Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 5 – 1914

1914 Mar 5 – Brattiko Shot Kuzyk

A coroner’s inquest was held on Thursday in the town hall to inquire into the shooting of Mike Kuzyk at Volga, a point 10 miles southeast of Winnipegosis, on Feb. 21st. Dr. Culbertson was the coroner.
The following composed the jury; T. Jordan, D.D. McDonald, W.A. Brinkman, H.G. Hills, S. Vance, J. Blanchflower, E. Webb, Geo. King, foreman.
The evidence of a number of Galicians, including Brattiko himself, was taken. The others heard were Dr. Medd and Constable Hunking, of Winnipegosis.
Brattiko told a rambling story saying that his gun was accidentally discharged and in this way Kuzyk was shot. All circumstances pointed to Brattiko having shot Kuzyk in mistake for a deer. He afterwards admitted he did.
The verdict of the jury was that Kuzyk came to his death by a wound inflicted by a bullet from a rifle in the hands of Nicola Brattiko.
Brattiko was afterwards arrested and appeared before Magistrate Munson on Saturday charged with shooting Kuzyk. After hearing the evidence Brattiko was remanded till Friday, the 6th.
Brattiko is out on bail.

1914 Mar 5 – Killed in Saw Mill

Gilbert Plains, March 2 – An accident at McKendrick’s saw mill, on the Riding Mountain, 21 miles south-east of this town at 5 o’clock on Saturday evening, resulted in the instant death of William Hickle. A young Scotsman, 23 years of age. Something had gone wrong with the cable feed and the engine was slowed down while the men were fixing it. Hickle working up around the saw alone, is suppose to have slipped and fallen with his shoulder against the saw, killing him instantly.

1914 Mar 5 – Fork River

Mrs. J. Parker and daughter are spending a few weeks in Winnipeg.
Gordon Weaver left for the south on important business. We wish him a pleasant trip.
D. Kennedy returned from a short visit to Dauphin, where he attended the Masonic school of instruction.
W. Williams is very busy these days with teams drawing lumber from his limits to his planning mill.
Dr. Gofton, veterinary surgeon, of Dauphin, was here on a professional trip lately.
Mrs. C. Bradley, of Winnipegosis, spent the weekend at the home of Mrs. D. Kennedy.
J. Angus, of Winnipegosis, was a visitor to this burgh with his dog team. He reports a good trip as the roads are Al. Scotty will vouch for this providing the dogs will keep the road.
Dr. Medd, health officer, was a visitor here this week. Some are still quarantined. It’s better to be sure than sorry.
Ed. Morris, of Winnipegosis, is spending the weekend at the home of Fred. King.
Our new settler, Mr. W.I. Brown, is stirring around and getting in shape to start farming in earnest in the spring time.

1914 Mar 5 – Fork River

Thomas Secord, homestead inspector, was here last week inspecting quite a number of claims.
Mr. W. Brown, of Hamilton, Ontario, has purchased the S.E. ¼ of 6-29-17, and intends erecting dwelling house and is bringing his family out shortly.
Nat Little and daughter Miss Grace have returned from a week’s visit in Winnipeg.
Dr. Medd was a visitor here on Saturday on his was from Dauphin.
The storm here on Friday night was the worst experience in years.
I.F. Hafenbrak, Sam Bailey and Wm. King, Country Orange Master, have returned from attending grand lodge meeting in Winnipeg.
D.F. Wilson is away again sporting at the fair at Brandon. “Lucky, Jim, oh, how I envy him.”

1914 Mar 5 – Winnipegosis

Well, this burg is certainly going ahead this spring. Just a few of the things that have happened this week. Sid Coffey bought a lot on Main street from Rod Burrell and is busy hauling material to erect a large theatre. We understand the price paid was a fancy one.
Ed. Cartwright and family of Mafeking, having arrived and are preparing for move in the place he bought from Sid. Coffey.
Wm. Christianson is taking possession of the place he recently purchased from John Seiffert.
Alex Bickle is remodelling his house.
J.O. Grenon has returned from his holiday trip looking the picture of health.
Harry Watson and Jack Angus left on Monday for Dauphin to take in the bonspiel.
Miss Clara Bradley left on Friday for Winnipeg, she intends taking a course in a business college.
Miss Gertie Bradley has arrived home from Brandon.
Miss Jane Paddock is leaving soon for Biggar, Sask., where she was accepted a position.
Miss Hanna Stevenson left last week for Winnipeg.
The curling season being over, the boys are preparing the ice for hockey. We expect they will be trying for the Allan Cup.
A great time is looked for Wednesday night in the Methodist Church. They are giving a box social and concert. A good programme is being prepared.
Postmaster Ketcheson has hone to Dauphin to meet Mrs. Ketcheson, who is retuning from the east.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 6 – 1913

