Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 27 – 1913, 1919

1913 Nov 27 – Given Two Months

Peter Pandro, a Galician from the Fork River district, appeared before P.M. Munson on Friday, charged with stealing a gold watch from W. Lawson, with whom he had been working. Pandro acknowledged the theft and was sentenced to two months in jail at Portage la Prairie.

1913 Nov 27 – Had Nose Broken

A spread rail near Kamsack threw two cars of a freight train off the track on Wednesday and delayed traffic for several hours. Brakeman John McRae, of this town, had his nose broken in the accident.

1913 Nov 27 – Fork River

Miss Alice Clark, of Dauphin, is spending a shot time here among her friends.
John Mathews left for Winnipegosis, having taken a position with Frank Hector, storekeeper.
N. Slobojan, Mowat Centre, is a visitor to Dauphin on business.
Messrs. Forst and Howitson and others took in the dance at Winnipegosis on Thursday night and report a whale of a time, never to be forgotten.
Mr. and Mrs. Gordan Weaver, of Winnipegosis are spending the weekend at the home of T.N. Briggs.
Fred. King and S. Bailey returned from a trip north and report the fishing town exceptionally quiet.
“Say, Mike, run over to the store and get us a dozen fresh eggs while we unload.” Arriving at the store he shouted back: “Pat, there’s only eleven eggs and Biddy’s on the nest. Hold the train a minute.” Then biddy flies off and Mike arrives with the dozen eggs all O.K., and off we go for Dauphin. Next.
Fred. Cooper has arrived home from a few days vacation at Dauphin.
Wm. Stonehouse, carpenter and contractor, has returned home after spending the summer with the A.T. Co., at Winnipegosis and South Bay.
The members of the S.S. and Women’s Auxiliary of All Saints’ Church held a meeting on Wednesday and arranged for a Xmas tree and programme to be held in Dec. 23rd.
Mr. Elliot, Methodist student of Winnipegosis, is spending the weekend visiting members of his congregation.
Alfred Snelgrove has returned home from Yorkton, where he has been the last two months with his threshing outfit.
Dunc. Briggs and MAX King have left for the north to draw fish for the Armstrong Trading Co.

1913 Nov 27 – Winnipegosis

Howard Armstrong, of Fork River, who was under remand on a charge of stealing, was brought up before the magistrate, Mr. Parker, on Monday, the case being dismissed for want of evidence, a verdict that was popular with all.
Miss Spence proceeded to Dauphin hospital on Monday, having to be conveyed to the station on an ambulance.
The government school inspector, conducted by Coun. Tom Toye, made a visit to all the schools in the district during the past week.
Mr. De Rouchess, of Pine Creek, has suffered a great loss through having some thousands of skins confiscated by the Inspector visiting his store.
A dance was given by the bachelors in conjunction with the spinsters (who supplied the refreshments) of this town on Monday night. Everybody enjoyed themselves immensely, the “turkey trot” and “bunny hug” being in great demand, the dancing lasting up to the wee sma’ hours of the morning. The music was supplied by Mr. Watson, being ably assisted by his wife. Noticeably among the guests present were Constable Hunkings, Messrs. Cunliffe, Paddock, Morton and Watson and their respective wives with Misses Stevenson, Goodman and many others. Numerous “boys” from Fork River took the opportunity of enjoying themselves on this occasion.
I. Foster, reeve of Landsdowne, near Galdstone, visited us on Wednesday for the purpose of buying a couple of car loads of cattle, but found that the surrounding country had been gleaned by previous operators who already left.
Mr. Graffe has taken over the Lake View hotel livery stable and no doubt this caterer for equine wants will make a success of it, as “Billy” Ford, proprietor of the hotel, has gone to considerable expense in renovating the barn and being a genial “Mine host” with a charming personality, both man and beast will be well provided for.
“Billy” Walmesley, pool room proprietor, intends standing as councillor for ward 4 in the coming election, and as he is greatly respected, it is hoped that everybody will give the support due to him, as he is an old timer, always to the front in all kinds of sport and making it his business to push forward the interests of the town on every occasion. “Billy” should do well in the council chamber as he has a most varied and vigorous style of speech.
Captain Reid, of Shoal River, is visiting the town after a considerable absence.

