Today in the Dauphin Herald – July 3, 1919

Case Transferred to Winnipeg

The case of the Armstrong Trading Co. vs. J.P. Grenon and J. McInnes, which was among the list of King’s Bench cases here, has been transferred to Winnipeg. This has been done for the benefit of the counsel who are all Winnipeg residents. The case starts today (Thursday).

Great War Veterans Hold Big Celebration

Fortune smiled on the Great War Veterans on Tuesday. Their first celebration was a splendid success viewed from all standpoints. The weather was ideal, and the crowds the largest that ever visited the town. Between four and five thousand people were on the Exhibition grounds in the afternoon. There was not a hitch to mark the day’s program.
The parade in the morning attracted much attention and favorable comment was heard on all sides on the many and varied representations in the line of march. There were cars decorated with flags without number, and it appeared as if every boy and girl in the town carried the colors.

Verdict for Mrs. Haley

Mrs. Jos. Haley has secured a verdict for $10,000 in the count at Saskatoon against the Canadian National Railway for the death of her husband. Joseph Haley was killed at Hawke’s spur, a mile west of Hudson’s Bay Junction in the fall of 1918 by being caught between a loading platform and a freight car. Action was instituted in the province of Saskatchewan owing to the accident having occurred there. The case came to trial at Saskatoon on June 25th, when judgment was given for $10,000. Bowman, McFadden & Caldwell represented the plaintiff.

Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River on Tuesday, June 10th, Coun. Yakavanka absent. The minutes of last meeting were read and adopted.
Communication were read from the solicitor re Bowlen judgment; Fred Wenger, account against ward 2; the teacher of South Bay S.D.; W.H. Paulson re taxes; three applications for the position of road commissioner; Bank of Nova Scotia re line of credit; Dept. of Public Works re road across 3-31-18; Geo. Lvon re wood on road; the estimates of Mossey River S.D., and a largely signed petition from ratepayers in south-east corner of the municipality and Lawrence municipality praying for a road on boundary line.
Hunt-Namaka – That a grant of $250 be made to the Fork River agricultural society.
Marcroft-Paddock – That after hearing the circumstances the taxes on the se 2-31-19 be allowed to stand over till the coming December, and that the penalty on them be cancelled.
Hunt-Reid – That a grant of $150 be made to the Returned Soldiers’ committee for the purpose of giving a banquet to returned soldiers.
Marcroft-Reid – That the secretary obtain designs of monuments from the different marble works with a view to erecting a monument to the memory of all Mossey River soldiers who were killed in the war.
Marcroft-Namaka – That Coun. Hunt and Reid be a committee to select, stake out and authorize the use of a nuisance ground for Fork River.
Hunt-Reid – That a grant of $10 be made to the South Bay Boys and Girls’ club.
Hunt-Namaka – That a special meeting of the council be held at Fork River on Saturday, June 14th.
Reid-Namaka – That Mrs. Domeric be refunded the taxes of 1918, with the exception of the special school tax.
Reid-Namaka – That the reeve and sec.-treasurer be a committee to deal with matters regarding the council chamber at Winnipegosis.
Marcroft-Namaka – That the account of Coun. Reid ($22) for letting and inspecting work be printed.
Marcroft-Paddock – That the auditor’s report be printed.
Reid-Namaka – That the accounts of the meeting of Jan. 7th, March 5th, and those of today, as recommended by the finance committee, be passed.
Bylaws were employing the collector at $5 per day when instructed to go out by the reeve and sec.-treasurer, appointing James Bickle road commissioner, and repealing the bylaw making the councilors road commissioners. Also authorizing a vote of the ratepayers of Mossey River School District, No. 999, on a $12,000 debenture bylaw.
The council then adjourned.

Fork River

A gang of men are engaged building a new elevator. This will make the second elevator at this point.
Gus. Andrus, Jim Parker and G. Lacey have invested in tractors and are busy turning over the soil.
The heavy rain of Saturday gave the hand a good soaking and the crops are greatly befitted by it.

