Today in the Dauphin Herald – June 5, 1919

Dominion Day Celebration

The Great War Veterans’ association intend holding a big celebration on Tuesday, July 1st (Dominion Day). The programme provides for an elaborate Calithumpain and automobile parade in the forenoon, and splendid sports—baseball, football, track and children’s races in the afternoon. Suitable prizes given in all events. A grand ball will be given in the evening in the town hall.

The Strike Situation

The strike situation remains unchanged but late news from Winnipeg is hopeful of a settlement being reached. Locally the number of strikers has increased. The freight handlers, car checkers and call boys are the latest to join the strikes.
Supt. R.C. Brown was up from Portage on Tuesday and met the telephone operators, but the conference has not altered the situation and the exchange remains closed.
The best of order, however prevails throughout the town.

Winnipegosis Elections

Winnipegosis village, which has a charter of its own, held their elections on the 30th ult. There were three candidates for the Major’s chair. The vote stood: J.C. Adam 57, J.P. Grenon 19 and S. Sieffert 10. The following councilors were elected: Geo. Lyons Ward 1, Ed. Cartwright Ward 2, Jos. Burrell Ward 3, Sid Dennett Ward 4.

A Returned Soldier’s Lament

We are the boys who have done our bit,
But when we came back we were very hard hit.
The girls of Dauphin say we are tough!
I guess we are, all right enough.

We don’t mind the slams we get from either man or girl.
We just laugh at them, till their minds are in a whirl.
They call us boys instead of men,
But we took our stand with the best of them.

We fought in Belgium and in France,
And we made the wily and brutal Hun dance,
To the tune of the cannon, machine gun and bomb
We boys helped the Hun on the way to his home.

When we went o’er the top we had the best of luck.
Every blessed soldier boy filled with vim and pluck.
Thinking of the girls at home land of the brave and free!
Fight, even unto death, for the dame of Liberty.

Now, comrades, you all will agree with me
That some of these girls are as tough as we
So let us all strive to forgive and forget.
That we may learn to become men yet.

Winnipegosis

Pte. A. Clyne has returned to town from overseas after seeing two years active service.
While Mr. F.G. Shears and a few friends were motoring back from Dauphin they met with an accident. Mr. Archie McDonell was slightly injured.
The Ladies Aid of the Union Church held a very successful picnic on the school grounds. Refreshments and ice cream were served and an interesting baseball game was played between Winnipeg and Fork River, the latter winning by one side score. A crowd was in attendance from Dauphin and Fork River.
A.H. Steele has returned from Mafeking, where he has been fighting bush fires for three days.
C.H. Dixon was in Camperville for three days on business.
J.P. Grenon has taken about 20 fishermen to the Pas to fish in the lakes near Sturgeon, being mile 239 on the Hudson Bay Railway.
Mrs. G.W. Mullhearn and children came on Tuesday’s train to visit Mrs. A.H. Steele for the summer.
Miss A. Wilson has returned from an extended visit to the coast, and has resumed her work at the post office.
Long Shaw house has been burned out through bush fires.
The body of Helger Johnson, who was drowned in the lake six months ago, has just been recovered and was brought to town by Dorie Stevenson, on the boat Odinak.
The municipal election for mayor has just closed. It was a 3cornered contest and was hotly contested. Courad Adam was elected. The vote stood Adam 57, Grenon 19, Sieffert 10.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 19 – 1914

1914 Nov 19 – Fatal Shooting Accident

A fatal shooting accident occurred five miles west of Sifton on the 18th, when Joseph Thomashewski, aged 30 years, lost his life. He was out hunting rabbits at the time. He wounded one and as the little animal started to run away he raised the gun and struck at struck at it. The gun was discharged by the act and the contents lodged in his stomach. The unfortunate man died on the spot.

1914 Nov 19 – Fire at Mossey River

Thos. Glendenning, whose farm is at the mouth of the Mossey River at Lake Dauphin, had his stables destroyed by fire on Friday last, the 13th isn’t. All the contents of the stables were burned. There was no insurance.

1914 Nov 19 – Had Hand Taken Off

Leslie Nash, a boy 14 years of age, was brought from Roblin on Tuesday and placed in the hospital here. He was out hunting rabbits at Roblin, when his gun was accidentally discharged, the contents lodging in his left arm. The wound was a bad one and was found necessary to amputate the hand. The boy is doing as well as could be expected.

1914 Nov 19 – Little Girl Smothered

A sad fatality happened at Gilbert Plains on Wednesday, when Thos. Poole’s two-year-old daughter was smothered. The little girl, 2 years old and her brother, 4 years, were left in the home, while Mrs. Poole was absent for a short time. In the meantime fire started with the result that the little girl was smothered. The boy will recover.

1914 Nov 19 – Ethelbert

The sleighing is fine. Farmers are bringing in wood now.
The Ethelbert mill is running all right now. This is what is wanted, a good mill.
Henry Brachman was a passenger to Dauphin on Monday.

1914 Nov 19 – Fork River

Mr. Geo. Lyons, of Winnipegosis, municipal tax collector, spent a short time here on business lately.
Mr. Fleming, of the Northern Elevator has returned from a few days visit to his old home in Veregin, Sask.
Mr. D. Kennedy, manager of the A.T. Co., returned from a short vacation south and reports having enjoyed his outing.
Mrs. C. Clark’s friends will be pleased to hear she has arrived safely at her home in Paswegan, Sask.
The threshermen’s annual ball came off on Friday night and proved an enjoyable affair. Everyone enjoyed the outing. “It’s a Long Way to Tipperary” and we trust all arrived safe.
The Rev. A.S. Wiley, rural dean of Dauphin, took the service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon.
Mr. Sid Gower, who has been spending the summer at Winnipeg, is renewing acquaintances here.
Mr. Green has returned from Dauphin, having taken Mr. Wiley’s place at St. Paul’s on Sunday.