1913 Feb 6 – Baran Fired Fatal Shot

Monday was the most fateful in the life of John Baran. It opened with the death of Provincial Constable Charles Rooke in morning and in the afternoon the coroner’s jury found Baran guilty of the shooting.
Coroner Harrington held an inquest in the afternoon, when the following composed the jury: Geo. King, foreman; H.F. Caldwell, John Cole, A.B. Buie, Nelson Taylor, Stewart Baird, Thos. Shaw, F.J. McDonald, R.G. Ferguson, Thos. Jordan, Frank Beely, and Arch. Esplen. Witnesses examined were Dr. Culbertson, as to immediate cause of death; John Tomaski, the man who drove the sleigh that carried Constable Rooke to Baran’s house where he was shot, and Marie Pelech, the woman who lived with Baran.
The jury, in order to receive the woman’s evidence, proceeded to the hospital and for an hour listened to a well connected and intelligent reciting of the incidents which led up to the shooting.
The woman testified that Baran fired two shots from a rifle through the door when Rooke attempted to force an entrance; that she knew that one of the bullets took effect for she examined the spot where Rooke fell exhausted in the snow, when the man who accompanied him left to secure assistance. She stated that she found a pool of blood. She also testified that Baran forced her to state that she fired two shot through the door. The whole affair was brought home to Baran in a most vivid manner.

THE JURY’S VERDICT

The following is the verdict of the jury:
“We, the jury empanelled to hear the evidence as to the death of Provincial Constable Charles Rooke, find that the said Charles Rooke on Sunday, Jan. 26, 1913, received a bullet in the breast from a rifle in the hands of John Baran and that the said Charles Rooke died on Monday, Feb. 3, 1913, from the effects of this shot.”
The death of Constable Rooke has cast a gloom over the community as he was a good citizen, as well a good officer, unassuming and kind to all.
Marie Pelech, who lived with Baran, is still in the hospital, but is doing as well as can be expected. If she recovers she will have to have her right arm amputated at the shoulder. Her brother, Michael, arrived from Winnipeg Monday morning and was overcome with grief to find his sister in such a pitiable condition. He says he has been looking for her for three years.
Baran appeared before Police Magistrate Munson on Monday on the charge of murder. He was remanded until Friday for trial.
Rooke was born at Redhill, Surrey, England. May 5, 1876, being the son of Inspector-General Rooke, of the Indian army, who was honorary physician to Queen Victoria, and was educated at Willington College. He came to Western Canada in 1895, and served five years with the Northwest Mounted Police. In 1905 the Manitoba government gave him the job of organizing the Manitoba mounted police, a body whose efforts were mainly directed to the suppression of lawlessness along the international boundary line. He made his name a terror to horse thieves, yeggmen and smugglers and soon made the frontier as safe as any other part of the province. Latterly, his headquarters have been here, where he had jurisdiction over much of the north country. In 1909 he married Elizabeth Surrey, who, with one son, survives him.
A brother, E.G. Rooke, news editor of the Nelson News, and former publisher of the Port Hope., Ont. Times, is here to attend the funeral as are also Mr. Geo. Surry, Victoria, B.C., Mrs. Rooke’s brother, and Miss Ellen Surrey, of Galt., Ont., sister of Mrs. Rooke.

1913 Feb 6 – Funeral Today

The funeral of the late Constable Charles Rooke is taking place this afternoon from the family residence 8th Ave., N.E. Vermillion Lodge No, 68, A.F. & A.M., of which deceased was a member having charge of the services. Rev. A.S. Wiley will conduct the service. Interment will be made at Riverside Cemetery.

1913 Feb 6 – Fraser Given Two Months

Wm. Fraser, who attempted suicide last week by cutting his throat, appeared before P.M. Munson on the 30th ult., and was sentenced to two months in jail. He was taken to Portage by Constable McLean.

1913 Feb 6 – Died From Bullet Wound

Fred Bichardson, a Barnardo boy who was working for Arthur Lee, a farmer at Togo, shot himself in the head Friday with a 22 rifle. He was brought to the hospital here on Saturday, but died shortly after his arrival. The remains were interred in Riverside Cemetery.

