Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 10 – 1910

1915 Nov 10 – MGR. JOST SUICIDES

The Well Known and Popular Manager of Union Bank Suicides while Temporarily Insane
The people of the town were shocked Sunday afternoon when the news spread that George N. Jost, manager of the Union Bank had committed suicide by shooting himself. During the past few days he had been complaining of not feeling well, and on Saturday night consulted a doctor, who told him that his temperature was high, and that it indicated typhoid fever and that he would arrange to have him placed in the hospital. The friend with whom he was staying left the premises for a short time, and during this period Mr. Jost procured a gun and retired to the stable, where he managed to discharge the gun by stooping over it and pulling the trigger. The charge entered the upper part of the abdomen over the left side of the stomach. When found he was still alive, but expired after a few minutes.

Coroner Harrington held an inquest Sunday afternoon and the verdict of the jury was that Jost came to his death by a gunshot wound while in a state of temporary insanity brought on by a high state of temperature in the early stages of typhoid fever.

Mr. Jost was about 28 years of age, and came to Dauphin three months ago from Kindersley, Sask., to assume the management of the Union Bank branch here. His home is in Guysboro, N.S. where his parents live. He was a popular young man and stood well with the business public. The remains were taken to Guysboro for interment.

1915 Nov 10 – Fork River

Editor King of the Dauphin Press paid us a visit last Saturday.
Professor Sutton gave an entertainment in the Hall last Saturday. Quite a number attended.
Mr. Scrase paid Winnipegosis a visit this week.
E. Clawson who has been away all summer returned from Rothwell last week.
W. Clark who has been away for some time returned last week.
Ten quarter sections of land were sold here last week for taxes.
Mr. Little left here last week for a two weeks holiday in the States.
Paul Wood from Sifton spent Thanksgiving Day here visiting D.F. Wilson.
Archie Stewart from Winnipegosis was here last week.
Quite a lot of damage has been done in this district by forest fires.
E. Clawson and A. Forbes paid Dauphin a visit.

1915 Nov 10 – To the Herald: –

SIR – Re Oak Brae P.M., F.B. Lacey’s reply to a correspondent of Fork River, re Fishing River p.o. and elevator at Fork River says it is a concoction of misrepresentations. Our O.B. friend does not like the truth. At a Burrows meeting at Fork River during the last Dominion election, our O.B. friend was asked by a large number of Fishing River farmers, to explain the reason the p.o. petitioned for was not given to some one of them and why one was established at O.B. instead. He replied that he was in a hurry but as soon as the train left he would explain. They waited, the train left, and our O.B. P.M. was conspicuous by his absence. No explanation. Shortly after our O.B. friend was sent to Winnipeg and we saw him no more till after the election at Fishing River.

If the P.M. appointed at Fishing River had left, there were plenty of other settlers left to take it. He states as an excuse the train did not stop at Fishing River. It does not stop at Oak Brae but he got a post office there and we never heard of a petition asking for one for Lacey P.O.

A post office was established at Fishing River Oct. 1st, 1910, and the mail is carried from Sifton, and not on the same date as the Lacey post office was established (September 25, 1905) as our Oak Brae friend would lead the public to believe in his letter, “A Misrepresentation.” Was a P.O. lost, strayed or stolen for the period of five yeas? The new P.M. has lived eight years there; he should have had it sooner. True he was a supporter of Glen Campbell at the last Dominion election, but he did not get the P.O. then, no Tories need apply. He, I believe, supported the Grits at the last Provincial election and got a P.O. in short order, which shows to get post offices keep in with the postmaster general at Oak Brae. He kicks because the people are tired of the O.B. mail coming in and going out at any old time and carried by every Tom, Dick or Harry. Our O.B. friend told us some time ago it is well to remind people of their duty as they get careless, so we are only giving our friend his own medicine.

Regarding the clique at Fork River, they are doing nicely, the place is booming in the absence of our friend. As for the champions of the Provincial Government, we have a great deal to thank them for in bridges and roads. They have always kept their promises to the people here.

Re the elevator that the O.B. P.M. is worrying about being lost, strayed or style. He is the only man we heard say that the government promised one this fall. True we need one at this point and we sent a petition for one, but the government has no say. There is an Elevator Commission appointed and I have no doubt they will build us one as soon as possible.

