Today in the Dauphin Herald – April 29, 1920

G.W.V.A.

We regret to learn that Comrade Roy Armstrong has resigned the secretaryship of the association. His work with the soldier settlement board as supervisor takes him away from town so much he could not attend to the duties.
Comrade Bates was in the city last attending a meeting of the executive of the provincial command when a lot of routine work was put through.
A number of returned boys are looking for homestead and soldier grant lands these days and the country south of Dauphin Lake will be well taken up this spring and a large amount of breaking will be done if we only get the right weather from now on. The rooms are proving of great service to these men.
We are sorry to learn that a great number of the soldier settlers lost a large amount of stock on account of the hard winter and the shortage of feed.
At a meeting of the executive Comrade E.C. Batty was asked to act as secretary-treasurer for the local branch of the association to fill in the term of Comrade R. Armstrong, who has resigned. Comrade Batty has agreed to fill the breach.
The Ladies’ Auxiliary held a very successful dance on Friday last. The ladies are doing good work and same is appreciated by the association.
Returned men should note that school lands are now open for soldier settlement, and any returned man may apply for an examination and estimation on any particular parcel.
Capt. Scrase has gone to Banff to take treatment and it is hoped by all the comrades that he will greatly benefit and will return to Dauphin fully restored to good heath.
Comrades Lys and Armstrong are waiting on the roads to dry up till they try out their Henry Fords. Watch for smoke when Hugh gets at the wheel.

Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River on the 12th inst., all members being present. He minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted.
Communications were read from the Bank of Nova Scotia, re line of credit; The C.N. Town Properties, re roadway; the Dept. of Education; the H.B. Co.’s, re road divergence, 3-3-16, and the Provincial Board of Health, re district nurse.
Yakavanka-Panageika — That the clerk write the municipalities of Ethelbert and Winnipegosis and ask if they will cooperate with this municipality in the matter of a district nurse.
Marcroft-Thorsteinson — That the discount and penalty, amounting to $9.14 against the s.w. 13-41-19, be cancelled.
Hunt-Yakavanka — That the account of Peter Drainian for delivering [pilng] at Fork River, $11.40, be paid.
Marcroft-Hunt — That the action of the committee on seed grain in securing wheat, barley and flax be endorsed, and that the two samples of oats now sown are satisfactory.
Hunt-Marcroft — That the gravel which will be required for the foundation of the soldiers’ monument be procured at once and that the matter be placed in the hands of the reeve.
Marcroft-Hunt — That the secretary write the returned soldiers’ committee thanking the organization for its kind appreciation of the council’s action regarding the mater of a monument in memory of the fallen soldiers.
Hunt-Marcoft — That the services of an engineer be procured to lay out certain roads throughput the municipality and giving an estimate of the cost. This with a view to borrowing money by the issue of debentures for the building of such roads.
Marcroft-Yakavanka — That the clerk ask for tenders for the peeling of the timber now in the municipal yard. Tenders to be received up to April 30th, and that the reeve and clerk be a committee to deal with the matter.
Hunt-Marcroft – That Robert Allen be employed to run the road engine for the season of 1920, and that his remuneration be $1 an hour.
Marcroft-Hunt — That the clerk ask for applications for man to run grader for the season of 1920.
Yakavanka-Namaka — That the declaration of the reeve $23.60, and Coun. Marcroft, $12.70, for letting and inspecting work be passed.
Hunt-Yakavanka — That Coun. Marcroft be authorized to call for tenders for the building of a bridge, 20 feet, on road allowance east of 34-31-19.
Panageika-Yakavanka — That a grant of $25 be made to the Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ club for the year 1919.
The accounts as recommended by the finance committee were ordered paid.
Marcorft-Thorsteinson — hat the reeve, clerk and Coun. Hunt be a committee to look for suitable sites for the soldiers’ memorial.
By-laws were passed authorizing the purchase of seed grain and cancelling soldiers’ taxes.

Ethelbert

The meetings took place on Thursday evening of Mr. William S. K[illegible], of Dauphin and Miss Florence J. [illegible], of Ethelbert.
[illegible] Adams, of Winnipegosis, has been appointed registration clerk for the east half of the Ethelbert constituency, and [illegible] Skaife, of Ethelbert, has been appointed registration clerk for the west half.

Winnipegosis

The Dramatic society have two performances of “The Private Secretary” last week. Mr. Shears in the title part was very good indeed. We did not know he could be so funny. Mr. Lamont as the Uncle from India was excellent; his acting was perfectly smooth and full of life. A new addition to the society was r. D.C. Brown, of the Bank of Nova Scotia here. He had an easy stage presence on the whole and a good voice. Our old friend Mr. Wilis is getting into a habit of trotting about too much. He is an old favorite and we don’t want to see him acquiring bad habits. The ladies all did well. Mrs. Shears’ voice was all it should have been in calling upon the spirits for a sign. Miss McMartin, as the daughter of the house and Miss Leith McMartin, as the widowed landlady, were both good. Miss Woodiow, who possess a striking beauty, was a most charming little girl on the stage n her flame colored dress. The make-ups were all good, some of them exceptionally so. Mr. Ketcheson, as the tailor, was very good indeed also Mr. Roberts.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – April 22, 1920

G.W.V.A. Notes

We wish all comrades to note that before they can make entry on Dominion Lands, both homestead and soldiers grant, they must have attestation certificates. If they will look after this matter before time of making entry, it will save them a lot of trouble and delay.
We note that Comrade Roy Armstrong is now with the Soldier Settlement Board as supervisor and takes in the district of Winnipegosis, Ochre River and Makinak.
At the last meeting of the Association we had a very fair attendance to hear Comrade Batty give his report of Montreal convention. He gave a general outline of the work done at the convention. We hope to see an increased interest in the meetings. Come out to them. The matter of the War Veterans’ home was up before the meeting and some discussion took place. We are still waiting on the results of the work of the Memorial Committee before making any public campaign for funds for our building. In the meantime we are getting all the money we can gather toward our building fund.
Comrade Herman, of Ashville, who has been in the hospital, is convalescent.
Comrade Garth Johnston has gone to Prairie River to start operations on his farm.
Hugh Lys and E.R. Bewell, supervisors for the S.S.B., are out on soldier settlement work.
We have had a number of men make use of the rooms this month while passing through and who appreciate same very much.

Bicton Health

Winnipegosis, April 20.
The rain Tuesday was welcome. Warmer weather is now assured. Don’t let us be impatient; you know we are promised seedtime and harvest as long as the world lasts.
The United Famers of the district held a meeting on the 17th at the home of Mr. Dumas. Important business was transacted. A resolution was passed requesting the Grain Growers to build an elevator at Winnipegosis the coming summer. The question of taking political action was brought up and discussed. A vote showed the meeting to be in favor of such a move.
The corduroy road leading to the school is nearly complete.
James Laidlaw is drawing his house and stable over to the homestead.
Frank Sharp has purchased a fine team of horses from Mr. Pruder.
A meeting will be held in the Orange Hall, Fork River, on the 27th inst. and it is expected that delegates from every local in the Ethelbert constituency will be present and it will then be decided whether a farmers’ candidate will be placed in the field.

Fork River

Father and Son Banquet—Boys’ work has come right into the limelight in Fork River with the introduction of the Canadian standard efficiency training under a local advisory council composed of Messrs. W. King, J. Williamson, A.J. Little, Fred. Cooper, C.E. Bailey and Milton Cooper.
A Trail Rangers’ camp has been formed with E.V. Lockwood as mentor, Robt. Williams chief ranger; Arthur Jameson, sub ranger Nathan Schucett, tally, and Ben Schucett, cache.
So interested are the boys that the ladies of the district, to encourage them, supplied a splendid banquet on Friday night last at which some 43 fathers and sons sat down and enjoyed the substantial repast. When the eating was finished the chief ranger bade them toast “The King,” which was done with musical honors.
The following toasts were enthusiastically honored: “Canada,” proposed by Arthur Jameson; “Tuxis Boys,” by N. Schuchett; “Our Dads,” by B. Schuchett; “Our Sons,” by W. King. A very nice little speech by D. Robertson on the “Kind of Dad I Like,” was responded to with excellent advice to boys on the “Kind of Son I Like,” by D.F. Wilson. “Our Homes” was given by Mr. Lockwood, and this was followed by three sort addresses by Prof. Williamson on the advantages of an education; Tuxis boys at large by Rev. H.P. Barrett and the boy and the church by Rev. E. Roberts. Votes of thanks to boys, ladies, speakers and officers were proposed by W. King, D. Lockwood, E.V. Lockwood and Rev. H.P. Barrett. The national anthem brought to a close an evening long to be remembered in the annuals of Fork River.

