Today in the Dauphin Herald – April 24, 1919

Boys Plead Guilty to Robbery

On Sunday night, April 6th, the Clothes Shop, Mr. Benedickson’s store, was entered and a quantity of goods stolen. The matter was placed in Chief Bridle’s hands and he at once got busy with the result that two boys, about 17 years of age, were arrested at Wadena, Sask. The boys’ names are Fred Beach and Norman Clubb, and hail from Winnipeg. They were brought from Wadena on Tuesday and appeared before P.M. Hawkins on Wednesday, and pleaded guilty to the charge. They were remanded till Friday for sentence. The boys are known to the city police and their previous history is to be investigated. The most of the stolen goods were recovered.

G.W.V.A. Notes

A meeting of the above association was held on Thursday, April 17th, some 40 members being in attendance.
The question of a memorial for the fallen comrades was discussed by the comrades, and it was suggested that the memorial should take the shape of a home for the returned men, and that a committee be formed to confer with the memorial committee organized by the town.
It was moved by Comrade Armstrong, seconded by Comrade H. Harvey, “that this branch of the G.W.V.A. endorse the Imperial Veterans’ resolution, and request that the government take up the matter of insurance by the state for returned men who, owing to injuries received whilst in action, are at the present time unable to get insurance, or who have to pay excessive rates for such.
Moved by Comrade H. Harvey, seconded by Comrade Oliphant, that this branch endorse the resolution of the G.W.V.A. Winnipeg, and protest against the sect known as ‘Hutterites’ from being allowed to settle in this country.
A delegation was received from the Ladies’ Auxiliary, and arrangements made as to taking care of soldiers’ widows, who come to this town in connection with land, etc. It was decided that the auxiliary should provide rooms, as it was not considered that the G.W.V.A. rooms were suitable accommodation for ladies, and that they would be more comfortable in a separate house.

Mossey River Council

The council met at Winnipegosis on April 7th, all the members being present. The minutes of the previous meeting wee read and adopted.
Communications were read from the Children’s Hospital, Winnipeg; the solicitor, re passing of social legislation; R. Flett, re reduction of taxes; The Red Triangle Fund, R. Cruise, M.P., re Hudson’s Bay Railway; copies of letters from the weed commission, C.B. Martin, re seed grain, and Sawinski Bros., re car of plank.
Hunt-Reid – That in consideration of the large amount of money that has been expended in the buildings of the Hudson’s Bay railroad, and, further, very large amounts in construction of harbor accommodation on the bay, and, whereas, a comparatively small amount will be required to finish the railway and thus render the large expenditure useful; this council is therefore, of the opinion and most empathically recommends that the Hudson’s Bay railroad be completed as soon as possible, thus giving to Western Canada the benefits to be derived from it and for which it has waited so long. That a copy of this resolution be forwarded to Sir Thomas White.
Yakavanka-Namaka – That the council of the rural municipality of Mossey River hereby makes formal application to the Good Roads Board of the Province of Manitoba that the following roads within the municipality be brought under the provisions of “The Good Roads Act, 1914,” and amendments thereto;
Road from south boundary of the municipality, making connection with the Dauphin good road system; due north to the village of Fork River, and from that point north and easterly to the village of Winnipegosis.
Road from the village of Fork River due west to the western boundary of the municipality road from corner on Fork River-Winnipegosis road to west side of range 19, along township line between tps. 29 and 30. Also from corner on same road westerly two miles between tps. 30 and 31.
Road from n.w. corner 12-29-19, easterly six miles, thence south to Lake Dauphin and then following lake shore to south boundary of the municipality.
Road from Winnipegosis north-westerly through tp. 31, rge. 18, and continuing into tp. 31, rge. 19.
Road from Winnipegosis south-easterly through tp. 3, rge. 18, and continuing easterly across tp. rge. 17.
Hunt-Reid – That Coun. Paddock and Marcroft be a committee to inspect road northwest of Winnipegosis, and report what can be done in the matter of making it passable at net meeting.
Yakavanka-Namaka – That the municipal bank account be moved from the Bank of Ottawa, Dauphin, to the Winnipegosis branch of the same bank.
Yakavanka-Namaka – That the clerk write the rural municipality of Dauphin and ask its council of it is prepared to pass a bylaw similar to those passed for the last two years covering work on the boundary road between the two municipalities.
By laws authorizing a line of credit of $15,000, amending the collector’s bylaw by reducing the salary to $125 pre month, and a bylaw authorizing a vote of the ratepayers of the Mossey River School district to issue expenditures for the borrowing of $12,000 to purchase grounds and build and equip a school. The vote to be taken June 14th.
The council adjourned to meet at Fork River at the call of the reeve.

Winnipegosis

The regular monthly meeting of the Home Economic Society was held on Friday evening, April 18th, at 8 p.m., in the Union Church. It being Good Friday the musical part of the programme consisted of Easter hymns. Mrs. J.E. McArthur gave an excellent paper on “Ventilation and Well-Lighted Rooms,” and Mr. Hook spoke in his usual pleasing manner on the subject, “Associates for the Young,” bringing foremost in his speech the necessity of child training. Ten cent tea was served, proceeds in aid of the library fund, when the meeting was brought to a close by singing he National anthem.
The Home Economics Society library is open every Saturday from 3 o 5 p.m., in Mrs. Honchin’s ice cream parlor.
Mr. D.G. McAulay and family have moved from the farm into town and taken up residence in the house formerly owned by J. Alexander.
The executive of the Order of the Needle wish to thank all those who helped to make the bazaar on the evening of Monday, the 21st, so successful. Mr. J.R. Burrell and her assistants, Mrs. K. McAuley and Mrs. Thomas, are especially to be lauded for the efficient way in which they handled the tea room, which was very popular. Mr. Hamilton very kindly gave his time in arranging the booths, which were very prettily decorated by Mrs. Steele, Mrs. St. Amour, Mrs. J.E. McArthur and Mrs. J.A. Campbell. A number of ladies and gentlemen assisted on the programme of music for dancing after the booth closed. Mr. Ketchison acted as floor manager and as usual made things go. The receipts for the evening were $119.10. Paid out for working material $3.75, for decorations $1.40, cartage 75 cents, rent of hall $6; total $11.90. To be divided between Red Cross and Belgian Fund, $107.20.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – March 13, 1919

Flogging Advocated

The problem of dealing with the small boy who smokes is troubling many of the teachers, the members of the school board and even the members of the town council, which body, at its last meeting appointed Coun. Houston and Katz to cooperate with the trustees as to the best means of remedying this undesirable sate of affairs.

