Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 12 – 1914

1914 Nov 12 – Men for Second Contingent

The following have successfully passed the preliminary medical examination here this week conducted by Dr. Bottomley. The men are now drilling at the barracks under Sergeant-Major. Goodall and Sergeant Highfield. There are 50 men wanted from district No. 10., which territory is almost all in the Dauphin district, for the Second Contingent.
A.G. Cockrill, Dauphin. (Ashton Dennis Cockrill, 1887, 12656)
T. Boakes, Swan River. (Thomas Boakes, 1892, 81084)
A. Kerr, Swan River.
F. Conley, Benito.
S.J. Ellis, Dauphin.
W.J. Falconer, Dauphin. (William John Falconer, 1894, 106218 SGT)
J.L. Younghusband, Dauphin.
J.W. Cleaver, Dauphin. (John Wesley Cleaver, 1890, 106138)
Andrew Andrew, Dauphin. (Andrew Andrew, 1883, 81019 CSM)
J.W. Meek, Dauphin. (John Wilson Meek, 1892, 81578 QMS)
Glen H. Pettis, Dauphin. (Glen Haslome Pettis, 1893, 81704 SGT)
H. Knight, Dauphin.
A. Richmond, Swan River.
W.H.G. Cattermole, Grandview. (William Harry Gage Cattermole, 1879, 81140)
H. Wade, Dauphin.
D. Leigh, Ashville. (Duncan Blake Leigh, 1893, 106356)
A. Towns, Grandview. (Alfred Towns, 1893, 81894 LCP)
Jas. Walkey, Dauphin.

1914 Nov 12 – Fork River

Mr. R.M. Bell has left for a short vacation to Brandon and Russell.
Mr. and Mrs. Brown, of Alexandria, Ont., are visiting their daughter, Mrs. A. Snelgrove.
Mrs. Joe Hunter left for home at Severn Bridge, Ont., after spending a few weeks with her sons, Sam and Harry.
The school was closed on Wednesday. The kids enjoy a holiday in the middle of the week or at any other time.
Mr. T.B. Venables has left for a vacation trip to Boissevain. Major Humphries is in charge of the farm during his absence.
Mr. Sam Hunter has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Mr. Sydney Howlet, of Million, paid his friends of this burgh a visit, while passing through from Winnipegosis.
The Orangemen’s patriotic ball on November the 5th was admitted by all to be the best event of the kind ever held in this little burgh. There were fifty couple present, Dauphin, Dublin Bay, Sifton and Winnipegosis represented. The music was furnished by the Russell family and several others. From the opening at nine o’clock with the grand march till the “Home Sweet Home” waltz at 4:30, everything moved along pleasantly and most enjoyably. The ladies furnished a good supper. Speeches and songs were given during that interval. The song, “It’s a Long, Long, Way to Tipperary” by the three Russell children was well received. Ice cream was served by the ladies of the Women’s Auxiliary and a nice sum realized for the fund. The Orangemen wish to thank the public for the assistance given towards making it a success.

1914 Nov 12 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. Bradley is fast recovering from the effects of the burning she received on Hallowe’en night.
Mr. Grenon returned from Dauphin on Monday.
Dr. Medd took Mrs. R.C. Birrell to Dauphin on Monday for treatment. Mrs. B. has been in unsatisfactory health for some time past.
Capt. Coffey arrived on Wednesday’s train.
We see that Charlie White has been appointed fishery overseer for the province. We hope that this does not mean that our old friend may have to pull up stakes and locate elsewhere.
What Winnipegosis would be without a curling club it is hard to say. It is truly our chief winter sport. A meeting was held recently to organize and the feeling prevails that the game will be as popular as ever this season. Dr. Medd is president and Fred McDonald secretary-treasurer. The curlers have taken over the rink from Mr. Whale, and will manage it themselves this winter.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 20 – 1914

1914 Aug 20 – Dauphin Contingent

During the past week Lieut. Ed. Manby, of the 32nd Manitoba Horse, has been engaged drilling the Dauphin contingent so as to familiarize them with their work and have the men in readiness for the call when it comes to them. Thirty-one have passed the medical examiner and are drilling. The following compose the number:
Lieut. A.E.L. Shand, Sergt. G. Fraser, Sergt. W Code, Corp. D. Wetmore, Corp. N.C. Chard, Corp. C.S. Wiltshire, and Privates H.A. Bray, H.H. Moore, A.J. Pudifin, Garth Johnston, N. Munson, W.S. Gilbert, C. Curtis, H. Izon, S. Laker, J.E. Greenaway, A.J. Johnson, D. Powell, E. Sonnenburg, E. Classen, E. Herrick, E. McNab, J.F. Lewis, C.S. Van Tuyll, D. McVey, A.E. Pickering, A. Redgate, F.A. Matthews, H. Pollard.
Sergt. Major A.C. Goodall and Sergt. F. Highfield, who are also on the volunteer list here, will probably be assigned another squadron.