Our friend mentions the 9th of June often. His must have had an attack of the Hipocketzotic them. He reminds one of the little boy who stuck a pin in his toy balloon left after the wind escaped.

A Fork Riverite

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 7 – 1914

1914 May 7 – Escaped in Male Attire

Woman at station on Tuesday Night Dressed in a Man’s Suit – Who was the Woman?
When court was called on Wednesday morning there was a surprise when Chief Bridle gave out that Mrs. Murphy had left town and would not appear to answer the charge of attempting to commit suicide.
How the woman managed to get away is now what is puzzling the police as she was supposed to be in bed at home sick and the trains were being closely watched.
But there is a possible explanation of how the escape was effected. On Tuesday night a woman dressed in a man’s suit was observed on the station platform by several who were there. So sure was the conductor of the train that the supposed man was a woman that he offered to be the cigars with an acquaintance that such was the case. The disguise was very good but the woman, whoever she was, evidently forgot one essential in her make-up, which was a source of much amusement to the bystanders.

MRS. MURPHY HEARD FROM.

This (Thursdays) morning the Herald received a little from Mrs. Murphy, the postmark being Winnipeg, May 6th. In this letter she says that “she has to thank the liars of Dauphin for the trouble they have caused her.” She further remarks that after it is too late she has had her eyes opened and warms other women to beware and not believe liars as she did until it is too late to mend the damage done.

1914 May 7 – Met Instant Death

Maurice Frobisher and his brother arrived a short time ago from St. Norbert, Man., and took up homesteads at Asham Point, in the Ste. Rose district. On Saturday last the two brothers were going by ox team to Ste. Rose. Maurice was sitting in the back end of the wagon holding a rifle, when it accidently discharged, the bullet entering his arm, passing to his jaw and came out at the back of his head. Death was instantaneous.
Dr. Harrington was telephoned for and went to Ste. Rose. After learning the circumstances be decided that an inquest was not necessary.
Deceased was 40 years of age and unmarried.

1914 May 7 – Prairie Fire Does Damage

Prairie fires were running southwest of the town in the Mayflower and Spruce Bluff districts on Friday and Saturday. A dwelling on the farm of Arthur Bule, near the Mayflower School, was burned. A. Maynard lost a quantity of hay and other settlers suffered minor losses.

1914 May 7 – Ethelbert

Seeding has been going ahead actively and much of the wheat has been ???. The recent rain held things up for sure.
Very little wood is now being shipped out, still there are always a few cars moving.
Business is a little on the quiet side of late. Our burgh is becoming quite an egg expecting centre, many cases being shipped out weekly.
Wm. Morray, truancy officer, is visiting schools in our municipality. He is very busy going from one farmer to another making them send their children to school. On account of his visit the school trustees of Ethelbert S.D. have to provide more accommodation for the children that are of school age and who must attend. The people are satisfied with the action of the government in this move and will assist the officer in every way in enforcing the law.

1914 May 7 – Fork River

R. Corbett and his assistant returned to Winnipeg after taking the levels for draining a township and a half and laying out the road to Winnipegosis.
The English Church concert held in the Orange Hall, May 1st, was a very successful one. Our critic here admits it the best. A large number came from Sifton and put on a dialogue, which, to say the least was a laugh maker from start to finish. It pleased everyone. Our Winnipegosis friends were out in force and helped materially and that with the help of Fork River contingent a good evening’s entertainment was enjoyed. An excellent super was provided by the ladies. After supper several hired the hall for a dance and splendid music was supplied by Mr. Russell and sons.
Contractor Briggs is busy these days trying to make Main Street passable. Next thing we know Councilor Richardson will be putting down the balance of the sidewalk and all will be rosy.
John Clemens and family have left for McCreary, where they will reside in the future.
W. King has been appointed registration clerk for the northern portion of Gilbert Plains constituency. He starts in on the 12th of May at Winnipegosis.
Richard Harrison and E. Bickle, of South Bay, were visitors here at the council meeting during court of revision.
The dwelling house of J. McDonald caught fire last week. Captain Wilson and the fire brigade were soon on the ground. There was very little damage done.
Mr. McMillian, of Cyprus River, is a visitor at the home of A. Cameron of Mowat.
Our Mowat friend states they have put a bell and tower on the Mowat School house and yet they forgot to put a foundation under it. Of course, our friend usually does things different from others, which accounts for his being in a kicking frame of mind. He goes on to state the folks he sends to take his mail out, take all the way from one day to a week and the sometimes longer before he gets his mail back. What a shame. We trust he got the paper which contained the write up of how his pet government let the contractors mulet the people out of forty million dollars in building the Transcontinental Railway. Say, F.B. don’t get sore over our convention at Gilbert Plains. Have you forgotten the fuss you made with your friends here and up north because they wanted a share of the swag when you carried the chequebook and had to take a holiday for a few weeks in Winnipeg. You were not missed a bit. Have the common decency to keep in your own backyard, as we believe the glass in our house is of better material than yours and as in the past you can’t afford to indulge in stone throwing.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 28 – 1910