Flogging Advocated
A correspondent writes: “We hear a great deal about the small boy who goes to school smoking and having tobacco on his person and the regrets expressed that the trouble can’t be remedied. If these boys attended school in England they would soon be disciplined, and in no namby-pamby style either. They would simply be flogged, and if one application was not sufficient the second strapping would effect the cure. But, after all is the small boy to blame when he sees the bigger boys parading the streets smoking both pipe and cigarette? Perhaps now that we have a committee to investigate they will bring in a report which will offer suggestions concerning the big boy as well as the small boy as to the bad effects of tobacco on the developing youth.”

Memorial Committee Busy

Chairman W. Rintoul, of the memorial committee, states that progress is being made. No definite plans have been considered as yet. A suggestion that an up to date skating and curing rink be built as a “memorial” is meeting with much favor in some quarters. Some favor a “community building,” others a monument, and so forth.

Opening G.W.V. Club Rooms

The new club rooms of the Great War Veterans will be opened on Tuesday evening next, the 18th inst. There will be a short musical program at which Mayor Bowman will preside. Later there will be dancing and cards. Refreshments will be served. The McMurray orchestra will furnish the music. The public are invited to attend.

“Still” Operators Fined

For some time past there has been an increasing supply of what is known as “domestic’ manufactured liquor. The manufacture was exclusively in the hands of the foreign element. Almost any tin vessel from a teapot to a ten gallon can was improvised as a “still.” And despite the crudeness of the particles used to manufacture the “liquor” a fairly good brand is said, by those who sampled it, to have ben produced in some cases. But the promoters’ dreams of accumulating wealth in an easy manner, were destined to failure. Collector Ball was soon wise to the operation of the “stills” and with the assistance of the local police, rounded up three parties who were either operating or connected with the enterprises.
The parties were Mike Torharczuk, Fred Moranczuk and M. Silverman. Informations were laid under the Inland Revenue act, and they appeared before P.M. Hawkins on Monday and were found guilty. Torharczuk and Moranczuk were each $200 and costs, and Silverman $250 and costs.

War Bride to Arrive

The first war bride that is to come to Dauphin is expected to arrive about the first of next week. During the month of December Sergt. Harold Crowe was married to a young lady in London. The young couple sailed on the Grampian, which was due to arrive at Halifax on Wednesday.

Fork River

Pte. Eales and his war bride have arrived from overseas. They are visiting at the home of H. Pearson.
The manager of the Northern Lumber Co. was a recent visitor to our town. The company may open a lumber yard here.
Mr. Osborne, municipal auditor, is auditing the books of the municipality. When he is through we shall expect the council to have the report printed. This is the only way the ratepayers have of knowing how their money is being spent and the law directs that the report be published.
Mr. Martin, homestead inspector, was here last week in connection with the applications of returned soldiers for land.
The stork visited the home of H. Little last week and left a wee girlie.
Wm. King is visiting Dauphin and Winnipeg this week.
Jack Richardson has purchased a registered Holstein bull, having sold his old sire to Thos. Toye, of Bicton Heath.
The committee which is looking after the interests of the returned soldiers has been organized and is now composed as follows: Owen Pruder, S.L. Gower, A. Hunt, J. Shuchett, J.D. Robertson, Thos. Briggs, F. Cooper, and W. King, sec.-treasurer.

Ethelbert

At a well attended meeting of the Ukrainian farmers held at Ethelbert on March 1st, the following resolution were unanimously passed. Over $100 was collected at the gathering which will be devoted to assisting the returned men.

RESOLUTION NO. 1
1. Having experienced the hardship of the newcomer, we therefore wish to help the returned men to settle with their families on the land. We are ready to volunteer at any time to graciously help any returned soldier settling in our district on the land by offering at least one day’s work on his farm in plowing or doing any required improvements, and will also arrange to have his family and luggage brought from the station to his respective land.
2. We also wish to assure such newcomers that friendly and neighborly assistance will always be at their disposal and that such returned men shall not suffer an want or hardship of a beginner. Carried.

RESOLUTION NO. 2
That we, as one of the Dominion Communities of Canada, do express our belief and faith in the principle of the League of Nations which has recently come into being at the Peace Conference at Paris.
That while believing in the self interim nation of nationalities, we cordially support the idea of human brotherhood and the new international order expressed in its terms.
That we look to the League as the ultimate solvent of the barriers which have hitherto divided mankind and plunged them in recurring strife.
That we also believe the protection of customs tariff the most potent and evil of all the barriers against the unity of mankind must be broken down to insure the permanence of political peace and the continued effectiveness of the League.
That we hold the Farmers’ platform as adopted by the Grain Growers’ conventions recently held in the Provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, to be a welcome step in the direction of that universal free trade which must be chief buttress of a stable international order.
And also that we cordially support the other reforms contained in the same platform.

RESOLUTION NO. 3
That we wish that a committee be appointed whose duty it will be to help the returned men coming into our midst. Carried.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 24 – 1912, 1918

1912 Oct 24 – Typhoid Fever Outbreak

Typhoid fever has broken out among the school children at Winnipegosis and the school has been closed.

