Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 1, 1919

Clubb Sentenced to One Year

Norman Clubb and Fred Beach, the two boys who pleaded guilty to breaking into Benedickson’s store, came up for sentence before P.M. Hawkins on Wednesday. Clubb, who has a bad record was sentenced to one year in jail. Beach was let off on suspended sentence.

G.W.V.A.

All members of the above association and other returned soldiers wishing to exercise their soldier rights with regard to the land scheme are requested to attend a meeting to be held on Thursday, May 1st, at 8.30 p.m. Important information will be imparted.
(Signed)
J.M. Chalmers,
Sec. G.W.V.A.

Fork River

Sowing and ploughing is the order of the day. The land is in good shape and there will be a large acreage sown if the fine weather continues.
Mr. Andy Rowe received an Easter gift. It’s a wee daughter.
Miss Stella and Ina Briggs, teachers of Pine View and Mossey River Schools, returned from their Easter holidays to Winnipeg and Rathwell.
The stork left a little girl at the home of Robert Rowe the other evening.
Mr. J.H. Lowes has returned from Makinak.
This is to be clean up week around the village by the order of the health officer. All should join heartily in the good work.
On Friday evening last, April 25th, the home of Mr. and Mrs. T.B. Lacey, at Oak Brae, on the Mossey, was besieged and taken possession of for the evening by about eighty old-time friends of Private L.H. Lacey, late of 226th Battalion and who enlisted in Dauphin in April 1916. He went overseas with the battalion and later joined the 44th Battalion and was sent to France. He was at Vimy Ridge and after at Lens where he was taken prisoner on the 23rd of August, 1917. He remained a prisoner to the close of the war. On April 5th last he had the pleasure of stepping off the local at Fork River to be greeted by 84 old-time friends. Previous to this a committee had been formed and about one year ago they appointed canvassers to collect fund for the purpose of providing a suitable present to every boy that had enlisted from Fork River and the southern portion of the municipality. It was arranged that the sum of $50, or its equivalent, should be presented to each of the boys after their return in recognition of their services overseas. A public reception has taken place as a rule and the presentation has been made, but owing to the frail condition of Lorne’s mother and out of deference to her, the presentation of a valuable gold watch was made to him at his home. Mr. Wm. King, (whose three sons were “over there” and did their bit gallantly), is the sec.-treasurer of the fund, and who with other members of the committee, drove in from Fork River and at about 10 p.m. Mr. King called for Lorne and presented him with an inspiring address and a gold watch as a token from the people. Young and old had a good time that night over one of the returned, but we thought that night of the many anxious mothers that are still waiting for those they love, and many that wait until the resurrection for their loved ones.
Mrs. and Mr. F.B. Lacey desire to thank Mr. King and the committee for their kindness and consideration in acceding to their wishes and making the presentation at their home.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 25 – 1917

1917 Oct 25 – The Week’s Casualties

Pte. Alfred Kelly, Dauphin, died. (Alfred Louis Kelly, 1881, 461093)
Pte. S.A. Keays, Dauphin, wounded. (Samuel Alfred Keays, 1893, 255859)
Pte. V. Rogers, of Ochre River, wounded. (John Vercor-Rogers, 1885, 216982)

1917 Oct 25 – Awarded Military Medals

The following Dauphin boys have been awarded military medals since the commencement of the war:
Flight Lieut. W.G. Barker. (William George Barker, 1894, 106074)
Gunner. Stewart Widmeyer. (Stuart Robertson Widmeyer, 1895, 151343)
Pte. Batchelor. (???)
Pte. Wm. McLean. (???)
Pte. Percy Lowes. (???)

1917 Oct 25 – Fork River

Fred Cooper arrived home from Dauphin in his new car the other day. Fred, looks imposing sitting at the wheel.
Mr. Timewell has returned from a trip south.
His Grace Archbishop Matheson paid Fork River a visit on Saturday last and held confirmation service.
The snowstorm of Saturday night found considerable grain out in the stook and some potatoes and roots in the ground.
There are three grain buyers on the market new exclusive of the elevator. This should prove satisfactory to all.
Carloads of fat stock are going out on every train. It seems a pity to see so many young heifers being sent out for beef.
The children’s Sunday school service was postponed from Oct. 21 till Oct. 28.
Cohen’s “cordial” is a thing of the past. As Bill Walmsley says “No use trying to establish an industry in this northern end of his country.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 16 – 1914

