Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 11 – 1915

1915 Mar 11 – Found Dead in Bed

S.C. Powley, traveller for the firm of James Robertson & Son, of Winnipeg, was found dead in bed at the Kings Hotel on Saturday morning. Coroner Harrington was notified, and after making an examination, decided that an inquest was not necessary. Heart failure was stated to be the cause of death. Deceased was 20 years of age and single. The remains were sent east to Orillia, Ont. on Monday for interment.

1915 Mar 11 – Dauphin Soldier Dead

J.J. Bloomer (John James Bloomer, 1887, 136), private of the C.M.R. who enlisted at Dauphin, died of pneumonia at Brandon on Monday.

1915 Mar 11 – Fork River

Mr. Biggs, of Dauphin, was a visitor for a few days at the home of Mr. F. Wilson on the Mossey River.
F.B. Lacey, of Mowat, is a visitor to Winnipeg to interview the government re a generous grant to the municipality for 1915, which would be very acceptable.
Mr. D.F. Wilson is a visitor to the ‘Peg and will no doubt have a pleasant time.
Mr. Dan McLean is off for a trip south on important business.
Mr. Wiggins, travelling agent for the Winnipeg Steel Granary and Culvert Co., was here lately and appointed W. King agent for this district for 1915.
Mr. McCaulay, travelling agent for the Massey-Harris Co., appointed W. Stonehouse as their agent for Fork River. We should be able to sell him a tin hat on the head of this.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred. Cooper, who have been visiting with friends in Ontario during the last two months, returned home on Friday and are looking hale and hearty. Mr. c. states they had a pleasant time and were pleased to get back to Manitoba.
The roads are getting bare and everyone is buy hauling before the break up.
We hear it is rumoured that we are only to have trains Tuesdays and Fridays. This is Hell after giving them the railroad and paying them to run it. Three times a week is little enough.
In looking over the Mowat correspondence we notice the correspondent takes a Sifton writer to task re sickness. If the professor’s word is worth anything there has been considerable sickness and several deaths in the Wieden district. Then to be fair, why try to cover up these serious matters. It is only the way to keep a clean sheet of health in the community by calling a spade a spade. We do doubt the authorities are doing what they can.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 4 – 1915

1915 Mar 4 – Playing Joke and is Head

Swan River, Feb. 26 – J. Hoey, a homesteader living near here, is dead as the result of playing the leading part in a practical joke. He was at some distance from his shack when he saw his chum come out. He thought it would be a good joke to imitate a wolf and see what happened. He crouched down low and began to howl like a wolf. The other man immediately got his rifle and shot. The bullet struck Hoey in the thigh. He was rushed to the hospital, where the leg was amputated. The shock, however, was too much and he died shortly after.

1915 Mar 4 – Thought He Had to Carry a Broom

A Galician seeing so many on the streets this week carrying brooms, asked a citizen if this was a new war regulation. He was jocularly told it was. The man then went into a store and bought a broom and proudly walked up Main Street with the “weapon” elevated over his shoulder at 45 degrees.

1915 Mar 4 – Fork River

Mr. G. O’Neil, of Mowat, is off on a visit to Rainy River.
Miss S. Lacey has returned from a few weeks’ visit with friends at Rainy River.
Mr. Munro and daughter, of Winnipeg, are spending a short time with Mr. and Mrs. A. Hunt.
Mrs. R. McEachern spent a few days at the Lake Town lately visiting he sister, Mrs. E.J. Morris.
J. Denby and Tom Sanderson, of Winnipegosis, paid this burgh a visit on business and are looking hale and hearty after their winter up the lake fishing.
Mr. Steede, lay reader, paid a visit to Sifton in connection with church work last week.
Mr. Wm. Howitson have a dance to his many friends on Friday night in the hall. A very good time was spent.
W. King returned from attending the 43rd annual session of the Provincial Grand Orange Lodge of Manitoba at Winnipeg, on Friday. He reports the largest meeting in the history of the lodge. Arrangements were made for entertaining the Triennial Council of Ireland and the Grand Lodge of British North America next summer.
Reeve Lacey and D.F. Wilson are attending the Trustees’ Convention at Winnipeg this week.