1912 Oct 24 – Fork River

J.H. Martinson, of Fort Rouge, Winnipeg, real estate agent, was here on business last week.
Alex. Cameron, of Mowat Centre, was a visitor to Dauphin on business a few days ago.
Mr. Sturdy, who has been all summer at the A.T. Co. store at Winnipegosis, is assisting Mr. Kennedy in the store here now.
Samuel Reid, returned home after a week’s holiday with friends at Brandon.
Mrs. A. Snelgrove and family spent a few days in Dauphin lately with friends.
J. Parker, of the Stark farm, has returned from a business trip to Winnipeg.
Captain Russell, of Sifton, was a visitor at D. Kennedy’s lately.
Miss Comber returned home after spending the summer at Selkirk.
Mr. Silverwood, of Dauphin, was in town for a short stay the guest of Wm. Williams, lumber merchant.
George Sumpton, of Dauphin, is here for a short stay with Mr. Snelgrove.
The railway traffic is getting so heavy on this line that it takes two locomotives to handle a train, especially when they take the side track for it.
The Press of October 17th refers to Macdonald election as a “Howling Farce” and has not got sand enough to print the exact majority.
F. Champion, of Cleveland, England, was here a few days ago in connection with a business transactions.
Harvest festival service at All Saints’ will be held in the church at 3 o’clock Sunday afternoon, Oct. 27th.

1918 Oct 24 – This Week’s Casualties

Pte. Lloyd Winters, Ashville, killed in action. (Lloyd Levi Winters, 1896, 2129348)
Lieut. Stewart Widmeyer, Dauphin, killed. (Stuart Robertson Widmeyer, 1895, 151343)
Pte. Arthur Day, Dauphin, gassed and wounded. (Arthur Archibald Day, 1896, 424013)
Pte. J.W. Lane, Dauphin, wounded. (James William Lane, 1879, 1000018)
Pte. Go.F. King, Dauphin, wounded. (George Francis King, 1891, 151775)
Pte. W.K. Goodman, Winnipegosis, wounded. (Wilbert Karl Goodman, 1894, 294203)
Pte. W.J. Bothwell, Makinak, wounded. (Wilfred James Bothwell, 1899, 2184456)
Pte. L. Ward, Grandview, wounded. (Lewis Ward, 1896, 2129152)
Pte. J. Lahaie, Makinak, wounded. (Joseph Lahaie, 1889, 291727)
Lance Corp. D. Stewart, Dauphin, wounded. (???)
Pte. E.L. Abrey, Dauphin, wounded. (Ernest Lincoln Abrey, 1889, 865837)
Pte. C.A. Blackmon, Ochre River, wounded. (Charles Alexander Blackmon, 1897, 1001157)

1918 Oct 24 – Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Fair

The Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair was held on Oct. 10th. The weather was perfect but this militated against the attendance for threshing was going on. The attendance of children was good, still some of the schools were very poorly represented owing to the rush of work on the farms. The lack of teachers for some of the schools and the many changes in teachers in others, was a serious handicap to the welfare of the club during the past years.
Lawrence Rowe won the Bank of Commerce prize for the vest pair of pigs at either the Fork River or Winnipegosis fairs, with a very creditable pair of Yorkshires.
It is to be hoped that the club will receive greeter interest from the parents in the coming year and so encourage the children in this work.

PRIZE LIST.
The following is a list of prize winners at the fair:
Grain growing:
Wheat sheaf – Fred Jager 1st, Peter Zaplitney 2nd.
Wheat, 20 lbs – Fred Jager 1st, Peter Zaplitney 2nd.
Rye sheaf – Albert Janowski 1st.

Stock, Calves:
Dairy – Donald McEachern 1st, Arthur Jamieson 2nd, Dave Nowosad 3rd.

Calves:
Beef – Bob Williams 1st, Kate Williams 2nd, Steve Beyko 3rd, Bill Williams 4th.

Pigs:
Pair – Lawrie Rowe 1st, Alice Nowosad 2nd.

Poultry:
Pen of Barred Rocks (3) – Kate Williams 1st, Lawrie Rowe 2nd.
Pen Buff Orpingtons – Dave Nowosad 1st, Stanley Lundy 2nd.
Pen White Leghorns – Stanley Benner.
Pen Black Minorcas – Mike Borowski 1st, Bob Williams 2nd.
Pen Brown Leghorns – Bill Williams 1st.
Pen White Rocks – Arthur Jamieson 1st.

Gardening: Half bushel potatoes – Rosie Sowenski 1st, Alex. Zaplitney 2nd, Nicola Poctylo 3rd, Annie Sowinski 4th.
Six carrots – Charlie Jager 1st, Viola Rowe 2nd, Lawrie Rowe 3rd.
Six turnips – Lawrie Rowe 2nd.
Six beets – Viola Rowe 2nd.
Two cabbages – Annie Beyko 1st, Mike Borowski 2nd, Charlie Jager 3rd.
Pumpkins – Nellie Kolokicvk 1st.
Onions – Alice Nowosad 1st, Charlie Jager 2nd.

Cooker:
Loaf of bread – Viola Rower 1st, Annie Beyko 2nd.
Buns – Viola Rowe 1st.

Sewing – Viola Rowe 1st, Annie Beyko 2nd.
Patching – Viola Rowe 1st, Emily Strasdin 2nd.
Fancy work – Emily Strasdin 1st.
Canning – Viola Rowe 2nd.
Longest ??? thistle root – Peter Zaplitney 1st, Fred Jager 2nd.
Woodwork – Bob Williams 1st, Dave Nowosad 2nd, Belle Williams 3rd.
Ducks – Sophie Beyko 1st.
Butter – Rosie Sowskine 1st, Mary Mieke 2nd.
Knitting – Emily Strasdin 1st.
Scribblers – Yumtaska 1st, Annie Chornoboy 2nd, Nellie Karwstski 3rd.

Writing:
Grade I – Horace Thompson 1st, Clara Dewberry 2nd.
Grade II – Ivor Humphreys 1st, Alley Dewberry 2nd.
Grade III – Bernard Hunt 1st, Lulu Thompson 2nd, Golkie Schuchett 3rd.
Map of Manitoba – Dave Nowosad 1st, Viola Rowe 2nd, Arthur Jamieson 3rd.

