Today in the Dauphin Herald – March 27, 1919

$20,000 Damage Suit

Suit for $20,000 against the Canadian National Railways has been filed in the Court of King’s Bench at Saskatoon by Evelyn Haley, widow of Joseph Haley, of Dauphin, a brakeman, who was crushed to death between a freight car and a loading platform on the C.N.R. at Hawkes Spur, near Hudson Bay Junction, last fall. The action will be heard at the next sitting of the court.

THE ACCIDENT
The fatal accident occurred early in the morning of October 18, 1918. According to the statement of claim which has been filed at the court house by Messrs. McCraney, McKenzie & Hutchison, solicitors for the plaintiff; Joseph Haley was a brakeman on an extra train, under Conductor B.L. Haley, of Dauphin. The conductor was instructed to proceed with his train from the junction to Hawkes Spur, one mile west, for the purpose of picking up two freight cars which were on the spur track. This was done, and after attending to his duties as brakeman, which included fixing switches and couplings, Haley gave the engineer the signal to go ahead. He then climbed on to the step of the last car on the train. It was dark at the time.
The train started and Haley was crushed between the side of the car and a loading platform that was placed alongside the tracks. He received injuries from which he died shortly after.

G.W.V.A.

Members of the above association please note that a general meeting will be held to night (Thursday) in association headquarters at 8 p.m. sharp. A full attendance is requested.

Plebiscite Advocated

Increase interest is being taken in the matter of a memorial for our soldiers who made the supreme sacrifice. The residents of the rural municipality of Dauphin must be taken into consideration as well as the tow in the proposed memorial. It is suggested that a plebiscite should be taken. The matter however, should be thoroughly discussed in the columns of the Herald before it is submitted to a vote.

War and Repatriation

A lecture was given in the town hall on Monday evening on the above subject by Lieut.-Col. (Rev.) Woods, secretary of the Repatriation committee. Mayor Bowman presided and introduced the speaker.
Lieut.-Col. Woods said he did not think the people of Canada realized what was at stake during the four years of strife nor what was at stake today and proceeded to enlighten his audience as to the aims of Germany which fell nothing short, in his opinion, of the conquest of France, Belgium and Britain, and then the United States and Canada. The cruelty practiced and the devastation wrought by the Germans was spoken of and denounced. By the use of a diagram on a blackboard the speaker described the part taken by “The Little Black Devils” in the action of April 22nd, 1915, and paid a glowing tribute to their conduct on that memorable occasion. Referring to the conditions necessary to the reconstruction of the Empire he outlined the course to be adopted, his great plea being for unity and purity in all matters. Coming to the repatriation side of his subject, he described the scheme proposed for the settlement of returned men on the land. In the event of a man being able to prove hi ability to farm properly the government would purchase a quarter section of land, at a cost not exceeding $5000 and resell to the applicant at cost price, no commission being charged or allowed. An additional sum of $3000 may be borrowed for the purchase of stock and machinery. In this capital sum no interest will be charged for the first two yeas; at the end of that period 5 per cent per annum would be charged. Coming to the men who were not farmers Col. Woods said that vocational training would be given and all reasonable means employed to help the men to resume their places in the community and home life of the nation. The lecturer laid emphasis on the fact that many of “our boys” were coming back to us with their nervous system shattered, and he bespoke for them kindly sympathy and and consideration.
At the conclusion of his lecture Col. Woods invited those present to ask questions, which he would be pleased to answer.
Replying to the question, “Would returned men get a rebate on their taxes,” the answer was in the affirmative, it being explained that the provincial government would recoup the municipalities.
The Land Settlement Board, Post Office Building, Winnipeg, was the answer given to a question as to where returned men should apply for any and all information in connection with this scheme.
Col. Woods nominated a committee of ladies and gentlemen, Mr. F.T. Wright being mentioned as chairman.
A verse of the National Anthem brought the proceedings to a close.

Fork River

Geo. Tilt has bought from Jack Chipley his house and lots, and intends residing in town.
Wm. King has purchased the north half of 31/2 29 19, the Haryey farm and adjoining quarter.
Wm. Bollen, of Dauphin, is visiting this district selling medicines.
Fred Cooper has finished his contract for the gravel for the new schoolhouse and is now busy hauling gravel for the foundation for the new elevator which is to be built this summer.
On the 14th inst. a concert, box social and dance were held in the Orange Hall under the auspices of the baseball club. Each event was a distinct success and reflected great credit on the members of the dramatic society who was responsible for the entertainment. The sale of the boxes realized the sum of $146.

Fork River Criticism

To the Editor of the Herald
Sir, Some two weeks ago a box social was held at Fork River and at the beginning of the proceeding a statement was made on the platform that the proceeds were to be used by a baseball outfit and the balance was to go to the return soldiers fund. The bidding for the boxes was spirited, good prices obtained and some $135.00 over expenses realized. It now transpires that some of those interested in baseball intend to use the money not only to buy bats, balls, etc. but also baseball uniforms for the players. Should this be carried out how much will be left for the return soldiers fund. There is not a doubt that the free bidding was due to the majority of those present believing that the greater portion of the money they were giving was going to the return soldiers fund and it has been remarked that this fund should get the even one hundred. For the past four years the government has been supplying free uniforms and should there be any return soldiers on the baseball team no one will object to their being supplied with a baseball uniform but then again there will be no doubt the others who did not accept a government uniform and presumably being on a baseball team they are sound wind and limb and there is no doubt that the people who payed their money would object to it being used to supply them with free suits to play baseball in when they refuse to accept uniforms to serve their country in.
A contributor,
Fork River, March 24.