1915 Mar 4 – Sifton

Mr. James McAuley and Mr. Eberby of the Massey-Harris Co., were visitors in town last week.
Sid Coffey was in our midst last week and gave a good show with is moving pictures, but unfortunately there was a very poor attendance. Cheer up, “Sid,” better luck next time.
Mr. Oliver Abraham has been busy hauling wheat to the elevator for the last few days. He is putting about two carloads through the elevator. We trust he will be successful in getting a top price as the wheat is of good quality.
There was half a carload of cattle shipped out of here this week. We would like to know what has become of Robt. Brewer this last week or two. Surely his smiling face would be welcomed back again.
Mr. Walters, Mr. Kitt and Mr. Onlette, of this burgh, visited the Grain Growers Association concert and dance at Fairville last Friday and report having had a good time.

1915 Mar 4 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. J.P. Grenon is in Winnipeg undergoing an operation.
J. Denby, Wm. Denby, Sr., and W. Johnson, are Winnipeg visitors this week.
Mr. Chas. Stewart, of Dauphin, was in town on business, and left on Friday’s train.
Government officials, Sweny and Taylor, were here on Friday inspecting the works.
Mrs. Jack Denby has been on the sick list for a few days, but is around again.
Mrs. Theo Johnston left on Monday for Dauphin to visit Mr. and Mrs. King.
Mr. Ed. Morris left for Dauphin on Friday’s train.
Mrs. Wm. Williams, of Fork River, is a visitor in town.
Mr. and Mrs. Himie Cohen, of Winnipeg, are visiting Mr. and Mrs. F. Hechter this week.
Jim McInnes had a run for his life on Friday evening. A call was made to the rink that there was a deuce of a rumpus at the hotel, and, of course, Jim can home on the bound to settle the dispute, but to his surprise he found about 25 o 40 lads and lassies waiting for him and Mrs. McInnes in parlour. On their entering the brunch demanded the dining room cleared out, which was done in short order. It being Mr. McInnes’ birthday a dance was enjoyed till the wee sma’ hours of the morning. Jim has not given his age away yet, imitating the ladies in this respect.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 13 – 1913

1913 Feb 13 – Baran Committed For Murder

The adjourned preliminary trial of John Baran, under arrest for the murder of Constable Rooke, was concluded on Saturday. Magistrate Munson remanded the prisoner to Portage la Prairie, to stand his trial at the next criminal court on a charge of murder.
The court was called to order at eleven o’clock, the court house being crowded by a throng who were anxious to hear the outcome of the trial.
The prisoner had to be assisted into the court by two officers and appeared in a very weak condition. Later he fell from his chair to the floor, where he was allowed to lie during the trial.
Dr. Harrington gave evidence as to his attendance on Constable Rooke, and stated death to have been caused by the bullet wound, and resultant weakness.
When the charge was read the prisoner declined to make any statement. Bertram Ryan, for the defence, admitted that Baran had fired the shot which killed Constable Rooke, but pleaded justification on a plea of provocation, claiming Baran could not have known it was an officer of the law who was demanding entrance and then breaking in the door of his house, and that Baran had a right to defend his home and had fired the shot with the intention only of frightening away whoever was forcing his door. He asked to have the charge at least modified to one of manslaughter.
In passing sentence, Magistrate Munson severely criticized the past character of the prisoner and had no hesitation in committing him on a charge of murder to stand his trial at the Portage spring assizes.

1913 Feb 13 – Salt Wells to be Worked

That there is abundance of salt in the Lake Winnipegosis region is well known. For years the springs there have been running freely with brine and thousands of tons of the best salt going to waste each year. It is now proposed to tap the springs and install machinery to reduce the brine and manufacture the output into salt for various uses. The quality of the salt, after it has gone through a purifying process is reported by those who have made experiments with it, to be of the highest grade. It is probable that a salt reducing plant will be built at Winnipegosis town. The salt can be brought down the lake in its raw state and later manufactured into various grades to suit the market demand. During the past three months three entries were made at the Dominion Lands office here for mines and as the capital to develop them is already assured the enterprise will undoubtedly be established.