1913 Nov 27 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Nov. 21.
Frank Hechter was the delegate to the District Grain Growers convention at Dauphin. Frank is now a horny handed son of toil.
The snowstorm on Monday has put a stop to the stock grazing in the open.
The ratepayers from this section will attend the next meeting of the council, on Dec. 5th, in a body. This will mean a road to the school.
Mr. Wenger is contemplating holding an auction sale at an early date.

1913 Nov 27 – Ethelbert

Mr. A. McPhedran and wife have returned from Fort William, where they were visiting relatives.
Mr. Leary has been to Winnipeg interviewing the Returned Soldiers Pension Board.
Miss McLennan was a visitor to the hospital here this week.
The Victory Loan in Ethelbert sure was a success. The allotment was $25 000, but over $45 000 was subscribed. The canvassers did good work.

1913 Nov 27 – Winnipegosis

Monday, Dec. 22nd, at the Rex Hall, is the date fixed for the Union Sunday School Christmas tree and entertainment. The scholars are engaged upon the preparation of a comedy entitled “Santa Claus and the Magic Carpet,” and a good miscellaneous program.
Mr. F.G. Shears returned on Saturday from a trip to Dauphin.
The winter fishing season opened on the 20th.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 4 – 1913

1913 Sep 4 – Ethelbert

An extraordinary general meeting of the shareholders of the Ruthenian Trading Company, Limited, was held at two o’clock at Ethelbert, on the 28th day of August. The president, Mr. M. Pacholok was in the chair. The president explained that the meeting had been called for the purpose of considering the question of increasing the capital stock of the company from ten thousand dollars to twenty-five thousand dollars by the creation and issue of six hundred new shares of the par value of twenty-five each. The matter was then left to the meeting for discussion. After a long discussion a by-law of the directors passed the 26th day of July, authorizing the increase of capital of the company from ten thousand dollars to twenty-five thousand dollars was sanctioned and confirmed by special resolution of the shareholders.
The Ruthenian Literary Society, under the leadership of K.F. Slipetz, its president, arranged a programme of giving lectures to the farmers. The subjects that are taken up are: organization, economy and mixed farming. We shall be very glad to get particulars and, if possible, regulations of farmers’ societies. This need is very necessary for us. We, as farmers, don’t want to be left behind the other farmers but must struggle or the survival of the fittest for existence.
Mr. Hill, an Ethelbert pioneer, is renewing acquaintance here. We are always gad to see old friends.
Some of the prominent Ruthenian farmers at Garland are forming a company with the idea of buying up the other business there.
The construction of a Greek Catholic Church at Garland has been postponed on account of some members objecting to the transfer of the said church under the name of Bishop Budka.

1913 Sep 4 – Fork River

Mrs. Avid Briggs, of Brandon, is visiting at the home of Mr. and Mrs. T.N. Briggs on the Mossey River.
Mrs. Potts, of Neepawa, returned home after a week’s vacation with Mrs. D. Robinson, of Mowat.
Miss Gilanders and brother, of Brandon, returned home after spending a short time with Mr. and Mrs. Joe Lockhart.
John Mathews and Fred Storrar are assisting Mr. T.N. Briggs, the bonanza farmer, with his harvest.
We are pleased to hear the town orator has recovered from his recent illness. Some of the fair sex remarked he was becoming thin as its hard on the constitution sitting on the sidewalk without a sunshade.
Mrs. Fred Cooper and Miss Alice Godkin are visiting with friends at Dauphin.
Alfred Snelgrove, who has been on the dredge at Regina all summer, returned home and is of the opinion there are worse places than Fork River.
We notice the hum of Tom Shannon’s and King Bros.’ machinery threshing a few loads of grain. Fred Cooper and Billy Williams have their outfits ready to start as soon as the grain is fit.
Dr. Ross and W.H. Morison, of Dauphin, passed through here with their automobile on Tuesday. The roads north of here were so soft that they had to return and take the train from Fork River to Winnipegosis. The appropriation money for the north road must have miscarried.
Jack Angers, of Winnipegosis, spent the week-end in town renewing acquaintances.
W. Howitson, of Winnipegosis, is clerking in A.T. Co. sore at this point for a time.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 27 – 1914

1914 Aug 27 – Latest From Line of Battle

LONDON, Aug. 27 – Late reports to War office state that desultory fighting is occurring along French frontier.