CORRESPONDENT CRITICIZED.
To the Editor of the Dauphin Herald:

SIR:—
O’wad some power the giftie gie us
To see ourselves as others see us.
So wrote the poet long years ago and we hope the writer of the article in your last issue entitled, “Fork River,” will be given that blessed gift, it may reach him sometime that it is very bad form to wash his dirty linen in public and still worse to do it in such a way as to convey the impression that it is editorial news.
Have very good first hand information as to all that happened at the returned soldiers “get together” in Fork River on a recent Saturday night and I suggest that the moralist who penned the account in the paper would be better employed in taking an active and religious interest in the welfare of the young folk of the district than in writing scurrilous articles under the cover of anonymity.
I am dear sir, yours faithfully,
HARRY P. BARRETT,
Priest in charge of Fork River.

Winnipegosis

The regular monthly meeting of the Women’s Institute was held on Friday evening, April 16th, in the Union Church. A large number of the members were present. After the business was finished. Dr. Medd gave an interesting and most instructive address on “Child Welfare,” which was greatly appreciated by all present. The social part of the evening consisted in songs and a recitation, which were much enjoyed. Tea was served by the refreshment committee. The proceeds of the evening were placed to the credit of the Library fund.
The Fisherman’s ball, held last Thursday at the Rex Hall, was a great success.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – February 12, 1920

Fined $200

On Tuesday, the 10th, Inland Revenue Officer J.A. Hall made a raid on certain parties at Winnipegosis suspected of illegal whiskey manufacturing. A quantity of mash and large still were discovered and as a result E.D. Philibelt appeared before P.M. Hawkins on Wednesday and was fined $200 and costs.

G.W.V.A. Notes

Comrade R.B. Maxwell, vice-president of the Dominion Command, was a visitor at last Thursday’s meeting. He came to Dauphin for the purpose of explaining some aspects of the reestablishment proposals, with which many members of the association and the general public are unfamiliar. Comrade Maxwell proved to be an instructive and entertaining speaker, and his address was very much appreciated.
At the next regular meeting, which will be held on Thursday, Feb. 19th, the course of action with regard to acquiring permanent quarters for the association will be decided upon.

Oil Boom

Oil has been discovered on the farm of Mr. McKay across Lake Dauphin, sec. 16, tp. 28, range 18, and for the past two or three days there has been a rush at the Dominion Lands office to enter claims.

Fork River

A very pleasant time was spent Friday evening, February 6th, in taking a trip around the world. All parties having gathered at the Union Station, Fork River, first special train left at 8 o’clock and each 20 minutes thereafter. First stop was made at China, where the guests were treated to all the dainties China can produce, also the costumes and customs of the people were a great treat to all. Next stop was made at India, where all were treated with the greatest courtesies by the natives and came away with a great impression of the people, also the fare they had to eat. Last stop was made at Japan where the tourists were feasted with all the delicacies of that wonderful nation. They were struck by the beauties of the quaint little people and advise that the missionaries have done a great work there. On arrival back in Canada the homesick people were given a grand reception by those at home and gave a pleasant account of their trip. The reception consisted of songs by Rev. Roberts, music by Mrs. Little, recitation by Mrs. Lockwood, also instrumentals by the Russell boys, and Miss Ina Briggs. The nice sum of $58 was made by the United Church of Canada.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – January 29, 1920

G.W.V.A. Notes

Members are requested to remember the meeting called for Thursday, Feb. 5th, in the rooms. Comrades Bowler and Wilton, of the Provincial Command, will address the meeting.
The association would be glad to receive any discarded magazines or books.

Fork River

Peter Ellis and son Ray, of Kamsack, spent last week here. He had Dun Hamilton sell his homestead effects. The goods off and sold well.
Robt. Hunt, homestead inspector, spent several days in the district last week. Bob is one of the old-timers and we are always glad to see him.
Max. King was a visitor to the Peg last week.
The funeral of the late John Basham took place on Sunday.
The Literary Society had the meeting in All Saints’ Church on the 20th inst. It was magazine night, Mrs. Ina Briggs, editor, had charge of the adult portion of the program. Mrs. A.J. Little gave a selection on the piano. The papers by the juveniles were very good. There were ??? by Prof. Williamson and his pupils, W. and A. Russell. Mrs. I. Briggs accompanied on the piano. There was a ten minute talk by Mr. Lockwood. There was a good ??? and all enjoyed the excellent program. W. King was chairman, Wednesday next, the 28th, the program will be in charge of the school teachers.
More snow has fallen of late. An abundance of snow always means sufficient moisture and good crops.
It seemed a little odd to be without the daily papers of late, but I suppose one has to get used to anything these days when the times are out of joint.

Sifton

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Wood and family, who have gone to Florida, are greatly missed by their many friends and we wish them every success in their new home.
There is very little wheat coming to the elevator now. The most of it has been already marketed.
W.C. Wellborn was in town a few days ago and says the fishing on the lake is fairly good this winter.
The trains are running all hours these days.
Mike Poloski is in Winnipeg attending college this winter.
Ed. Woods, of Dubin Bay, is spending the winter with Mr. Willison.
The stock is wintering fairly well although feed is very scarce.
Mr. Fred Kitt spend a few days in Winnipeg lately.
Mr. Ramsey, who has been under the weather for some time, is improving in health.
The roads are good and the town is full of famers every day.
Brigham Young is again in our midst.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – October 23, 1919

G.W.V.A. Notes

Regular meeting of the above association was held on the 9th inst. about 40 comrades being in attendance. Application for membership was received from 9 returned men, all of whom were accepted.
The committee appointed to consider the question of building a home for the returned men reported that they had approved a design for a veterans’ home as presented to them by Mr. H. Payton, the architect, this sketch being placed before the comrades for approval. Instructions have been given to Mr. Payton to finish the design and it is hoped to have these drawings shortly to place before the public so that when an appeal is made for help in the construction there will be no doubt in the mind of anyone as to where the money is going. It is also felt that the plans under consideration will not only meet the needs of the veterans but will meet with the approval of the community and be a credit to the town of Dauphin and district, and will give those interested in the welfare of the returned men the opportunity of expressing their appreciation.
The members of the above mentioned committee are as follows: Comrades J.D. Neeley, H. Oliphant, F. Neeley, F. Bumstead, D. Kitney, J.W. Skinner, W.F. Terrell, W. Wright, C. Lane, H.H. Olson, E.C. Batty (chairman) and J.M. Chalmers (secretary). Any of the afore-mentioned committee will be only too pleased to go into the matter of the building and give all the information that is desired.
We are informed that the Ladies’ Auxiliary intend putting on a dance on Hallowe’en Eve (Oct 31st). Some very fine prizes have been donated, and all are asked to bear the date in mind and come and have a good time.
I have been asked to state that Comrade R.H. Elliott has lost his service button. The number of which is 163371. Anyone finding same will please return it to the G.W.V.A. rooms or to the above mentioned. These buttons cannot be replaced and also that it is a criminal offence to be in possession of one unless the certificate belonging to same is also in the possession of the bearer.
On Thursday, 14th, the Victorian Serenaders performed at the town hall under the auspices of this Association. The show was as usual good, and the music after for the dance was generally conceded to be first rate. The house was not as good as might have been hoped, but this was in a large measure due to the weather and the fact that there have been several other attractions during the month. However it was a well-paying proposition and the proceeds will be used in the furtherance of the building proposition.
On Nov. 3rd the third of the series of the concerts to be run under the auspices of this association will be placed on at the town hall. This time it is the Canadian Juveniles and it will not be necessary to say a great deal about these as they are well known to the residents here. The Gray Girls, who are travelling with this company, have already established a reputation for themselves in Winnipeg second to none; the same also applying to Charlie Wright. We would strongly recommend this entertainment to all and would ask that we be given the usual support of the public and so enable us to bring that home for the veterans a little nearer to a possibility.
Members are asked to note that the regular meeting will be on the 23rd inst., and a full attendance is requested. Now that the bulk of the farm work for the season is through, there is no reason why the members should not attend, and it is only by so doing that we can accomplish anything for the bettermen in general of the returned men.