Fork River Agricultural Society

The first meeting of this society was held in the municipal office at Fork River on Saturday March 22nd and was well attended. T.B. Venables was in the chair and E.F. Wilson acted as secretary. The chairman spoke of the advantages that would be accrued to the district through a good live agricultural society and those present showed considerable enthusiasm over the prospect. D.F. Wilson provisional secretary also spoke and read portions of the agricultural society’s act. The officers elected were T.B. Venables president, J.H. Richardson vice and as directors J.D. Robertson, W. King, F.F. Halfinbrak, W. Greghill, J. Yakavanka, Panko Solomon, S.J. Perepeluk, D.F. Wilson, Mike A. Moyer. A discussion then took place as the advantages of purchasing grounds and it was the unanimous opinion that the society should join the Mossey River School District in securing grounds large enough for an agricultural show. A meeting of the members is called to [unknown] purchase of the grounds Tuesday April 22nd.

Sifton

Subscriptions to the Great War Veteran Association of Dauphin from the Ruthenian citizens in the Sifton district. The subscriptions were given after a public meeting held on the 9th under the auspice of the Canadian Patriotic Association.
W. Mazuryk, 5, S. Stichishon 5, M. Litowetz 50 cents, K. Choloweky 4, H. Konowalchuk 5, Kostesky 5, J. Stifanuk 5, F. Guiazdowsky 5, A. Stifanuk 5, N. Dudar 5, P. Sawchyn 10, P. Trach 5, O. Burawkyo 5, N. Ogryalo 10, J. Korolyk 5, M. Nakonechny 5, A. Herman 1.50, G. Nikikchuk 2, M. Kuzyk 2, J. Kuyk 1, H. Dundar 1, O. Hrimak 5, W. Blenduk 25 cents, J. Feduk 5, D. Wasilishen 4, J. Wasilyshen , F. Kostur 5, T. Mostowy 5, T. Belesky 5, E. Pankiw 5, W. Jarema 5, M. Hafichuk 5, T. Bayduza 10, W. Kuzyk 1, N. Popelta 5, C. Bayduza 2, N. Zubreaky 1, N. Hnatuk 1, A. Atamanchuk 2, P. Brazchul 2, S. Harema 1, P. Hrushowy 75 cents, PO. Nakonechny 2, D. Heschuk 2, M. Kolcun 1.25, P. Lukenko 1, P. Swerbyos 15, W. Shimansky 5, F. Farion 15, Sopunik 5, D. Kindrat 6, H. Kindrat 5, J. Atamanchuk 1, H. Sokal 2, P. Kuzyk 5, Hryhorchuk 10, J. Rola 10, J. Burtniak 10, S. Lozinesky 5, S. Lusko 5, N. Xabiaka 5, A. Basurba 5, S. Halinsky 5, W. Brazchuk 5, S. Atamanchuk 5, H. Stasiuk 5, W. Paulak 5, H. Kopychuk 5, J. Zarusky 5, Miss P Xarusky 5, N Dozinsky 1, M. Pasieka 1, Mrs. A. Dolhun 1, S. Marsenuk 2, Pulak 5, S. Pulak 5, S. Jasentuk 2, P. Burtnial 5, W. Lilik 1, L. Waly 1, N. Jasentuk 5, C. Atamachuk 5, G. Shimanszy 2, S. Nabozak 1, Mrs. Merenchuk 2; Mrs. Shimansky 1, Mrs. A. Basaraba 2, Miss C. Basaraba 1, A. Weselowsky 2, J. Weselowsky 2, F. Bunka 1, P. Nabozniak 5, M. Komarnisky 2, B. Komarnisky 2, S. Weselowsky 1, H. Lysak 3, Mrs. Potosky 5, W. Lulashni 3, S. Dowbush 5, M. Lulashnik 2, J. Rafalsky 5, H. Shmigarowsky 5, M. Harasym 1, W. Kalita 5, M. Kwolik 5, J. Kwolik 5, N. Rokush 4, N. Pawlowsky 10, A. Jakamisky 5, S. Ganchar 2, K. Horodnisky 5, J. Ganchar 5, J. Lucharawy 4, S. Stadnyk 5, J. Zagrodny 2, P. Spoel 5, F. Kalychak 1, S. Jakamisky 1, N. Dirkach 1, A. Ganchar 5, J. Zagrodny 5, J. Ganchar 1, J. Jakilashek 2, A. Kruk 5, A. Kruk 5, N. Lukowich 2, Ganchar 2, Werbisky 1, Werbisky 2, J.A. Polowy 3, R.T. Edwards 1, M. Shachinger 7, S. Antoski 2, N. Uskowsky 2, O. Dirhak 2, N. Martinuk 4, S. Jasentuk 5, M. Jarema 1, N. Rizok 1, Z. Plawusky 1, J. Shmenduk 1, F. Burtniak 1, M. Saruk 2, W. Kinzersky 1, N . Brezdin 1, S. Brezdin 1, M.P. Berezyuski 5. Total $548.25.

