Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 9 – 1915

1915 Dec 9 – Private Jas. Craig on Wrecked Steamer

Private James Craig was on the hospital boat that struck a mine in the English Channel recently and was wrecked. In a letter to his brothers here he gives a description of his thrilling experience as follows:
I would have written you before this but I didn’t know how long I might have been in the last place I was in or whether I would go back to my regiment. Instead of going to my regiment the doctor sent me to the base and then across to England so here I am in the hospital with some kind of disease in my joints, more especially in one of my knees and the experience I came through when coming across the Channel hasn’t helped me any. I have something to be thankful for in being here at all. I suppose you will have seen in the papers of that disaster to the hospital ship being sunk by a mine in the Channel an over 80 wounded soldiers were drowned. Well, I was on the boat at the time and I have to thank Providence that I was amongst the saved. He boat was sunk three miles from Dover. I was in the upper deck astern at the time she struck the mine. There must have been a big hole torn in her for she immediately began to sink ahead and listing to the portside. There was only one boat got away full. I got in the boat nearest me and when it was full nobody knew anything about how to lower it. We kept tugging and pulling at the block ropes but nothing wound work and thee was none of the crew to be seen to let us see or help us to get it launched, so we all got out again. By that time a lot of the fellows had jumped overboard and as the ship was still going though slower, they were left behind struggling in the water. It wasn’t long before a destroyer came along side so close that a number of men jumped on to it but it moved off for some reason. Later the boat came close in again and some more got on it.

JUMPED INTO THE SEA.
I was in the act of making a jump, but it was too far away at the time, so I stood for a minute or two thinking and taking in the situation. In thinking what would be best to do, I rushed down below and got hold of a lifebelt. When I got up I could hardly stand on deck there was so much list. Well, I took up a position ready to jump. I had thrown off my heavy overcoat and taken off my boots. I don’t know how long I stood there watching her gradually sinking; finally, I thought it was time for getting clear of her before she sunk so I jumped into the water and got several good mouthfuls of it for the sea was pretty choppy at the time. Before I jumped I saw some rowboats making for us so I struck out to meet them. I was picked up by one of them and put on destroyer. The ship that was nearest us at the time was coming to our assistance when she also struck a mine and sunk.
I left the ship none too soon, just two or three minutes after she went out of sight. There were some heartrending scenes that I won’t forget as long as I live. When I was in the water I could see the propellers still running above me and some ropes had got entangled around them and were making a terrible noise.

1915 Dec 9 – Private Izon Wounded

Mr. John Izon, of Dauphin Plains, received a little from his brother, Private Hubert Izon, this week. The letter contains the information that Hubert, who was in the trenches in France, was hit on the shoulder by a piece of shell; the shell driving the bone in for about three inches. He is at present in the hospital at Taplon, England, and slowly recovering from the wound.

1915 Dec 9 – Military Notes

J.W. Skinner, locomotive shop foreman of the C.N.R., has received his lieutenancy commission in the 53rd battalion. He will be quartered in Dauphin during the winter under Lt.-Col. Gillespie and starts on duty his week.
Et. Severn, of Winnipeg, one of Lt.-Col. Gillespie’s staff, arrived in town this week, to whip the Dauphin ???.
The recruits now number 45, and together with the staff of officers the total enlistment is about 50.

1915 Dec 9 – Fork River

Mr. E. Hunt, from Ontario, is a visitor to his brother Mr. A. Hunt for a couple of weeks.
Mrs. Sam Reid [1 line missing] a visit to friends in Winnipeg for a week.
Mrs. J. Chippey received word her mother was very sick and left on the train for a week’s visit at her home.
Mr. D. Scarth, of Hartney, is a visitor with Mr. T.N. Briggs during the hunting season.
Mrs. Little and daughter, Miss Grace are visitors to Winnipeg for a few days.
Mrs. Paul Wood and children of Sifton, are visiting Mrs. D.F. Wilson on the homestead in the Mossey.
Mr. Sam Reid left with his hay press for the old Hood ranch on Lake Dauphin having taken a contract to pressing hay for Shand & Thomas of Dauphin.
Mr. W. King received a letter from his son Edwin, of the 44th Batt., which is in England, who states that things are quite lively over there. The weather is wet and sloppy. This is quite a contrast to the dry winter weather of Manitoba, and the boys feel the change badly.
Several parties left on the 1st to take in the hunt for the big game.
Hunter Bros. shipped their first load of Lake Dauphin fish on Saturday.
Geo. Lyons, of Winnipegosis, was here loading for 25 head of yearlings and two year olds which he will feed for winter.