1910 Apr 28 – Found Dead Near Sable

George Frame, a homesteader of the Fork River district, was found dead Friday morning near his stable by a neighbouring farmer, Mr. G. Shannon.

Authorities and his brother Robt. Of Kelso, Sask., were at once notified and Coroner Harrington went up on Monday’s train, but did not deem an inquest necessary.

Mr. Frame was subject to epileptic fits. He was 60 years of age and unmarried.

1910 Apr 28 – Fork River

Mr. Clawson paid Dauphin a visit last week.

George Frame, who had been farming in this district for some years, was found dead near the stable. The body was found by a neighboring farmer, G. Shannon, last Tuesday. He at once gave information and the coroner, Dr. Harrington of Dauphin, was notified, also R. Frame at Kelso. Mr. Frame came by the first train on receipt of the sad news, and on getting to Dauphin saw Dr. Harrington and told him that George Frame was subject to epileptic fits. On the strength of this the coroner did not think a post mortum examination necessary. The body must have laid over a week before found. Mr. Frame was born in Hamilton, Scotland about sixty years ago. He was a bachelor.

1910 Apr 28 – Winnipegosis

A very successful social was held in the Methodist Church on Thursday, April 21st. The church was crowded and a good programme consisting of songs, recitations and dialogues was gone through. The chair was taken by the Rev. W.E. Rowan and a very pleasant evening was spent. The net proceeds realized the magnificent sum of one hundred and fifty dollars, truly a noble effort.

Mrs. Malo, of Vancouver, B.C., is visiting her sister, Mrs. Derochers, here for a few weeks.

George Frame, who has lived on a homestead here for some time, was found dead Friday morning in his stable. The cause of death is unknown other than he was subject to fits. He had been dead some days before being found, as he lived alone on the homestead.

Hon. Hugh Armstrong was in town a few days in connection with his fish business and other matters.

The Government are now installing a new and improved dredge here to operate at the mouth of the Mossey River.

The ice on Lake Winnipegosis has not yet broken up, but it is expected it will be clear in a week or ten days.

A case of assault and rape is reported at South Bay, near here. The victim was unable to identify the assailant. The attorney-general has been communicated with and has been asked to send a detective. Local authorities are now working on the case.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 28 – 1910

1910 Apr 28 – Found Dead Near Sable

George Frame, a homesteader of the Fork River district, was found dead Friday morning near his stable by a neighbouring farmer, Mr. G. Shannon.
Authorities and his brother Robt. Of Kelso, Sask., were at once notified and Coroner Harrington went up on Monday’s train, but did not deem an inquest necessary.
Mr. Frame was subject to epileptic fits. He was 60 years of age and unmarried.

1910 Apr 28 – Fork River

Mr. Clawson paid Dauphin a visit last week.
George Frame, who had been farming in this district for some years, was found dead near the stable. The body was found by a neighboring farmer, G. Shannon, last Tuesday. He at once gave information and the coroner, Dr. Harrington of Dauphin, was notified, also R. Frame at Kelso. Mr. Frame came by the first train on receipt of the sad news, and on getting to Dauphin saw Dr. Harrington and told him that George Frame was subject to epileptic fits. On the strength of this the coroner did not think a post mortum examination necessary. The body must have laid over a week before found. Mr. Frame was born in Hamilton, Scotland about sixty years ago. He was a bachelor.