1913 Feb 6 – Fork River

Henry Benner, of Lloydminster, is visiting his parents up the Fork River. He is wanting a car of young cattle to take back with him. No objections to females being among them.
Howard Armstrong has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Mrs. R. McEachern and son Dony, left for Bayhead, Nova Scotia, for a two months visit among relations and friends.
D. Kennedy’s high flyer got kicked the other day and is out of business for a short time, consequently Dunk had to fall back on the old reliables for a trip to Winnipegosis.
All the threshing outfits got cold feet early this fall except for Fred Cooper and he is on his last job. Fred’s a stayer and there should be no kick from the farmers as there’s no money in it for either this year as far as threshing goes.
We were out the other day looking for a stray heifer and didn’t find her, but came across someone looking for a pig. They did not mention whether it was a live pig, or dead pig or a blind pig and judging from their track a few hours after they must have run across a pig of some kind. Moral, don’t try to carry more pig than you can handle unless you cover up your tracks.
There is considerable kicking being done among the owners of gasoline engines re the poor gasoline sent up here from Dauphin. It not only wastes our time but puts the engines out of order.
We notice in the Press a long rigmarole about compulsory education also an ad for a teacher for Mowat School. We hear there has been several application received. It seems a pity this school should be closed since the summer holidays, it being in the centre of a settlement where there is a large number of children. The parents seem to be anything but delighted to have the kids miss all the nice weather we have had. We bet dollars to doughnuts that the head push has no children to send or we would have heard of it every week for the last five months.
Can anyone tell us what benefit the majority of the ratepayers receive for their taxes in the Municipality. Of course there are some who go on a pilgrimage to all the meetings looking for snaps and they get them, by gum. The clerk has had a rise of fifty. Oh well, I believe he published the minutes of one council meeting since last June. The municipal auditor was around so look out for the statement three inches by four. We received a copy of the Auditor’s report in book form of 47 pages from Ochre River Municipality. Its good reading and looks like business. A few dollars expended like this would be more appreciated by the ratepayers than paying two road commissioners in ward five, as there has been done the last three years to spend two or three hundred dollars.
The new Oak Brae postoffice as officially opened today. It is situated at Janowski schoolhouse and should prove a great boon to the people of that locality as it has been a deeply felt want. Geo. Basham is postmaster and we feel sure he will fill the bill to all satisfactorily. We hear Billy is sore, but we can’t help these things, so Billy, please remember the little saying “No use crying over spilt milk.” Such is life in the Wolly West.
The annual clearance sale started today 1st Feb. at the Armstrong Trading Company’s store and they are sure slaughtering the prices. This has been a poor year for the farmer so now is your chance to buy right.
Wanted, a boarding house right away for the travelling public.

1913 Feb 6 – Sifton

A ball was held in the Kennedy hall in aid of the English church; about forty couples were present, and a very enjoyable time was spent.
Elaborate arrangements were made for a wedding here on the 31st ult. A large number of guests had assembled and everything was in readiness for the ceremony when it was found that the would-be bride was missing. Consternation reigned for a time and great disappointment was felt, especially by the intended groom.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 30 – 1913

1913 Jan 30 – Constable Rooke Shot
CONDITION CRITICAL

Thursday Jan. 30th, 11:30 a.m. – Constable Rooke’s condition critical, but he is holding his own well considering the wound is of such a dangerous character.

Constable Chas. Rooke was seriously shot Sunday by John Baran. A Galician, whom he was attempting to arrest, and is now in the general hospital. Mr. Rooke left early Sunday morning, taking a livery team and driver to arrest John Baran, who lives some twenty miles southwest of town, in the municipality of Gilbert Plains.
Baran has been giving considerable trouble of late and had deserted his wife, who has been a public charge for several years and was living with another woman at his farm in the Riding Mountain.
In driving out Sunday morning Rooke left his team at a neighbour’s a mile from Baran’s, and proceeded on foot accompanied by J. Tomaski, his driver, expecting that he would be able to approach and capture his man without giving him the alarm and perhaps escaping in the woods. After carefully approaching the house he rapped on the door but was told by the woman, who came to a window, that Baran was not at home. Rooke then proceeded to affect a forcible entrance, when three shots were fired in rapid succession through the door, the weapon used being a rifle.
The first shot struck the officer in the left breast over the heart.
His driver attempted to assist him to walk back to where the team was left, but after proceeding a short distance was compelled to leave him and hasten on for his team. Returning, with the assistance of the neighbour, he conveyed the wounded man to this neighbour’s house, but had to leave him there as he could not stand the jolting of the cutter. The driver drove down the mountain about nine miles to the home of H. McCorvie, who has a telephone, and summoned medical aid from town.
Upon receiving advice Dr. W.J. Harrington at once drove out, using all possible haste and getting a fresh team at McCorvie’s. A sleigh was fitted out in which to ring the injured man to the hospital and followed the doctor out.