Sir Henry Drayton to Speak

The Victory Loan Committee have their organization completed and the canvases for both town and rural will commence Monday, Oct. 27th. A public meeting will be held at Dauphin on Oct., 29th, at which Sir Henry Drayton, Minister of Finance, is expected to speak.

Fork River

Will Northam, has purchased a house and lot in town from J. MacDonald and will take up his residence with us.
E. Lockwood and family have arrived from Regina. Mr. L is the new station agent.
Bert Little and family have arrived from Chicago to take up their residence.
Ben Cameron has charge of the White Star elevator and is handling considerable grain.
A pleasant time was spent at the Orange Hall on Friday evening, when a dance and presentation was given to our returned boys. Proceedings started at nine sharp and a good crowd turned out for the occasion. Dancing occupied those present until eleven o’clock when an address was read by the se.-treasurer of the Returned Soldiers’ Committee. Presentation of watches was next on the program. Corp. Briggs, Pte. Briggs, Pte. Gasena, Pte. Reader and Drive S. Craighill each receiving a watch as a small token for the service they have rendered their country. Pte. A. King who was “over there” for four years returned while the dance was on but for some reason did not get his watch with the rest. I wonder why? The banquet for the boys is to be given on Friday evening, Oct. 31. Let us hope everyone will turn out and have a good time.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – October 2, 1919

G.W.V.A. Notes

The regular meeting of the above association was held on Sept. 25th. Only a small turnout was registered, this without a doubt being due to the fact that the majority were busy threshing, still, all the same, there could and should have been more and the comrades are earnestly asked to remember the meeting on October 9th. A full attendance is desired and, in fact, must be had, and all are asked to make a special effort to attend. Matters of great importance to the association will be dealt with and it is the desire of the executive that a representative meeting give its ruling on these matters.
On the 14th inst. the second entertainment arranged by the Veterans will be placed on at the town hall, viz., The Victorian Serenaders. There will be a dance after the same as the previous show an the co operation of all to secure a good house is asked. Little need be said as to the merits of the company as same is well known to the majority, but it will fully maintain the reputation established by the Castle Squares and good value for money is assured.
We would draw the attention of the reader to the special appeal from the G.W.V.A. in this edition of the paper and ask that they give the proposition their support. This will be the first time that a general appeal has been made in this district by the returned men and we are confident that we shall not ask in vain, but that the public will respond in the same spirit as the men did in the past four years.
Comrades, keep the 9th October in your “bean” and attend the meeting that night.

Presented With Meerschaum Pipe

The employees of the town met at the hall on Wendesday afternoon and presented ex-Chief Bridle with an address and valuable meerschaum pipe. Mr. Bridle and family left on the early morning train for British Columbia.

Women Killed by Tree

A sad fatality occurred last Friday during the heavy windstorm. Mrs. Wm. Lesiuk, of Venlaw, was out in the garden digging potatoes for the mid-day meal when she was struck on the head by a falling tree. A limb of the tree pierced the unfortunate woman’s skull and penetrated the brain. She leaves a family of several small children – Gilbert Plains Maple Leaf.

Fork River

The postponed Fork River fair was held on the 26th. Owing to rain the night before some of the farmers in the outlying districts did not exhibit as had been their intention. The exhibits in all classes were exceptionally good; the garden truck, I am told by those who were at both fairs, was even better than Dauphin. Taken all around Fork River did will and with the experience gained next year should be a top notcher.
The Boys’ and Girls’ Club held their fair the same day and the showing made by them was a credit to the children and their teachers.
A great deal of trouble is caused by the young people on the district in tricks played with the property of residents of the town. Unless this is stopped some of the younger generation may find themselves up before the local J.P. Boys will be boys, but the destruction of property is carrying fun too far. Placing a hayrack on the road, and piling barrels and boxes in the way of the automobiles is a pastime that may prove costly for the offenders.
Victory Loan Campaign starts Oct. 27th. This will give those who are applying for their naturalization papers a chance to show just how patriotic they are, and we are waiting to see how much they will put into victory bonds. Everybody should subscribe for some and help reconstruction.
I read with interest “Well Wisher’s” letter in last week’s Herald and think it well worthy of the thought and action of those having the welfare of the boys and girls of the district at heart.
Mrs. Jerry Frost and family have returned to Southern Manitoba, after having spent a month with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
The dance in the hall on fair night proved a success. Let us dance while we are young, as the time will come when we can’t.
Prof. Williamson and family have arrived from Southern Manitoba to take up their residence. The professor will teach music.
The Jewish New Year service was held on Thursday and Friday. Quite a number attended from Winnipegosis, Sifton and other points.
Mrs. McQuay and children were visitors at the home of Mrs. Fred. Cooper during the fair.
Mrs. Vining and G. Stuart, of Winnipeg, are visiting Mrs. Rice, who is on the sick list.

Zelana

Fork River, Sept. 23rd.
My last letter spoke of some nice weather for threshing. Perhaps I spoke too soon for there seems to have been very little nice weather since for threshing. But according to the old saying “It is an ill wind that blows nobody good,” so if people could not thresh then at least some of them can plow. A few around here have quite a bit turned over ready for next spring. If the fields could be sown now, there would surely be enough moisture to promote growth. In fact grain is sprouting in the stooks and in some of the stacks.
After threshing for Peter Drainiak on Saturday, Gaseyna’s machine was moved to their own place just before another rain. We understood that John Pokotylo’s machine held up at Mr. Chraighill’s by the bad weather. The threshing outfit owned by Messrs. Bugutsky, Miskae and Lyluk had not been out at all this season.
Last Friday Mrs. Paul Lyluk had the misfortune to run a pitchfork into her foot. Our teacher, who has taken a course in “First Aid”, dressed the wound.
Jim Phillips lost a valuable cow recently from blackleg it is supposed. A number of animals have died around here from the same cause.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – September 18, 1919

G.W.V.A. Notes

The regular meeting of the above association was held on Thursday, 11th inst., some 70 of the comrades being in attendance. Applications were received from 28 retuned men for membership, all of whom were accepted. This brings the local branch membership up to 331.
The main business of the evening was the question as to the possibility and advisability of having quarters owned and operated by the association. After considerable discussion the following resolution was arrived at: That this branch of the association go before the public of Dauphin and the municipality and collect the necessary funds for the erection of a building to be run and owned by this branch of the association. Same to take the form of a club room and home for returned soldiers and that provision shall be made to have bed rooms for the use of the members and that it shall be so constructed and planned that it shall be self-supporting, i.e., that the ground floor shall be suitable for rental for offices, etc. The resolution was carried without further comment. A committee was then appointed to submit to the association the best way to raise the money necessary and the manner that we shall go after same; also to draft plans as to the nature of the building that the association has in mind.
The committee that as appoint by the meeting was carefully selected and men naturally adapted to work of this nature were asked to act. One o the main ideas of the building is to have one on much the same lines as the Y.M.C.A. buildings in Winnipeg, which would be an asset to the town and a token of its appreciation to the men that had served. While the idea that we have in view is of erecting a building of a distinctive type so that it shall be recognized as a soldiers’ building it is not by any means proposed to make this a memorial building, but to be built, owned and operated as a building devoted to the veterans use, which will be self-supporting so that in the future years we may not have to go before the public for its support. That the scheme will receive the response from the public that will be necessary, if we are to have such a building, is looked upon with confidence, for judging by the generosity that has been given to the men of this town in the past is excellent encouragement that the same will be given in the present case. The public will be further notified in the near future as to the plans of the veterans and the manner in which they propose raising the funds that will be required.
The comrades are pleased to welcome home Comrade Mackie and his bride. They have the best wishes of the branch for their future happiness.
Please remember the Castle Square Entertainers on the 19th. This is a first-class show and will please the most particular. After the show the orchestra will play for a dance. Come and give that building a little lift.
Forms have been received by the secretary from the Provincial Command re the re-establishment question. These are to be filled out by every returned solider and returned to the secretary. They will be posted at the first opportunity and should be returned with as little delay as possible. A supply is also on hand in the G.W.V.A. building and call be filled in there. By calling you will assist the secretary and help yourselves in getting the best terms possible. These forms are required to give the Association the facts necessary to place the case of the returned men before the commission which has been appointed to look into their requests.