ON EVE GREAT BATTLE

Germans are ready to strike great blow. The troops are fast advancing and one of the biggest battles of the war is in sight.

RUSSIANS ADVANCING

The Russians are advancing in German territory and clearing everything before them.

1914 Aug 27 – Volunteers Get Right-Royal Send-Off

It was truly a great night in Dauphin, the night before the volunteers went away. It was Friday night last, the boys leaving on Saturday morning. The people of the town were out in full force and their right royal patriotism was most marked. The reality of war is brought home to us when “Our Own” are called out for service and hence a subdued depth of pent up emotion which is not found on other occasions. The Band did their part well, and what could be done without the band at such a time as this.

Great Cheering

A crowd of enthusiastic men, joined by a host of boys, well supplied with Union Jacks, some Belgian and French flags, formed in procession headed by band and red-coats. Everywhere, from doors and windows, hotels and street corners, the volunteers were lustily cheered.

Meeting Held in Open

The procession reached the town hall about 9 o’clock. The ball had been packed for nearly an hour and the enthusiasm inside was no less than on the street. Patriotic music was indulged in led by Prof. Minnaert. Only a small portion of the crowd being able to hold the public meeting and send-off for the boys in the op. When all gathered in front and around the corner, as large a crowd as was ever seen in Dauphin, surrounded the group of thirty-two men, whom we have the honour of sending to the front. Again the Band did its part well and between the addresses gave without stint, sweet patriotic strains.

Farewell Speeches

The chairman, Mayor Bottomley, took his place on the front steps of the town hall and everyone, except the volunteers, stood up for over an hour’s programme of music and speeches.
The speakers were Messrs. D.S. Woods, Munson, Wiley, Flemming, Bethell, Major Walker and Captain Newcombe.
The words spoken by all were in accord with Britain’s position and in a deep serious vein set forth the new grave situation in which Canada and the Empire stand today.
The Boys were recipients of a box of cigars each, some wholesome advice, heartiest congratulations, with affectionate hopes for a safe return.
It was an evening never-to-be-forgotten in Dauphin and the warmth of the farewell, the deep subdued feeling, was only surpassed on Saturday morning, when the train actually pulled out, all hats and handkerchiefs waving, all eyes wet, and the Band paying “God be With You Till We Meet Again.”

1914 Aug 27 – Praise For Dauphin Boys

W.J. Rawson, of Brandon, who was in town on Wednesday, told a Herald representative, that the Dauphin contingent had the best appearance of any of the troops assembled at that point for transpiration to Valcartier.

DAUPHIN.
Lieut. A.E.L. Shand (Albert Edward Lawrence Shand, 1891)
Sergt. G. Fraser
Sergt. W. Code
Sergt. T.D. Massey
Corp. D. Wetmore (David Lee Wetmore, 1884, 346)
Corp. N.C. Chard (Norman Cyril Chard, 1894, 240 SGT)
Corp. C.S. Wiltshire
Pte. H.A. Bray (Harold Arthur Bray, 1891, LT)
Pte. H.H. Moore
Pte. A.J. Pudifin (Arthur James Pudifin, 1885, 322)
Pte. Garth Johnston (Garth Fraser Johnston, 1890, 718076)
Pte. Neville Munson (Neville Munson, 1892, 313)
Pte. W.S. Gilbert (William S. Gilbert, 1874, 265)
Pte. C. Curtis
Pte. H. Izon (Hubert Izon, 1885, 280)
Pte. S. Laker (Stephen Laker, 1895, 13)
Pte. J.E. Greenaway (Joseph Edward Greenaway, 1885, 269)
Pte. A.J. Johnson
Pte. D. Powell
Pte. E. Sonnenberg (Edward Sonnenberg, 1892, 335)
Pte. E. Classen
Pte. E. Herrick (Eliot Charles Herrick, 1887, 275)
Pte. E. McNab
Pte. J.E. Lewis (John Edmund Lewis, 1893, 27501)
Pte. C.S. Van Tuyll
Pte. D. McVey (Devon McVey, 1892, 302)
Pte. A.E. Pickering (Albert Edward Pickering, 1892, 320)
Pte. A. Redgate (Albert Redgate, 1889, 324)
Pte. F.A. Mathews
Pte. H. Pollard
Pte. T.A. Collins (Thomas Arthur Collins, 1887, 245)
Pte. Frank Norquay (Frank Norquay, 1891, 318)
Pte. F. Jauncey (Fredrick Jauncey, 1890, 282)

