Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 25 – 1913, 1919

1913 Dec 25 – Fork River

F.F. Hafenbrak, T. Needham and R.C. Sparling, of Dauphin, all old timers, were here renewing old acquaintances on the 16th. We were pleased to see them.
Miss Alice Clark returned to her home at Paswegan, Sask., after spending a month visiting friends here.
Messrs. J. and P. Robinson, of Mowat, have returned from a business trip to Winnipegosis in connection with their fish business at Lake Dauphin. They have shipped a large number of boxes of fish from this point.
Several Americans have been looking over the district lately. They have returned to their home with the impression that this is a good country and promised to pay us a visit later on. They hope to get land where a number can settle together.
Wm. King wishes to thank the ratepayers of Mossey River municipality for their hearty support on the 16th. He says he will do all in his power for the benefit of the municipality.
The many friends of Mrs. A. Snelgrove are pleased to see her around after her recent illness.
Business here is dull, principally on account of the poor condition of the roads. A fall of snow would be much appreciated.
A large party of young folks from here attended the ball at Sifton on Fright night. They report a good time.
The New Year’s ball will be held in the Orange Hall under the auspices of the members of purple Star L.O.L., 1765, on the night of January 1st, 1914. Good music and refreshments. Admission $1.00 per couple. Everyone welcome.

1913 Dec 25 – Sifton

The most successful ball ever given in the history of the village was attended Friday evening last by some sixty couples. From the opening Grand March at 9 p.m. to the “Home Sweet Home” waltz at six o’clock the next morning not a single untoward incident distributed the harmony of the gathering. A number of guests came from Fork River, Dublin Bay, Melton and Dauphin and seemed to thoroughly enjoy themselves. Mrs. Norman Gray and other ladies very kindly and ably accompanied several of the various violinists on the piano. The flute and zither accompaniment was also much appreciated. The music was good, the floor good, and the Sifton cooking of the best. A well-known critic was heard to remark that the hall, owned by the Kennedy Mercantile Co., is the best between Dauphin and Prince Albert. A vocal and instrumental programme, somewhat shortened by the unexpected absence of several of the artists was put on after supper, Mr. Henry Woods very ably acted as chairman. Mr. Paul Wood, on behalf of the hosts, the residents of Sifton, in a few words, bade everybody welcome and the compliments of the season. Amongst other prominent old-timers and friends were noticed. Mr. and Mrs. Mooney, Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Woods, Mr. and Mrs. W.J. Walker, Mr. and Mrs. Norman Gray, Mr. and Mrs. W. Fair, Mr. and Mrs. Howard Love of Melton and Dublin Bay; Mr. H. and Miss Little, the Misses Nelson, Miss Cooper, Miss Weatherhead, Fork River.
Miss (Nurse) Reid’s Sunday school class Christmas tree is to take place in the Kennedy Hall on Tuesday evening, the 23rd. All the kiddies are looking forward to a visit from Santa Claus. A fine program is promised.
While business has not been quite as brisk as in some former years every indication points to better times ahead. But, at this, the festive season, let us for the time, at least, forget our troubles and join in the gaiety and happiness that always prevail at the close of the year.

1913 Dec 25 – Winnipegosis

Constable Hunking took two Indians to Winnipeg on Monday, where they will appear before the chief Indian agent. The redskins have been getting liquor from some quarter and an effort is being made to find out who the guilty parties are. When this is done there is going to be something doing. Up to the present it is not definitely known who supplied the liquor but there are grave suspicions. It is understood some of the officials will visit this district before long.
Mr. McKerchar went to Dauphin on Monday.
Now that the cold weather has set in the fishing industry will take on more life. It’s an ill wind that blows nobody good.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Sieffert left for Brandon on Tuesday to spend Christmas with Mr. S’s parents.
Councillor elect Hechter appears to be hearing the honours of his office with the due gravity. There is one thing we may look for now that the portly Frank is in office, and that is, that the municipality of Mossey River and Winnipegosis will get some publicity. That is all this town and district needs to be appreciated by outside investors. Three Dakota men were in the district last week and they said it was surprising that such a fertile belt was so little known. They are going to move here and say others will follow. Let us advertise like Dauphin and Ochre Rive have done and then we will come into our own.
H. Wilson, L.C. Doran and C. Hober from Dakota were here last week looking over the district. They intend buying lands and with others making their homes here.