WAS NOTORIOUS CHARACTER

Baran is a notorious character. He had been sent to jail two years ago for assaulting his wife. Baran deserted her and was living with another woman and his wife has to be supported as a charge on the town. It was only two years ago that Constable Rooke drove thirty-three miles in the coldest day of January, through a storm, in order to rescue Baran’s two little children, who were reported to be destitute and starving to death. These children were committed to the Winnipeg Children’s Aid Society by Magistrate Munson. Baran was summoned to appear before the magistrate for the non-support of his wife and children, and having disobeyed the summon, the magistrate issued a warrant and it was this warrant that Constable Rooke was endeavoring to arrest Baran on when he was shot.

THE INQUEST

The inquest on the death of the Baran baby, who was shot Monday by the police posse which went to the Galician settlement, was held, on Tuesday in the town hall. Evidence was taken from Dr. Ross, Chief of Police Bridle, F. May, W. Evans, W. Knight, E. Turland and Fred Little, members of the posse who did the shooting. The evidence produced showed that the child was killed almost instantly, the bullet passing through the body, causing a shock and hemorrhage.
The following jurymen were empanelled: Geo. King, foreman; Thos. Shaw, N. Taylor, E. Batty, H.F. Caldwell, D. Sutherland, T. Jordan, J.F. Neeley, R.G. Ferguson, F. Copeland, F.J. McDonald, H.R. Morrison.
After viewing the remains of the child and hearing the evidence, they returned the following verdict: –

VERDICT OF JURY

“We, the jury empanelled to take evidence as to the death of the baby Baran, on Jan. 27th, find that the baby came to his death by being shot with a rifle in the hands of one of the posse under Chief Bridle, organized for the purpose of arresting John Baran, suspected of having shot Constable Rooke, and the death of the baby, while regrettable, was purely accidental under the circumstances and we attach no blame to any member of the posse.”

1913 Jan 30 – Woman Placed Under Arrest

Annie Chisyk, who is a patient in the hospital suffering from a bullet wound, was formally placed under arrest on Wednesday, charged with shooting Constable Rooke. Her trial was set for Feb. 4th.

1913 Jan 30 – Fork River

Mr. W. Murray, Municipal Auditor, has been here auditing the books of Mossey River Municipality and it has been a busy week for Clerk Wilson.
Wm. Northam, who has been spending a few months at Weyburn, Sask., returned home last week.
Fred Storrar and William Johnston returned from the north end of the lake and report the fishing not to good lately as some of the men are off work.
Dunk Kennedy and John Richardson attended the Masonic banquet at Dauphin and report a good time.
Fred Cooper has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Wm. King returned from a two weeks’ trip west on business.
The cordwood has been coming in lively of late and the place looks like a wood camp; wood bring piled on all the streets.
At the inter-diocesan examinations of the Church of England Sunday School, Mrs. H.H. Scrase teacher of All Saints’ S.S. was sixth place in first class work, securing a diploma and book. Mrs. C. Bradley, of Winnipegosis, passed with first class diplomas as teacher of Winnipegosis Anglican S.S. We congratulate these ladies.
Wm. Parker was at the Armstrong store on business Thursday and Friday.
Mr. Cockerill of the Peabody Company, was a visitor at Dunk Kennedy’s on Saturday.
Howard Armstrong’s nephew has arrived on a visit from Ontario.
J.W. Johnston has moved up with his family to the hatchery on Lake Winnipegosis and Miss Eva Storrar accompanied them for a visit.
Sandy Munro was a weekend visitor at home on Saturday and Sunday.
Billie Coultas is sporting around with a new cutter these days and seems right in line with the Educational Department in the speeding line and guarantees to take the curves safely.
We must ask our readers to excuse the want of news last week as our correspondent was off for a week’s trip and our motto is while we are alive we will crow.
Service will be held in All Saints’ Anglican Church Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock, February.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 14 – 1915

1915 Jan 14 – This is a Record

A Prince Albert woman gave birth to three girls and a boy on Tuesday of this week.