Made Haul of Scotch Whiskey

A bootlegger met with lard luck at Ste. Rose village last week. He arrived in town with two valises well filled bottles containing Scotch whiskey and secured a room at the hotel. On leaving the hotel to go down street to work up a connection he locked the door of the room. On returning, after being away less than half an hour, he found the room had been broken into and the liquor removed from the valises. He then interviewed the magistrate who informed him that the quicker he made tracks out of town the better for his welfare.

To be Appointed Chief of Police

Mr. F.W. Little, turnkey at the jail, will be appointed to the position of chief of police made vacant by the resignation of Chief Bridle. Mr. Little has been a member of the London, Eng. Police force and a few years ago served on the local force with satisfaction to the council.

Fork River

Willard McPhedren, from Ethelbert, has arrived to take charge of our 2×4 station. It is about time the railway company built a new station with a platform large enough to accommodate the growing business of our district.
Thanksgiving harvest festival was held on Sabbath last. Wet weather interfered with the attendance.
Geo. B. Scriven, Anglican lay reader, left on Monday for Faribault, Minn., where he will attend college.
Sunday school will continue as usual at 2 p.m.
F.B. Lacey and son have invested in a tractor. The faithful plodding horse is no longer speedy enough for our progressive farmers.
E. Munro is wearing a pleasant smile. The arrival of a little dairy maid is the reason for so much joy in the household.
J. Reid, of Sifton, one of the oldtimers, was a visitor in town on Sunday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – September 11, 1919

G.W.V.A. Notes

Members of the above association are requested to note that a general meeting is called for Sept. 11th at 8 p.m. All members are asked to make an effort to be present as business of importance will be placed before the comrades.
Arrangements have been made with Wallace Graham for a series of concerts to be put on at the town hall, under the auspices of this association.
The dates are as follows:
The Castle Square Entertainers, Sept. 19th.
The Victorian Serenaders, Oct. 14th.
The Canadian Juveniles, Nov. 3rd.
The Varsity Sixtette, Dec 5th.
The Dixie Jubilee Singers, Dec. 15th.
The Rob Wilson Co., Jan 1st.
All of the above are first ate shows and have been to Dauphin on several occasions and are well known to the majority of the residents here. A start is made on Sept. 19th with the Castle Square Entertainers; it is proposed to have a short dance after the show for which the Castle Square orchestra has been retained. The idea of having these entertainments is to further the possibility of having quarters owned by this association and the support of the public is looked for and counted on in the usual manner that it has always been given.
The dance held on the 8th inst., by the Ladies’ Auxiliary as a success and the ladies are to be congratulated on their venture, which, like the above concert, is to help along the main plan of this association.

Roie Waters Drowned

A sad event occurred last week when Roie Waters, a returned man, was drowned through the upsetting of his canoe on Sarah lake, 10 miles south of Durban. The young man left his home on Friday morning Aug. 28th, and noting was seen of him until his body was recovered by his brother and Constable Tacuik, of Dauphin, last Saturday. From all appearances it would seem that the canoe was overturned on the discharge of his gun and being hampered with heavy clothing he was unable to extricate himself from the dangerous condition.
Deceased was well and favorably known in the Swan River Valley, and also leaves many friends in the Dauphin and Ste. Rose districts to mourn him untimely end.

Fork River

Pte. W. Pruden, lately from overseas, is visiting his brother, O. Pruden.
The station here had a little fixing done last week in the way of a signal and a lamp. It looks as if we were to have an operator. None to soon to suit the public.
G. Scriven, lay reader, who has been in charge of the Anglican mission this summer, will preach his farewell sermon in All Saints church at three in the afternoon, Sunday, Sept. 14th.
The Returned Soldiers’ Committee will meet in W. King’s office at 8 o’clock Saturday evening, Sept. 13th. All members are requested to attend as there is business of importance to transact.
Two elevators are now in running order.
The rain at the end of the week held up threshing for a few days.
Fred King caught a large rat in a trap on his farm. This is the first rat seen in this part of the country.
Some small minded persons, for the want of better employment, on Saturday night last decorated one of the church doors with rotten eggs. Such happenings are a disgrace to a community and the culprit should be apprehended and dealt with. This is not the first occasion such rowdyism has happened.

Zalana

Mossey River Municipality, Sept. 6.
Harvesting grain is practically over around here. Possibly a few have not quite finished stacking yet. Some have already threshed, mostly from the stook; the stacks can wait until later if necessary. This has been a nice week for threshing. Pokotylo’s machine seems to be the only one working just around here. John is quite an enterprising fellow and is deservedly popular. The prevailing price for threshing here seems to be 8 cents a bushel for oats and 12 cents a bushel for wheat. Although the farmers around here had more land under cultivation this year than last the average yield is not so good. The rust did considerable damage, especially to the wheat. There seems to be a pretty good yield of vegetables this year, though in some instances not quite so good as last year.
The Fork River Agricultural fair, which was advertised for Aug. 15th, but postponed on account of heavy rain that day, is now advertised to come off on Friday, Sept. 26th, in conjunction with the Boys’ and Girls’ club fair. An interesting feature of the fair will be a baby show. Two prizes are offered—1st prized $10; 2nd prize $5. There ought to be a lot of entries here, I wonder if Frank and the wife will show the big boy who arrived last week. It is to be hoped the weather man will be in good humor and favor us this time.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – August 28, 1919

G.W.V.A. Notes

(Contributed by J.M. Chalmers, secretary.)
Members of the above association are asked to note that the regular meeting called for 28th inst. Has been cancelled. This is owing to the fact that threshing operations make it pretty nearly impossible for the majority of the comrades to attend. In fact, at this time of the year it is hard for any to attend. The next meeting will be held on the 11th of September and all the members are asked to make an effort to be present as business of importance will be placed before the comrades.
The rooms are proving their use these days. During the month of July some 250 comrades slept in them and this number will be exceeded during the present month. We have within the past two weeks had a large number of comrades from the east looking for work in the harvest fields and on threshing gangs and the fact that these men are able to put up in these rooms until they have been placed has been a boon to mauy, and the manner in which they have expressed their appreciation speaks well for Dauphin.
We are informed that Comrade G.F. King has been notified that he is to be presented with the Military Medal, earned whilst he was in France by the Prince of Wales during his visit to Winnipeg. This will mean another parade for George, but he will doubtless endure same in consideration of the fact that by doing so he is giving a boost to the Vets of Dauphin, to say nothing of the town in general.

Verdict in Favor of Mr. Grenon

In the suit of the Armstrong Trading Co. Ltd., against T.P. Grenon for possession of the property known as the Commercial hotel, Winnipegosis, has resulted in favor of defendant. Mr. Grenon’s counter-claim for rent was allowed. Bowman, McFadden & Caldwell represented Mr. Grenon and a Winnipeg firm the A.T. Co.