1915 Dec 9 – Winnipegosis

There was a most successful skating carnival in the rink on Monday night, in aid of the Red Cross Society. The turnout was splendid and the door receipts were $??. The ladies served tea and coffee at ten cents a cup which will bring the total receipts up to a good figure. The prize winners were Miss Myrtle Grenon, Mr. ???, Mrs. ??? McMartin, Miss Geekie, Miss Crawford, Mr. R. Bradley, Miss Margaret Bradley, Miss A. Hechter, Miss Esther Hechter, Miss Beth MacAulay and ??? Cecil Paddock.
Sam Sanderson had the misfortune to lose a valuable team of horses last week in a crack in the ice.
John Redisk is all smiles these days – it is a baby girl.
Frank Hechter returned from Waterhen after spending a week there. He reports fishing good.
The new store across the ??? is doing a good business.
We are sorry to report the death of Mr. and Mrs. Dudley’s little baby girl, which took place on the 4th inst. The funeral was on the 7th.
The council had their regular monthly meeting on the ?th inst., and among other business they passed the herd law. A copy of same can be had at the clerk’s office.
Mr. L???, rancher of Waterhen, passed through here on his way to Winnipeg for a business visit.
C.L. White, fishing overseer, made a quick trip to River last week.
Dr. Medd and Rev. Kirkpatrick left on Wednesday for the west on a hunting expedition.
W.R. Paddock, left for Pine River and Garland on business.
Threshing is now finished in this district and the crops have been very good.
The town is livening up now that the fish teams are coming in so steady.
The Municipal elections are over again for another year and everyone is happy.
New settlers still keep coming in here and we are glad to welcome them.
Mr. Kenny Morris, of the 79th Battalion, spent a few days leave of absence with friends here.
Rev. Mr. Kirkpatrick, an old-timer, here took the service in the Methodist Church on Sunday last, and the church was crowded to its utmost capacity.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 27 – 1914

1914 Aug 27 – Latest From Line of Battle

LONDON, Aug. 27 – Late reports to War office state that desultory fighting is occurring along French frontier.

ON EVE GREAT BATTLE

Germans are ready to strike great blow. The troops are fast advancing and one of the biggest battles of the war is in sight.

RUSSIANS ADVANCING

The Russians are advancing in German territory and clearing everything before them.

1914 Aug 27 – Volunteers Get Right-Royal Send-Off

It was truly a great night in Dauphin, the night before the volunteers went away. It was Friday night last, the boys leaving on Saturday morning. The people of the town were out in full force and their right royal patriotism was most marked. The reality of war is brought home to us when “Our Own” are called out for service and hence a subdued depth of pent up emotion which is not found on other occasions. The Band did their part well, and what could be done without the band at such a time as this.

Great Cheering

A crowd of enthusiastic men, joined by a host of boys, well supplied with Union Jacks, some Belgian and French flags, formed in procession headed by band and red-coats. Everywhere, from doors and windows, hotels and street corners, the volunteers were lustily cheered.

Meeting Held in Open

The procession reached the town hall about 9 o’clock. The ball had been packed for nearly an hour and the enthusiasm inside was no less than on the street. Patriotic music was indulged in led by Prof. Minnaert. Only a small portion of the crowd being able to hold the public meeting and send-off for the boys in the op. When all gathered in front and around the corner, as large a crowd as was ever seen in Dauphin, surrounded the group of thirty-two men, whom we have the honour of sending to the front. Again the Band did its part well and between the addresses gave without stint, sweet patriotic strains.