WITH 99TH BRANDON.
Pte. C. Lane
Pte. P. Mickleburg (Ernest Michleburgh, 295)
Pte. Jackson
Pte. W. Bubb (William Charles Bubb, 1884, 2140)

WINNIPEGOSIS.
Pte. E. Morris
Pte. A. Martin
Pte. A. McKerchar

SWAN RIVER.
Pte. D. Stringer (Dixon Stringer, 1890, 24178)

ROBLIN.
Corp. J.B. Shearer (John Buchanan Shearer, 1892, LT)
Pte. J. Hallam (Jonathan Hallam, 1878, 46973)
Pte. W. Day
Pte. W. Armstrong
Pte. R.J. Ritchie
Pte. F. Burt
Pte. A. Hay
Pte. E. Simpson

1914 Aug 27 – Fork River

Mr. Vivian Hafenbrak and bride have returned from a month’s visit to Ontario. Mr. H. is of the opinion the crops in the Dauphin district are ahead of anything along the route he travelled.
It is said, “War is Hell.” So is the price of binder twine, when there is a difference of 1 to 4 cents on the same quality. How the war should affect twine now that was made in 1912 we give it up and leave it to other fellows to explain. Even the motorcar dare is doubted.
The fall fishing has started, so we are told, and while wages are lower our bonnie fishermen are head singing. “Rule Britannia” and “Britons never shall be Slaves.”
Some of our ratepayers are enquiring who is running the Mossey River School affairs at present.
Jack Chipla left for Winnipeg to work on the C.P.R.
D.F. Wilson returned from a trip west on business and reports crops light out there.
A. Snelgrove and Pat Powers have left for Yorkton for the threshing season.
Mrs. Johnston, of Port Arthur, is a visitor at the home of Mrs. Kennedy.
Mr. Clarkson, Winnipegosis, passed through en route for Yorkton.
The Winnipegosis contingent passed through here for the seat of war as happy as clams on their way to Dauphin.
Mr. Ramsay, of Sifton, paid the burgh a visit with a cattle buyer and is rustling a car of stock.

1914 Aug 27 – Winnipegosis

The fishing fleet has left for Spruce Island, a point about 40 miles north. There are between 15 and 20 boats engaged in the work. The catches so far are reported good.
Capt. Coffey arrived from Dauphin on Wednesday.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong was a late visitor.
To be or not to be, that is the great question. At the time of this writing the funds required to complete the school are not yet in sight. It is believed they are forthcoming but until they are the citizens are in a sate of doubt. The new school is needed that is one thing sure.
Architect Bossons, of Dauphin, was here on Saturday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 14 – 1913

1913 Aug 14 – Ethelbert

Captain (Mrs.) Tutte, of the Salivation Army, is visiting her mother, Mrs. A. Willey, for a few days.
Mrs. McVicar, formerly of Garland, now of Brandon, is renewing old acquaintances at Ethelbert, and is stating at the station agent’s home.
Mrs. McDonald of Fort William, youngest sister of J. McLean, is visiting old scenes hereabout.
Mrs. Rod Campbell, the oldest sister of Mrs. McPhedrian, is visiting relatives in this neighbourhood.
H. Brachman has been gazetted as J.P.
There is a fear amongst the famers that the copious rain may injure the crop prospects.
Great quantities of berries are being shipped east and west; more than 100 pails a day.
This is a great country for fruit, wheat, hay, eggs, and last but not the least in mosquitoes. They come and go in millions.