Winnipegosis

The regular monthly meeting of the Home Economic Society, held Friday, March 21st, took the form of a social evening. Owing to our regular club room being burned down some short time ago the meeting was held in the Union Church. An excellent address was given by Dr. Medd, touching on skin diseases and the hospital question, but the main question was “Infant Feeding.” The subject is a practical one and we feel that by having our local physician speak to us we are getting deeper into community life, which is the real aim of the society.
Mr. CH. Dixon, our local lawyer, gave a very interesting talk on law, and la-making and we feel very grateful to Mr. Dixon for having so favored us. Then followed a musical programme of choruses, duet, reading and a pleasing solo by Miss Ida Rintoal. Tea was served at the close by the ladies, and we felt that our social evening’s quarterly would prove a success not only to our members but to all interested in the town.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – January 16, 1919

Dauphin Flour in Belgium

Our readers will remember that shortly after the first reports of the suffering among the Belgian people, due to the Hun invasion in 1914, reached Canada, the Dauphin Milling and Creamery Co. Limited, ground a carload of flour from wheat donated by farmers and others in Dauphin and adjoining municipalities. This carload was duly shipped to Belgium but no official record was ever received of its having reached its destination. The following letter received a few days ago by the company makes very interesting reading, and it is gratifying to note that at least part of the donation reached the people for whom it was intended:
“52 Rue De Mondigny,
“Charleroi, Belgium.
“Dec. 1, 1918.
“Dear Sir,—You will no doubt be greatly surprised to receive this letter from a person that you have never seen nor heard of before, and your surprise will be still greater when you hear that it is written at your request.
“One day, early in 1915, I was present at the opening of a bag of flour which, with several others, had just arrived from Canada. At the bottom of the sack was a strip of paper bearing these words, ‘Whoever gets this bag of flour write and let us know if it is good.’ I would have written at once only the Germans, with their usual kindheartedness, made things so easy for us that letter writing was out of the question. I hope never to see a German again as long as I live. ‘The best of them are bad.’
“Your flour was excellent; it has not been our luck to have such good quality since. For the last three years our bread—it really doesn’t deserve the name of bread—was composed of everything except flour, thanks to Fritz.
“You would not recognize your flour sack. It has been transferred into a beautiful sofa cushion and occupies a prominent place in our drawing-room It is the admiration of all visitors.
“Last week the Canadian troops came to Charleroi; they received a warm welcome on all sides. Everyone here speaks highly of your compatriots, many English regiments passed two or three days in this town before entering Boschland. With every good wish for Xmas and with kindest regards.
“Believe me, yours sincerely,
(Signed) Andree McDonnell.”

Mossey River Council

The first meeting of the council of 1919 took place at Fork River on Jan. 7th.
The clerk swore in the newly elected members – T.B. Venables, reeve; J. Yakavanka, councilor for Ward 1; E.A. Marcroft for Ward 3, and J. Namaka for Ward 5.
Bylaws were passed making the councilors’ fees $4 per day and appointing D.F. Wilson sec.-treasurer at a salary of $875.
The bylaws of 1918 appointing the solicitors and health officer were confirmed for 1919.

COMMITTEES
Finance – Hunt, Marcroft and Paddock.
Bridges – Coun. Reid and Hunt.
Public Works – Coun. Marcroft, Paddock and Namaka be public works committee for Wards 3, 4 and 5, and Coun. Yakavanka, Hunt and Reid be public works committee for Wards 1, 2 and 6.
Paddock-Marcroft – That the bridge committee examine the bridges that are needing repairs and make an estimate of the material that will be required for the season’s bridge work and report to the clerk who is instructed to purchase same.
Hunt-Namaka – That the assistance which has been given to the family of the late Peter Smith be discontinued.
Hunt-Marcroft – That each councilor make a diagram showing the work in his ward which he would prefer to come under the working of the Good Roads Act for the yea 1919, and forward said diagrams to the sec.-treasurer, who is instructed to make a diagram from them showing the whole municipality, which diagram is to be forwarded to the Good Roads board.
Marcroft-Paddock – That the clerk instruct the solicitors to prepare a bill legalizing the assessment roll of 1918, and that the member for the constituency be asked to bring it before the legislature at the coming session.
Marcroft-Hunt – That a grant of $50 be made to ex-Reeve Lacey for miscellaneous expenses.
Hunt-Marcroft – That the assessment roll for the year 1919 is hereby adopted for the years 1919 and 1920.
Reid-Namaka – That Reeve Venables be a delegate to the convention of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities and that the delegates receive $25 for expenses.
Council adjourned to meet at the call of the reeve.

Fork River

Mrs. James Rice, of Northlake School, has returned from a trip to Winnipeg.
Mrs. R. McEachren and daughter Helen were recent visitors to Dauphin.
A car of young fat stock was shipped out last train. Good prices were realized by the sellers.
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Little have returned from a short visit south.
H. Swartwood, International Implement Co., general agent, was at Fork River last week to hook up the orders of the local agent, W. King, for the coming season. Agent Billy K. is most optimistic as to the coming season’s business and to show his faith, has placed liberal orders.
Sunday school in All Saints Church every Sunday at 2 p.m.
Mr. Jarvis is now teacher of the Mowat School.
The continued fine weather is very favorable to stock and they are in fine condition.
Grain and cordwood are coming to market in considerable quantities every day.
The following are the officers of Purple Star Lodge, L.O.L., No. 1765, for the ensuing term:
W.M., Bro. C.E. Bailey; D.M., W.J. King; chaplain, Edwin King; rec. secretary, Wm. King; fin. Secretary, A. Hunt; D. of O., F. Cooper; treasurer, Sam Bailey; lecturer, F.F. Hanfebrak; dep. lecturer, Sam Reid. Committeemen – M. Cooper, H. Hunter, W. Russell, Ed. Morris, S. King, Jos. Bickel.