Farewell Speeches

The chairman, Mayor Bottomley, took his place on the front steps of the town hall and everyone, except the volunteers, stood up for over an hour’s programme of music and speeches.
The speakers were Messrs. D.S. Woods, Munson, Wiley, Flemming, Bethell, Major Walker and Captain Newcombe.
The words spoken by all were in accord with Britain’s position and in a deep serious vein set forth the new grave situation in which Canada and the Empire stand today.
The Boys were recipients of a box of cigars each, some wholesome advice, heartiest congratulations, with affectionate hopes for a safe return.
It was an evening never-to-be-forgotten in Dauphin and the warmth of the farewell, the deep subdued feeling, was only surpassed on Saturday morning, when the train actually pulled out, all hats and handkerchiefs waving, all eyes wet, and the Band paying “God be With You Till We Meet Again.”

1914 Aug 27 – Praise For Dauphin Boys

W.J. Rawson, of Brandon, who was in town on Wednesday, told a Herald representative, that the Dauphin contingent had the best appearance of any of the troops assembled at that point for transpiration to Valcartier.

DAUPHIN.
Lieut. A.E.L. Shand (Albert Edward Lawrence Shand, 1891)
Sergt. G. Fraser
Sergt. W. Code
Sergt. T.D. Massey
Corp. D. Wetmore (David Lee Wetmore, 1884, 346)
Corp. N.C. Chard (Norman Cyril Chard, 1894, 240 SGT)
Corp. C.S. Wiltshire
Pte. H.A. Bray (Harold Arthur Bray, 1891, LT)
Pte. H.H. Moore
Pte. A.J. Pudifin (Arthur James Pudifin, 1885, 322)
Pte. Garth Johnston (Garth Fraser Johnston, 1890, 718076)
Pte. Neville Munson (Neville Munson, 1892, 313)
Pte. W.S. Gilbert (William S. Gilbert, 1874, 265)
Pte. C. Curtis
Pte. H. Izon (Hubert Izon, 1885, 280)
Pte. S. Laker (Stephen Laker, 1895, 13)
Pte. J.E. Greenaway (Joseph Edward Greenaway, 1885, 269)
Pte. A.J. Johnson
Pte. D. Powell
Pte. E. Sonnenberg (Edward Sonnenberg, 1892, 335)
Pte. E. Classen
Pte. E. Herrick (Eliot Charles Herrick, 1887, 275)
Pte. E. McNab
Pte. J.E. Lewis (John Edmund Lewis, 1893, 27501)
Pte. C.S. Van Tuyll
Pte. D. McVey (Devon McVey, 1892, 302)
Pte. A.E. Pickering (Albert Edward Pickering, 1892, 320)
Pte. A. Redgate (Albert Redgate, 1889, 324)
Pte. F.A. Mathews
Pte. H. Pollard
Pte. T.A. Collins (Thomas Arthur Collins, 1887, 245)
Pte. Frank Norquay (Frank Norquay, 1891, 318)
Pte. F. Jauncey (Fredrick Jauncey, 1890, 282)

WITH 99TH BRANDON.
Pte. C. Lane
Pte. P. Mickleburg (Ernest Michleburgh, 295)
Pte. Jackson
Pte. W. Bubb (William Charles Bubb, 1884, 2140)

WINNIPEGOSIS.
Pte. E. Morris
Pte. A. Martin
Pte. A. McKerchar

SWAN RIVER.
Pte. D. Stringer (Dixon Stringer, 1890, 24178)

ROBLIN.
Corp. J.B. Shearer (John Buchanan Shearer, 1892, LT)
Pte. J. Hallam (Jonathan Hallam, 1878, 46973)
Pte. W. Day
Pte. W. Armstrong
Pte. R.J. Ritchie
Pte. F. Burt
Pte. A. Hay
Pte. E. Simpson