1913 Feb 13 – Section Foreman Loses His Life

Harry Mushynski, section foreman for the C.N.R. at Pine River lost his life on Saturday in a peculiar manner. The pipes at the water tank froze up and Mushynski and another man descended into the well with a pot of live coals to thaw them out. When the two men got down the well the gas from the pot became too strong for them and Mushynski was overcome and fell into the water and was drowned. His companion managed to get out of the well. Coroner Harrington held an inquest on Mushynski on Sunday and the jury rendered a verdict in accordance with the above facts.
Mushynski was highly spoken of by Supt. Irwin as a faithful employee of the company. He was 28 years of age and leaves a wife and two children.

1913 Feb 13 – Fork River

Howard Armstrong left for a trip up the lake teaming.
Herman Godkin, one of Dauphin’s energetic real estate agents, is spending the weekend at W. Williams.
C.E. Bailey and Wm. King returned from attending the county L.O.L. meeting at Dauphin.
Pat Powers, who has been running a threshing outfit at Winnipegosis, returned and is renewing acquaintances.
Henry Benner left here with a car of cows and young cattle for his ranch at Lloydminster.
Professor G. Weaver of East Bay, passed through here en route to the North Pole to lecture on diversified farming, etc.
Mr. and Mrs. C. White, of Winnipegosis, were visitors at D. Kennedy’s on Sunday.
Mrs. Theo. Johnson is visiting her daughter, Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Mr. and Mrs. Cameron, of Neepawa, returned home after spending a few weeks with A. Cameron at Mowat Centre.
Mrs. Rice, teacher of North Lake School, was in town on business lately.
Sid Howlett and family have returned from the north end of the lake, where he spent the winter fishing and reports fishing good. He is going out on his homestead at Million.
“Say, Pat, it seems too bad the Mowat correspondent cant’s get his proper rest lately.” “What’s the matter now Mike?” “Well, he says the blooming politicians at Ottawa will keep haggling over the $35,000,000 Borden is sending to the dear old mother country after the assistance she has given us financially and otherwise for years. You remember a short time ago in the Press the M.C. wanted and howled for an all-Canadian navy. Now he turns around and poses for peace and spend the money in P.O. and roads.” Pat, “Well, I prefer it in Dreadnoughts as we have had enough of the sort of roads he has been instrumental in dishing up to us the last two or three years. I wonder which way he will jump next.” Mike, “Don’t be too hard on him, chure you know he handled the Liberal cheque book for years and there is a few blank forms left and our friend expected to be Admiral of Sir Wilfy’s dinky navy, but the election knocked that into a cocked hat and the blank cheques are no use now and the P.O. is like the elevator he twitted us about some time ago lost, strayed or stolen. When dear T.A. got licked we lost our telegraph office here and now we are getting the peace racket put up to us. Now someone has got to the end of their rope.” “Say, Pat, did yees notice divil a word does our Liberal friends print or say regarding the dredge contract let by the late Liberal government and that is being looked into by Borden.” “Oh, that’s a horse of another color.” M.C. stop grouching.
Wm. Amos, of Deloraine, travelling agent for the Ontario Wind Engine and Pump Co., was a visitor at Wm. King’s.
Miss Lizzie Clark paid a short visit to her parents here.
J. McAulay, traveller for the Massey-Harris Co., stopped over to see D. Kennedy on business for that firm.
Service will be held in All Saints’ Anglican Church every Thursday evening at 8 o’clock during Lent and next Sunday, Feb. 16, at 3 o’clock, D.D. at 2 o’clock.
Geo. Dickason, of Dauphin, is around soliciting patronage for the Laurentia Milk Co., at Neepawa, and offers these prices till Mar 1st. $2.50 per hundred lbs, of sour cream; thirty-seven cents per pound of butter fat; sweet cream; forty-two cents per pound butter fat.
Our genial friend, Andrew Powers, is wearing a broad smile these days owning to the arrival of a new baby girl and Bob Rowe is also the happy father of a little baby girl. We wish them both the best of luck.
We notice in the correspondence from our Mowat friend in the Press of last week’s issue some very sensational items, more especially the one referring to so much grouching at outside points on account of the high cost of living and would like to say the prices quoted are far from correct. We always were under the impression that our Mowat friend was at all times ready to advertise this district at its truth worth and endeavor to get more land settled up, but by the remarks referred to we are at a loss to know just what is meant by this sarcasm and would refer him to some time ago and his remarks regarding the loss of the late P.O. at Oak Brae to the district and the damage it would do to this part of Manitoba in the way of getting this land settled up. For the benefit of our Mowat friends and the public in general we would like to give the correct prices of the products of the farm and forest at Fork River today. He quotes wheat 50c to 60c, barley 25c, potatoes 35c, pork 9c, beef 6c, seasoned wood $1.65, greed wood, $1.25. Now the correct prices of these are as follows: (Elevator prices), wheat 89c, 88c, ble, according to grades. Barley 32c and 40c being offered by outside parties and refused. Green pole wood $1.75 a cord and season poplar $1.75; butter 30c, eggs 30c, pork 10c, beef 7c and 7 ½ in trade.
Council meets at Winnipegosis on Thursday, the 20th inst.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 11 – 1915