1910 Apr 28 – Winnipegosis

A very successful social was held in the Methodist Church on Thursday, April 21st. The church was crowded and a good programme consisting of songs, recitations and dialogues was gone through. The chair was taken by the Rev. W.E. Rowan and a very pleasant evening was spent. The net proceeds realized the magnificent sum of one hundred and fifty dollars, truly a noble effort.
Mrs. Malo, of Vancouver, B.C., is visiting her sister, Mrs. Derochers, here for a few weeks.
George Frame, who has lived on a homestead here for some time, was found dead Friday morning in his stable. The cause of death is unknown other than he was subject to fits. He had been dead some days before being found, as he lived alone on the homestead.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong was in town a few days in connection with his fish business and other matters.
The Government are now installing a new and improved dredge here to operate at the mouth of the Mossey River.
The ice on Lake Winnipegosis has not yet broken up, but it is expected it will be clear in a week or ten days.
A case of assault and rape is reported at South Bay, near here. The victim was unable to identify the assailant. The attorney-general has been communicated with and has been asked to send a detective. Local authorities are now working on the case.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 24 – 1913

1913 Apr 24 – Ethelbert

Mr. and Mrs. L.W. Saunders and children left last week for Herbert, Sask., where Mr. Saunders will operate a steam plough during the summer. The family have been residents of this district since the settlement was opened and carry the best wishes of many friends to their new home.
Geo. P. Metz, another of our old-timers, has also left for Saskatchewan.

1913 Apr 24 – Fork River

Alfred Snelgrove has left for Regina to work on the government dredge at that point for the summer.
Wm. David has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Archie McMillan returned to his home at Kindersley on Saturday.
Howard Armstrong and nephew, have arrived from Dauphin and intend farming on a larger scale this summer.
Wm. Parker, of Winnipegosis, is busy taking stock at the Armstrong Trading Co., store.
D. Kennedy’s little boy was taken suddenly ill with convulsions and had to get Dr. Harrington, of Dauphin to meet him at Sifton. We are pleased to hear the lad is recovering.
W. Williams, lumber merchant, was a visitor to the Lake Town recently on important business.
C. Clark is spending the weekend at Dauphin attending the railway mens’ meeting at that point.
We are sorry to hear friend George’s new bridge went down stream.
Charles White, fish inspector of Winnipegosis, is a visitor at D. Kennedy’s.
Mrs. T. Johnson is visiting with her friends in town for a few days.
If you want a horse call at Kennedy’s new emporium. He has all sorts and sizes. You pay your money and get your choice. A bargain every time.
“Say, Mike, they had quite a picnic at Monday’s council meeting. I am told the boundary bridge was laid over for the present.”
“Well, Pat, the doc gets a bonus of $600 for the coming year. That’s equal to three miles of graded road and the fun of it is in many cases we have to send to Dauphin for a doctor on account of not being able to get him when wanted.”
“Well, Mike, Winnipegosis, was represented by the Mayor and Alderman and they claim the doc will be around at all ball games. That’s something we are thankful to know. Then there’s our genial friend, the town orator; he gets the price of another 4 miles of graded road to sit on the sidewalk and sun himself while we flaunter through the mud.”
“Well, Pat, it does look as if things were shure going to the divel, but there’s a good time coming by and by.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 11 – 1915

1915 Mar 11 – Found Dead in Bed

S.C. Powley, traveller for the firm of James Robertson & Son, of Winnipeg, was found dead in bed at the Kings Hotel on Saturday morning. Coroner Harrington was notified, and after making an examination, decided that an inquest was not necessary. Heart failure was stated to be the cause of death. Deceased was 20 years of age and single. The remains were sent east to Orillia, Ont. on Monday for interment.

1915 Mar 11 – Dauphin Soldier Dead

J.J. Bloomer (John James Bloomer, 1887, 136), private of the C.M.R. who enlisted at Dauphin, died of pneumonia at Brandon on Monday.