Mossey River School Report

The following is a list of pupils who were successful in the recent mid-summer exams:
Grade VII—Honors; Bob Williams. Pass; Ben Shuchett.
Grade VI—Nathan Shuchett, David Nowasod.
Grade V—Honors; Arthur Jamieson.
Grade IV—Mildred Carlson, Amos Carlson, Bill Williams, Sofie Beyko.
Grade III—Goldie Shuchett, Edna Hafenbrak, Earnest Hafenbrak, Donald McEachern, Tony Beyko.
Grade II—Birdie Stonehouse, Roy Dewbury, Allie Dewbury, Steve Nowasod, Jack Puchaylo.
Grade I sr—Kate Williams, Milo Carlson, Peter Zerba.
Class A—Clarice Carlson, Mary Stefishon, Tommy Hafenbrak, Cornie Chipley.
Gertrude M. Cooper, teacher.

Winnipegosis Public Schools

Grade IV to Grade V—Honors; Theary Frederickson, Benjamin Ketcheson, Lawrence Marchenaki. Pass; Gladys Cartwright, Jos. Mikit, Clara Hubble, Alexina Dumas, Charlie Adam, Mary Langlois, Harry Whale, Muriel Snelgrove, Rae Spence.
Primary to Grade II—Pass; Olive Shears, Vera Wills, Christine Schaldemose, Glen Dunby, Marie Loire, Hugh Johnson, Elizabeth Bradbury, Brynhildur Bjornsson, Grace Campbell, Bert Hubble, Chas. Spence, Harriet McLeod, Paul Lemchuk.
T. Tozer, Teacher.

Grade IV jr. to Grade IV sr.—Honors: John Marchenski, Rose McAuley. Pass: Agnes Burrell, Mary Chermak, Margaret Sanderson, M. Mapes, Albert Dumas, Sarah Klyne, Mary Richard, Donald McAuley, Violet Groff, Wm. Mapes, Olivina Langlois, Blennie St. Matt, Jessie Paddock, Jas. Richard, Hilliard Denby, Beverley Scchaldemose.
Grade III to Grade IV—Pass: Jos. Ponliot, Daisy Walmsley, Frank Wallace, Myrtle Snelgrove, Lawrence McDonell, Martha Sanderson, Wall. Pouliot, Ralph McAuley.
Following is a list, in order of merit, of successful pupils in the recent yearly examinations in Winnipegosis public schools:
Grade VII to Grade VIII—Pass: Tina Marchenski, Margaret Robinson, Ernest Needham.
Grade VI to Grade VII—Honors: Margaret Magnusson, James Brown, Kathleen Dempsey, Margaret McAuley, Charlotte Bradley. Pass: Paul Rudiak, Grace Whale, Cecil Paddock, Frank Needham.
Conditional—Alice Mapes, Harvey McAuley.
Grade V to VI—Honors: Mary Marcuenski, Evelyn Groff, Svava Frederickson, Charlotte Adam, Addie Ketcheson, Gordon Rognvaldson, Edith Hubble. Pass: Muriel Burrell, Annie Denby, Archie McLellan, Amelia Adam, Hjalmtyr Thorarinsson, Jos. Schaldemose.
Grade V Jr. to Grade V Sr—Honors: Leo Magnusson. Pass: Harvey Grenon, Verna Denby, Esther Hechter, Evolda Whale, Felix Magnusson, Gifford Campbell, George Campbell.
M. McMartin, Teacher.
Leith McMartin, Teacher.

Grade II to Grade III—Honors; Fred Magnusson, Jennie Ogryzlo, Margaret McLellan, Annie Dubinak, Stearnie Fredrickson, Stephen Zawrich, Alvina St. Godard, Sarah Alex, Mary Lyons, Myrtle Clarkson, Roderick St. Matt, Jos. Hechter, Mark Brown, Annie Zuk, Alex Klyne, Uric Lavergna. Pass; Wm. Wallock, D’Elroy Pouliot, Medos Langlois, Wm. Flamand.
Conditional: Ernest Seiffert, Bruce McAuley, Florence Paddock.
Grade I to Grade II—Honors: Viva Burrill, Lilian Bilenduke, Mary Kruchek, Donald Morris, Iva Whale, Vera Rognvaldson, Dolly Morris, Annie Marchenski, Armand Langlois, Nora Demery, Keitcha Snelgrove. Pass; Chas. Kachoe, Roderick Klyne, Dan McKay, Stephen Ogryzlo, John Semchuk, Fred St. Matt, Jos. Vermette, Helen Fiddler.
L. Levites, Teacher.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 6 – 1917

1917 Dec 6 – Over $400 000 000 Raised

Over $400 000 000 has been raised in the Dominion for the Victory Loan.
Dauphin town and rural municipality guaranteed over $400 000.