1919 Dec 25 – Sleeping Sickness at Swan River

The Swan River Star reports that the Board of Trade of that town has died from “sleeping sickness.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 29 – 1914

1914 Oct 29 – Fork River

Mrs. Wm. Davis has sold off all her stock and rented her farm and left with her mother for her old home in Illinois.
Mrs. W.D. King and daughter, of Dauphin, were visitors at the home of Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Mr. Stevenson, Dominion government engineer, of Winnipeg, was here in connection with finishing the dredging work of Fork River and Mossey River. Wm. King and Sandy Munro went over the proposed work with Mr. Stevenson, who later left for Winnipeg to report.
Sam Hunter has rented the Davis farm. Sam’s a hustler.
Mrs. Little and daughter, Miss Grace, have left for a trip east.
James Parker has rented the Company from Mr. Grenon.
The pupils of All Saints’ Sunday school, spent the afternoon on Saturday at the farm of W. King, superintendent. Games of ball, running and other sports were indulged in until supper time. Mrs. King, Mrs. McEachern and Mrs. C.E. Bailey, attended to their “inner wants” at the supper table, after which a tired, but happy bunch of kiddies left for their several homes.
Nat Little has completed his new livery farm. It looks well with a coat of red paint.
Mrs. J. Robinson, of Mowat, has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
The Orangemen of Fork River are advertising a patriotic ball is to be held in the Orange Hall on the right of November the 5th. The proceeds are to be donated to the Patriotic Fund. Everyone is cordially invited to come and help in making this a successful ball. God Save the King.

1914 Oct 29 – Winnipegosis

Mr. and Mrs. C.L. White were passengers to Winnipeg on Monday. Mrs. W. is to have her eyes treated in the city.
Constable W.H. Hunking was a Dauphin visitor this week.
A number from here will take in the Patriotic Ball at Fork River on Nov. 5th, Guy Fawkes anniversary.
Mrs. Theo. Johnston is visiting at Dauphin this week.
The lake is several feet lower than in past years, in fact, it is said to be lower than in the recollection of the oldest inhabitants.
The winter fishing season opens on Nov. 15th, and most of the fishermen and supplies have gone north. The indications are that there will be a good winter’s fishing.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 14 – 1915

1915 Oct 14 – Arrested

Two young Ruthenians were arrested in the Ethelbert district this week charged with setting fire to two stacks of wheat on Michael Buyar’s farm. The case against them appears to be a strong one. Detective John Parn worked up the case and made the arrests.

1915 Oct 14 – Ethelbert

Harry Cope Nash, of Cowan, was a visitor in town Monday.
We have failed to announce for the last week or two that Mr. Wm. Barrie was appointed as justice of peace for and in the province and Mr. Geo. C. Smith as a provincial constable.
Threshing is just beginning ere and if we only get a few nice days there would be quite a portion of it done.
The average is very good, but the wheat grades somewhat low.
Brachman’s have enloaded this week a carload of flour. It looks as if they alone are going to stock flour this fall.
We had a temperance meeting here this last Sunday. There was a big crowd gathered in the town hall and Mr. Farley, from Winnipeg put up a strong speech and made an impression on the Ruthenians, which were in the majority at the meeting and it looks as if they might join the temperance forces.
Mr. White, from Grandview, is doing a big cattle business in this locality. He has shipped four cars in two weeks.
Mr. Kenneth McLean has built an addition to his house on the farm and has fixed up the house first class. Kenneth, I’ll be you expect company!
Mrs. A. Clarke, of Munson, Alta., returned home on Monday.
Ethelbert will be the chief centre of the wood business again this winter.

