Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 6 – 1914

1914 Aug 6 – C.N.R. Excursion to Winnipegosis

The 2nd annual picnic of the Dauphin employees of the Canadian Northern Railway will be held on Tuesday, August 18th, at Winnipegosis. An excellent programme of events has been arranged, consisting of foot races, boat races, swimming races, lake trips, dancing, tug-of-war, and a baseball match, mechanical dept. vs. traffic dept. Band in attendance. Train will leave Dauphin at 8:30 a.m. and returning will leave Winnipegosis at 8 p.m.

1914 Aug 6 – Dauphin Officers 32nd Horse

The 32nd Manitoba Horse will undoubtedly be pressed into service. “C” men. The following are the officers:
Major G.C.J. Walker.
Captain. H.K. Newcombe.
Lieutenants P. Wilson, E. Manby, L. Shand, E.P. Milward.
Sergeant-Major Fletcher; Sergts. T. Coghian, G. Fraser, Alguire.

1914 Aug 6 – From the Seat of War

London, Aug. 6.
The war situation is extremely critical at present. All Europe is little better than a vast powder magazine.
The British fleet is concentrated in the North Sea and it is quite probable that important engagements have already taken place. All cables are being used almost exclusively for war purposes.
The cutting of the German telegraph and telephone connections and the severance of the German trans-Atlantic cable virtually cut Germany from communication with other countries. Reports from France, Belgium, Holland and Russia showed that Germany’s armies were steadily moving east and west, and that her advance posts were in contact with the opposing Russian and French armies.

1914 Aug 6 – Glen Campbell to Raise Scout Troop

The Militia department at Ottawa has received an offer from Glen Campbell offering to raise and command a troop of scouts.
Several Dauphin men have been offered positions in the troop and some, it is understood, will accept.

1914 Aug 6 – Fork River

Gerald Stuart, of Winnipeg, is spending his holidays with his aunt, Mrs. J. Rice, teacher of North Lake School, and is putting in a good time at the lake.
Mr. Earie, engineer, and his assistant are putting in an apparatus for taking the levels of the Mossey River at Wilson’s.
E. Williams, lay reader, was a visitor for a few days with Mrs. J. Reid of North Lake, and has a very enjoyable time.
J.R. Roblin, Government engineer, paid Reeve King a visit in connection with the roadwork being doe in the municipality.
Several ratepayers turned out to the annual school meeting on Saturday night. No “biz” was done as the books were not audited. It’s strange how the heat affects even our school officers.
Mrs. King had tomatoes ripe in the last week of July in her garden and also corn.
A good rain is needed to cook things off.
W.W. Cooper and family, who have been absent from this burgh over a year, returned and are staying with their people, Walter Cooper, Sr., on the Mossey River.
We hear F.B. Lacey is to be the councillor for ward 6, as unfortunately Sam Reid’s papers did not arrive till twenty minutes past two, and the returning officer refused to take them then and stated it was law. Yes, that is the law. What a difference; a week ago a farmer wanted redress for stock destroying his crop and every obstacle was put in the way to prevent him securing justice.
Pat says give a calf rope enough and it will hang itself in time. True, and if public opinion is anything to bank on there will be no one to cut the calf down.
Mrs. C.E. Bailey has returned from Winnipeg and reports a present holiday.
We notice in the Winnipegosis news that the Fork River dredge has been sent to Pine Creek, while the Winnipegosis lays rotting on the river. More will be heard of this unfair deal to Fork River later on.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 16 – 1914

1914 Jul 16 – Both Drew Gun

There was a lively time at Ashville on Monday and it looked like a shooting bee at one stage. John Burnison, a section man, has been acting strange of late and among other things was threatening to shoot residents. He drive his wife and family from the house and shot a cow belonging to Fred Kemp, the storekeeper. He services of Constable Levins, of the town force, were called into requisition and in company with John Campbell, son of Glen, he went to the house. Burnison told the men to get out and to enforce his order moved emphatically reached for his gun. As he raised the weapon Levins flashed out his revolver and Burnison wilted, dropped the gun. He was then placed under arrest and brought to Dauphin by automobile.

JOHNNY SPRINTED.

When Burnison raised the gun, Johnny Campbell, who was in the room, waited for no further display of hostility, but bolted out the door, dashed through the potato patch and over the back fence. As far as known at Ashville he holds all records for this kind of a sprint up to the present.