Handwork:
Grade I – Mossey School.
Grade II – Mossey School.
Nature Book – Beatrice Rowe 1st.
Collection of butterflies – Irene Bailey 1st.

1918 Oct 24 – Winnipegosis Boys’ and Girls’ Fair

The Boys’ and Girls’ Cub Fair was held at Winnipegosis on Friday, Oct. 11th. This was the fist event of the kind ever held in this locality and thanks to the efforts of the public school teachers, was a decided success. Keen interest was displayed by the residents of South Bay, and a large number were on hand to view the fair.
The judges were Miss Speechley and Mr. Murray, of the Extension Department of the M.A.C.
The sewing exhibit, largely due to the efforts of Miss M. McMartin, was a credit to Winnipegosis schools. The chickens were good, as were also the display of vegetables. With a greater interest taken by the surrounding schools we hope to double or treble our entries another year.
The secretary and organizer was Mr. H.L. Williams, public school principal.

PRIZE LIST.
Class I: Pair of pigs – Harry Whale 1st, Cecil Paddock 2nd.
Single pig – Wallie Pouliet 1st, Evelyn Groff 2nd, Harry Whale 3rd, Gordon Rognvaldson 4th.
Class II, Chicken Raising: Pen of 3 Barred Rocks – Walter Keen, South Bay, 1st, Cecil Paddock 2nd, Wilfred Moyer, South Bay, 3rd, Ignace Bobinsky, South Bay, 4th, Mike Samimski, South Bay, 5th, Anthony Bobinsky, South Bay, 6th.
Pen of 3, any other breed – Daisy Walmsley 1st, Cecil Paddock 2nd.
Class III, Gardening: One dozen potatoes – Beverly Schaldemose 1st, Elizabeth Moyer, South Bay, 2nd, Ruth Groff 3rd, Evelyn Groff 4th, Mike Verchaski 5th, Gladys Cartwright 6th.
Dozen large onions or 3 large turnips – Lois Whale 1st, Wilfred Moyer 2nd, Albert Moyer 3rd, Elizabeth Moyer 4th.
Dozen parsnips – Lois Whale 1st, Wilfred Moyer 2nd, Albert Moyer 3rd.
Dozen carrots or beets – Mary Marchenski 1st, Mike Samimski 2nd, Albert Moyer 3rd, John Moodry 4th, Elizabeth Moyer 5th, Lois Whale 6th.
Class IV, Cooking: Two loaves of bread – Lottie Moore 1st, Attie Hechter 2nd.
Dozen oatmeal cookies – Margaret McAuley 1st, Lottie Moore 2nd, Mabel Rognvaldson 3rd, Alice Hechter 4th.
Dozen cornmeal muffins – Ruth Groff 1st, Mabel Rognvaldson 2nd, Lottie Moore 3rd.
Class V, Sewing: Work bag – Mary Magnuson 1st, Ester Hechter 2nd, Edith Hubble 3rd.
Knitted article – Cecil Paddock 1st, Mary Marchinski 2nd, Amelia Adam 3rd, Evolda Whale 4th.
Sewing apron – Mary Magnuson 1st, Verna Denby 2nd, Edith Hubble 3rd, Esther Hechter 4th, Evolda Whale 5th, Charlotte Adam 6th.
Red Cross Collection – Evolda Whale 1st, Mary Magnuson 2nd, Amelia Adam 3rd, Charlotte Adam 4th, Addie Ketcheson 5th.
Night gown or tea apron – Charlotte Adam 1st, Addie Ketcheson 2nd, Edith Hubble 3rd, Amelia Adam 4th.
Table runner – Helen Macaulay 1st, Lenore Denby 2nd, Mabel Rognvaldson 3rd.
Dust cap and work apron – Lenore Denby 1st, Tina Marchenski 2nd, Mabel Rognvaldson 3rd.
Piece of crochet work – Attie Hechter 1st, Mabel Rognvaldson 2nd, Tina Marchenski 3rd, Lenore Sehaldemose 4th, Mary Marchenski 5th, Lois Whale 6th.
Two Red Cross articles – Lenore Sehaldemose 1st, Mabel Rognvaldson 2nd, Tina Marchenski 3rd, Ruth Groff 4th.
Middy suit – Lottie Moore 1st, Lenore Sehaldemose 2nd.
Class VII, Weed Contest: Collection of seeds of 10 noxious weeds – Ignace Bobinsky 1st, Mary Fleming 2nd, Ella Martin 3rd, Arthur McLellan 4th.
Class VIII, Woodwork Contest – Stanley Miket 1st, John Wallace 2nd, Nieh Rudiak 3rd, Alec. Ogryzlo 4th.

1918 Oct 24 – Fork River

Frank Bailey, of Winnipeg, spent the week-end with his parents.
There was a very good turnout to the Thanksgiving service on Sunday.
Mr. Fred Tilt is building a house next to the Orange Hall. He has retired from farming and will reside in town.
Dunc Kennedy and party from Ochre River passed through the town on Sunday on their way to Winnipegosis.
Pte. Venables, who has just returned from overseas, is visiting his brother, T.B. Venables.
Sunday was children’s day at All Saints’ Church and the attendance was good. It is hopeful sign when interest is taken in our young people.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 15 – 1914

1914 Oct 15 – Gasoline Boat Burned

The gasoline boat, “Lake View,” owned by Mr. Frank Hechter, was burned at the north end of Lake Winnipegosis last week, together with supplies and fishing nets. The boat was in charge of Dan Martin. Mr. Hechter places his loss a near the $3000 mark. There was no insurance.

1914 Oct 15 – Doctors on Strike

It is said that since the declaration of war, the Swan River physicians have refused to threat German measles.