1915 Feb 11 – Death Under Suspicious Circumstance

Coroner Culbertson held an inquest on the remains of Pawlo Jura, which were found in the Duck Mountain, at Ethelbert on Wednesday. The verdict of the jury was that Jura came to his death under suspicious circumstances, and the jury request that further investigation be made. Wm. Barrie was foreman of the jury.

1915 Feb 11 – Selected to Fill Vacancies

The following twenty-five volunteers left on Friday for Winnipeg, where they will fill vacancies on the corps there caused by illness and death:
A. Wilson, R.D. Reeve, J.E. Welsh, T.M. Ray, J. Armstrong, W.C. Miltchell, R. Smith, P.E. Millard, W. Donaldson, W.E. Ridley, W.J. Hill, W. Miller, J.S. Blundell, W. McDonald, J. Nochol, W.J. Wallace, A. Baldwin, T.L. Rodway, I. Osman, B. Dilworth, R.E. Richards, P. Cowley, P. Boam, I. McGlashin, W. Munro.

1915 Feb 11 – “Winged Animals” at Ashville

R.J. Avison, the well-known farmer of Ashville district, was in town on Wednesday. He report people seeing aeroplanes and other “winged animals” in that part. From what we know of the people of that thriving district they would not be content to let other places get ahead of them in “seein’ balloons,” or anything else.

1915 Feb 11 – Mossey River Council

Meeting of the council held at Fork River, Monday, Feb. 1st, 1915. Councillor Hechter absent.
The clerk swore in the newly elected councillor for Ward 6, li. S.B. Reid.
The minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted as read.
Hunt-Yakavanka – Confirming by laws No. 107, sec.-treas. by-law.
Bickle-Yakavanka – Confirming by-laws 21 and 196, councillors’ fees and mileage.
A by-law appointing Dr. Medd health officer, at a salary of $50.00 was passed.
Hunt-Reid – That the councillors be instructed not to expend Ward appropriations or other funds on the municipal boundary roads without consulting the council.
Reid-Yakavanka – That the councillors Hunt, Bickle and Hechter be finance committee for 1915 and the Coun. Hunt be chairman.
Hunt-Bickle – That Councillors Reid, Yakavanka and Namaka be Public Works committee and the Coun. Reid be chairman.
Yakavanka-Namaka – That Councillors Reid, Hunt and Bickle be bridge committee and that Councillor Reid be chairman.
Communications were read from the Deputy Municipal Commissioner, the Red Cross Society, S. Hughes, M.P.P., Professor Black, the solicitor, the Rural Municipality of Dauphin and Ochre River municipality.
Hunt-Reid – That the secretary write the Municipality of Ochre River and express this council’s willingness to cooperate in the matter of a convention of the Northern Municipalities and that the reeve and Councillor Hechter be a committee to take up the matter.
Bickle-Reid – That a grant of ten sacks of flour be made to Siefat Mcushka and that the clerk purchase the flour where it can be obtained at the lowest price.
Namaka-Reid – That the accounts as recommended by the finance committee be passed.
Hunt-Reid – That if material and work can be obtained at a few months time the bridge committee be authorized to finish the boundary bridge between sections 5 and 6, tp. 29 rge. 18.
Bickle-Yakavanka – That the key of the council chamber at Winnipegosis be delivered to W.H. Hunking and that he keep the place in good condition and be responsible for the same.
Bickle-Hunt – That the reeve be appointed to go to Winnipeg and interview Mr. Hughes, M.P.P., and the Minister of Public Works regarding a grant to the Municipality for 1915.
Hunt – Reid – That W.H. Hunking be authorized to purchase two padlock and two pairs of blankets for use in the Winnipegosis lock-up.
A by-law was passed cancelling certain taxes.
Hunt-Namaka – That the council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the reeve.