1914 Jul 16 – Cadets at Sewell Camp

For the first time in cadets history of this province a camp has been conducted and found to be a success, the boys coming from all parts of the province. The days were given over to drills and training in the various branches of cadet work. Reveille call for rising at 6:30, breakfast at 7:00, cleaning up lines to 8:30, when Divine service was conducted, making it impressive with the boys taking part in the singing and responsive reading; 9 to 11 inspection in drills, musketry signalling, first aid, physical training. 12:00, noon dinner; 1:00 to 2:15, rest; 2:30 to 4:00, drilling and general training work; from 4:00 to 5:00, rest, shower bath, etc.; 6:00 p.m., tea; 7 to 9 games and sports; lights out at 9.45. The above makes up the daily routine of camp life, and for the men in charge there were not many idle moments.

SPORTS CURTAILED

It was planned to have Saturday given over entirely to games and sports, but owning to the great storm that passed over the camp this programme was greatly curtailed, only eleven events being run off. Dauphin won five firsts and one second in these events. Our boys, however, kicked because they could not make it an even six firsts. This was a very creditable showing, however, hen you consider tat there were over 20 contingents of cadets in camp, most of who entered teams for the sports.

SUNDAY ROUTINE

Sunday was given over to drying clothes and blankets after the washing of Saturday’ storm, we were able, however, to have our church parade on Sunday afternoon, when the boys made a fine showing in the march past Col. S.B. Steele, Camp Commandant.

GIMLI NEXT YEAR

The camp this year has been largely in the nature of an experiment, and both officers and men profited by the experience gained, which will be conductive to better results in next year’s camp, which we are informed, on good authority, will be held at Gimli, making a more interesting camp for the boys.

PRESENTATION OF PRIZES

Presentation of prizes won by the Dauphin Cadets will take place as soon as the prizes active from Winnipeg, when both Messers. Manby and Batty will express their appreciation of the boys in camp.

PRIZES WON

The following were won by the Dauphin cadets:
Seniors – 220 yard race – P. Lowes, 1st. 440 yard race – P. Lowes, 1st.
Juniors – Standing broad jump – C. Bossons, 1st.
Horse and rider – C. Bossons and E. Struthers, 1st.
Relay Race – Struthers, Bossons, Dunstan and C, Dickerson, 2nd.

1914 Jul 16 – Notes From the Firing Line

Our boys were seldom late for the Knife and Fork Parade.
Some boys were sick, but after one visit to the hospital tent and a taste of the medicine, were able to appear again at the dining tent.
It was a surprise to the officers in charge what a lot of food the boys could consume.
Sammy Dunstan only had seven eggs, three cups of coffee and five slices of bread and butter for breakfast on Friday morning.
It took a special dish to hold the porridge for the Tierney Bros.
2nd Lieut. Lowes’ tent was the quietest one in the whole came at 6.30 a.m.
After dinner on Wednesday G. White could hardly see and had o be taken to the hospital.
Who stole the pies from the cook’s tent on Friday, July 10th?
Instructors Manby and Batty were on duty from 6 a.m. to 11.45 p.m.; everybody here sleeps with one eye open.
The Dauphin Mouth Organ Band and Quartette, consisting of Messrs. Lowes, C. Batty, Gougeon, C. Fickerson, Dunstan and Murphy, made night horrible after hours.
Sammy Dunstan, with his long blue shirt, was the star of the baseball diamond.
Our four boys, who attended the ambulance class, passed with such high honours, that they have decided to stand practice here. The charge will be moderate.
With the aid of our expect signallers, Dauphin Cadets won the sham fight on Friday night.
We wonder by whose order the mixture was put into the tea on Friday night.
Instructors Manby and Batty had their beds made every day by the cadets. We don’t think.
Gougeon and Kuryk are open to give lessons in wrestling. Charges very moderate.
Our boys were always the first in the grub tent and the last out.
Mr. Campbell, of Souris (late of Dauphin), took some interesting group photos of our boys.
The mud fight a 8.30 p.m. Saturday night was a sight never to be forgotten.
The thanks of the boys are due to Mr. Moor and Mrs. Smithers, of the Winnipeg Y.M.C.A., for the assistance rendered us in various ways.