Sifton

A crowded schoolroom showed the appreciation of the residents of Sifton district of the Wycliff School Xmas concert. The hit of the evening was a three-piece sketch called “Santa and the Fairies.” Joe Reid acted as Santa, Miss Tilly Farion as Queen of the Fairies, and Witch Doubletongue was impersonated by Mary Braschuk. Patriotic songs opened the program, while several part-song contributed much to the enjoyment of the evening. An effective item was a serenade by the school children, clustering in a semicircle on the platform, with a flashlight playing on them for the darkened auditorium. Mrs. J.A. Campbell contributed the piano and violin accompaniments.
A good old-time dance, at which there was a large attendance, followed the concert. The dance music was given by Mrs. Campbell and Messrs. Marcott, Potoski, Kuczma, Halinski, and others.
The proceeds of the evening, totaling $56.75, have been placed in the bank as the Wycliff School Children’s Amusement fund. Part of it is to be applied at once to the repair of the school toboggan slide, a new concert platform, and ropes for the swings.
The teachers of the school, Mr. Bousfield and Miss Trew, and the children are grateful to the friends who gave the ample and excellent refreshments; to Mr. Paul Wood for the loan of his piano and for the willing assistance given by friends before and during the evening.
The fudge and taffy were provided by the children from their own lunch as a treat to adults, enjoying the Christmas spirit. The artists responsible for the blackboard scenes of the stage were Leslie Kennedy and Tilly Farion.

Winnipegosis

Old Josey Campbell, who resides near Water Hen, had his house and content totally destroyed by fire last Friday. The house was a new frame building, and the loss is ruinous to old Josey.
The council of the Village of Winnipegosis held its regular meeting last Tuesday. The council has been shorthanded for several months but is now complete, being reinforced by the addition of two new councilors, J. Willis and Chas. Denby. The council donated $400 to the Red Cross and discussed the building of a hospital and giving the town better fire protection. These last two matters will come up again at next council meeting.
The interment of the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy, Ochre River, formerly of this town, took place on Tuesday. Rev. Mr. Hook conducted the service.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – January 2, 1919

Big German Gun for Dauphin

While nothing has been definitely settled regarding the disposition of much of the spoils of war captured from the Germans enough is known that Dauphin will have the refusal of one of the big cannons. The railway board, it is understood, is willing to grant sufficient of the right-of-way in front of the Grand View Hotel for a foundation upon which to mount the monster.

Reeve Lacey Wants the Kaiser Shot

To the Editor of the Herald:
SIR—The following is an extract from a letter received from a relative in English since the signing of the armistice and return of the prisoners of war from Germany:
“There have been several boys of Penarth, returned prisoners of war, and some of them have been treated most cruel. One has an eagle branded on each side of his face, his teeth knocked out, and a piece cut off his tongue. Another with an eagle and “God Blast England,” or some such words as that, and a torpedo on his forehead. There are quit a lot of Germans prisoners here and when one sees them one cannot help using strong language when you know they have had such fiendish thins done to our prisoners by these Germans.”
The above is one instance that is recorded out of thousands that are unfortunately too true. God grant that our representatives at the peace conference may not forget the horrible tortures inflicted on those French and Belgian women and children, and, on the noble men of the Allied armies and navies who voluntarily offered their liberty, limbs and lives by thousands to save the world from German bondage. We shall be robbed of victory if those fiendish war lords are not stripped of all they possess and led out and shot by some of the boys they have tortured. Let us back up our army and navy and insist on a death punishment for the Kaiser and his war lords: otherwise there will be no lasting peace.
Fed B. Lacey
Fork River.

Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River on December 18th, all the members being present.
The minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted as read on motion of Coun. Hunt, seconded by Coun. Namaka.
Communications were read from St. Joseph’s Orphanage, the Bank of Commerce, the fire guardian, J. Rosenthal (re: sale of bridge), P.J. Robertson and T.N. Briggs (re: flooding of land next spring), the Navy League (re: grant), tax accounts of F. Thorsteinson and N. Syder, Lawrence municipality (re: boundary road) and the inspector of legal offices.
McDonell-Reid – That a grant of $250 be made to the Navy League of Canada.
Hunt-Yakavanka – That Constable Lyon push proceedings with a view to having the stable removed from the lane in block 1, Fork River.
Hunt-McDonell – That a rebate of taxes for 1918 of $13.60 be made on the Orange Hall property.
Reid-Yakavanka – That the accounts of Coun. McDonell ($134) and Hunt ($34.50) for letting and inspecting work be passed.
Hunt-Reid – That the account for culverts to be used on the Dauphin-Mossey River boundary of $195.20, at present charged to Ward 1 be transferred to the public works account and applied on the work for which the government grant is given.
Yakavanka-Reid – That the accounts as recommended by the finance committee be passed.
Hunt-Reid – That Wards 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 be credited with $230 each of the Government grant, with the understanding that the money be spent on the main roads through the Wards.
Yakvanka-Paddock – That Coun. Hunt and Reid be authorized to obtain material for a bridge across Fishing River, on the west side of 2-29-19.
Reid-McDonell – That the Reeve and Coun. Hunt be delegates to the municipal convention to be held in Winnipeg on January 21st, 22nd, and 23rd.
McDonell-Reid – That the clerk put up notices asking for applications for the position of sec.-treasurer, and also advertise in the Dauphin Herald.
Hunt-Reid – That the council tender Reeve Lacey a hearty vote of thanks for his services to the municipality and wish them every success in the future.
The council then adjourned.