1915 Oct 14 – Fork River

Private A.J. Storrar, of the 45th Batt., has returned to Sewell camp after spending a few days with friends. [1 line missing].
Miss Robinson, of Dauphin, is a visitor at the home of Mrs. Dewsbury.
Mr. Sam McLean, of Dauphin, was here on a business trip lately. He had his little gun with him. Some say he was up for chickens, others think it was for larger game.
Mr. Hosey, horse dentist, spent a few days here fixing up the company farm horses.
T.N. Briggs’ outfit is threshing the company’s crop. The yield is such a surprise to Archie that it keeps him busy; in fact, he has not time to sleep as they thresh night and day.
Fred. Coop and Billy Williams are hard at the threshing also and the elevator is busy these days.
John Watson, bailiff of Dauphin, was a visitor here for a short time last week getting the lay of the land.
Capt. Alex. Russell is home from Kelwood and is spending the Thanksgiving holidays with his family.
Mr. and Mrs. Somerfield, from Ontario, are visiting at the homes of their nephews, F.F. and Vivian Hafenbrak, on the Fork River.
Prairie chickens are not near so numerous as in past years in this vicinity.

1915 Oct 14 – Sifton

Football match – 1st Sifton Patrol Boy Scouts vs. Revd. Father Sabourin’s school. Thanksgiving day was celebrated here by a football match between the above trams. The scouts made the challenge, which was kindly accepted and by the permission of Father Sabourin, the scholars marched to the Wycliffe School grounds in charge of the teacher. The Scouts played with dash and vim and although much less in stature and outweighed, steadily kept the ball in the enemy’s quarters and finally succeed in placing the leather. A large number of spectators enjoyed the dun. Score: Scouts, 1 goal; Father Sabourin’s school, nil. Scout team: Leslie Kennedy, (captain), John Gillis, Max Marantz, G. Marantz, Joe Reid, John Terchennik, Roy Kennedy, Louie Kennedy, Roddy Gillis, Mike Setchiabin, Stanley Gillis.

1915 Oct 14 – Winnipegosis

Last week was a busy week in town, every night being filled by a concert, dance or moving picture show and we all feel the better for it.
There was a most enjoyable dance in honour of our soldier boys on he occasion of their leaving for their regiment. Everybody was there and seemed to have a great time.
On Wednesday evening Mr. and Mrs. Sid. Coffey gave a dance in the Rex Hall, which was well attended and a most enjoyable evening was spent.
The concert in aid of the Red Cross Fund was held in the Rex Hall on Friday, the 8th, inst., and the hall was crowded; the program was a good and varied one and was much appreciated. The proceeds amounted to $57.10.
The ten-cent tea at the home of Mrs. White last Wednesday netted the handsome sum of $11.75.
Don’t forget the masquerade ball in the Rex Hall on Friday, the 22nd Oct. or you will sure miss a good time. Tickets on sale from Dunc Kennedy.
Three cars of settlers’ effects arrived on Saturday from the east. This northern country is rapidly filling up. We are glad to welcome all comers.
Miss Dolly Geekie and Miss Eva Fredrickson left on Saturday’s train for Winnipeg to spend a few days with friends.
[1 line missing] few days with Miss McMartin, left on Monday’s train for Neepawa.
Mr. Wiseman, of Roblin, has opened up a jewellery store and repair shop in the Rex Hall block.
Mr. Goodman, of Winnipeg, has opened up a second hand clothing emporium in the old Hunking house across the track.
The council met as a court of revision on Wednesday the 6th inst., and adjourned to meet again on the 14th October at 9.30 a.m.
Mayor J.P. Grenon returned Friday from a business trip to Winnipeg.
Frank Hechter left on Saturday for Dauphin on business.
The Field Day at the schoolhouse on Wednesday last, the 6th Oct., was a great success but the cold weather prevented quite a number from attending. Much credit is due Principal Davis and Miss McMartin and Miss Whitemore for the good time the children had. The singing of “O Canada” deserves special mention.
All the fishermen are busy these days getting their outfits ready for leaving for the north this week.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 9 – 1915