1914 Jul 16 – Fork River

Mr. Sinstiski, who has been here the last two weeks, took great interest of the Liberal party. He is said to be a cattle buyer but no stock has been shipped up to date. All the bests are off. Nuff said.
Hurrah for Sam Hughes! This northern county knows a good man when we have him, and what we have we will hold, as Scotty says.
Edwin King, of Kinistimo, Sask., is spending his holidays at his home here.
The members of L.O.L., No. 1765, attended the Methodist Church on Sunday, the 12th. Rev. Bro. Clixby, of Winnipegosis, preached the sermon. There was a fair turn out considering the hot weather.
Miss Chase, of Dauphin, is spending her holidays with her grandmother. Mrs. W.R. Snelgrove, on the Mossey.
Walter Clark, of Paswegan, Sask., has returned home after spending a few days among friends here.
Mr. Runny, of Saskatchewan, liberal representative, has returned home with an enlarge cranium, as an election souvenir in remembrance of Fork River.
The Misses Briggs, of Brandon, are visiting at their aunt’s Mrs. T.N. Briggs.
Dr. Shortreed, at his meeting here, stated that the Roblin government was supported by the rabble. As the people here did not agree with these sentiments they did their best on the 10 h to leave him at home to think over the errors of speech, trusting that in future he will have respect for the opinion of others.
Mrs. R. McEachern and son returned from a week’s visit with friends at Million.
Mr. Sam Lowery returned to Winnipeg after a week’s visit here in connection with his farm.

1914 Jul 16 – Winnipegosis

Progress is being made with the new four rooms brick school. The building promises to be adequate to our needs for the present.
Contractor Neely returned on Monday from Dauphin.
Several new residences are going up in town. Among those building are Donald Hattie, Capt. Mapes and Steven Bros.
Coun. Hechter and J.P. Grenon are taking in the exhibition at Winnipeg this week.
The steamer Manitou will commence making trips to the north end of the lake this week.
Capt. Coffey and Jos. Grenon, Sr., are building a boat with a 65 foot keel. The boat will be operated by steam power.
The elections are over and a feeling of goodwill towards all pervades us. The stress of battle is often trying and during the heat of it we are prone to lose our tempers. But this we are glad to say is only a temporary lapse. Misrepresentation should never be resorted to even in the heat of battle. In the report sent the Press of the meting at Fork River, Mr. Lacey went far out of his way to misrepresent sent Mr. Grenon and others. There was no disturbance at the meeting as Dr. Shortreed will readily admit if appealed to. The truth should be the first consideration in sending out newspaper reports.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 9 – 1914

1914 Jul 9 – Boy Scouts at Sewell

The Dauphin contingent of Boy Scouts, numbering 50, left on Wednesday for Sewell, where they go into camp for a week. The boys are in charge of Lieut. E. Manby and Mr. E. Batty.
The officers of the corps are:
Patrol leaders – Stanley Nicholson, Clarence Bossons, Percy Lowes and Tom Walker.
Corporals – W. Gardiner, Henry Terrell, Ed. Gougeon and Cliff. Baird.
New uniforms, including belts and hats, were supplied to the boys before they left and they looked spic and span.
They left on No. 2 as the train pulled out they lustily joined in singing.
“Where the boys are dog-gone glad to lay in Sewell;
“Sew” – I don’t know how to spell it.
But I am going to my home in Sewell camp.”

1914 Jul 9 – Fork River

The Reeve has proclaimed Monday, July 13, a civic holiday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 18 – 1914

1914 Jun 18 – Off for Camp Sunday

The 32nd Manitoba Horse leave on Sunday night for camp at Sewell. The Dauphin troop will go ?? strong this year. There are expected to be 2000 men all told at the camp. Moving pictures will be one of the sources of entertainment.
The officers of the Dauphin troop are as follows:
Major G.C.J. Walker
Captain H.K. Newcombe
Lieutenants E. Manby, M.F. Wilson, L. Shand, E.P. Millward
Regiment S.M., A.C. Goodall
Squadron S.M., Fistches
Sergeants T. Coghlan, G. Fraser, T.D. Massy, Alguire
Corporals W. Cede, H. Wade, Alguire, Chard
The ??? party consisting of C.N.S. Wade, Frank ???, cook, and Private W. ??? have on Thursday night for the camp.

1914 Jun 18 – Ethelbert

Court of revision will be held here Wednesday, 17th inst., with Judge Ryan presiding.
The old McLean flourmill is being overhauled and rebuilt. Another story will be added. The Kennedy Mercantile Co. now own the mill.
The school accommodation is now over taxed, the outcome of this will be that a new building will have to be erected, or an addition built. How would it do to have a consolidated school, and build an up-to-date building. Ethelbert is going to grow, let us anticipate the future.
Principal White is in Dauphin this week with five scholars writing on entrance, grade IX and grade X. The following are the pupils: Entrance, Jessie McMillian and Ben Brachman; grade 9, Maggie Wager and Willie Masticub; grade 10, Wsldmar Masticub.
The crops are looking well, but rain is now needed.
F.K. Slipets, our municipal clerk, is building a new house.
On Thursday night last there was a baseball match between the married and single men. The benedicts won by a nice margin. Ethelbert has some good ball material and will be heard of during the summer when they get more practice.
A petition is in circulation with the object of having the C.N.R. move their station at this point. The location of the building is such that it makes it very inconvenient for passengers and the public to reach it, having to cross the sliding to reach it. It is expected that the company will comply with this reasonable request.
N.A. Hryhorenznk, general agent for the International Harvester Co., went to Dauphin on Monday.