1914 Aug 20 – Little Shots

Col. Steele will command all western troops.
Dauphin has 31 soldiers drilling daily and ready for the call.
A Minitonas correspondent writes: “The patriotic spirit of Minitonas is evident. Messrs. C. Smith, V. Walker, J. Maltman, E. Koons, S. Henderson and R. Henderson having volunteered for the front.”

1914 Aug 20 – Fork River

Miss Alice Godkin has returned from spending a few days in Dauphin.
Wm. Hunkins, of Winnipegosis, was a visitor here lately.
Archie McDonald, manager of the A.T. Co. farm, reports having finished cutting a half section of oats and barley.
Geo. Basham, postmaster of Oak Brae, was in town on Saturday. He states he is delighted with the fine weather, which leaves the roads in good shape to Oak Brae.
King brothers started up their threshing outfit to thresh a few loads for the farmers and judging from the way the grain turned out it will be an improvement on last year’s yield.
We learn that Mr. W. Howitson will have charge of the elevator and that Mr. D. Kennedy will pay out the cash for grain.

1914 Aug 20 – Winnipegosis

It is just a question in the minds of sportsmen here whether the change of the date for duck shooting from Sept. 1st to Sept. 15th, is not a mistake. Experiences goes to show that many of the ducks take their flight south about this time of the year.
There was a consternation among the people lately when a report was circulated that our new school was not to be completed owing to the commencement of the war and the difficult of selling the bond. It is understood, however, that the work will go on, the money being supplied from private sources. It would have been too bad, as the new building is needed to accommodate our growing school population.
Despite the dry season the quantities of hay put up for feed in the district is large.
The war, of course, is the great topic here and some of our boys have got the fever and want to go to the front. Patriotism is a fine thing and we are glad to see it displayed in all parts of the country.
War news has been scarce of late, but we feel that we had better get no news than much of the bogus stuff that was being sent out.
We were glad to welcome the Dauphin excursionists ere on Tuesday. The railway employees brought a fine crowd and all seemed to enjoy themselves. The chief attraction was the water and nearly everyone enjoyed a sail. Our town possess many advantages for picnic parties and we hope more societies will be induced to hold their outings here. The people here as well as the excursionists enjoyed the music of the band and before long we hope to welcome them back.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 2 – 1914

1914 Jul 2 – Damage by Hail Storm

A heavy ran storm accompanied by hail visited the Mountview district on Tuesday afternoon. The strip touched by the hail was a narrow one and only two farms were struck.
W.G. Lock last 45 acres of wheat and 15 of oats. Crop insured.
Jas. Scarff last 40 acres wheat and 20 oats. Not insured.
Mr. Lock had only insured his crop a few days before the storm and only received his policy from Winnipeg on Wednesday.

1914 Jul 2 – Latest From Sewell Camp

Sewell Camp, June 30.
The Sergeant-Trumpeter mounted a new steed on Tuesday and we were treated to a great display of fireworks from the horse’s heels, the sergeant’s tongue and also eventually from the part of his pants which struck the ground after a while. For a minute or so he was hear saying, “Going up! Going up!” When he struck the ground, Sergeant-Major Fletcher was heard to say, “Coming down, I fiddler.” Highfield after four days’ rest has still a stiff neck.
The boys look very smart in their new Indian service helmets, which were presented to us alone (the 32nd) as a distinction for our work last year. The boys are proud of them as they should be.
Someone caused an uproar on Sunday. He said the camp was being attacked by Suffragettes. On closer examination they proved to be Cameron Highlanders.
Our shoeing smith thought he would ride the Sergeant-Trooper’s broncho, but changed his mind at the same time as the broncho.
It takes Dave Cox to ride the bronchos and round-up the runaways.
We will leave here on Friday morning arriving at Dauphin in the evening.
Our regiment was inspected on Saturday by the honourary colonel, Dr. Roche.
We turned out on Saturday morning at 4.30 a.m. for shooting on the range. Major Walker very conveniently was absent having a blister on his heel, so stayed in bed.
The Ashville boys are a first-class bunch of rifle shots.
The Dauphin squadron has been nicknamed “The Devil’s Own,” and they are worthy of it.
Red noses are the fashion. It is the fault of the occasional sunshine, not the grog.
On galloping off the field two regiments collided, resulting in a bad smash, one man getting his collarbone broken and two others disabled.
Our boy troopers, Gordon Walker, Gordon Batty and Roy Wade, are constantly being court-martialled by Squad Sergeant-Major, for unsoldierly conduct; not being on parade at 5.30 a.m., catching gophers before cleaning up their tent, etc.
Our cook put up some fine apple pies, things which are comparatively unknown here. We have an idea that Frank Beyette can have his job every year if he likes.
We have had a number of lady visitors up to now, among whom was Mrs. Walker and little daughters.
We wonder what it is that makes the boys sit down so slowly and gently. Having had some ourselves they have our sympathy.
H.H. Allan, the photographer, came down here this year and he is doing roaring business.