1915 Sep 9 – Winnipegosis Council

Meeting of the Council of the Village of Winnipegosis held in the Council chambers at 7 p.m. on the 6th inst. Mayor J.P. Grenon in the chair and Councillors Walmsley, Levons, Morris and Hjalmarson present.
Walmsley – Morris – That the minutes of previous meetings be adopted as read. Carried.
Morris – Walmsley – That Dunc Kennedy be appointed sec-treasurer at a salary of $30 per month from Sept. 1st till end of the fiscal year. Carried.
Lyons – Hjalmarson – That Walter Clarkson be appointed constable for the Village of Winnipegosis at a salary of $40 per month. Carried.
Lyons – Morris – That the Mayor and Councillors walmsley and Lyons be a committee to secure a yard and feed for pound for Village of Winnipegosis. Carried.
Lyons – Hjalmarson – That the Mayor, Coun. Walmsley and the Sec.-Tresurer meet the committee appointed by the municipality to go over the matter of the appointment between the village and the municipality. Carried.
Morris – Walmsley – That the Council may for the transportation of Mr. [2 lines missing] such time as the Council are in a position to buy it our it is sold. Carried.
Morris – Walmsley – That the Council adjourn to meet at the call of the Mayor. Carried.

1915 Sep 9 – Winnipegosis

Miss Evelyn Barrell and Mr. Sidney Coffey were married in Winnipeg on the 30th August, and arrived in town on Saturday’s train. Their many friends wish them a long and happy wedded life.
G.O. Bellsmy, an old-timer, spent Sunday in town.
Geo. C. Nigh spent the week-end wit his wife and reports the crops in good shape at Grandview. He left on Monday’s train for Grandview.
Dr. Buttomley, accompanied by Tom Needham, arrived from Dauphin by auto Saturday, and left for Meadow Portage with Ern. Bickel to inspect the smallpox epidemic over there.
J.A. Ball, customs officer, spent Saturday in town.
T.F. Ganther arrived on Saturday’s train and is helping J.C. Adams with the completion of his residence.
Sergeant Jack Angus came up from Brandon on Saturday’s train and is looking well and reports the boys from here all well and happy and getting along splendidly. He left Joe Johnston in charge of his squad.
Jas. McInnes has purchased a gasoline launch and made a trip to Waterhen on Saturday with a survey party.
Hull Burrell took Mr. Loire and party to their ranch on Saturday, returning Saturday night.
The S.S. “Maniton” arrived from the north Sunday with a load of fish and report fishing quiet.
Donald Hattie returned from Snake Island and report fishing quiet.
W.H. Hunking left on Wednesday from Johnston, North Dakota, where he intends making his home. His family preceded him some time ago.
Harry and Walter Grenon returned on Saturday from an extended trip to Quebec and Eastern points and report a splendid vacation and a real good time.
Miss St. Vrain and Geo. Adams were married at the home of the latter’s parents last week and are receiving the congratulations of their many friends.
Mrs. Jne. Cain left on Wednesday’s train for her home in Rainy River, Ont.
The Mossey River Council met in the council chamber, Winnipegosis, on the 31st August. The reeve and all councillors present.
E.R. Black and Scotty Howatson had an exciting trip going to Grave’s Point in a gasoline boat. They were lost and were eleven days making their destination. Why they made the point they had only a few matches left.
Sam McLean made a flying visit to town on Friday by automobile. We don’t see much of Sam nowadays.
Mrs. W. Morton and children returned on Wednesday from a two months’ visit to her parents at Wadena, Sask.
Capt. Russell received a nice bull terrier from Kelwood recently. Experts Dunc Kennedy and Billie Walmsley will tell you all about it. These two can sure spot a good dog with half an eye open.
Mr. and Mrs. Woiff and family motored up from Ochre River on Sunday to visit Mrs. Kennedy.
Joe Alex left for Winnipeg on business on Saturday.
Wm. Flett, Hudson’s Bay agent, returned from the far north and has been spending a week in town. He left for Winnipeg Saturday.
C.L. White left for Waterhen River Friday, taking a canoe in tow on account of the low water in the rivers.
The new principal for our school arrived in town Wednesday last.