1914 Jul 16 – Both Drew Gun

There was a lively time at Ashville on Monday and it looked like a shooting bee at one stage. John Burnison, a section man, has been acting strange of late and among other things was threatening to shoot residents. He drive his wife and family from the house and shot a cow belonging to Fred Kemp, the storekeeper. He services of Constable Levins, of the town force, were called into requisition and in company with John Campbell, son of Glen, he went to the house. Burnison told the men to get out and to enforce his order moved emphatically reached for his gun. As he raised the weapon Levins flashed out his revolver and Burnison wilted, dropped the gun. He was then placed under arrest and brought to Dauphin by automobile.

JOHNNY SPRINTED.

When Burnison raised the gun, Johnny Campbell, who was in the room, waited for no further display of hostility, but bolted out the door, dashed through the potato patch and over the back fence. As far as known at Ashville he holds all records for this kind of a sprint up to the present.

1914 Jul 16 – Cadets at Sewell Camp

For the first time in cadets history of this province a camp has been conducted and found to be a success, the boys coming from all parts of the province. The days were given over to drills and training in the various branches of cadet work. Reveille call for rising at 6:30, breakfast at 7:00, cleaning up lines to 8:30, when Divine service was conducted, making it impressive with the boys taking part in the singing and responsive reading; 9 to 11 inspection in drills, musketry signalling, first aid, physical training. 12:00, noon dinner; 1:00 to 2:15, rest; 2:30 to 4:00, drilling and general training work; from 4:00 to 5:00, rest, shower bath, etc.; 6:00 p.m., tea; 7 to 9 games and sports; lights out at 9.45. The above makes up the daily routine of camp life, and for the men in charge there were not many idle moments.

SPORTS CURTAILED

It was planned to have Saturday given over entirely to games and sports, but owning to the great storm that passed over the camp this programme was greatly curtailed, only eleven events being run off. Dauphin won five firsts and one second in these events. Our boys, however, kicked because they could not make it an even six firsts. This was a very creditable showing, however, hen you consider tat there were over 20 contingents of cadets in camp, most of who entered teams for the sports.

SUNDAY ROUTINE

Sunday was given over to drying clothes and blankets after the washing of Saturday’ storm, we were able, however, to have our church parade on Sunday afternoon, when the boys made a fine showing in the march past Col. S.B. Steele, Camp Commandant.

GIMLI NEXT YEAR

The camp this year has been largely in the nature of an experiment, and both officers and men profited by the experience gained, which will be conductive to better results in next year’s camp, which we are informed, on good authority, will be held at Gimli, making a more interesting camp for the boys.

PRESENTATION OF PRIZES

Presentation of prizes won by the Dauphin Cadets will take place as soon as the prizes active from Winnipeg, when both Messers. Manby and Batty will express their appreciation of the boys in camp.

PRIZES WON

The following were won by the Dauphin cadets:
Seniors – 220 yard race – P. Lowes, 1st. 440 yard race – P. Lowes, 1st.
Juniors – Standing broad jump – C. Bossons, 1st.
Horse and rider – C. Bossons and E. Struthers, 1st.
Relay Race – Struthers, Bossons, Dunstan and C, Dickerson, 2nd.

1914 Jul 16 – Notes From the Firing Line

Our boys were seldom late for the Knife and Fork Parade.
Some boys were sick, but after one visit to the hospital tent and a taste of the medicine, were able to appear again at the dining tent.
It was a surprise to the officers in charge what a lot of food the boys could consume.
Sammy Dunstan only had seven eggs, three cups of coffee and five slices of bread and butter for breakfast on Friday morning.
It took a special dish to hold the porridge for the Tierney Bros.
2nd Lieut. Lowes’ tent was the quietest one in the whole came at 6.30 a.m.
After dinner on Wednesday G. White could hardly see and had o be taken to the hospital.
Who stole the pies from the cook’s tent on Friday, July 10th?
Instructors Manby and Batty were on duty from 6 a.m. to 11.45 p.m.; everybody here sleeps with one eye open.
The Dauphin Mouth Organ Band and Quartette, consisting of Messrs. Lowes, C. Batty, Gougeon, C. Fickerson, Dunstan and Murphy, made night horrible after hours.
Sammy Dunstan, with his long blue shirt, was the star of the baseball diamond.
Our four boys, who attended the ambulance class, passed with such high honours, that they have decided to stand practice here. The charge will be moderate.
With the aid of our expect signallers, Dauphin Cadets won the sham fight on Friday night.
We wonder by whose order the mixture was put into the tea on Friday night.
Instructors Manby and Batty had their beds made every day by the cadets. We don’t think.
Gougeon and Kuryk are open to give lessons in wrestling. Charges very moderate.
Our boys were always the first in the grub tent and the last out.
Mr. Campbell, of Souris (late of Dauphin), took some interesting group photos of our boys.
The mud fight a 8.30 p.m. Saturday night was a sight never to be forgotten.
The thanks of the boys are due to Mr. Moor and Mrs. Smithers, of the Winnipeg Y.M.C.A., for the assistance rendered us in various ways.