Winnipegosis

The ladies of the Woman’s institute entertained the children of the town at a picnic at the beach on Wednesday Aug. 20th. Races and games were the order of the day, for which prizes were given and a beautiful lunch and parcel of candy to each child. After having a good time they were taken home in cars by the Misses Grenon, Dr. Medd and Mr. Bradley.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – July 24, 1919

G.W.V.A. Notes

The regular meeting of the above Association was held last Thursday, July 17th, Comrade F. Scrase, president, in chair.
Application for membership was received from eleven returned men, all of which were accepted. This now brings the total membership of the Dauphin Branch to 271. It is hoped that same will reach the 500 before the end of the year. Any returned men in the town that have not become members up to the present are asked to do so at an early ate, for like all other things, many can help one, and the greater the membership then so much more will be able to be done for the returned man by the association.
The auditors’ report for the past six months was submitted, and on motion of Comrades Armstrong and Miles it was accepted.
During the past year considerable progress has been made by the local branch in the town. The present new quarters were opened in March and between three and four hundred men have slept in these rooms during that period. When it is considered that no charge is made for the use of these and the fact that it is sometimes next to impossible to secure a room in the town on shot notice, the use and benefit of the rooms to the retuned men that are here looking for land and getting information and particulars re the Soldier Settlement, can be readily seen. The rooms are also used to a very great extent by the returned men of the town in the evenings, and also by the boys who are living on the farms when they are in town during the day, and were it not for them it would be hard to find a place for them to spend the time, especially the men that are here to make entry on land and are compelled, owing to waiting for trains, etc., to stay in the town over night or in some cases two or three days.
Application was received from the Ladies’ Auxiliary for the use of the large hall on Aug. 6, 7 and 8 for the purpose of serving dinner, and same was granted by the comrades.
The next meeting of the association will be July 31st, and members are requested to make note of the date.

Peace Day Celebration

In spite of the counter attractions elsewhere the citizens turned out in large numbers to celebrate Peace Day in Dauphin. At 10 a.m. about 250 people gathered for a Union Thanksgiving Service, which was conducted by Captain Kitson and Rev. Harry P. Barrett, while the address was given by Rev. J.A. Haw.
At 1.30 the children gathered at the two schools and a procession of about 40 automobiles, crowded with happy youngsters, headed by the town band, went along Main street to Fourth avenue and Second street to the park. In the park races were run for all children and in many events there were so many competitors it was necessary to have two and sometimes three beats.
The grown-ups of the town brought baskets and quite a number of family parties were to be seen enjoying picnic tea on the grass. Hot water was supplied and a booth managed by the members of the Children’s Aid Society, under the conductorship of Mrs. Vance, dispensed ice cream, sandwiches, lemonade, etc. in aid of the Home.
The whole day’s programme was arranged at two hurriedly called meetings at which Mr. George King was chairman. It would be impossible to mention all who contributed to the success of the day, but we must make note of the energy and interest of the Committee, Rev. Harry P. Barrett, Messrs. Ramsay Skinner, R.J. Malcolm, Rintoul, D. Sutherland, Wright, Barker and Ferguson.

Fork River

Harvest is expected to begin at once. There is some good crop in the district this season, and the quality, too, is expected to be high.
Wm. Coultas is building a dwelling on his farm.
S.B. Reid and family are visiting at Rathwell, Man.
Fred. Cooper and Mr. Hunt and family are on a vacation to Saskatchewan points.
The wild raspberry crop is a prolific one this season and canned raspberries will be found settlers’ tables this winter.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – July 17, 1919

Fined $200 for Operating Still

Nikola Presiloski, of Valley River, appeared before the police magistrate this week on the charge of “operating a still illegally.” He pleaded guilty and was fined $200 and $7 costs. The brand of whiskey manufactured by Presiloski is said, by those who sampled it, to be the best they ever imbibed.
Constable Coleridge, laid information against Joe Woiak, for failing to register under “Alien Enemy Act.” He was fined $10 and $5 costs.

G.W.V.A. Barn Dance

A barn dance was held on July 10th under the auspices of the Great War Veterans’ association in the barn of Mr. Arthur Fisher, Burrows. Some 150 people made the trip, and as the roads were good and the weather all that could be desired, a good time was spent. The McMurray orchestra was in attendance and, as usual, this was an assurance that the music was of the highest order. After all expenses had been paid a good sum was turned over to the association which will help their work and bring nearer the fond hope of the members that at some time, and it is hoped soon, they will be able to see their way to having quarters owned by the association as a permanent home for the veterans of the district. The thanks of the association are due to Mr. Fisher, who has placed his barn at the disposal of the association on two occasions this summer, and also to the various ladies and gentlemen who assisted in the arrangements.

G.W.V.A. Notes

Members of the above Association are asked to note that the meeting will be on Thursday night at 9 o’clock in place of 8 as usual. This change is to prevent a clash with the baseball game to be played the same evening. Members are requested to put in an appearance as matters of importance will be discussed. The executive of the association is informed that an Order-in-Council has been passed extending the War Service Gratuity to men that have seen service in England, but did not proceed to France. Particulars have been requested as to the manner in which application should be made for same and comrades will be notified on receipt of same.
This association wishes to thank those ladies who kindly sent cakes for the dance recently held at Mr. Fisher’s barn, also to Mr. Fisher for the use of his place.

Peace Day Observance

Dauphin citizens will observe Peace Day by a short service in the town hall at 10 a.m. In the afternoon a basket picnic will be held in the park with a program of sports for the children.

Sentenced to Five Years

The town of Dauphin laid a charge of “vagrancy” against Wm. Boyko. He appeared for trial before P.M. Hawkins on Monday. He entered a plea of not guilty but was convicted and sentenced to five years imprisonment in the Industrial Training School at Portage la Prairie on Tuesday. Boyko’s previous record is bad.

Winnipegosis

Geo. Spence, who has been overseas for over two years, returned home last week.
A party of surveyors are surveying the new railway line from Toutes Aides to Winnipegosis.
Miss A. St. Godard, of the Pas, is visiting her sister before going to Winnipeg to reside.
Misses Myrtle and Edna Grenon were passengers to the city on Saturday to meet their father. They will leave for Minneapolis to send their holidays.
Mrs. St. Amour and Misses A. and H. St. Godard left on Saturday for a visit to Winnipeg.
A fire occurred in the Armstrong Trading Company’s oil sheds this week, but was put out before serious damage was done.
F.G. Shears, J.P. Grenon and A.H. Steele have left for Winnipeg in connection with the suit started by the Armstrong Trading Co. against J.P. Grenon as to the ownership of the Winnipegosis hotel.
This has been a dry season here but lots of rain has fallen this week which has put the crops in good condition.
The lake steamers have been overhauled and have made several successful trips up to the north end of the lake, establishing new fishing posts.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – June 5, 1919

Dominion Day Celebration

The Great War Veterans’ association intend holding a big celebration on Tuesday, July 1st (Dominion Day). The programme provides for an elaborate Calithumpain and automobile parade in the forenoon, and splendid sports—baseball, football, track and children’s races in the afternoon. Suitable prizes given in all events. A grand ball will be given in the evening in the town hall.

The Strike Situation

The strike situation remains unchanged but late news from Winnipeg is hopeful of a settlement being reached. Locally the number of strikers has increased. The freight handlers, car checkers and call boys are the latest to join the strikes.
Supt. R.C. Brown was up from Portage on Tuesday and met the telephone operators, but the conference has not altered the situation and the exchange remains closed.
The best of order, however prevails throughout the town.

Winnipegosis Elections

Winnipegosis village, which has a charter of its own, held their elections on the 30th ult. There were three candidates for the Major’s chair. The vote stood: J.C. Adam 57, J.P. Grenon 19 and S. Sieffert 10. The following councilors were elected: Geo. Lyons Ward 1, Ed. Cartwright Ward 2, Jos. Burrell Ward 3, Sid Dennett Ward 4.

A Returned Soldier’s Lament

We are the boys who have done our bit,
But when we came back we were very hard hit.
The girls of Dauphin say we are tough!
I guess we are, all right enough.

We don’t mind the slams we get from either man or girl.
We just laugh at them, till their minds are in a whirl.
They call us boys instead of men,
But we took our stand with the best of them.