1915 Jan 14 – Mossey River Council

First meeting of the council of 1915 held in the council chamber, Winnipegosis, Jan. 5th. There were present Reeve Lacey, and Councillors Yakavanka, Hunt, Bickle, Hechter and Namaka.
The clerk swore in the new Reeve and councillors.
The minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted as read with a clause added giving the names of the councillors voting for and against.
Communications were read from W.B. Dempsey, Dr. Medd, F.E. Simpson and the Highway Commissioner.
The Reeve explained that it was rumoured that Winnipegosis was already incorporated as a village and that the two eastern townships had been taken from this municipality and were now a part of the new municipality of Lawrence; but in neither case had there been any official notification from the municipal commissioner and if either of these rumours were correct it would have a bearing on the appointment of the officers of the year.
Hunt-Hechter – That D.F. Wilson be secretary-treasurer at the same rate of salary as last year till the next meeting of the council.
Bickle-Namaka – That Dr. Medd be health officer till the next meeting of the council at the same rate of salary as for 1914.
Hechter-Yalavanka – That the finance committee of 1914 continue in officer till the next meeting of the council.
A by-law appointing F.E. Simpson solicitor at a salary of $50.00 was passed.
Hechter-Hunt – That Coun. Bickle issue a Ward certificate for $18.00 to J. Bickle, Jr., to replace a certificate issued by ex-councillor Fleming which has been lost.
Hunt-Hechter – That the council adjourn to meet at Fork River at the call of the Reeve.

1915 Jan 14 – Fork River

Mr. E. Thomas manager of the Northern elevator, this winter, left with his family for his home in Verigen, Sask. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas made many friends during their stay here and we wish them prosperity.
Mr. F. Hafenbrak and J. Richardson are spending a few days at Dauphin.
Mr. N. Little and his daughter, Miss Grace, have left for Rochester. A pleasant trip to them.
Mr. E. Humphreys has left for Dauphin on a short holiday.
Mrs. Sam Reid and daughters are spending a week with friends in Winnipeg.
Mr. T. Jordan, of Dauphin, passed through here returning from Winnipegosis. His automobile took a rest outside the town limits. Billy Williams pulled it into the storehouse. Judging from the number of expects around the machine, they will soon fix it or leave it so no one else can.
We notice a Winnipegosis correspondent has been ringing the changes for the last three or four weeks about that “gigger” that runs between Winnipegosis and Fork River. There is nothing very wrong with it, it only wants a little elbow grease. We heard no complaints when the educational department was aboard. We know of an old fellow about sixty who used to tote his former friends around Sunday after Sunday and our Winnipegosis friends thought it alright. It’s amusing to hear them lament about the “weary fisher of men.” We would suggest the cutting out of the hair pin brigade and ring off about the gigger.
A large gathering of the neighbours surrounding our little burgh stormed the castle of Mr. and Mrs. D.F. Wilson on the Mossey River on Thursdays night and had a very merry time. There was dancing, recitations and songs. The ladies put up a good supper and all left for their homes at 3 o’clock in the morning a tired but happy bunch to meet at Dublin Castle, the home of Mr. and Mrs. A. on Wednesday night, the 13th, at a farewell party to Mr. and Mrs. Harnets.
Sam Reid was elected councillor for Ward 6 by acclamation.
Don’t forget the pie social and dance at W. King’s on Friday night, January 22nd.

1915 Jan 14 – Winnipegosis

In all the winters of the past this winter stands out as the nest we remember.
The town is shortly to be incorporated. This will bean severance from the rural municipality of Mossey River with which we have been connected since it became a municipality. Our connection with the municipality, I might mention, has not been satisfactory of late. Town and rural affairs are different, which is natural. The town people want to strike out and go a little faster than our rural neighbours, that’s all.
The fishing keeps up well. The snow plow arrived this week with a big load. The weather has been great for the hauling. The prices paid the fishermen remain steady. Whites are worth 5c a lb; yellows 4 ½ and Jacks 2 1/2c. It is expected that the fish companies will cease operations about the end of the month.
Dr. Wm. Hosey, horse dentist of Dauphin, was in our midst this week. We don’t know how a horse feels with the toothache but between suffering from a jumping toothache and going to face German bullets send me to the front every time.
We hear it frequently asked who is to be our first mayor? Well, your correspondent don’t know, but of course, he must be good looking, affable, popular with the ladies and have a few other qualifications. Does this point to Joise or Frank.