1914 Jul 2 – Fork River

A. Cameron and F.B. Lacey, of Mowat, have returned from a trip to Dauphin.
Vote for Sam Hughes, the farmer, and you won’t make a mistake.
Miss Gertrude Cooper has returned from Dauphin and is with her parents on the Fork.
Mrs. Attwood, of Towell, Indiana, and her mother, are spending the summer months with Mrs. W. Davis on the farm.
Mrs. Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, is a visitor at the home of D.F. Wilson on the Mossey.
Messrs. J. Robinson and H. Hunter have put a three-horse power gasoline engine in their new boat. The water should fly now.
Several of the electors from her attended the Conservative meeting at Winnipegosis on Wednesday night. The speakers were Mr. Shears, and Mr. Grenon. The meeting was well attended. We hope to go again in the near future.
The Orangemen of Fork River have arranged for a grand celebration here on Monday, July 13th, when they will be a good programme of sports. The hall will be free to the public in the evening for a dance. All are cordially invited to come and have a good time. There will be a church parade at 3 o’clock on Sunday afternoon, the 12th.
On Saturday afternoon a Conservative meeting was held in the Orange Hall. W. King, president, presided, Mr. Sam Hughes have an account of his four years stewardship as member for Gilbert Plains, which was very satisfactory and well received. Hon. Hugh Armstrong, Provincial Treasurer, followed and gave a very satisfactory account of the financial standing of the province, which showed that the business was in good hands under the Roblin government.
Mr. Clopeck, of Winnipeg, addressed the Ruthenians for a short time and was well received. The hall was crowded and he gallery was taken possession of by a large number of ladies. Everything passed off quietly. It was a most successful meeting of the kind ever held in Fork River.
Mr. Green, late Liberal member for North Winnipeg, was here a short time Monday and later left for Winnipegosis accompanied by N. Little.
H. Woods, of Dublin Bay, was a visitor here on Saturday night attending the committee which is arranging for the Orange picnic.

1914 Jul 2 – Winnipegosis

Coun. Frank Hechter went to Winnipeg on Monday in connection with the good roads movement. He was joined by some of the delegates from the other municipalities at Dauphin.
Mrs. Kenneth McAulay, and children, and her sister, Miss Smith, left for Kamsack on Monday.
The big political guns, Hugh Armstrong and Sam Hughes left for Dauphin on Sunday.
Capt. Coffey returned on Sunday to Dauphin with his automobile, taking with him several of the politicians.
R. Morrison has finished the foundation for the new school.
Mrs. T. Johnston returned on Monday from a visit to Dauphin.
Mrs. W. Johnson and Mrs. McIntosh, of Fort William, are visiting with Mrs. Johnston.
The big political meeting on Saturday night was held in the new Rex Theatre. This building seats over 300 and a great many were obliged to stand during the speaking.
The weather has been rather on the cool side for boating and the usual umber of crafts are not seen on the lake. With the warm weather of July many will seek cool breezes of the water.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 21 – 1915

1915 Jan 21 – 90 New Enlisted

There are 90 out of the 110 men required now enlisted. They are a fine lot of men taken as a whole. Sergeant instructors are Highfield and Fletcher. The men are now well advanced in drill.

1915 Jan 21 – Going to the Front

Nurse Margaret Cummings has been offered and accepted a position on nursing staff of the medical department of the army. She leaves for Ottawa to-night (Thursday). This is the second graduate nurse of the Dauphin General Hospital called, the other being Miss Hudson, who is now in England.
Dr. Jas. C. King, of Humboldt, has been appointed to the medical corps with the rank of first lieutenant. His commission dates from January 1st.
Captain Newcombe will go to Winnipeg on Feb. 1st to attend the military school of instruction.