Fork River

Wm. Northam has returned from a two weeks’ visit to Weyburn, Sask.
The Chute brothers from Dauphin passed through here recently wit their teams. They intend to haul fish during the winter on Lake Winnipegosis. This is a local industry which puts an honest dollar within reach of our farmers.
Gordon Weaver, of Magnet, was a recent visitor at the home of Mr. T.N. Briggs. He has been in poor health for some time past and is going to the hospital for treatment.
Sid Gower is wearing that broad smile that won’t come off. It’s a Daughter of the Empire.
Mr. F. Cooper was a recent visitor to Dauphin.
Coun. Archie McDonell paid Dauphin a visit at the weekend. The genial Archie has just recovered from the flu.
Edwin King has gone to Winnipeg to take a business course.
The new council will assume office on the 7th inst. Your correspondent will watch carefully the moves of our representatives and note them for the Herald. Progress should be the watchword. There is a lot of work awaiting the activity of the council and we all hope they will prove equal to the occasion.

Winnipegosis

At the annual meeting of the Home Economics Society the officer elected were as follows:
President – Mrs. Houchin, re-elected.
Vice – Mrs. Dennett.
Secretary – Mrs. Spence, re-elected.
Treasurer – Miss R. Whale.
With the New Year we have a library of about 100 books belonging to the society and we hope to add another hundred books before the year is out. The January meeting will take the form of a social evening when each member is asked to bring a friend along.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 24 – 1910

1910 Nov 24 – Mossey River Council

A meeting of the Council was held in the Council Chamber, Winnipegosis, on Friday, Nov. 11, Councillor Fleming absent.
The minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted.
Nicholson-Toye – Re Shannon Road – That this roadway be opened on payment by Thos. Shannon of $150. Motion list.
Lacey-Toye – That Thos. Shannon be notified to attended a special meeting of the Council, to settle the matter of the road, to be held at Winnipegosis on Tuesday, Dec. 6 at 10 o’clock a.m.
Toye-Paddock – That any member of the Council who can attend the convection of Manitoba Municipalities be a delegate to the convention and that he be allowed $10 for expenses.
Hunt-Toye – That S. Bailey’s account for $75 as road commissioner be passed.
Nicholson-Hunt – That the accounts as recommended by the Finance Committee be passed; Dauphin Press Co., $10.50; Union Manitoba Municipalities, $20; Postage, $9; Dauphin Hospital, $100.
Paddock-Toye – That the Council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis on Tuesday, Dec. 4th at 10 a.m.

1910 Nov 24 – Fork River

Tom Shannon was the unfortunate loser of a separator this week, by some unaccountable means it caught fire in the night and when the family got up in the morning they saw that the separator had been burnt.
Mr. Venables is now occupying this Dallas’ farm. Mr. Dallas and family have moved to Winnipegosis for the winter.
J. Lockhart and family spent Saturday in Winnipegosis.
Harry Little paid Dauphin a visit last week.
A stable 28×30 is now being built for the benefit of the congregation of the English Church, when completed it will be a credit to those who helped to put it up.
Wm. King is paying the Swan River Valley a visit this week, in the interest of the Orange Order.

1910 Nov 24 – To the editor of the Herald: –

SIR – Re “Fork Riverite’s” letter in your issue of Nov. 10th, which I presume he must have penned while suffering from an attack of whiskeyitis, otherwise he would surely not have been so careless in his statements. Re the establishment of post offices, I again invite him to examine documents at Oak Brae. Re irregularities and irresponsibility of mail carriers between Oak Brae and Fork River, I refer him to P.O. Inspector, Winnipeg feeling sure that if “Fork Riverite” will formulate his charges he will get the satisfaction he is no doubt looking for. “Fork Riverite’s” reference to the people being tankful to the government for building roads and bridges with the people’s own money, also as to the inability of the government to build and control elevators is too amusing to be taken seriously. If my previous letter was the cause of “Fork Riverite” stooping to utter falsehoods I am in a serious predicament, for I read somewhere “Was unto the sinner but we onto him that causeth him to sin.” So in future I shall refrain from replying to this individual who is “intoxicated with the exuberance of his own verbosity.” I have spoken.

Fred Lacey, P.M. Oak Brae

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 10 – 1910

1915 Nov 10 – MGR. JOST SUICIDES

The Well Known and Popular Manager of Union Bank Suicides while Temporarily Insane
The people of the town were shocked Sunday afternoon when the news spread that George N. Jost, manager of the Union Bank had committed suicide by shooting himself. During the past few days he had been complaining of not feeling well, and on Saturday night consulted a doctor, who told him that his temperature was high, and that it indicated typhoid fever and that he would arrange to have him placed in the hospital. The friend with whom he was staying left the premises for a short time, and during this period Mr. Jost procured a gun and retired to the stable, where he managed to discharge the gun by stooping over it and pulling the trigger. The charge entered the upper part of the abdomen over the left side of the stomach. When found he was still alive, but expired after a few minutes.

Coroner Harrington held an inquest Sunday afternoon and the verdict of the jury was that Jost came to his death by a gunshot wound while in a state of temporary insanity brought on by a high state of temperature in the early stages of typhoid fever.

Mr. Jost was about 28 years of age, and came to Dauphin three months ago from Kindersley, Sask., to assume the management of the Union Bank branch here. His home is in Guysboro, N.S. where his parents live. He was a popular young man and stood well with the business public. The remains were taken to Guysboro for interment.

1915 Nov 10 – Fork River

Editor King of the Dauphin Press paid us a visit last Saturday.
Professor Sutton gave an entertainment in the Hall last Saturday. Quite a number attended.
Mr. Scrase paid Winnipegosis a visit this week.
E. Clawson who has been away all summer returned from Rothwell last week.
W. Clark who has been away for some time returned last week.
Ten quarter sections of land were sold here last week for taxes.
Mr. Little left here last week for a two weeks holiday in the States.
Paul Wood from Sifton spent Thanksgiving Day here visiting D.F. Wilson.
Archie Stewart from Winnipegosis was here last week.
Quite a lot of damage has been done in this district by forest fires.
E. Clawson and A. Forbes paid Dauphin a visit.