We fought in Belgium and in France,
And we made the wily and brutal Hun dance,
To the tune of the cannon, machine gun and bomb
We boys helped the Hun on the way to his home.

When we went o’er the top we had the best of luck.
Every blessed soldier boy filled with vim and pluck.
Thinking of the girls at home land of the brave and free!
Fight, even unto death, for the dame of Liberty.

Now, comrades, you all will agree with me
That some of these girls are as tough as we
So let us all strive to forgive and forget.
That we may learn to become men yet.

Winnipegosis

Pte. A. Clyne has returned to town from overseas after seeing two years active service.
While Mr. F.G. Shears and a few friends were motoring back from Dauphin they met with an accident. Mr. Archie McDonell was slightly injured.
The Ladies Aid of the Union Church held a very successful picnic on the school grounds. Refreshments and ice cream were served and an interesting baseball game was played between Winnipeg and Fork River, the latter winning by one side score. A crowd was in attendance from Dauphin and Fork River.
A.H. Steele has returned from Mafeking, where he has been fighting bush fires for three days.
C.H. Dixon was in Camperville for three days on business.
J.P. Grenon has taken about 20 fishermen to the Pas to fish in the lakes near Sturgeon, being mile 239 on the Hudson Bay Railway.
Mrs. G.W. Mullhearn and children came on Tuesday’s train to visit Mrs. A.H. Steele for the summer.
Miss A. Wilson has returned from an extended visit to the coast, and has resumed her work at the post office.
Long Shaw house has been burned out through bush fires.
The body of Helger Johnson, who was drowned in the lake six months ago, has just been recovered and was brought to town by Dorie Stevenson, on the boat Odinak.
The municipal election for mayor has just closed. It was a 3cornered contest and was hotly contested. Courad Adam was elected. The vote stood Adam 57, Grenon 19, Sieffert 10.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 29, 1919

C.N.R. Shopmen Drop Tools

The big strike is assuming greater proportions every day, and the universal question is, “Where is it going to end?” The railway mail clerks went on strike on Wednesday and there is practically no mail for outside points moving.
The men in the C.N.R. shops here struck at 10 o’clock this (Thursday) morning. This move will do much to cripple the operations of the company. The best of order, however, prevails.

G.W.V.A. Notes

Meeting of the above association, held Thursday, May 22nd, Comrades F. Scrase and G.F. Johnston both being away, Comrade Roy Armstrong took chair for the meeting.
Seven applications were received for membership. All were accepted.
Comrade Roy Armstrong reported on his trip to Winnipeg in connection with the question of memorial. He reports that Winnipeg is anxious to get a provincial memorial erected in Winnipeg, funds to be raised throughout the province. This does not meet with the approval of outside points, which desire memorials at local points. The question was referred to a committee, and another meeting will be held. He also stated that the general feeling favored a community hall.
The thanks of the association were tendered to Comrade Neeley for erecting doors for club room.
The Ladies’ Aid have turned over a balance of $100 to the association, and our thanks are due them.
The Sports Day committee met Friday, May 23rd. Citizens of the tow have generously supported the committee, and one of the best Sports day should result.
The Veterans’ baseball team played the C.N.R. on the 26th, and went under. More practice is needed to ensure better success.

“Ivens, the Terrible”

Recv. “Bill” Ivens is one of the leading figures on the labor side in the big strike. He was on the Ochre River circuit for several years and while there kept things going. During a recent visit the returned soldiers refused to permit him to speak. The Winnipeg Free Press refers to him as “Ivens, the Terrible.”

Married

READER-STORRAR – At the Parsonage, Dauphin, on May 27th, by the Rev. J.A. Haw. Alex. Reader to Eva May Storrar, both of Fork River.

Record Hot Weather

He hot weather for the past ten days is unprecedented for the month of May. The records in existence show nothing to equal it. The registering of the government thermometer since May 22nd is as follows:
May 22 …. 95 deg.
May 23 …. 92 deg.
May 24 …. 95 deg.
May 25 …. 95 deg.
May 26 …. 93 deg.
May 27 …. 95 deg.

Fork River

Pte. Alex. Reader has returned from overseas and, what do you think, came all the way to Fork River to pick out a wife. He was married at Dauphin on Tuesday to Eva May Storrar.
We are supposed to have a herd law at Fork River, but not withstanding many animals roam at will about the street at night.
John H. Richarson and Frank Hafenbrak made the trip to Dauphin on Tuesday by car. They report the roads good.
Fred Tilt has been appointed a justice of the peace. He will balance the scales evenly.
Adolf Rudinski has purchased a Clydesdale stallion from E.E. McKinstry, of Dauphin. The introduction of a better clam of stock in our district is what is needed.
Strike or no strike the Herald came to hand as usual last week. The large circulation of the paper at this point is evidence of the appreciation of the people.
When Mr. W.J. Osborne, municipal auditor, was here he assured a number of ratepayers hat he would have the auditor’s report printed this year. So far as can be learned the report has not yet made its appearance.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 22, 1919

G.W.V.A.

Regular meeting of the above mentioned association held Thursday, May 15th, some 30 of the Comrades being in attendance.
Application for membership received from 16 returned soldiers. All of these were accepted.
Moved by Comrade R. Armstrong, seconded by Comrade T. Boyce, that this branch endorse the resolution prepared by the Winnipeg branch of the G.W.V.A. and remain neutral with regard to the strike that is on at Winnipeg, and it was also resoled that should such occasion arise the G.W.V.A. in this town place their services at the disposal of the authorities to maintain order.
Moved by Comrade Price, seconded by Comrade Cocking, that a separate fund in connection with the work of this branch of assisting sick comrades and their dependents. And that in the future all grants under this heading shall be paid from that account and that moneys donated to this association shall be placed at their credit of same and shall not be used for any other purpose.
Moved by Comrade Percy, seconded by Comrade C. Lane, that this branch appoint a delegate in the Dominion convention to be held at Vancouver on June 8th. Vote taken and Comrade G.F. Johnston was appointed delegate.
General committee in charge of the G.W.V.A. sports day met Friday, 16th, to make further arrangements on this project. These committees are now completed and they were instructed to commence operations at once in the preparation of a program.
The association begs to acknowledge receipt of the sum of $64.20, raised at a box social held in Dauphin last Saturday evening, under the management of F. Tacuik.
Owing to the strike in Winnipeg the Better ‘Ole has been postponed. The new dates are Monday and Tuesday, June 2nd and 3rd.

The Strike Situation

The greatest strike in the history of Canada was declared in Winnipeg last Thursday. It is outcome of differences between employers and employees which include several matters besides the question of wages. Shorter hours and the recognition of the principle of bargaining are among these. It will be realized that it is not an easy matter to settle matters of this nature offhand. It is somewhat of a revolution; but there are days of revolutions and the issues must be squarely faced. In the meantime the public are not only suffering in convenience, but loss.
There have been no daily papers for the past week from Winnipeg and the absence of the papers is keenly felt. The last copies of the papers to be received was Friday and the newsy on the train sold these at from 10 to 25 cents each. It proved a bonanza for the agent.
There has been no mail going to Winnipeg for a week and during the past two or three days none south of the boundary.
The express service south and west have been discontinued for a week.
The managers of the moving picture theatre are obliged to go to Winnipeg to or three times a week to get the films. But this is better than having to close up.
The price of eggs has declined as there is no means of sending the hen fruit to outside markets.
Senator Robertson, Minister of Labor, was billed to arrive in Winnipeg on Wednesday. The outcome of his visit will be waited with much interest.