1914 Aug 27 – Fork River

Mr. Vivian Hafenbrak and bride have returned from a month’s visit to Ontario. Mr. H. is of the opinion the crops in the Dauphin district are ahead of anything along the route he travelled.
It is said, “War is Hell.” So is the price of binder twine, when there is a difference of 1 to 4 cents on the same quality. How the war should affect twine now that was made in 1912 we give it up and leave it to other fellows to explain. Even the motorcar dare is doubted.
The fall fishing has started, so we are told, and while wages are lower our bonnie fishermen are head singing. “Rule Britannia” and “Britons never shall be Slaves.”
Some of our ratepayers are enquiring who is running the Mossey River School affairs at present.
Jack Chipla left for Winnipeg to work on the C.P.R.
D.F. Wilson returned from a trip west on business and reports crops light out there.
A. Snelgrove and Pat Powers have left for Yorkton for the threshing season.
Mrs. Johnston, of Port Arthur, is a visitor at the home of Mrs. Kennedy.
Mr. Clarkson, Winnipegosis, passed through en route for Yorkton.
The Winnipegosis contingent passed through here for the seat of war as happy as clams on their way to Dauphin.
Mr. Ramsay, of Sifton, paid the burgh a visit with a cattle buyer and is rustling a car of stock.

1914 Aug 27 – Winnipegosis

The fishing fleet has left for Spruce Island, a point about 40 miles north. There are between 15 and 20 boats engaged in the work. The catches so far are reported good.
Capt. Coffey arrived from Dauphin on Wednesday.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong was a late visitor.
To be or not to be, that is the great question. At the time of this writing the funds required to complete the school are not yet in sight. It is believed they are forthcoming but until they are the citizens are in a sate of doubt. The new school is needed that is one thing sure.
Architect Bossons, of Dauphin, was here on Saturday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 13 – 1914

1914 Aug 13 – Assembling Volunteers

Major Walker, of “C” Squadron, 32nd Manitoba Horse, has received the following telegram from the Adjutant General, Ottawa.
OTTAWA, August 13.
In view of non-completion of medical examination in many places volunteering need not be closed until orders for mobilization at Valcartier are issued. Commanding officers will assemble all volunteers for overseas expeditionary force at local corps headquarters for instructional purposes from this date. Pay and substenance allowance will be allowed under authorized militia rates. Issue necessary instructions.
ADJUTANT GENERAL.

1914 Aug 13 – Latest War News

London, Aug. 13.
Great excitement prevails over report of fighting in North Sea.
German cruisers, Goeben and Brealan captured in Mediterranean. The cruisers surrendered without a shot.
Great Britain is now at war with Austria.
Bombardment of Liege forts has recommenced. Belgians are putting up strong fight.
French will force fighting with Germans. Big battle expected hourly.

1914 Aug 13 – Ready to Go to Front

The following local men have been passed by Dr. Bottomly, medical examiner, and have made application to go to the front. They are likely to be called upon at once:
Huber Izon, Garth Johnston, Neville Munson, C. Curtis, Eric Clausen, H. Pollard, F.W. Bunstead, H.H. Moore, A.J. Pudifin, E.C. Herrick, Neil A. Briss, J. Osman, H.A. Bray.

1914 Aug 13 – Fork River

Several farmers from this point took in the Dauphin fair. Another year we hope to see more go.
Mr. Fair, of Dauphin, is around peddling medicine for a medicine company. Some are of the opinion they got some bargains.
Miss Bessie Wilson was a visitor to friends at Sifton and Dauphin.
Professor Fred Storrar, of Werdon academy, is spending his holidays among friends here and is very uneasy about the war. He will no doubt tender his services as leader of a company of fullbacks and move to the front in a short order.
F.B. Lacey was a recent visitor to Winnipegosis.
The annual meeting of Mossey River School was held on Saturday night. W. King was chairman and C.E. Bailey, secretary. The annual report was passed. W. Williams and Sam Reid were appointed trustees to fill the vacancy of C.E. Bailey and J.W. Lockhart retiring.
The trustees are spending a large amount of money repairing the school which was condemned. The majority of ratepayers are of the opinion it would have been more in the interest of the community at large to build a school in the village where the majority of the scholars come from. The ratepayers who were conspicuous by their absence will have another year to chew the rag over school affairs.
A dance was held in the hall as a farewell to the Misses Briggs and Miss Gertrude Cooper, who are leaving.
John Reid and family, of Sifton, visited at the home of W. King for the weekend.
Mrs. Paul Wood and family, of Sifton, are visiting at the home of Mrs. D.F. Wilson on the Mossey River.