1915 Nov 10 – To the Herald: –

SIR – Re Oak Brae P.M., F.B. Lacey’s reply to a correspondent of Fork River, re Fishing River p.o. and elevator at Fork River says it is a concoction of misrepresentations. Our O.B. friend does not like the truth. At a Burrows meeting at Fork River during the last Dominion election, our O.B. friend was asked by a large number of Fishing River farmers, to explain the reason the p.o. petitioned for was not given to some one of them and why one was established at O.B. instead. He replied that he was in a hurry but as soon as the train left he would explain. They waited, the train left, and our O.B. P.M. was conspicuous by his absence. No explanation. Shortly after our O.B. friend was sent to Winnipeg and we saw him no more till after the election at Fishing River.

If the P.M. appointed at Fishing River had left, there were plenty of other settlers left to take it. He states as an excuse the train did not stop at Fishing River. It does not stop at Oak Brae but he got a post office there and we never heard of a petition asking for one for Lacey P.O.

A post office was established at Fishing River Oct. 1st, 1910, and the mail is carried from Sifton, and not on the same date as the Lacey post office was established (September 25, 1905) as our Oak Brae friend would lead the public to believe in his letter, “A Misrepresentation.” Was a P.O. lost, strayed or stolen for the period of five yeas? The new P.M. has lived eight years there; he should have had it sooner. True he was a supporter of Glen Campbell at the last Dominion election, but he did not get the P.O. then, no Tories need apply. He, I believe, supported the Grits at the last Provincial election and got a P.O. in short order, which shows to get post offices keep in with the postmaster general at Oak Brae. He kicks because the people are tired of the O.B. mail coming in and going out at any old time and carried by every Tom, Dick or Harry. Our O.B. friend told us some time ago it is well to remind people of their duty as they get careless, so we are only giving our friend his own medicine.

Regarding the clique at Fork River, they are doing nicely, the place is booming in the absence of our friend. As for the champions of the Provincial Government, we have a great deal to thank them for in bridges and roads. They have always kept their promises to the people here.

Re the elevator that the O.B. P.M. is worrying about being lost, strayed or style. He is the only man we heard say that the government promised one this fall. True we need one at this point and we sent a petition for one, but the government has no say. There is an Elevator Commission appointed and I have no doubt they will build us one as soon as possible.

Our friend mentions the 9th of June often. His must have had an attack of the Hipocketzotic them. He reminds one of the little boy who stuck a pin in his toy balloon left after the wind escaped.

A Fork Riverite

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 20 – 1910

1910 Oct 20 – Chapter of Accidents

Wm. Cruise has Ribs Broken
Wm. Ashmore Leg Broken
Gun Accident
Wm. Ashmore of Sifton, met with a serious accident Saturday. While felling a beef, the animal made an unexpected plunge and fell on one of Mr. Ashmore’s legs, breaking two bones below the knee. He was brought to the hospital, where he is doing as well as can be expected.

1910 Oct 20 – Had Ribs Broken

Robt. Cruise, who recently invested in a power gang plough and why is busy ploughing his farm south of the town, has among the crew operating the plough his son William, aged 17 years. On Saturday night, William attempted to jump from the engine to the plough and was thrown under the wheel and the weight of the plough passing over him, breaking four ribs and slightly injuring him internally. We are glad to report that the young man is now on a fair way recovery.

1910 Oct 20 – Arm Amputated

John Kolodichook of Pine River, was accidentally shot Sunday morning in the left forearm, which resulted in amputation of same just below the elbow. Mr. K was out shooting and had climbed a tree to see if there were any ducks on a nearby pond. Before climbing he laid his gun against the trunk of the tree. When part of the way up the tree he slipped and fell, discharging the gun with the above result. The unfortunate man had no attention for three hours after the accident, and bled from eleven o’clock in the morning until the arrival of Dr. Lineham that evening at seven. He was brought to Dauphin on a special Sunday evening, and taken to the hospital.

1910 Oct 20 – Fork River

Mrs. Lipsky and Mr. Shaffer, from St. Louis, are staying at Mrs. Clawson’s in this village.
Mr. Dallas having disposed of his farm intends to have a sale on November 2nd. Mrs. C. Bailey gave birth to a son last week.
A large congregation attended the English Church last Sunday night for Harvest Festival, when a very appropriate sermon was preached by the Rev. H.H. Scrase. The church was very prettily decorated by Mrs. Rowe, Mrs. Scrase, Miss Collins, Miss Gracie Little and Mr. King, Churchwarden.
Mr. Hugh Armstrong, M.P.P for Portage la Prairie and Provincial Secretary, paid us a visit last week and was accompanied by Mr. J. Grenon and Mr. D.F. Wilson looking over land in this district.
Mrs. C. Bailey gave birth to a son last week.
Mrs. Crouch and children who have been visiting Mrs. Kennedy, left for Winnipeg last week.
Mrs. Morris, who has been staying here for some time left for Winnipegosis last week.
Mrs. Johnson, from Winnipegosis, is staying with her daughter, Mrs. D. Kennedy.