1913 Aug 14 – Fork River

Mrs. Walter Cooper, Sr., left for a two weeks’ vacation among friends at Dauphin.
Sam Bailey left for a week’s visit to his son Frank at Winnipeg.
James McDonald, assistance express agent, left for a well-earned vacation at Winnipeg.
Miss Pearl Wilson has left for Dauphin for a short visit.
Mrs. W. Williams returned from a week’s rest in the south.
J. Stewart, of North Lake, was in town lately and reports the roads out that way very bad.
Postmaster Kennedy and wife are off to Winnipeg to take in the stampede in company with the Mayor of Winnipegosis and several others from this point.
Miss Alice Godkin is spending a week with Mrs. Johnson, of Winnipegosis, with the Misses Kennedy.
Miss M. Nixon left for Winnipeg, after a month’s vacation here with friends.
St. John Butler, of Winnipegosis, has charge of the A.T. Co. store, during manager Kennedy’s absence.
Miss Chase, of Dauphin, who has been visiting with her grandmother, Mrs. R. Snelgrove for some time, has returned home.
Although the council passed a by-law to the effect that all stock was to be on the owners property during sunset and sunrise and not allowed to run at large, we find cattle and ponies running at all hours of the night, and in places it is unsafe to drive along the roads dark nights for fear of tumbling over them.
The heavy rains of this week have stopped the haying and road making for a short time.
Councillor Hunt let several contracts for roads to Contractor Briggs and others. We trust there will be an open fall so this work can be done.
John Mathews, electrician for the A.T. Co., is intending to go into the pork raising business as a side issue. We wish him all kinds of success as Jack’s a pretty good fellow.
Our esteemed friends, Fred. Storrar, has charge of the cream department and is giving good satisfaction.
Much interest is being taken in the baseball match between the married and single ladies which is to come off on the 13th.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 12 – 1913

1913 Jun 12 – Ethelbert

The last week or so of fine hot weather has made a great transformation; the trees and flowers are decked out in all their loveliness and Ethelbert now looks good for picnickers.
Two autos came from Gilbert Plains and had an ideal run.
I.J. Katz had his farm house raided whilst he was at Pelly by a dozen school boys whose ages ranged from 8 to 14. The magistrate had them and their parents before him, and made them pay for the damage and loss, and advised the parents to look after the boys better, and to use small willows as a corrective.
The post office has got a new coat of paint all round, steel grey and dark trimmings, and looks very well in its new dress.
The ??? train will visit Ethelbert on Monday, the 23rd, and it is proposed to hold a general picnic that day in its honour. A good attendance is expected.
A tennis club has been formed and a nice court marked out, and play for the summer has commenced.

1913 Jun 12 – Fork River

A concert was held in the Orange Hall under the auspices of the Methodist Church, which was a success, there being a large attendance.
Is not remarkable that if a horse or cow belonging to a farmer strays into the village they are about devoured by dogs. On the other hand if a farmer has a few bags of grain shipped in for seed, and if, it is left on the platform for a few hours the town horses are allowed to rip and tear them at will while the owners of these pests looks on and congratulate themselves that it is lawful for them to do so and pay no damages.
Mr. Skelpen and wife are visitors at the home of T.N. Briggs.
Jack Mathews has accepted a position with the Armstrong Trading Co. He comes direct from London, England.
Miss Sparling, of Dauphin, returned home after a few days’ visit with Mrs. C. Bailey on the Mossey.
Miss Weatherhead is spending the week-end at her home in Dauphin.
Mrs. Peter Ellis returned home from a short visit to her folks in Dryden, Ont.
Mrs. W. King, president of the W.A. and delegate to the W.A. convention, Winnipeg, returned home on Saturday.
H. Benner, of Dauphin, is busy renewing old acquaintances for a few days.
Wm. Northam was a visitor to the Lake Town.
Wm. King, registration clerk, returned from the north and reports mosquitoes in full force up that way.
D. Kennedy returned from attending the Masonic rally in Dauphin and reports a good time.
Messrs. Robinson and Briggs, contractors, are rushing things in the building line.
John Seiffert, manager of the A.T. Co. farms, was here inspecting the Snelgrove farm and to see about seeding it.