1915 Feb 11 – Fork River

Mr. Shannon and daughter arrived from the east and are visiting at the home of Mr. Thos. Shannon, son of Mrs. Shannon.
Mr. Nat Little has returned from a trip to Brandon.
Mrs. Geo. Tilt is spending a few days on the homestead.
Mr. Wm. Russell has returned from Kamsack and is visiting at the house of his parents.
Ed. Morris and Max King have returned from their winter’s fishing up the lake and report a good season’s work.
L.E. Bailey, county secretary, and W. King, C.M., have returned from attending the L.O.L. annual meeting at Dauphin. Mr. King has filled the county master’s chair for five years and retired from that position satisfied that the order in the country is in a good healthy position.
There was a surprise party Friday night, the neighbours taking possession of the home of Mr. C.S. Bailey on the Mossey River. The visitors had a good time judging by the time they got home in the morning.
Mr. Steele, of Bradwardine, arrived here and has taken over this mission and will hold service on February 14th at Winnipegosis at 11 a.m., Fork River at 3 p.m. and Sifton at 8 p.m.
Mr. Green, lay reader of All Saints’ Anglican Church, Fork River, leaves for Winnipeg this week. He has been pining for the Sunny South and we wish him a pleasant journey to a warm climate.
A very pleasant time was spent by the young folks the other night at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Reid.
Mr. Wm. Howitson has been under the weather for the last week. We trust he will soon recover as this burgh will sure go broke without “Scott” to stir us up.
Mrs. K. McAulay and children, of Winnipegosis are visiting at the home of Mrs. P. Ellis.

1915 Feb 11 – Sifton

Jas. McAuley, the Massey-Harris collector, was in our midst last week.
Messrs. Baker and Kitt were visitors in town last week from Ethelbert, where they are drilling a well for the grist mill, and report that they are 105 feet down and no water, but we trust that by this time they have struck good supply of water.
The Catholic mission held a sacred concert on Sunday evening, which proved a great success.
The grist mill is running very steady these times.
Mr. Paul Wood received a carload of oats on Monday, which he is offering for sale, so there should not be a shortage of feed for a time now.
William Ashmore’s team took a jolly party of Siftonites out to a dance at West Bay School given by Mr. J. Adams. All report having a good time.
Business has been very quiet of late but we are looking forward to brighter times.

1915 Feb 11 – Winnipegosis

Mr. and Mrs. A. Meston returned last Friday from Minnesota.
Miss Jane Paddock, returned home from the west and says, “there is no place like the old burgh.”
James Fleming, from the Pas, spent the weekend with friend at South Bay.
Mammie Bickle entertained a few of her little friends at a birthday party.
Mrs. T. Morton, of Quill Lake, Sask., is visiting her son. Will, who has been very ill. We wish him a speedy recovery.
Tom Sanderson returned from the north last week.
Frank Hechter is a visitor to Mafeking this week.
Mrs. Theo. Johnston entertained ten of the pioneer ladies of Winnipegosis at a delightful tea in honour of Mrs. F. Morton, of Quill Lake.
Curling is the order of the day. A grand bonspiel is on. “Stoop her up,” is the by-word.