1910 Oct 20 – Sifton

Rev. Dr. Carmichael of Winnipeg and Dr. McLaren, of Toronto, stopped off at Sifton on Saturday on their way east.
Mark Cardiff, Dauphin, paid us a business visit last week.
Hugh Armstrong, M.P.P., passed through here a week ago on his way home from Winnipegosis.
J.G. Harvey, M.P.P., Robt. Hunt, and A.J. Rawson, Dauphin, were among the visitors to Sifton on Sunday.
Messrs. Kennedy & Barrie started up their flour mill on Monday for another season’s operations.
Wm. Ashmore met with a rather serious accident on Saturday last while felling a beef. The animal made an unexpected plunge forward, falling on Mr. Ashmore’s legs, breaking both bones below the knee in one leg. He was taken to the Dauphin General Hospital for treatment.
Everybody took advantage of the prevailing fine weather and drove in to the Ruthenian Church Services held by His Reverence Archbishop Sczeptycki, of the Greek Orthodox Church, on behalf of the adherents of that rite. The gathering was the largest in Sifton for years.
Mrs. Wm. Ashmore and John Kennedy were visitors to Dauphin on Sunday.
H.H. Scrase, Fork River, held services at the mission on Sunday, also Rev. Father Perhach at he Greek Orthodox Church.
Rev. Archbishop Scztepski and staff, left Monday evening for Prince Albert.

1910 Oct 20 – To the Herald:

SIR – In your issue of Oct. 6th, I noticed something about a missing post-office at Fishing River and a P.M. Re the missing P.O. That said P.O. was called Sobeiski and a man named Demko Kasczuk was duly appointed but owing to his moving to Sifton he would not accept that appointment therefore the post office was never opened so I fail to see where it was missing. Re the elevator. We heard a great deal about it in June but since then it has been hors de combat. Re the mail bag. I was always under the impression that the P.M. at the distributing office had the locking up of all mail bags leaving his office so as to prevent such things as tacks etc., getting mixed up with the mail and if that is so the mail carrier would be ignorant of what the mail bag contained.

A Subscriber

1910 Oct 20 – To the Herald:

SIR – In reply to, and for the information of, “A Fork River Correspondent” whose concoction of misrepresentations appeared in your issue of Oct. 6th, I beg to be allowed to state the following facts regarding the establishing of a post office at Fishing River. That on Sept. 25th, 1905, the post office that the farmers of Fishing River petitioned for on N.W. ¼ 33-28-19 west P. mer. was established under the name of “Sobieski,” and that Demko Kasczuk who was mentioned in the petition as a fit and proper person, was appointed as Postmaster. That the necessary papers, etc., for opening the office were taken to Kasczuk’s place of business at Fishing River, and it was found that Kasczuk had departed for Sifton and had barred the doors and windows, and that he did not intend to return to Fishing River to do business because the R.R. Company would not stop their trains at that point. That as there was no other person asking to take the office over, the matter was allowed to drop for a time; so it will appear that it was the postmaster that was lost, and not the post office as stated. I would also state that a postmaster has been found since in the person of one of Mr. Glen Campbell’s workers at last Dominion election, and that the Fishing River P.O. is in operation. Also on the same date (Sept. 25th, 1905) “Lacey” P.O. was established (since named Oak Brae) 5½ miles east of “Sobieski” and Fred Lacey was appointed Postmaster and still survive, much to the annoyance, it seems, of the Fork Riverite whose letter appeared on Oct. 6th. As to tacks and sugar being put into Oak Brae mail at Fork River, I may say that I am not responsible for what is put into the mail bag at Fork River. I would advise him to complain to Fork River postmaster or to the postmaster general at Ottawa, and state what damage has been done and I am confident he will get satisfaction, also if this correspondent will find out and inform me as to time of making up mail for Winnipegosis at Fork River I will try and get in on time and thus please him has he is the only one who seems to worry about the matter, we have yet to receive the first complaint on this score from any one who has mailed a letter from this office to Winnipegosis. If “A Fork River Correspondent” will call at Oak Brae I will produce documentary evidence to support the statement re establishment of post office which I am certain will convince this reckless individual.

Not many years ago we had in the British House of Commons a set of politicians known as “Little Englanders.” They were opposed to the progress and expansion of the empire and it seems to me that one or two of that party must have got their quietus in the old land and turned up at Fork River, for whenever anything is said or done having for its object the improvement and development of this part of Manitoba, this “Little Fork Riverite” and his kindred spirits oppose it, and set to work to frustrate any movement for the betterment of this country. We remember when a siding was asked for by the farmers of Fishing River district the “Little Fork Riverite clique saw ruination for Fork River in it, and suggested that something ought to be done to prevent that siding being constructed. The farmers of Fishing River and Fork River were encouraged to sign a petition just previous to the election last June, asking the Government to erect an elevator and were told again and again that an elevator would be erected this fall at Fork River is the Roblin Government was returned to power, have we got one? Not on your life and I charge that the action of the “Fork Riverite” clique has discouraged any of the Elevator companies from erecting an elevator at Fork River. I do not bow the knee to the Roblin Government but I signed the petitions for the erection of a Government Elevator and advised others to do the same and intended if it was built, to patronize it because it would be built with the people’s money and it is good policy the patronize any institution that our money is invested in and endeavour to get the best we can out of the investment, there are thousands of bushels of grain in our district this season and we have no local market, I repeat that the Government Elevator is lost to Fork River district and the famers have been fooled once again and I ask the disappointed farmers to become “knockers” along with me and we will get the elevator along with a lot of other good things such as post offices etc., etc.

Fred Lacey,
Post Master, Oak Brae.