Fork River

Pte. A.E. Eales has purchased the n.w. ¼ 6-30-18, and intends improving the property.
The Returned Soldiers’ Committee will meet on the 24th to arrange for a banquet and transact other business. The ladies are invited to attend.
Rev. H.P. Barrett, rector of St. Paul’s Dauphin, will hold service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday, June 8th, at 3 o’clock.
Max King has started breaking on the home farm with a 10-20 Titan and a 20 inch breaker. He is doing good work.
All Saints’ Sunday School has been reorganized and started on Sunday with W. King as superintendent, and Mrs. A. Russell, Mrs. McEachern, Miss I. Briggs and Miss S. Briggs as teachers.
Service was held in the Methodist Church by Rev. Mr. Hook on Sunday afternoon. There was a good attendance.
The dance given by the Returned Soldiers’ recently was well patronized and all who attended had a good time.
Edwin King, weed inspector for the municipality, has started on his rounds. Winn is some hustler, but he will have to go some if he keeps ahead of the fast growing weeds these days.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 15, 1919

Four Men Badly Injured

Mr. Arthur Fisher, who resides in the Burrow district, is erecting a large barn. Last Friday four men, John Neely, Frank Potter, John James and Geo. Smith were engaged erecting the rafters when a whirlwind came up suddenly collapsing the timbers. Neely, Potter and Smith were badly injured by the failing timbers. James, who was working on the top, jumped when the rafters commenced to fall, but was unable to clear himself and was struck and injured. Mr. Neely was so badly injured that his condition will not yet permit of his removal to town.

G.W.V.A.

The regular meeting of the above association was held on Thursday, May 8th, between 30 and 40 of the comrades being present. Owing to the unavoidable absence of the president, Capt. F. Scrase, Comrade G.F. Johnston, vice president, took the chair.
Applications were received from 13 returned soldiers for membership, all of which were accepted. This makes the membership of the local branch 195 and a considerable increase on this is expected in the near future.
The secretary has since this meeting been informed that a special meeting has been called by Premier Norrie to consider the memorial question for this province, on May 16th. It has, therefore, been decided to send a delegate to this meeting to represent this branch.
During the past week a donation of $112.65 was received from the citizens of the Ethelbert district, per Rev. G. Tymchuk. The thanks of the association are due to all the subscribers of the above mentioned donation.
A grant of $25 to this association has been received from the Dauphin Automobile club. This has been acknowledged and thanks are due to the members of the club for same.
On May 23rd and 24th the “Better ‘Ole” is being put on at the Star theatre. This is to be under the auspices of the G.W.V.A. Ask any returned man what he thinks of it and he will soon convince you, to say the least of it, that it will be well worth seeing, and at the same time give the association a lift.
A meeting was held on Friday, the 9th in connection with the G.W.V.A. Sports Day, to be held on 1st July, and arrangements made for appointing the various committees to make same a success. Posters are to be got out advertising same. The committee are requested to note that the next meeting will be held on Friday, may 16th, at 8 p.m. sharp. A full attendance is essential.
Members are asked to note that the Manitoba Provincial Command have issued a weekly paper devoted to the returned solider. It is known as the Manitoba Veteran, and will be issued weekly. The rate is 5c per copy or $2 per year. Sample copies have been received and if the paper continues like the sample a bright future is assured. Subscriptions are taken by the local secretary of the G.W.V.A.

Fork River

Billy Tuck has gone to Dryden, Ont., for a short trip.
W.R. Snelgrove is around again after his illness. He has moved on to the Chase farm, having exchanged his Dauphin residence for the property.
Steve Warrawrork, of Volga, has purchased the Slobodizan farm from W.R. Snelgrove.
Corp. Duncan Briggs and Private Tom Briggs and H. Craighill have arrived from overseas. They are looking hale and hearty.
Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Cameron and children, from Neepawa, are visiting at Mr. Nat Little’s house.
Robt. Rowe intends Fording it to town for the future, having purchased a Ford car from Nat Little.
Wm. Northam is busy fencing the farm be purchased south of town.
All Saints S.S. will meet as usual at 2 o’clock, Sunday, 18th inst.
Rain is falling as I write and it is welcome. All the wheat is about in. The season for work has been very favorable.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 1, 1919

Clubb Sentenced to One Year

Norman Clubb and Fred Beach, the two boys who pleaded guilty to breaking into Benedickson’s store, came up for sentence before P.M. Hawkins on Wednesday. Clubb, who has a bad record was sentenced to one year in jail. Beach was let off on suspended sentence.

G.W.V.A.

All members of the above association and other returned soldiers wishing to exercise their soldier rights with regard to the land scheme are requested to attend a meeting to be held on Thursday, May 1st, at 8.30 p.m. Important information will be imparted.
(Signed)
J.M. Chalmers,
Sec. G.W.V.A.

Fork River

Sowing and ploughing is the order of the day. The land is in good shape and there will be a large acreage sown if the fine weather continues.
Mr. Andy Rowe received an Easter gift. It’s a wee daughter.
Miss Stella and Ina Briggs, teachers of Pine View and Mossey River Schools, returned from their Easter holidays to Winnipeg and Rathwell.
The stork left a little girl at the home of Robert Rowe the other evening.
Mr. J.H. Lowes has returned from Makinak.
This is to be clean up week around the village by the order of the health officer. All should join heartily in the good work.
On Friday evening last, April 25th, the home of Mr. and Mrs. T.B. Lacey, at Oak Brae, on the Mossey, was besieged and taken possession of for the evening by about eighty old-time friends of Private L.H. Lacey, late of 226th Battalion and who enlisted in Dauphin in April 1916. He went overseas with the battalion and later joined the 44th Battalion and was sent to France. He was at Vimy Ridge and after at Lens where he was taken prisoner on the 23rd of August, 1917. He remained a prisoner to the close of the war. On April 5th last he had the pleasure of stepping off the local at Fork River to be greeted by 84 old-time friends. Previous to this a committee had been formed and about one year ago they appointed canvassers to collect fund for the purpose of providing a suitable present to every boy that had enlisted from Fork River and the southern portion of the municipality. It was arranged that the sum of $50, or its equivalent, should be presented to each of the boys after their return in recognition of their services overseas. A public reception has taken place as a rule and the presentation has been made, but owing to the frail condition of Lorne’s mother and out of deference to her, the presentation of a valuable gold watch was made to him at his home. Mr. Wm. King, (whose three sons were “over there” and did their bit gallantly), is the sec.-treasurer of the fund, and who with other members of the committee, drove in from Fork River and at about 10 p.m. Mr. King called for Lorne and presented him with an inspiring address and a gold watch as a token from the people. Young and old had a good time that night over one of the returned, but we thought that night of the many anxious mothers that are still waiting for those they love, and many that wait until the resurrection for their loved ones.
Mrs. and Mr. F.B. Lacey desire to thank Mr. King and the committee for their kindness and consideration in acceding to their wishes and making the presentation at their home.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – April 24, 1919

Boys Plead Guilty to Robbery

On Sunday night, April 6th, the Clothes Shop, Mr. Benedickson’s store, was entered and a quantity of goods stolen. The matter was placed in Chief Bridle’s hands and he at once got busy with the result that two boys, about 17 years of age, were arrested at Wadena, Sask. The boys’ names are Fred Beach and Norman Clubb, and hail from Winnipeg. They were brought from Wadena on Tuesday and appeared before P.M. Hawkins on Wednesday, and pleaded guilty to the charge. They were remanded till Friday for sentence. The boys are known to the city police and their previous history is to be investigated. The most of the stolen goods were recovered.

G.W.V.A. Notes

A meeting of the above association was held on Thursday, April 17th, some 40 members being in attendance.
The question of a memorial for the fallen comrades was discussed by the comrades, and it was suggested that the memorial should take the shape of a home for the returned men, and that a committee be formed to confer with the memorial committee organized by the town.
It was moved by Comrade Armstrong, seconded by Comrade H. Harvey, “that this branch of the G.W.V.A. endorse the Imperial Veterans’ resolution, and request that the government take up the matter of insurance by the state for returned men who, owing to injuries received whilst in action, are at the present time unable to get insurance, or who have to pay excessive rates for such.
Moved by Comrade H. Harvey, seconded by Comrade Oliphant, that this branch endorse the resolution of the G.W.V.A. Winnipeg, and protest against the sect known as ‘Hutterites’ from being allowed to settle in this country.
A delegation was received from the Ladies’ Auxiliary, and arrangements made as to taking care of soldiers’ widows, who come to this town in connection with land, etc. It was decided that the auxiliary should provide rooms, as it was not considered that the G.W.V.A. rooms were suitable accommodation for ladies, and that they would be more comfortable in a separate house.