1914 Oct 15 – Fork River

Max King and Karl Erikson have left for the north end of the lake for he winter’s fishing.
Mr. W. Howitson has left for Winnipegosis and is working in the A.T. Co store. “Scotty” is always in great demand.
Mrs. Peter Ellis has returned from a trip to Ontario.
Mrs. Theo. Johnson, of Winnipegosis, is a visitor with Mrs. D. Kennedy this week.
Miss M. Craighill and Mrs. W. Davis have returned from a short visit to Winnipegosis and report a pleasant time.
Mrs. Bert Cooper and daughter, of Winnipeg, are spending a short time with Mr. W. Cooper, Sr., on the Mossey River.
Mr. D.F. Wilson has been confined to the house for a short time. It’s nothing “catching.” We trust he will recover.
Next Sunday, Oct. 10th, will be Children’s day. Special services will be held for the children. We trust there will be a good turn out to this service. All are welcome.
Mr. Mullens and friend here motored from Cypress River and are spending a few days with Mr. and Mrs. A. Cameron, of Mowat Centre.
Mr. Eloftson, from Ontario, was up to W. King’s for the surveying teams and outfit which have been here all summer. He is moving them to Gimli ready for the winter’s work in that section.
Some one was enquiring of us last week if the A.T. Co. was still running the dredge at Winnipegosis.

1914 Oct 15 – Winnipegosis

Sid Coffey is going fishing and Harold Bradley will run the picture show while he is away.
Frank Hechter was a passenger Dauphin bound on Monday.
C.F. Stewart, insurance agent returned to Dauphin on Monday after a short business trip here.
Alex Bickel went to Dauphin on Monday.
Frank Hechter’s gasoline boat was burned at the north end of the lake last week. The loss is considerable as the boat was loaded with fishing apparatus and supplies for the winter. Dan Martin was in charge of the boat, and he says the origin of the fire is a mystery.
The Standard Lumber Co. is putting in a camp for the winter at Graves’ Point.
The steamer Manitou has already made several trips to the north end of the lake with supplies for the fishermen. Capt. McDonald is in charge of the boat.
It is expected that fully 150 men will be engaged in fishing this winter. The wages paid will be considerably lower than in the past two seasons.
Joe Johnston, from Fort William, is among the late arrivals. He reports times dull at the lake town. He will fish this winter.
Capt. Coffey’s new boat made her first trip to the north end of the lake last week. The boat has not been christened yet, but when the sparkling bottle of wine is broken the word “Mildred” will appear.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 27 – 1914

1914 Aug 27 – Latest From Line of Battle

LONDON, Aug. 27 – Late reports to War office state that desultory fighting is occurring along French frontier.

ON EVE GREAT BATTLE

Germans are ready to strike great blow. The troops are fast advancing and one of the biggest battles of the war is in sight.

RUSSIANS ADVANCING

The Russians are advancing in German territory and clearing everything before them.

1914 Aug 27 – Volunteers Get Right-Royal Send-Off

It was truly a great night in Dauphin, the night before the volunteers went away. It was Friday night last, the boys leaving on Saturday morning. The people of the town were out in full force and their right royal patriotism was most marked. The reality of war is brought home to us when “Our Own” are called out for service and hence a subdued depth of pent up emotion which is not found on other occasions. The Band did their part well, and what could be done without the band at such a time as this.

Great Cheering

A crowd of enthusiastic men, joined by a host of boys, well supplied with Union Jacks, some Belgian and French flags, formed in procession headed by band and red-coats. Everywhere, from doors and windows, hotels and street corners, the volunteers were lustily cheered.

Meeting Held in Open

The procession reached the town hall about 9 o’clock. The ball had been packed for nearly an hour and the enthusiasm inside was no less than on the street. Patriotic music was indulged in led by Prof. Minnaert. Only a small portion of the crowd being able to hold the public meeting and send-off for the boys in the op. When all gathered in front and around the corner, as large a crowd as was ever seen in Dauphin, surrounded the group of thirty-two men, whom we have the honour of sending to the front. Again the Band did its part well and between the addresses gave without stint, sweet patriotic strains.

Farewell Speeches

The chairman, Mayor Bottomley, took his place on the front steps of the town hall and everyone, except the volunteers, stood up for over an hour’s programme of music and speeches.
The speakers were Messrs. D.S. Woods, Munson, Wiley, Flemming, Bethell, Major Walker and Captain Newcombe.
The words spoken by all were in accord with Britain’s position and in a deep serious vein set forth the new grave situation in which Canada and the Empire stand today.
The Boys were recipients of a box of cigars each, some wholesome advice, heartiest congratulations, with affectionate hopes for a safe return.
It was an evening never-to-be-forgotten in Dauphin and the warmth of the farewell, the deep subdued feeling, was only surpassed on Saturday morning, when the train actually pulled out, all hats and handkerchiefs waving, all eyes wet, and the Band paying “God be With You Till We Meet Again.”

1914 Aug 27 – Praise For Dauphin Boys

W.J. Rawson, of Brandon, who was in town on Wednesday, told a Herald representative, that the Dauphin contingent had the best appearance of any of the troops assembled at that point for transpiration to Valcartier.