1917 Dec 6 – Fork River

Harry Hunter has returned from the hospital at Dauphin.
The “Whale” which appeared in the columns of the Herald last week, re the clerk’s absence, was duly noted here.
A number of prospective settlers from outside points are here looking over the district this week.
The elevators are all full up and no cars in sight.
The deer hunters are returning with poor bags.

1917 Dec 6 – Sifton

On the 23rd a “Hard Times” dance and box social were held at the Wycliffe School house. A large crowd assembled. No linen, jewellery or fashionable clothes were allowed and two constables were kept busy rounding up offenders who were promptly fined by Justice Spearman, assisted by P. Wood was clerk. The auction sale of boxes was very successful, the highest figure realized for a single box being $21. C. Brain, who had the cheapest box knocked down to him at $2.50, was promptly fined $1 for the offence and he paid just as promptly and cheerfully. S. Kitt and other kind helpers supplied the music, the floor being in charge of Mr. H. Woods. Dancing was kept up until 3 a.m. The handsome sum of $153 was realized and sent to the Red Cross.

1917 Dec 6 – Winnipegosis

The hauling of fish will commence in real earnest next week. Everyone is preparing for big business.
Mr. Groff a new stable is about completed and already is filled with teams.
The sad death of little Christine Johnson, seven-year-old daughter of Stoney Johnson occurred this week.
The Red Cross monthly meeting was held as usual in the old school. At this meeting the auxiliary was organized into a branch of the Red Cross Society of Canada, and officers and committee elected. Mr. Ketchison was again made president, and we feel confident he will be a very efficient one.
The weekly entertainment of the Red Cross last week was a great success. A very attractive programme of music, etc., was prepared. A chorus of school children was well received and Mrs. Litwin’s singing of Ukrainian songs, translated into English, was a unique item. A handsome Christmas cake donated by Mrs. Whale netted $17. Tickets were sold for a raffle and Mr. Kristinson was the winner, but very generously put it up for action. Mr. Rod Burrell finally carried it home in triumph having paid $20 for it. The total for the evening was $87.00.
A memorial service for the late “Joe” Johnston, who gave his life in the trenches for us at home, for his country and the cause of liberty, will be held in the Presbyterian Church on Sunday, the 16th. Rev. Mr. Kirkpatrick, of Ochre River, will officiate.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 24 – 1912, 1918

1912 Oct 24 – Typhoid Fever Outbreak

Typhoid fever has broken out among the school children at Winnipegosis and the school has been closed.

1912 Oct 24 – Fork River

J.H. Martinson, of Fort Rouge, Winnipeg, real estate agent, was here on business last week.
Alex. Cameron, of Mowat Centre, was a visitor to Dauphin on business a few days ago.
Mr. Sturdy, who has been all summer at the A.T. Co. store at Winnipegosis, is assisting Mr. Kennedy in the store here now.
Samuel Reid, returned home after a week’s holiday with friends at Brandon.
Mrs. A. Snelgrove and family spent a few days in Dauphin lately with friends.
J. Parker, of the Stark farm, has returned from a business trip to Winnipeg.
Captain Russell, of Sifton, was a visitor at D. Kennedy’s lately.
Miss Comber returned home after spending the summer at Selkirk.
Mr. Silverwood, of Dauphin, was in town for a short stay the guest of Wm. Williams, lumber merchant.
George Sumpton, of Dauphin, is here for a short stay with Mr. Snelgrove.
The railway traffic is getting so heavy on this line that it takes two locomotives to handle a train, especially when they take the side track for it.
The Press of October 17th refers to Macdonald election as a “Howling Farce” and has not got sand enough to print the exact majority.
F. Champion, of Cleveland, England, was here a few days ago in connection with a business transactions.
Harvest festival service at All Saints’ will be held in the church at 3 o’clock Sunday afternoon, Oct. 27th.