Today in the Dapuhin Herald – Sep 3 – 1914

1914 Sep 3 – Thousands are Being Killed

LONDON, SEPT. 3RD – While little or no official news has been allowed to pass the censors, it is known for the past three days that tremendous fighting has taken place between the Allies and the Germans. One authority places the number killed at 100 000, seventy percent being Germans.

1914 Sep 3 – Germans will be Licked

If the Germans can’t reach Paris by the end of the week they will not be able to reach it all. Emperor William is urging her generals to take the city at all costs. The English and French troops are being reinforced and there is no fear at headquarters that they will not be able to repulse the invaders and later drive them out of the country.

1914 Sep 3 – Ethelbert

Houses are scarce in our village. There is a good opening here for some enterprising contractor to build a half dozen dwellings.
There is a large supply of wood on hand. Pretty nearly everything else is affected by the war but it is not likely wood will soar. We are thankful for this small favour.
W.H. White, principal of our school returned on Monday from Dauphin. Mr. W. has not moved his family from Dauphin yet being unable tog et a house.
Threshing has commenced. The quality of the grain is good but the yields are on the light sight.

1914 Sep 3 – Fork River

Mrs. Minocan and Mrs. Carter returned to Montana, U.S. having spent the summer with Mrs. Nat. Little.
Wm. Howitson, assistant clerk at the A.T. Co. store, received an urgent call to headquarters at Winnipegosis to take charge of the manager’s gold fish emporium. “Scotty’s” all right and will will miss him around here.
E. Thomas, of Veregin, Sask., has arrived here to take charge of the elevator. He reports many elevators have been closed down in Saskatchewan. D. Kennedy will handle the finances.
Mrs. Rice, of North Lake, was in town on Saturday.
We overheard Mrs. Manglewortzel top giving His Majesty hail Columbia because she had not got her Eaton catalog the other day as the T.E. Co. had informed her that several copies had been sent to members of her illustrious family and she wanted them. Strange to say, two hours after two bags of the catalogs were seen on the platform addressed to the express agent. We trust her ladyship received her Sunday reading ere this. Some people are busy looking for imaginary trouble.
Miss M. Bradley, of Winnipegosis, has accepted the position of teacher to the Mossey River School for a time.
The few showery days have put back the harvesting but have put out the fires in most places. We should have a fire guardian here.
W. King, reeve, was a visitor to Dauphin on Monday.

1914 Sep 3 – Winnipegosis

There has been a bad outbreak of diphtheria among the Galicians in this district and already several deaths have occurred. It appears that these people will not obey the instructions of the health officer in regard to quarantine and as a result the disease has spread. The services of Constable Hunking have been required and he will endeavour to reinforce the law. A supply of antitoxin has been secured from Dauphin.
Negotiations have been completed for funds and work has been resumed on the school. What a power the mighty dollar has.
The fishing is very good and the fishermen seem to be fairly satisfied, which counts for something. When you find a satisfied fishermen then the end of the universe is in sight.
The war is likely to do several things for this district. One is that the farmers will bend their efforts to raise more cattle and hogs and another is that a larger area of land will be got ready for crop next year.
J.S. Seiffert has been appointed police magistrate for the district. The office is an important one and if properly filled requires judicial talent. We sure have had a variety of P.M.’s – good, bad and indifferent.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 25 – 1914

1914 Jun 25 – With the Soldiers at Sewell

Sewell, June 23rd.
We made a splendid journey down here upon which the C.N.R. might be congratulated. Arrived Monday, 5 a.m., but immediately we reached the place allotted to us, before we had even tied our horses, we got a terrific downpour of rain for about 3 hours, which drenched every man to the skin. As we were all kept busy, we soon got warm, and no one is the worse, in fact it helped to wake up some of the sleepy ones.
Everything down here, travelling, food and routine in general is 50 percent better than last year, and things are running nice and smoothly. The regiment compares very favourably with any other. I might conclude by saying that one of the things which has caused the Dauphin boys the most pleasure is the report we have received to the effect that Dauphin received its share of the much needed rain for the benefit of its crops.