DAUPHIN.
Lieut. A.E.L. Shand (Albert Edward Lawrence Shand, 1891)
Sergt. G. Fraser
Sergt. W. Code
Sergt. T.D. Massey
Corp. D. Wetmore (David Lee Wetmore, 1884, 346)
Corp. N.C. Chard (Norman Cyril Chard, 1894, 240 SGT)
Corp. C.S. Wiltshire
Pte. H.A. Bray (Harold Arthur Bray, 1891, LT)
Pte. H.H. Moore
Pte. A.J. Pudifin (Arthur James Pudifin, 1885, 322)
Pte. Garth Johnston (Garth Fraser Johnston, 1890, 718076)
Pte. Neville Munson (Neville Munson, 1892, 313)
Pte. W.S. Gilbert (William S. Gilbert, 1874, 265)
Pte. C. Curtis
Pte. H. Izon (Hubert Izon, 1885, 280)
Pte. S. Laker (Stephen Laker, 1895, 13)
Pte. J.E. Greenaway (Joseph Edward Greenaway, 1885, 269)
Pte. A.J. Johnson
Pte. D. Powell
Pte. E. Sonnenberg (Edward Sonnenberg, 1892, 335)
Pte. E. Classen
Pte. E. Herrick (Eliot Charles Herrick, 1887, 275)
Pte. E. McNab
Pte. J.E. Lewis (John Edmund Lewis, 1893, 27501)
Pte. C.S. Van Tuyll
Pte. D. McVey (Devon McVey, 1892, 302)
Pte. A.E. Pickering (Albert Edward Pickering, 1892, 320)
Pte. A. Redgate (Albert Redgate, 1889, 324)
Pte. F.A. Mathews
Pte. H. Pollard
Pte. T.A. Collins (Thomas Arthur Collins, 1887, 245)
Pte. Frank Norquay (Frank Norquay, 1891, 318)
Pte. F. Jauncey (Fredrick Jauncey, 1890, 282)

WITH 99TH BRANDON.
Pte. C. Lane
Pte. P. Mickleburg (Ernest Michleburgh, 295)
Pte. Jackson
Pte. W. Bubb (William Charles Bubb, 1884, 2140)

WINNIPEGOSIS.
Pte. E. Morris
Pte. A. Martin
Pte. A. McKerchar

SWAN RIVER.
Pte. D. Stringer (Dixon Stringer, 1890, 24178)

ROBLIN.
Corp. J.B. Shearer (John Buchanan Shearer, 1892, LT)
Pte. J. Hallam (Jonathan Hallam, 1878, 46973)
Pte. W. Day
Pte. W. Armstrong
Pte. R.J. Ritchie
Pte. F. Burt
Pte. A. Hay
Pte. E. Simpson

1914 Aug 27 – Fork River

Mr. Vivian Hafenbrak and bride have returned from a month’s visit to Ontario. Mr. H. is of the opinion the crops in the Dauphin district are ahead of anything along the route he travelled.
It is said, “War is Hell.” So is the price of binder twine, when there is a difference of 1 to 4 cents on the same quality. How the war should affect twine now that was made in 1912 we give it up and leave it to other fellows to explain. Even the motorcar dare is doubted.
The fall fishing has started, so we are told, and while wages are lower our bonnie fishermen are head singing. “Rule Britannia” and “Britons never shall be Slaves.”
Some of our ratepayers are enquiring who is running the Mossey River School affairs at present.
Jack Chipla left for Winnipeg to work on the C.P.R.
D.F. Wilson returned from a trip west on business and reports crops light out there.
A. Snelgrove and Pat Powers have left for Yorkton for the threshing season.
Mrs. Johnston, of Port Arthur, is a visitor at the home of Mrs. Kennedy.
Mr. Clarkson, Winnipegosis, passed through en route for Yorkton.
The Winnipegosis contingent passed through here for the seat of war as happy as clams on their way to Dauphin.
Mr. Ramsay, of Sifton, paid the burgh a visit with a cattle buyer and is rustling a car of stock.

1914 Aug 27 – Winnipegosis

The fishing fleet has left for Spruce Island, a point about 40 miles north. There are between 15 and 20 boats engaged in the work. The catches so far are reported good.
Capt. Coffey arrived from Dauphin on Wednesday.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong was a late visitor.
To be or not to be, that is the great question. At the time of this writing the funds required to complete the school are not yet in sight. It is believed they are forthcoming but until they are the citizens are in a sate of doubt. The new school is needed that is one thing sure.
Architect Bossons, of Dauphin, was here on Saturday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 4 – 1912

1912 Apr 4 – Fork River

Duncan Kennedy has been appointed a commissioner for taking affidavits for use in the courts of the province.
Mr. Jangerman, who has been homesteading east of the Mossey, left for Dauphin with his family for a few months.
Mr. and Mrs. J. McAuley of South Bay, were visitors at D. Kennedy’s.
Mr. Combers of Selkirk, a relative of Capt. D. McLean, arrived here with a car of settlers’ effects and intends farming in this vicinity.
Mr. and Mrs. J McMillian and family who have been spending the winter here, have left for the west.
J. Seiffert of Winnipegosis, was here attending Court of Revision and Council meeting.
The bridge gang of the Canadian Northern Railway are busy fixing bridges in this vicinity.
Purple Star, L.O.L., 1765, held their general meeting on Thursday night last. A. McKerchar, J. Bickle and Martin, Winnipegosis, and W. Weir of Dauphin, visited the lodge and an interesting evening was spent.
The heaviest fall of snow of the season occurred on Friday, and puts an early spring out of the question. The horses and cattle are looking fairly well considering the long winter.
Our Mowat friend of the Press evidently declines our advice. We wish to tell him that we had a short conversation with the Dr. as he wished. The Dr. did not seem to be ??? all over the scribe’s health ?? not be a benefit to the public ??? health officer would take a trip ??? to the vicinity of Oak Brae and investigate the nuisance there, and have it removed as soon as possible before the hot weather sets in.
What has been become of the Fork River correspondent to the Press? Did he get snowed under as he has not been heard of lately. He must have gone across the herring pond for those letters that never arrived. Quite a fake.
Our friend Jimmy Johnston stole a march on the boys. We congratulate him and his bride and wish them a long life and a happy one. So say all.
A. Cameron is a visitor to Dauphin this week.
The council meeting held last week went off quiet well.
A nice little children’s party was held at the home of Mrs. Scrase, when Mr. McCartney gave a magic lantern entertainment. The pictures shown consisted of St. Paul’s Cathedral, Japan and Jessica’s first Prayer. When this was over the children had candies, cakes &c. and played all kind of games. At 10 o’clock they all went home after having enjoyed themselves.
Mr. McCartney returned from visiting friends at Grandview.