1918 Oct 24 – This Week’s Casualties

Pte. Lloyd Winters, Ashville, killed in action. (Lloyd Levi Winters, 1896, 2129348)
Lieut. Stewart Widmeyer, Dauphin, killed. (Stuart Robertson Widmeyer, 1895, 151343)
Pte. Arthur Day, Dauphin, gassed and wounded. (Arthur Archibald Day, 1896, 424013)
Pte. J.W. Lane, Dauphin, wounded. (James William Lane, 1879, 1000018)
Pte. Go.F. King, Dauphin, wounded. (George Francis King, 1891, 151775)
Pte. W.K. Goodman, Winnipegosis, wounded. (Wilbert Karl Goodman, 1894, 294203)
Pte. W.J. Bothwell, Makinak, wounded. (Wilfred James Bothwell, 1899, 2184456)
Pte. L. Ward, Grandview, wounded. (Lewis Ward, 1896, 2129152)
Pte. J. Lahaie, Makinak, wounded. (Joseph Lahaie, 1889, 291727)
Lance Corp. D. Stewart, Dauphin, wounded. (???)
Pte. E.L. Abrey, Dauphin, wounded. (Ernest Lincoln Abrey, 1889, 865837)
Pte. C.A. Blackmon, Ochre River, wounded. (Charles Alexander Blackmon, 1897, 1001157)

1918 Oct 24 – Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Fair

The Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair was held on Oct. 10th. The weather was perfect but this militated against the attendance for threshing was going on. The attendance of children was good, still some of the schools were very poorly represented owing to the rush of work on the farms. The lack of teachers for some of the schools and the many changes in teachers in others, was a serious handicap to the welfare of the club during the past years.
Lawrence Rowe won the Bank of Commerce prize for the vest pair of pigs at either the Fork River or Winnipegosis fairs, with a very creditable pair of Yorkshires.
It is to be hoped that the club will receive greeter interest from the parents in the coming year and so encourage the children in this work.

PRIZE LIST.
The following is a list of prize winners at the fair:
Grain growing:
Wheat sheaf – Fred Jager 1st, Peter Zaplitney 2nd.
Wheat, 20 lbs – Fred Jager 1st, Peter Zaplitney 2nd.
Rye sheaf – Albert Janowski 1st.

Stock, Calves:
Dairy – Donald McEachern 1st, Arthur Jamieson 2nd, Dave Nowosad 3rd.

Calves:
Beef – Bob Williams 1st, Kate Williams 2nd, Steve Beyko 3rd, Bill Williams 4th.

Pigs:
Pair – Lawrie Rowe 1st, Alice Nowosad 2nd.

Poultry:
Pen of Barred Rocks (3) – Kate Williams 1st, Lawrie Rowe 2nd.
Pen Buff Orpingtons – Dave Nowosad 1st, Stanley Lundy 2nd.
Pen White Leghorns – Stanley Benner.
Pen Black Minorcas – Mike Borowski 1st, Bob Williams 2nd.
Pen Brown Leghorns – Bill Williams 1st.
Pen White Rocks – Arthur Jamieson 1st.

Gardening: Half bushel potatoes – Rosie Sowenski 1st, Alex. Zaplitney 2nd, Nicola Poctylo 3rd, Annie Sowinski 4th.
Six carrots – Charlie Jager 1st, Viola Rowe 2nd, Lawrie Rowe 3rd.
Six turnips – Lawrie Rowe 2nd.
Six beets – Viola Rowe 2nd.
Two cabbages – Annie Beyko 1st, Mike Borowski 2nd, Charlie Jager 3rd.
Pumpkins – Nellie Kolokicvk 1st.
Onions – Alice Nowosad 1st, Charlie Jager 2nd.

Cooker:
Loaf of bread – Viola Rower 1st, Annie Beyko 2nd.
Buns – Viola Rowe 1st.

Sewing – Viola Rowe 1st, Annie Beyko 2nd.
Patching – Viola Rowe 1st, Emily Strasdin 2nd.
Fancy work – Emily Strasdin 1st.
Canning – Viola Rowe 2nd.
Longest ??? thistle root – Peter Zaplitney 1st, Fred Jager 2nd.
Woodwork – Bob Williams 1st, Dave Nowosad 2nd, Belle Williams 3rd.
Ducks – Sophie Beyko 1st.
Butter – Rosie Sowskine 1st, Mary Mieke 2nd.
Knitting – Emily Strasdin 1st.
Scribblers – Yumtaska 1st, Annie Chornoboy 2nd, Nellie Karwstski 3rd.