CLEANED FROM A HORSES BACK.

Our younger troopers say they left their hearts with the girls at Dauphin.
We missed Capt. Newcombe the first few days. He missed the ducking we all got, so the honours are even.
Major Walker is smiling. He says he is proud of the boys and he knows crops are growing at Dauphin.
There are nearly twice the number in camp this year than there was last.
It isn’t fair to tell tales out of school but there are a couple of incidents which have happened in camp which I will relate later. There is a laugh coming to the girls sure.
Frank Beyette is dishing up the hash this year as usual. Frank is some cook and the rations are better this year than last. But Frank is mad some of the hungry boys “hooked” his pan of hot biscuits.
Q.M. Sergt. Wade is as busy as a washerwoman and as happy as a clam.

1914 Jun 25 – Winnipegosis

It is election talk and nothing but election talk.
Candidate Sam Hughes was in town on Saturday.
J.P. Grenon returned from a trip to Dauphin and Winnipeg on Saturday.
Constable Hunking took a Galician named John Soloway to Dauphin on Monday. Soloway has shown signs of insanity and will be examined at Dauphin as to his condition.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong and Sam Hughes will address a meeting here on Saturday night next.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 26 – 1910

1910 May 26 – Sentenced to Three Years

John Demoria, the young half-breed who was arrested by Constable Hunking at Dauphin last week for housebreaking, was tried before Geo. O. Bellamy, P.M. on the charge and found guilty. He was sentenced to three years in the reformatory at Portage la Prairie, where he was taken on Saturday morning.

1910 May 26 – Fork River

A Conservative meeting was held last Wednesday in D.F. Wilson’s office.
H.P. Nicholson of Dauphin, visited here last Friday.
R. Hunt from Dauphin paid us a visit last week.
Mr. and Mrs. Cooper from Brantford, came up last Friday’s train.
Miss Finch and Miss C. Bailey paid Winnipegosis a visit last Friday.
Mayor Sparling of Dauphin was up here last week looking over some farms.
The Armstrong Trading Company of Winnipegosis will shortly open up an up-to-date store in this village.
Mrs. C. Smith and family who have been residing here for two years left this week for Calvin, North Dakota.
The Mossey River Municipality held a meeting at Winnipegosis last Saturday when some important business was done.
A very important Orangemen’s meeting was held in the Orange Hall last Wednesday when four of the members were advanced to the Royal Scarlet Chapter. Seven gentlemen from Dauphin came up and a very pleasant time came to a close in the early morning.

1910 May 26 – Winnipegosis

A very impressive memorial service for Edward VII was held on Friday, May 20th in the Presbyterian Church. Previous to the service in the church, the children of the day school under the charge of Reeve Grenon and Mr. Shannon paraded the streets en route to the church. The congregation was a large one and the service was conducted by Rev. H.H. Scrase (English Church minister). A brilliant address on the life and character of our late King was given by the Rev. W.E. Rowan (Methodist minister) and was highly appreciated. The Rev. Mr. McKay (Presbyterian minister) also took part in the service. The Dead March in Saul was impressively rendered on the organ by Miss McArthur.
The Quarterly Board of the Methodist Church was held on Friday evening under the chairmanship of the Rev. A.E. Smith of Dauphin, the chairman of the District. All the departments of the church work were reported to be in a flourishing condition, and a hearty invitation to remain as minister of the church for another year was extended to the highly esteemed minister, Rev. W.E. Rowan. Mr. Rowan’s acceptance of the invitation gave great satisfaction to the members of the Board.
On Tuesday the 24th the ladies held a picnic for the purpose of raising funds to procure a baseball outfit. A good time was enjoyed by everyone and the baseball enthusiasts will at once organize and get the game started.
C.F. Stewart, who was spending a few days in town returned to Dauphin Monday.
H.W. Grenon has built and opened up a poolroom and tobacco store.
Tag-day, the ladies were kept quite busy all day, the result of their untiring efforts being about $100.
McArthur’s boats returned from the north bringing in a raft of about 540,000 feet of lumber.