1912 Apr 4 – Sifton

The roads are very poor where Galicians live. They are not doing their share to advance these country places. There is a marked difference in the roads where English speaking people live. One hears that Canadians and English settlers give their time and their horses gratis for so many days each year to “grade” the roads. The Galicians are unwilling to help in any way unless they get from $1.50 to $2 daily. They, however, use the roads that others make. This is unfair! We need extra laws and to have them enforced. If a man does not help the country that helps him and he at “loggerheads” with the community in which he dwells he ought to leave the country. We have too many such in Canada now. They take all they get and hinder all progress to wit, the effort to get money for bridges in the municipality, etc.
The school at Sifton is making great progress under Capt. A. Russell. Sifton is fortunate in getting such an able man. He has an average of 59, a far from easy task daily instructing them. He must be congratulated in one feature especially the teaching of patriotism and love for the country. The exercising of his thoroughbred stallion keeps his health up. “Bunkus” is the pride of the place.
Nurses Goforth and Reid do excellent work at Sifton. They are always busy, and work on so untiringly in caring for Galicians. Not all the heroes work along the plaudits of the crowd. Many heroes work on unknown by the many. We wonder if Galicians are grateful enough for the services given them in these hospitals.
The mill formerly owned by Messrs. Kennedy & Barrie is now being run by Galicians.

1912 Apr 4 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Munro, who has been working for the Presbyterian Church in Winnipegosis, South Bay, Fairville and Sifton, for the Winter, closed his ministry last Sunday, March 31. He had large attendances at his closing services at each place, including people of all denominations. Attendances were favourable right through the winter. He never before experienced such a beautiful winter. He leaves soon for Saskatchewan Presbytery, where he takes up work for the Summer months.
The Presbyterian Church at Winnipegosis voted in favour of union unanimous all but two. Some did not vote. Those who voted against union and those who did not vote have the greatest standing in the church. At the closing service, which was a united one, Mr. Munro urged union for Winnipegosis even if organic union failed to be realized.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 4 – 1915

1915 Feb 4 – Remains Found

Some time last fall Paulo Jura, a one-armed young Ruthenian, disappeared at Ethelbert. An investigation was held but no trace of the young man could be found. He went out shooting with another young man named Timothy Nakonectiny, and at the time and considerable money on his person. Recently his remains were found in the Duck Mountain, but the flesh had just about all disappeared from the bones. His clothes, however, were identified. No trace of the money could be found.
Detectives are now again investigating the case.
Nakonectiny, Jura’s companion, has disappeared from the district.

1915 Feb 4 – Third Contingent Complete

The 110 men allotted to the Dauphin district to be raised for the Third Contingent has just about been enrolled, the number now reaching 106. Taken altogether the men are a fine lot and compare favourably with the first that enlisted here. The following is a summary of the nationality of the men:

Canadian 37
English 43
Scotch 20
Welsh 1
American 3
South Africa 1
Danish 1

CANADIAN.
J.D. Munson, single. (Jack Devereux Munson, 1895, 424039)
G. Prieur, single. (Gabriel Prieur, 1896, 425219)
A.A. Day, single. (Arthur Archibald Day, 1896, 424013)
J.E. Welch, single. (John Edward Welch, 1891-1916, 74199)
C.W. Shaw, single. (Charles Wallace Shaw, 1875-1916, 424037 or A/24015)
W.C. Mitchell, single. (William Charles Mitchell, 1885, 74202)
I. Zufelt, single. (Isaac Zufelt, 1891, 425518)
H.W. Gardiner, single. (Hugh William Gardiner, 1894-1916, 424020)
J. Gallant, single. (Joseph Gallant, 1892-1916, 424019 or A/24019)
B.A. Whitmore, single. (Burton Alfred Whitmore, 1890, A/24250)
H.L. Pearson, single. (Harry Lindley Pearson, 1896, 425194)
J. Payne, single. (John Payne, 1892, 424066)
F.W. Clark, single. (Francis William Clark, 1890, 424671)
C.J. Ivens, single. (Charles John, xxx-1917, 424952)
G. Wildfong, single. (Gordon Wildfong, 1892, 424079)
S. Day, single.
J. Hicks, single. (John Hicks, 1895, 154745)
A.E. Arnold, single. (Albert Edward Arnold, 1895-1916, 424002 or A/24002)
P.E. Chard, single. (Percy Edwin Chard, 1896, 424657)
J.A. Justice, single. (James Amos Justice, 1896, 424028)
H.W. Minish, single. (Herbert Whitfield Minish, 1893, 424061)
G. Stewart, single. (Garfield Stewart, 1895-1916, 425364)
H. Bidak, single.
C.C. Stacey, single. (Clarence Crozier Stacey, 1896-1916, 425349)
J.E. Wells, single. (Joseph Edward Wells, 1889, 424076)
J.E. May, married.
J.J. Troyer, single. (Joseph James Troyer, 1887, 425428)
J.A. McLean, single.
J.S. Willis, single.
Jas. E. Cain, single. (James Edward Cain, 1894, 154744)
John Ball, single. (John Ball, 1895, 424539)
Edward Gordon, single. (Edward Gordon, 1893, 425870)
J.M. Crossland, single. (John Marshall Crossland, 1887, 154737)
Victor Lavalle, single.
John R. Levins, married. (John Richard Levins, 1880, 424033)
L.A. Campbell, single. (Lorne Alexander Campbell, 1879-1916, 460743 or A/60743)
Henry C. Batty, single. (Henry Charles Batty, xxx-1916, 424320)