1910 Oct 20 – Winnipegosis

On Monday last the “Manitou” left the landing stage at Winnipegosis, heavily laden with fishermen and their equipment. Part of this equipment, and one would think a very important part, consisted of the wives and children of some of the fishermen. Although so many have left the town, the toll of departure is not yet complete but it is expected that this week all the people occupied during the winter in fishing, will have left the town. We wish them luck.
On Sunday next the Rev. James Malley will conduct the service in the Fork River Methodist Church at 11 o’clock in the morning instead of 3 p.m.
On Sunday next the Methodist pulpit at Winnipegosis will be occupied by the Rev. Jas. Malley. The subject will be “Buried alive by Devils.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 6 – 1910

1910 Oct 6 – First Automobile Accident

The first automobile accident in town to write of happened Friday evening. Eric Nicholson driving his father’s (H.P. Nicholson) horse on Vermillion Street, collided with J.W. Johnston’s automobile just as it was coming over the crossing at his lane on the ave, N.W., Mr. Johnston immediately put on the emergency break but the machine struck the horse before it was stopped. On examination for casualties it was found that the animal had received a broken leg. The two veterinary, Dr. Bryant, was telephoned for to dispatch the animal.

1910 Oct 6 – Thresher Fatally Injured

Gilbert Plains, Man., Oct. 1 – Mike Genik, who was working on the threshing machine of Frank Morris, on the farm of Fred Manns, was run over by the front wheel of the engine last night, receiving internal injuries which, it is said, will prove fatal.

1910 Oct 6 – Fork River

A meeting of the Council was held here last week, when some important business was done.
Miss Hansford of Winnipegosis, paid us a visit was done.
Rev. H.H. and Scrase visited Mr. and Mrs. Lacey at Oak Brae last week.
Mowat School house was prettily decorated last Sunday on the occasion of their Harvest Festival. A nice congregation attended.
We are all wondering if the Fork River and Winnipegosis road will be ready for use this coming winter. Slow progress seemed to be made on account of scarcity of teams and men.
A spark from the engine was the cause of a load of wheat being burned up in the wagon owned by Mr. W. King was badly damaged.
Mrs. Tilt from Dauphin, came up last week.
The Rev. H.H. Scrase preached a very eloquent sermon to the congregation of All Saints Church which was greatly appreciated. His subject was “The Holy Eucharist Congress at Montreal” and replied to Father Vaughan, who said that Protestantism is a soulless religion and that Canadian public schools are Godless schools. Mr. Scrase handled the subject well.

1910 Oct 6 – To the Herald:

SIR – I notice in the press an article dated September 17th, from a Mowat correspondent, re Government Elevator, which he thinks is lost, strayed or stolen. If either of these three things have happened it, the people of this vicinity would not be surprised to hear of it dropping out of the Mowat mail bag some day as it is remarkable what that mail bag will consume – tacks, sugar and other things too numerous to mention.
I have never heard of such a thing happening an elevator but we have had an experience like that in post offices up here. Fishing River being mentioned in the Mowat article reminds me what happened a few years ago, the settlers of Fishing River petitioned the Ottawa Government for a post office. Did they get the post-office at Fishing River? Not your life! It was lost, strayed or stolen as a new post office was located shortly after, not a hundred miles from Fishing River. If our Oak Brae P.M. would put the same energy behind the mail cart as he uses on his pen, knocking at the Provincial Government, the Winnipegosis mail it carries would get here before the train leaves and not have to lay over and the people would appreciate it very much.

A Fork River Correspondent

1910 Oct 6 – North Lake

Councillor Lacey has let quite a few contracts for road work lately, which will help the Galicians to get around easier.
John Bolinski is erecting a dwelling and stable on his farm on the lake shore.
Rev. H.H. Scrase conducted harvest thanksgiving service at Mowat School house last week. His text was very appropriate. The school house was tastefully decorated by Misses Charlotte and Harriet Lacey.
If any person comes in contract with a threshing outfit looking for work, be so kind as to show them the way here in case they get lost.

1910 Oct 6 – Sifton

Fine weather continues. Threshing progressing very nicely.
Mr. Carruthers and gentlemen friend from Valley River, paid our village a visit on Tuesday evening. “Me thinks” a fair inducement.
The Rev. Sabourin is moving the R.C. Church to a property across the road from the present location.
The Rev. Archbishop of Lemburg, Galicia accompanied by Archbishop Langevin, St. Boniface, is expected at Sifton in the near future, in the interests of the Greek rite of the R.C. Church.
A number of our villagers went out to Lake Dauphin on Saturday for the day’s shooting.
The Sifton village mock council met on Wednesday of last week. After the minutes of the previous meeting were read and several very important communications were brought up and read before the council after which some heated discussions followed.
The matter of the excessive use of the Comfort Soap miniature wagons on the sidewalks of the village, was brought to the attention of the council, that the practice be immediately stopped, thus lessen the dangers to pedestrians exceeding the speed limit by law. After due discussion the motion was seconded by Alderman Dneufre, that the constable be ordered to put the by-law in force respecting this and in failure of that recommended that the family production be curtailed.
A complaint was also read from some residing in the farther wards east, of a nuisance of late in that locality. The west winds of late are heavily laden with the smell of carrion. The constable was ordered to investigate and see that all dead mosquitos, horses or horse flies, be buried at once by or at the expense of the parties responsible.
Alderman Pantoline thought that the nuisance ground was being moved too near the centre of the town anyway and wanted to know of the constable what was being done re the manure heaps which were called to his attention some time ago and demanded to know why he was not taking action. Alderman Dneufre thought the constable very dilatory in the performance of the duties of his position and said that he could produce a more competent party at less salary to take the place of the present policeman. Some charged graft repeatedly in the way of that officer’s position, others demanded investigation.
It was then moved by Alderman Dneufre and seconded by Pinkas that the matter of graft in the police commissioner’s office be investigated and reported to the council at the next meeting. Council then adjourned to again meet at the usual date.