Writing:
Grade I – Horace Thompson 1st, Clara Dewberry 2nd.
Grade II – Ivor Humphreys 1st, Alley Dewberry 2nd.
Grade III – Bernard Hunt 1st, Lulu Thompson 2nd, Golkie Schuchett 3rd.
Map of Manitoba – Dave Nowosad 1st, Viola Rowe 2nd, Arthur Jamieson 3rd.

Handwork:
Grade I – Mossey School.
Grade II – Mossey School.
Nature Book – Beatrice Rowe 1st.
Collection of butterflies – Irene Bailey 1st.

1918 Oct 24 – Winnipegosis Boys’ and Girls’ Fair

The Boys’ and Girls’ Cub Fair was held at Winnipegosis on Friday, Oct. 11th. This was the fist event of the kind ever held in this locality and thanks to the efforts of the public school teachers, was a decided success. Keen interest was displayed by the residents of South Bay, and a large number were on hand to view the fair.
The judges were Miss Speechley and Mr. Murray, of the Extension Department of the M.A.C.
The sewing exhibit, largely due to the efforts of Miss M. McMartin, was a credit to Winnipegosis schools. The chickens were good, as were also the display of vegetables. With a greater interest taken by the surrounding schools we hope to double or treble our entries another year.
The secretary and organizer was Mr. H.L. Williams, public school principal.

PRIZE LIST.
Class I: Pair of pigs – Harry Whale 1st, Cecil Paddock 2nd.
Single pig – Wallie Pouliet 1st, Evelyn Groff 2nd, Harry Whale 3rd, Gordon Rognvaldson 4th.
Class II, Chicken Raising: Pen of 3 Barred Rocks – Walter Keen, South Bay, 1st, Cecil Paddock 2nd, Wilfred Moyer, South Bay, 3rd, Ignace Bobinsky, South Bay, 4th, Mike Samimski, South Bay, 5th, Anthony Bobinsky, South Bay, 6th.
Pen of 3, any other breed – Daisy Walmsley 1st, Cecil Paddock 2nd.
Class III, Gardening: One dozen potatoes – Beverly Schaldemose 1st, Elizabeth Moyer, South Bay, 2nd, Ruth Groff 3rd, Evelyn Groff 4th, Mike Verchaski 5th, Gladys Cartwright 6th.
Dozen large onions or 3 large turnips – Lois Whale 1st, Wilfred Moyer 2nd, Albert Moyer 3rd, Elizabeth Moyer 4th.
Dozen parsnips – Lois Whale 1st, Wilfred Moyer 2nd, Albert Moyer 3rd.
Dozen carrots or beets – Mary Marchenski 1st, Mike Samimski 2nd, Albert Moyer 3rd, John Moodry 4th, Elizabeth Moyer 5th, Lois Whale 6th.
Class IV, Cooking: Two loaves of bread – Lottie Moore 1st, Attie Hechter 2nd.
Dozen oatmeal cookies – Margaret McAuley 1st, Lottie Moore 2nd, Mabel Rognvaldson 3rd, Alice Hechter 4th.
Dozen cornmeal muffins – Ruth Groff 1st, Mabel Rognvaldson 2nd, Lottie Moore 3rd.
Class V, Sewing: Work bag – Mary Magnuson 1st, Ester Hechter 2nd, Edith Hubble 3rd.
Knitted article – Cecil Paddock 1st, Mary Marchinski 2nd, Amelia Adam 3rd, Evolda Whale 4th.
Sewing apron – Mary Magnuson 1st, Verna Denby 2nd, Edith Hubble 3rd, Esther Hechter 4th, Evolda Whale 5th, Charlotte Adam 6th.
Red Cross Collection – Evolda Whale 1st, Mary Magnuson 2nd, Amelia Adam 3rd, Charlotte Adam 4th, Addie Ketcheson 5th.
Night gown or tea apron – Charlotte Adam 1st, Addie Ketcheson 2nd, Edith Hubble 3rd, Amelia Adam 4th.
Table runner – Helen Macaulay 1st, Lenore Denby 2nd, Mabel Rognvaldson 3rd.
Dust cap and work apron – Lenore Denby 1st, Tina Marchenski 2nd, Mabel Rognvaldson 3rd.
Piece of crochet work – Attie Hechter 1st, Mabel Rognvaldson 2nd, Tina Marchenski 3rd, Lenore Sehaldemose 4th, Mary Marchenski 5th, Lois Whale 6th.
Two Red Cross articles – Lenore Sehaldemose 1st, Mabel Rognvaldson 2nd, Tina Marchenski 3rd, Ruth Groff 4th.
Middy suit – Lottie Moore 1st, Lenore Sehaldemose 2nd.
Class VII, Weed Contest: Collection of seeds of 10 noxious weeds – Ignace Bobinsky 1st, Mary Fleming 2nd, Ella Martin 3rd, Arthur McLellan 4th.
Class VIII, Woodwork Contest – Stanley Miket 1st, John Wallace 2nd, Nieh Rudiak 3rd, Alec. Ogryzlo 4th.