1915 Mar 11 – Fork River

Mr. Biggs, of Dauphin, was a visitor for a few days at the home of Mr. F. Wilson on the Mossey River.
F.B. Lacey, of Mowat, is a visitor to Winnipeg to interview the government re a generous grant to the municipality for 1915, which would be very acceptable.
Mr. D.F. Wilson is a visitor to the ‘Peg and will no doubt have a pleasant time.
Mr. Dan McLean is off for a trip south on important business.
Mr. Wiggins, travelling agent for the Winnipeg Steel Granary and Culvert Co., was here lately and appointed W. King agent for this district for 1915.
Mr. McCaulay, travelling agent for the Massey-Harris Co., appointed W. Stonehouse as their agent for Fork River. We should be able to sell him a tin hat on the head of this.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred. Cooper, who have been visiting with friends in Ontario during the last two months, returned home on Friday and are looking hale and hearty. Mr. c. states they had a pleasant time and were pleased to get back to Manitoba.
The roads are getting bare and everyone is buy hauling before the break up.
We hear it is rumoured that we are only to have trains Tuesdays and Fridays. This is Hell after giving them the railroad and paying them to run it. Three times a week is little enough.
In looking over the Mowat correspondence we notice the correspondent takes a Sifton writer to task re sickness. If the professor’s word is worth anything there has been considerable sickness and several deaths in the Wieden district. Then to be fair, why try to cover up these serious matters. It is only the way to keep a clean sheet of health in the community by calling a spade a spade. We do doubt the authorities are doing what they can.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 6 – 1913

1913 Mar 6 – 100 Years Old

An old resident of Ethelbert, named Hogg, died this week. He was believed to be 100 years old.

1913 Mar 6 – Baran Pleads Not Guilty

The assizes opened on Tuesday at Portage la Prairie. The Baran case is the most important one on the docket. Contrary to expectations Baran has put in a plea of “not guilty.” The witnesses from here are Mary Peleck, the woman who was in the house at the time the shot was fired, E.A. Munson, S.A. McLean, J. Tomoski, A. Rzesnoski and Dr. Harrington.

1913 Mar 6 – Fork River

A. Hunt returned from Ottawa having spent two months visiting with his parents and friends. While in Ottawa he located our friend, “Bob” Cruise in his seat in the house. Ab. will know where his seat is when he goes to Ottawa again.
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Ramsay, of Sifton, were visitors at the home of Dunc Kennedy this week.
Duncan Briggs returned from Mafeking having spent the winter fishing up north with Theo. Johnston.
Messrs. Johnston, Nowside and King were visitors to the Lake town on business recently.
Sid Howlet, of Million, paid us a visit last week and is returning with a road of supplies to his homestead.
Miss Pearl Wilson has returned from Dauphin after a month’s visit among friends at that point.
Sandy Munro is spending the weekend with his family at Mowat.
The Fork River Quadrille club got a little mixed up on Friday night. Part went to one house and part to another. They all claim to have had a good time. It’s no trouble to have a good time at Fork River.
John Nowsede, after spending two months with his parents, left for Aberdeen, Sask., to take up his duties as teacher for another term.
Miss Gilanders, who has been some time with her sister, Mrs. J. Lockhart, left on a vacation among friends in the south.
George Butler, assistant to Frank Hechter, of Winnipegosis, was a visitor at Wm. King’s recently.
Fred and Max King have purchased from the Ontario W.E. & Pump Co., Winnipeg, a 18 horse power gasoline engine of the Stickney manufacture, also a J.T. case separator and are taking them to Fishing River among the Ruthenian farmers to finish their threshing before spring opens.
S. Strasdin, of North Lake, paid us a visit overnight on his way to Winnipegosis and says everything is quiet in his district.
J.P. Grenon, manager of the A.T. Co., Winnipegosis, has purchased the west half of 36-29-19 from Morley Snelgrove.
Mr. Rowe, section foreman of Laurier, is visiting with C. Clark for a few days.
Rev. Dr. Page, travelling missionary for this diocese will hold baptismal service and holy communion in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon, March 16th, at 2:45. Lenten service every Thursday night at 8 o’clock during the season.