ENGLISH.
A. Grove, single.
W.F. Percy, single. (William Freeman Percy, 1886, 425202)
P.E. Millard, single. (Percy Edward Millard, 18781916, 74190)
A.H.G. Whittaker, married. (Albert Henry Guilym Whittaker, 1891-1916, 424077 or 424245)
A.G. Sanderson, married.
Wm. Coleman, single. (William Coleman, 1876, 424688)
R. Smith, single. (Richard Smith, 1889, 74196)
F. Clark, married. (Frank Clark, 1883, 424009)
J.S. Blundell, single. (James Stuart Blundell, 1893-1916, 74201)
A.J. Middleditch, married. (Albert John Middleditch, 1892, 425078)
J.W. Thompson, single. (John Walter Thompson, 1891, 424072)
Ivo Osman, single. (Ivo Isman, 1892, 74204)
T.L. Radway, single.
H. Marchant, single. (Harry Marchant, 1891, 424194)
G.J. Dickason, single. (George James Dickason, 1887, 424035)
P. Cowley, married. (Paul Cowley, 1886, 74186)
G. Burkett, married. (George Burkett, 1870, 154735)
J.A. Hurst, married. (J Arnold Hurst, xxx, 424339)
T.W. Swannell, single. (Frank Walton Swannell, 1893-1918, 425389)
C. Recknell, single. (Cuthbert Bradshaw Recknell, 1890, 425232)
F. Pexton, single. (Fred Pexton, 1887, 424067)
A. Wood, single. (Arthur Wood, 1897, 424375)
A.E. Weeks, single. (Arthur Edward Weeks, 1880-1917, 425472)
C.P. Webb, single. (Charles Peter Webb, 1895, 424374)
W. Weeds, single. (Walter Weeds, 1894, 424371)
A. Baldwin, single. (Andrew Baldwin, 1889, 74184)
W.E. Ridley, single. (William Ernest Ridley, 1891, 74205)
R.E. Richards, single. (Robert Edmond Richards, xxx, 74207)
R.W. Watson, single. (Robert William Watson, 1891-1917, 424075 or 24229)
F. Pickup, single. (Frederick Pickup, 1893, 424068 or A/24068)
T. Pedley, married. (Thomas Pedley, 1878-1918, 425197)
A. Spence, married.
J. Gomme, single. (John Gomme, 1890, 424021)
C. Heather, single. (Charles Robert Heather, 1887, 424896)
B. Cheesmore, single. (Benjamin Cheesmore, 1887-1916, 424327)
W.J. Hill, single. (William James Hill, 1880, 74189)
P. Boam, single. (Percy Boam, 1883-1916, 74185)
T. Brown, single.
Herbert Townson, single. (Herbert Townson, 1896, 425426)
R.C. Crowe, single. (Roland Charles Crowe, 1897, 424012 or A/24066)
H.F.B. Percival, single.
Wm. J. Hickman, married. (William James, 1881, 424910)
F.L. Pearce, single.
Benj Dilworth, married. (Benjamin Dilworth, 1884-1916, 74187)

SCOTCH.
T.M. Ray, single. (T.M. Ray, xxx, 74206)
W.J. Wallace, single. (William John Wallace, 1895, 74200)
W. McDonald, single. (John Elliott McDonald, 1882, 424064)
Wm. Donaldson, married. (William Donaldson, 1885, 74188)
J. Nicol, married. (James Nicol, 1884, 74194)
J. Armstrong, married.
T. Latta, single. (Thomas Latta, xxx, 424031 or A/24136)
J.A. Craig, married.
A. Wilson, single. (Allan Wilson, 1895, 74198)
I. MacGlashan, single. (Isaac MacGlashan, 1885, 74193)
Wm. Miller, single. (William Miller, 1883-1916, 74191)
J. Alexander, single. (John Alexander, 1890, 425896)
R. Morrice, single. (Robert Morrice, 1892, 424343)
J.A. Whyte, single. (Joseph Alexander Whyte, 1893, 424078)
Wm. Lyon, single. (William Lyon, 1883, 424034)
R.L. Adams, single. (Robert Lawson Adams, 1896, 424001)
Wm. Munro, single. (William Munro, xxx, 74192)
Thos. Martin, single. (Thomas Martin, 1892, 424046)
N. McLeod, single.
T. Woodhouse, single. (Thomas Woodhouse, xxx, 425906)

WELSH.
E. Burnett, single. (Edwin Burnett, 1896, 424323)

U.S.A.
E. Engebretson, single. (Elmer Rudolph Engebretson, 1890-1918, 424015)
Wm. Madden, single. (William Madden, 1878, 424341)
C.B. Shales, single. (Chester Berdell Shales, 1896, 622436)

TRANSVAAL S. A.
H.E. Lys, married. (Hugh Ernest Lys, 1875-1876, Capt.)

DENMARK.
A. Peterson, single.

1915 Feb 4 – Fork River

Mr. Nat Little and daughter, Miss Grace, have returned from a two weeks’ trip to Rochester, Minn.
Mr. W. Walmsley was in town last week.
Archdeacon Green spent a few days in Dauphin on church business last week.
W. King county Orange master, is away on his annual tour among the various lodges and expects to return to Dauphin in time for the annual county meeting to arrange business for the coming term.
Wm. Northam, one of the standby subscribers of the Herald at Fork River, sends in the following verse when remitting his subscription. We take it that Mr. Northam intends the lines as a warning to delinquents:
He who doth the printer pay
Will go to Heaven sure some day;
But he who meanly cheats the printer
Will go where there is never winter.

1915 Feb 4 – Winnipegosis

Five men are working on the dredge fitting her out for the summer.
A large number of the fishermen are back in town again, and things are moving a little faster than usual.
J.W. McAulay was a visitor to Dauphin on Wednesday to attend the trainmen’s ball.
Dancing is one of the chief pastimes in this town. Lately, hardly a week goes by without one or two dances being held. A surprise dance was given at the home of Hos. Grenon on Friday last and another dance on Tuesday night in the Rex Hall.
Will Morton, station agent, whose life was despaired of, is getting better.
Mr. and Mrs. Ravelli, left on Wednesday for Portage la Prairie, where they will enter the employ of Hugh Armstrong.
Mrs. Theo. Johnson was a visitor to Dauphin on Wednesday.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Litwyn on the 28th ult., a son.
Mrs. (Dr.) Medd returned on Monday from a visit to Winnipeg.