1914 Jun 18 – Fork River

Frank Hafenbrak spent a few days in Dauphin last week. While away he purchased a team of mares with foals at foot.
D. Kennedy was a visitor to Dauphin last week.
Wm. Murray, of Dauphin, provincial auditor, is staying with Clerk Wilson while auditing the municipal books.
W. King has returned from a trip to Winnipeg on municipal affairs. He reports the crops are looking well along the line.
Nat Little was unfortunate in losing one of his valuable brood mares last week.
A. McDonald is busy these days on the road from the A.T. Co. Ltd.
Cap. Coffey, of Dauphin, paid this burgh a visit in his automobile last week.
The boys got busy last week and organized a football club. The first game of the season was played on Saturday night between Mowat and Fork River, which ended in a draw.
John Angus, of Winnipegosis, spent the weekend here and is of the opinion this is the most restful place he has stuck in his travels. There are several others believe so, too.
Mr. Atkinson, of Prince Albert, has rented the Chase farm and is busy seeding it with barley.
Gen. Neil, of Rainy River, has returned to Mowat experimental duck farm for the summer.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 27 – 1913

1913 Mar 27 – Military Men For Winnipeg

Dr. Walker, Percy Willson, and Ed. Manby, officers, and A.C. Wade, Geo. Astley, T. Coghlan and D.C. Boire, non-commissioned officers, left this morning for Winnipeg, where they will take a two weeks’ course at the military school. The men belong to the 32nd Manitoba Light Horse with headquarters at Dauphin.

1913 Mar 27 – Fork River

B. Venables shipped by express a very fine yearling Holstein bull to a farmer in Saskatchewan.
Miss Grant, of Pine View School and Miss Weatherhead left for their homes where they intend spending the Easter holidays.
“Say, Mike, did you hear the opposition bluffed Borden about that memorandum?”
“No, Pat.”
“Well, one fine morning Borden laid it on the table and the opposition took a chill and dear Wilfy took a cold after and did not go down to the house for several days. Bill Pugsley undertook to run the opposition and the government too, but the Hon. Bob sat on him. Micky Clark, of Red Deer, got fresh and the speaker threatened to name him. Jack Turriff, says, name and be damned, and there was the divel to pay, just like old Dounybroos. Next day Bill Pugsley and some more kinder smoothed it over and in the meantime Bob, having nothing to do, took a Cruise home for Easter holidays, where we hope he’ll have a good time.”
“Well, Pat, if Glen had been there to throw a little Cree into them the Naval bill would have been passed long ago. There’s nothing like education.”
Edwin King is spending Easter at his home and renewing acquaintances.
Easter service was held in All Saints’ Church in the evening last Sunday and Rev. Scrase preached a most appropriate sermon, the text being, “He is risen.” The alter was tastefully decorated with beautiful white Easter lilies supplied by Mr. A.C. Bradley, of Winnipegosis.
The farmers are rushing the grain into the elevator as it is to close next week.
Harcourt Benner, one of Dauphin’s prominent real estate agents, is renewing old acquaintances here.
We now have a veterinary surgeon which is a long felt want in this burgh and being proficient in wood work, artificial limbs can be supplied on shortest notice.
Ed Morris and family, of Winnipegosis, spent the weekend with Mrs. Wm. King.
D. Kennedy received a nice bunch of barred Plymouth Rock fowl from C.F. Brewer of Ashville, and F. Hafenbrak received a fine pair of black Minorcas from an Eastern breeder.
Quite a number from here took in the St. Patrick’s ball, given by Mr. McInnes, of the Winnipegosis hotel. They report a swell time.
Miss Gertrude Cooper and Miss Clark, of Dauphin, are spending their Easter holidays with their friends.
The Fork River correspondent in the Press of the 20 inquires for his friends Joe Fahey and Bishop Langevin. They are well. Can our friend tell us if there is any profit keeping a pig after paying Cox’s fee of one hundred and forty dollars. They keeping heifers, friend, and don’t get too fresh.
Miss Pearl Wilson and Miss Woods returned from Sifton, where they have been visiting friends.