1914 Jul 16 – Fork River

Mr. Sinstiski, who has been here the last two weeks, took great interest of the Liberal party. He is said to be a cattle buyer but no stock has been shipped up to date. All the bests are off. Nuff said.
Hurrah for Sam Hughes! This northern county knows a good man when we have him, and what we have we will hold, as Scotty says.
Edwin King, of Kinistimo, Sask., is spending his holidays at his home here.
The members of L.O.L., No. 1765, attended the Methodist Church on Sunday, the 12th. Rev. Bro. Clixby, of Winnipegosis, preached the sermon. There was a fair turn out considering the hot weather.
Miss Chase, of Dauphin, is spending her holidays with her grandmother. Mrs. W.R. Snelgrove, on the Mossey.
Walter Clark, of Paswegan, Sask., has returned home after spending a few days among friends here.
Mr. Runny, of Saskatchewan, liberal representative, has returned home with an enlarge cranium, as an election souvenir in remembrance of Fork River.
The Misses Briggs, of Brandon, are visiting at their aunt’s Mrs. T.N. Briggs.
Dr. Shortreed, at his meeting here, stated that the Roblin government was supported by the rabble. As the people here did not agree with these sentiments they did their best on the 10 h to leave him at home to think over the errors of speech, trusting that in future he will have respect for the opinion of others.
Mrs. R. McEachern and son returned from a week’s visit with friends at Million.
Mr. Sam Lowery returned to Winnipeg after a week’s visit here in connection with his farm.

1914 Jul 16 – Winnipegosis

Progress is being made with the new four rooms brick school. The building promises to be adequate to our needs for the present.
Contractor Neely returned on Monday from Dauphin.
Several new residences are going up in town. Among those building are Donald Hattie, Capt. Mapes and Steven Bros.
Coun. Hechter and J.P. Grenon are taking in the exhibition at Winnipeg this week.
The steamer Manitou will commence making trips to the north end of the lake this week.
Capt. Coffey and Jos. Grenon, Sr., are building a boat with a 65 foot keel. The boat will be operated by steam power.
The elections are over and a feeling of goodwill towards all pervades us. The stress of battle is often trying and during the heat of it we are prone to lose our tempers. But this we are glad to say is only a temporary lapse. Misrepresentation should never be resorted to even in the heat of battle. In the report sent the Press of the meting at Fork River, Mr. Lacey went far out of his way to misrepresent sent Mr. Grenon and others. There was no disturbance at the meeting as Dr. Shortreed will readily admit if appealed to. The truth should be the first consideration in sending out newspaper reports.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 9 – 1914

1914 Jul 9 – Boy Scouts at Sewell

The Dauphin contingent of Boy Scouts, numbering 50, left on Wednesday for Sewell, where they go into camp for a week. The boys are in charge of Lieut. E. Manby and Mr. E. Batty.
The officers of the corps are:
Patrol leaders – Stanley Nicholson, Clarence Bossons, Percy Lowes and Tom Walker.
Corporals – W. Gardiner, Henry Terrell, Ed. Gougeon and Cliff. Baird.
New uniforms, including belts and hats, were supplied to the boys before they left and they looked spic and span.
They left on No. 2 as the train pulled out they lustily joined in singing.
“Where the boys are dog-gone glad to lay in Sewell;
“Sew” – I don’t know how to spell it.
But I am going to my home in Sewell camp.”

1914 Jul 9 – Fork River

The Reeve has proclaimed Monday, July 13, a civic holiday.