking, was tried before Geo. O. Bellamy, P.M. on the charge and found guilty. He was sentenced to three years in the reformatory at Portage la Prairie, where he was taken on Saturday morning.

1910 May 26 – Fork River

A Conservative meeting was held last Wednesday in D.F. Wilson’s office.
H.P. Nicholson of Dauphin, visited here last Friday.
R. Hunt from Dauphin paid us a visit last week.
Mr. and Mrs. Cooper from Brantford, came up last Friday’s train.
Miss Finch and Miss C. Bailey paid Winnipegosis a visit last Friday.
Mayor Sparling of Dauphin was up here last week looking over some farms.
The Armstrong Trading Company of Winnipegosis will shortly open up an up-to-date store in this village.
Mrs. C. Smith and family who have been residing here for two years left this week for Calvin, North Dakota.
The Mossey River Municipality held a meeting at Winnipegosis last Saturday when some important business was done.
A very important Orangemen’s meeting was held in the Orange Hall last Wednesday when four of the members were advanced to the Royal Scarlet Chapter. Seven gentlemen from Dauphin came up and a very pleasant time came to a close in the early morning.

1910 May 26 – Winnipegosis

A very impressive memorial service for Edward VII was held on Friday, May 20th in the Presbyterian Church. Previous to the service in the church, the children of the day school under the charge of Reeve Grenon and Mr. Shannon paraded the streets en route to the church. The congregation was a large one and the service was conducted by Rev. H.H. Scrase (English Church minister). A brilliant address on the life and character of our late King was given by the Rev. W.E. Rowan (Methodist minister) and was highly appreciated. The Rev. Mr. McKay (Presbyterian minister) also took part in the service. The Dead March in Saul was impressively rendered on the organ by Miss McArthur.
The Quarterly Board of the Methodist Church was held on Friday evening under the chairmanship of the Rev. A.E. Smith of Dauphin, the chairman of the District. All the departments of the church work were reported to be in a flourishing condition, and a hearty invitation to remain as minister of the church for another year was extended to the highly esteemed minister, Rev. W.E. Rowan. Mr. Rowan’s acceptance of the invitation gave great satisfaction to the members of the Board.
On Tuesday the 24th the ladies held a picnic for the purpose of raising funds to procure a baseball outfit. A good time was enjoyed by everyone and the baseball enthusiasts will at once organize and get the game started.
C.F. Stewart, who was spending a few days in town returned to Dauphin Monday.
H.W. Grenon has built and opened up a poolroom and tobacco store.
Tag-day, the ladies were kept quite busy all day, the result of their untiring efforts being about $100.
McArthur’s boats returned from the north bringing in a raft of about 540,000 feet of lumber.