1918 Oct 24 – Fork River

Frank Bailey, of Winnipeg, spent the week-end with his parents.
There was a very good turnout to the Thanksgiving service on Sunday.
Mr. Fred Tilt is building a house next to the Orange Hall. He has retired from farming and will reside in town.
Dunc Kennedy and party from Ochre River passed through the town on Sunday on their way to Winnipegosis.
Pte. Venables, who has just returned from overseas, is visiting his brother, T.B. Venables.
Sunday was children’s day at All Saints’ Church and the attendance was good. It is hopeful sign when interest is taken in our young people.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 13 – 1911

1911 Apr 13 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Winnipegosis on the 20th alt. Coun. Paddock absent.
Communications were read from Algoma Steel Bridge Co., Chairman of the Telephone Commission, stating that a telephone line would be built through Fork River to Winnipegosis this coming season; from Supt. Fisher of C.N.R.; Western Municipal News, re vital statistic register; Salvation Army and Campbell, Simpson & Macneill.
Lacey – McAuley – That the secretary write the superintendent of C.N.R., the Minster of Railway and the Railway Commission, urging the necessity of a tri-weekly service on the Winnipegosis branch.
McAuley – Hunt – That the swamp on the road allowance, lying north of secs. 35 and 36, tp. 30, range 19, be corduroyed and that A.E. Groff be appointed foreman at $2 per day and that he be empowered to employ men at $1.50 per day, or man and team at $3 per day.
The following accounts were passed by the Finance committee: J. Nawasod, assisting surveyor, $3; W. Clark, $3; St. Boniface Hospital, $3; postage, $2; team with survey party, $7; F.B. Lacey, expenses to convention, $15.75.
Nicholson – Lacey – That the tender of he Algoma Steel Bridge Co. for the building of a combination steel and wood bridge across the Fork River between sections 21 and 28, tp. 29, range 19, for the sum of $230 be accepted.
A by-law appointing the officers for 1911, was passed; the noxious weed inspectors being T.B. Venables and W. King of Fork River, and W. Marcroft and I.K. Robinson of Winnipegosis.
McAuley – Hunt – That the council adjourn to meet at Fork River at the call of the reeve.

1911 Apr 13 – Fork River

Geo. Nicholson had the misfortune to have his house and contents burnt last week. How the fire originated is a mystery. He had no insurance.
Mr. Homey, the horse dentist, is busy fixing up horses around Fork River. We have to do something with the hay as the railway seems unable to move it fast enough, and shippers are losing money on account of not being able to make prompt shipments.
A.H. Hodgson was a visitor to Fork River to spend the week-end.
A Press correspondent is shouting reciprocity because he can send to American firms and purchase barbwire and binder twine cheaper than he can get it at Fork River. We wonder if this is the individual that was giving us pointers on building a few weeks ago. We can’t all be R.C. and chairman of Boards of Public works committee. How about that municipal scheme for bringing settlers in? Rush it along, lots of room.
The people of Fork River spent an amusing evening in the Orange Hall listening to an entertainment given by Prof. Sas Koo Tam consisting of songs, recitations and vocals bits. Some of us will need remodelling before we can get into paradise. Its the first time we were aware we had Miltonia in Fork River.
W. Williams has moved his sawing outfit from Lake Dauphin here ready to saw the logs drawn by the settlers to Fork River. Billy’s a hustler in the sawdust line.
Our genial P.M., Mr. N. Little, has the greatest display of farm Implements ever seen in Fork River. If you want anything in that line give him a call. Say taw care those bandies don’t get stuck in those culvert pipes they might get damaged before they have time to experiment with them.
P. Ellis paid a flying visit to Dauphin. He believes in ascending and descending. Flying machines are all right if they run level. Call and get prices before buying. Blank forms on hand.
Wm. King has been under the weather the last two weeks. Its just a complaint he caught when the old McKenzie government was in power; times were hard then, soup kitchens were opened all over Canada. Billy says he had to consume so much free trade soup to get a little nourishment he never rightly recovered, in fact it stopped his growth. His one consolation is he’ll never have a show with the fellow who was to big to get into Paradise.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 26 – 1914