1914 Nov 19 – Winnipegosis

Miss Bernice Walker, of Dauphin, who has been visiting her cousin, Miss Ross, returned home by Monday’s train.
Hon. Hugh and Mrs. Armstrong are visiting at the home of Mrs. Bradley.
Mr. and Mrs. Bert Steele arrived in town on Saturday’s train from Warroad, en route to Mafeking. They are visiting at the home of Mrs. J.P. Grenon.
A number of young folks took this season’s first sleigh ride to Fork River to the Threshermen’s ball. All report having a good time.
The curling and skating rinks are fast getting into shape. E.R. Black has the contract for making the ice.
The bachelor apartments were the scene of an enjoyable evening last week. A whist drive and any oyster supper finished a very pleasant evening.
Ed. Cartwright and family left on Monday’s train for Mafeking, where Mr. Cartwright looks after the interests of the Canadian Lakes Fishing Co.
Ben Hechter has been laid up trough sickness for the past few days.
When are we going to have the formal opening of the new school?
Jos. Grenon, manager of the Winnipegosis hatchery, left on Monday’s train for Fort Qu’Appelle, with sixteen million whitefish eggs, for the new government hatchery there.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 26 – 1914

1914 Feb 26 – Arrested on Murder Charge

The following dispatch was received from Edmonton on Saturday and concerns two parties which are well known around Sifton and Dauphin, Charles Turcunuk and his wife, who is better known as Mrs. Lena Wilson.
About four years ago Turcunuk worked for the railway being engaged cleaning out cars. He afterwards went West to Edmonton, where he started a boarding house among the foreigners and has been doing well up to the time of the advent of his wife a weeks ago. Those who were acquainted with him while he was in Dauphin speak highly of him.
Mrs. Turcunuk, or Wilson, as she was known about town, only left here a few weeks ago for Edmonton. During the Rooke trial she acted as interpreter for the crown.
Charles Turcunuk, a boarding and lodging housekeeper, was arrested this morning on a charge of murdering his four-months-old child in Sifton.
Mrs. Wilson has made a statement that Turcunuk murdered their four-months-old child and afterwards made her promise not to tell the police, or anyone else. She heard the child crying, and all of a sudden it stopped. She ran upstairs to the bedroom and found the child dead on the bed; her husband was standing a few feet away and looking at the corpse. It was then that he grabbed a carving knife and holding it over her head while she knelt on the floor commanded that her mouth be sealed and her tongue be silent forever.

SHE TOLD SECRET

Convinced that her husband would carry out his terrible threat, Mrs. Wilson obeyed and promised to keep the secret, and this morning after seeing Turcunuk escorted to the prisoner’s dock to answer to a charge of non-support, she told the story to Deputy Chief Wright, and other police officials and in doing so submitted a written statement that will be used in evidence at the preliminary hearing next Tuesday morning.
The charge of non-support had just finished and the man fined $75 and costs, when Magistrate Massie commanded him to stand up to listen to a second charge.

1914 Feb 26 – Fork River

Nat Little and daughter, Miss Grace, have left on a trip east on business.
W.J. Johnston, of Mowat, has returned from Mafeking where he spent the winter fishing.
W. King returned the latter end of last week from a business trip to Winnipeg, and states there are a large number there taking in the bonspiel and the Agricultural college course.
Prof. J. Robinson returned from fishing up north and there is little doubt but he will soon have the Fork River band in shape for any emergency.
We notice the minutes of the municipal meeting were published the following week after the meeting in the Herald. This is as it should be Promptness is what the people look for and appreciate.
Mr. T. Secord, homestead inspector, is spending a few days in this burgh.
Mrs. R. McEachern and son, Donnie, are spending a week in Winnipeg.
“B and K” are not breaking any law of the country, Mowat friend. So try again. We have no doubt that the late Oak Brae mail carrier thought it an interesting event every Saturday and we are also sure though it a more interesting and wonderful stroke of luck when the cheques came along. It is not everyone gets paid for carrying their own mail. We don’t hold our meeting on Sunday friend. Get wise and shake yourself. Nuff for this time. Practice what you preach.

1914 Feb 26 – Winnipegosis

The bonspiel will open on Wednesday at one o’clock with sixteen rinks. Keen competition is looked for, as there is a large number of very valuable prizes. Some of the fellows that have been saying all winter what they would do if they wee only skips, will have a chance to try their hand now.
A very serious shooting accident took place about 25 miles south east of here on Monday. A Galician by the name of Kusyk, being shot through the back with a 44. Calibre rifle. The bullet passed through his abdomen. Dr. Medd was sent for and advised him to go to Dauphin Hospital to undergo operations. Since it is learned he has died.
Mrs. A.E. Groff, who has been on the sick list, we are glad to report is much better.
Frank Hechter arrived home from the Winnipeg bonspiel on Friday looking as hearty as ever.
J.P. Grenon left on Monday for Winnipeg and points east.
The W.A. are giving an alphabet party at the home of Mrs. Bradley on Tuesday evening.
Since the parcel post rates went into effect there is a large increase in parcels passing through the mail. The mail carrier is talking about getting a horse. But we see that Eaton’s still left Morten handle their catalogues.