1915 Jan 21 – Got Contract for Lighthouse

Mr. Frank Neely has been notified by the Dept. of Marine and Fisheries, Ottawa, that he is the successful tenderer for the proposed lighthouse at Winnipegosis. Mr. Neely is now making arrangements for the material. A.J. Hunt has the contract for the painting.

1915 Jan 21 – Letter From Lewis Barnard

Mr. Thos. Barnard received a letter from his son Lewis, who is with the first contingent at Salisbury Plain this week. He states, in the letter, that he visited the Dauphin men at their camp recently and found them in bad quarters and quite a number sick. The sickness, he says, was nearly altogether confined to the older men. They were still occupying tents and the mud around the tents was fully a foot deep.
Mr. Barnard enlisted at Prince Albert and went to the front with the Saskatoon section.
Lewis has the distinction of being the second best shot in the regiment for rapid firing.

1915 Jan 21 – Mrs. Arnold Wins Case

Shortly after the death of Mr. Jas. Arnold, engineer, in the collision on the C.N.R. near Kamsack last summer. Mrs. Arnold applied through her solicitor, Mr. Bowman, for compensation. This was refused by the railway company and a suit was entered under “The Workman’s Compensation Act” of Saskatchewan, claiming a considerable amount of damages. When the case was ready to come to trial the officials of the company had evidently changed their minds for a cheque for the full amount claimed was forwarded to Mr. Bowman.

1915 Jan 21 – No Trace of Deserter Yet

Private John Alexander deserted on Saturday from the Dauphin contingent, and although the wires have been busy no trace of him has yet been ascertained. All that is known is the Alexander took the train south.

1915 Jan 21 – Fork River

Mr. Thos. Secord, of Dauphin, homestead inspector, spent a short time here lately.
Mr. W. Williams and gang of men left for his timber limits east of Lake Dauphin, where they will run his sawing outfit for the winter.
A large party of neighbours met at the home of Mr. A. Hunt on Wednesday evening the 13th, when a very pleasant evening was spent in dancing and social recreation.
Messrs. Walmsley, Hunking and Toye, of Winnipegosis, were visitors to this burgh on municipal matters lately.
The A.T. Co. have been very busy shipping cordwood lately.

1915 Jan 21 – Sifton

Mr. Robt. Brewer was in our midst last week and purchased a number of hogs. He states that business is still good with him and still has a pleasant smile for everyone.
Messrs. Baker and Kitt, the well drillers, left here last week and are now busy drilling wells around Ethelbert. Their outfit is a good one.
Since sleighing has commenced there is quite a lot of hardwood coming into town and our friend Fred Farion, seems to be the “Cordwood King.”
Joe Shand, of Dauphin, was a visitor here last week on his way from Ethelbert, where he had been on business.
The grist mill here has been running very steady this last week owing to the roads being good for sleighing and the people are now able to bring their grain to town.
We are all looking forward to business being a little brighter now that all the holidays are over.

1915 Jan 21 – Winnipegosis

A concert was held here on Friday evening in aid of the Red Cross society. Everybody turned out for the good cause, and a pleasant evening was spent. The sum of $30.00 has been forwarded direct to the society at Toronto, making in all a total of $70.00 sent from Winnipegosis, in addition to three shipments of bandages, pillows, etc.
It is understood the incorporation of the town will not take place until the return of the fishermen from the north. A considerable portion of our population is away at present.
Capt. Wm. Sifton, who is in charge of the Standard Lumber Co.’s camp at the north end of the lake, is visiting at Dauphin. The captain says the output of logs this winter will be limited.
We are all patiently waiting for the return of the fishermen. When they are away the town is like the play of “Hamlet” with “Hamlet” left out. And, you know, the nimble dollar of the fishermen is like the fish, it has the faculty of slipping from one to the other.
Like everything else, curling is expected to boom when the boys return from the north end of the lake. Up to the present it has been on the slow side.

Winnipegosis

1915 Jan 21 – Winnipegosis

Chas. White returned on Saturday night from his rounds as fish inspector, and reports the fishing good.
To Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Christianson, a daughter, on Jan. 13th.
Jack Matthews is on the sick list, but is reported improving.
Mr. F. Neely, of Dauphin, has been awarded the contract for the new lighthouse.
The young ladies of the town are giving a dance and skating party on Wednesday evening, the 20th.