1914 Feb 26 – Arrested on Murder Charge

The following dispatch was received from Edmonton on Saturday and concerns two parties which are well known around Sifton and Dauphin, Charles Turcunuk and his wife, who is better known as Mrs. Lena Wilson.
About four years ago Turcunuk worked for the railway being engaged cleaning out cars. He afterwards went West to Edmonton, where he started a boarding house among the foreigners and has been doing well up to the time of the advent of his wife a weeks ago. Those who were acquainted with him while he was in Dauphin speak highly of him.
Mrs. Turcunuk, or Wilson, as she was known about town, only left here a few weeks ago for Edmonton. During the Rooke trial she acted as interpreter for the crown.
Charles Turcunuk, a boarding and lodging housekeeper, was arrested this morning on a charge of murdering his four-months-old child in Sifton.
Mrs. Wilson has made a statement that Turcunuk murdered their four-months-old child and afterwards made her promise not to tell the police, or anyone else. She heard the child crying, and all of a sudden it stopped. She ran upstairs to the bedroom and found the child dead on the bed; her husband was standing a few feet away and looking at the corpse. It was then that he grabbed a carving knife and holding it over her head while she knelt on the floor commanded that her mouth be sealed and her tongue be silent forever.

SHE TOLD SECRET

Convinced that her husband would carry out his terrible threat, Mrs. Wilson obeyed and promised to keep the secret, and this morning after seeing Turcunuk escorted to the prisoner’s dock to answer to a charge of non-support, she told the story to Deputy Chief Wright, and other police officials and in doing so submitted a written statement that will be used in evidence at the preliminary hearing next Tuesday morning.
The charge of non-support had just finished and the man fined $75 and costs, when Magistrate Massie commanded him to stand up to listen to a second charge.

1914 Feb 26 – Fork River

Nat Little and daughter, Miss Grace, have left on a trip east on business.
W.J. Johnston, of Mowat, has returned from Mafeking where he spent the winter fishing.
W. King returned the latter end of last week from a business trip to Winnipeg, and states there are a large number there taking in the bonspiel and the Agricultural college course.
Prof. J. Robinson returned from fishing up north and there is little doubt but he will soon have the Fork River band in shape for any emergency.
We notice the minutes of the municipal meeting were published the following week after the meeting in the Herald. This is as it should be Promptness is what the people look for and appreciate.
Mr. T. Secord, homestead inspector, is spending a few days in this burgh.
Mrs. R. McEachern and son, Donnie, are spending a week in Winnipeg.
“B and K” are not breaking any law of the country, Mowat friend. So try again. We have no doubt that the late Oak Brae mail carrier thought it an interesting event every Saturday and we are also sure though it a more interesting and wonderful stroke of luck when the cheques came along. It is not everyone gets paid for carrying their own mail. We don’t hold our meeting on Sunday friend. Get wise and shake yourself. Nuff for this time. Practice what you preach.

1914 Feb 26 – Winnipegosis

The bonspiel will open on Wednesday at one o’clock with sixteen rinks. Keen competition is looked for, as there is a large number of very valuable prizes. Some of the fellows that have been saying all winter what they would do if they wee only skips, will have a chance to try their hand now.
A very serious shooting accident took place about 25 miles south east of here on Monday. A Galician by the name of Kusyk, being shot through the back with a 44. Calibre rifle. The bullet passed through his abdomen. Dr. Medd was sent for and advised him to go to Dauphin Hospital to undergo operations. Since it is learned he has died.
Mrs. A.E. Groff, who has been on the sick list, we are glad to report is much better.
Frank Hechter arrived home from the Winnipeg bonspiel on Friday looking as hearty as ever.
J.P. Grenon left on Monday for Winnipeg and points east.
The W.A. are giving an alphabet party at the home of Mrs. Bradley on Tuesday evening.
Since the parcel post rates went into effect there is a large increase in parcels passing through the mail. The mail carrier is talking about getting a horse. But we see that Eaton’s still left Morten handle their catalogues.