Mossey River Council

The council met at Winnipegosis on April 7th, all the members being present. The minutes of the previous meeting wee read and adopted.
Communications were read from the Children’s Hospital, Winnipeg; the solicitor, re passing of social legislation; R. Flett, re reduction of taxes; The Red Triangle Fund, R. Cruise, M.P., re Hudson’s Bay Railway; copies of letters from the weed commission, C.B. Martin, re seed grain, and Sawinski Bros., re car of plank.
Hunt-Reid – That in consideration of the large amount of money that has been expended in the buildings of the Hudson’s Bay railroad, and, further, very large amounts in construction of harbor accommodation on the bay, and, whereas, a comparatively small amount will be required to finish the railway and thus render the large expenditure useful; this council is therefore, of the opinion and most empathically recommends that the Hudson’s Bay railroad be completed as soon as possible, thus giving to Western Canada the benefits to be derived from it and for which it has waited so long. That a copy of this resolution be forwarded to Sir Thomas White.
Yakavanka-Namaka – That the council of the rural municipality of Mossey River hereby makes formal application to the Good Roads Board of the Province of Manitoba that the following roads within the municipality be brought under the provisions of “The Good Roads Act, 1914,” and amendments thereto;
Road from south boundary of the municipality, making connection with the Dauphin good road system; due north to the village of Fork River, and from that point north and easterly to the village of Winnipegosis.
Road from the village of Fork River due west to the western boundary of the municipality road from corner on Fork River-Winnipegosis road to west side of range 19, along township line between tps. 29 and 30. Also from corner on same road westerly two miles between tps. 30 and 31.
Road from n.w. corner 12-29-19, easterly six miles, thence south to Lake Dauphin and then following lake shore to south boundary of the municipality.
Road from Winnipegosis north-westerly through tp. 31, rge. 18, and continuing into tp. 31, rge. 19.
Road from Winnipegosis south-easterly through tp. 3, rge. 18, and continuing easterly across tp. rge. 17.
Hunt-Reid – That Coun. Paddock and Marcroft be a committee to inspect road northwest of Winnipegosis, and report what can be done in the matter of making it passable at net meeting.
Yakavanka-Namaka – That the municipal bank account be moved from the Bank of Ottawa, Dauphin, to the Winnipegosis branch of the same bank.
Yakavanka-Namaka – That the clerk write the rural municipality of Dauphin and ask its council of it is prepared to pass a bylaw similar to those passed for the last two years covering work on the boundary road between the two municipalities.
By laws authorizing a line of credit of $15,000, amending the collector’s bylaw by reducing the salary to $125 pre month, and a bylaw authorizing a vote of the ratepayers of the Mossey River School district to issue expenditures for the borrowing of $12,000 to purchase grounds and build and equip a school. The vote to be taken June 14th.
The council adjourned to meet at Fork River at the call of the reeve.

Winnipegosis

The regular monthly meeting of the Home Economic Society was held on Friday evening, April 18th, at 8 p.m., in the Union Church. It being Good Friday the musical part of the programme consisted of Easter hymns. Mrs. J.E. McArthur gave an excellent paper on “Ventilation and Well-Lighted Rooms,” and Mr. Hook spoke in his usual pleasing manner on the subject, “Associates for the Young,” bringing foremost in his speech the necessity of child training. Ten cent tea was served, proceeds in aid of the library fund, when the meeting was brought to a close by singing he National anthem.
The Home Economics Society library is open every Saturday from 3 o 5 p.m., in Mrs. Honchin’s ice cream parlor.
Mr. D.G. McAulay and family have moved from the farm into town and taken up residence in the house formerly owned by J. Alexander.
The executive of the Order of the Needle wish to thank all those who helped to make the bazaar on the evening of Monday, the 21st, so successful. Mr. J.R. Burrell and her assistants, Mrs. K. McAuley and Mrs. Thomas, are especially to be lauded for the efficient way in which they handled the tea room, which was very popular. Mr. Hamilton very kindly gave his time in arranging the booths, which were very prettily decorated by Mrs. Steele, Mrs. St. Amour, Mrs. J.E. McArthur and Mrs. J.A. Campbell. A number of ladies and gentlemen assisted on the programme of music for dancing after the booth closed. Mr. Ketchison acted as floor manager and as usual made things go. The receipts for the evening were $119.10. Paid out for working material $3.75, for decorations $1.40, cartage 75 cents, rent of hall $6; total $11.90. To be divided between Red Cross and Belgian Fund, $107.20.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – March 27, 1919

$20,000 Damage Suit

Suit for $20,000 against the Canadian National Railways has been filed in the Court of King’s Bench at Saskatoon by Evelyn Haley, widow of Joseph Haley, of Dauphin, a brakeman, who was crushed to death between a freight car and a loading platform on the C.N.R. at Hawkes Spur, near Hudson Bay Junction, last fall. The action will be heard at the next sitting of the court.

THE ACCIDENT
The fatal accident occurred early in the morning of October 18, 1918. According to the statement of claim which has been filed at the court house by Messrs. McCraney, McKenzie & Hutchison, solicitors for the plaintiff; Joseph Haley was a brakeman on an extra train, under Conductor B.L. Haley, of Dauphin. The conductor was instructed to proceed with his train from the junction to Hawkes Spur, one mile west, for the purpose of picking up two freight cars which were on the spur track. This was done, and after attending to his duties as brakeman, which included fixing switches and couplings, Haley gave the engineer the signal to go ahead. He then climbed on to the step of the last car on the train. It was dark at the time.
The train started and Haley was crushed between the side of the car and a loading platform that was placed alongside the tracks. He received injuries from which he died shortly after.

G.W.V.A.

Members of the above association please note that a general meeting will be held to night (Thursday) in association headquarters at 8 p.m. sharp. A full attendance is requested.

Plebiscite Advocated

Increase interest is being taken in the matter of a memorial for our soldiers who made the supreme sacrifice. The residents of the rural municipality of Dauphin must be taken into consideration as well as the tow in the proposed memorial. It is suggested that a plebiscite should be taken. The matter however, should be thoroughly discussed in the columns of the Herald before it is submitted to a vote.

War and Repatriation

A lecture was given in the town hall on Monday evening on the above subject by Lieut.-Col. (Rev.) Woods, secretary of the Repatriation committee. Mayor Bowman presided and introduced the speaker.
Lieut.-Col. Woods said he did not think the people of Canada realized what was at stake during the four years of strife nor what was at stake today and proceeded to enlighten his audience as to the aims of Germany which fell nothing short, in his opinion, of the conquest of France, Belgium and Britain, and then the United States and Canada. The cruelty practiced and the devastation wrought by the Germans was spoken of and denounced. By the use of a diagram on a blackboard the speaker described the part taken by “The Little Black Devils” in the action of April 22nd, 1915, and paid a glowing tribute to their conduct on that memorable occasion. Referring to the conditions necessary to the reconstruction of the Empire he outlined the course to be adopted, his great plea being for unity and purity in all matters. Coming to the repatriation side of his subject, he described the scheme proposed for the settlement of returned men on the land. In the event of a man being able to prove hi ability to farm properly the government would purchase a quarter section of land, at a cost not exceeding $5000 and resell to the applicant at cost price, no commission being charged or allowed. An additional sum of $3000 may be borrowed for the purchase of stock and machinery. In this capital sum no interest will be charged for the first two yeas; at the end of that period 5 per cent per annum would be charged. Coming to the men who were not farmers Col. Woods said that vocational training would be given and all reasonable means employed to help the men to resume their places in the community and home life of the nation. The lecturer laid emphasis on the fact that many of “our boys” were coming back to us with their nervous system shattered, and he bespoke for them kindly sympathy and and consideration.
At the conclusion of his lecture Col. Woods invited those present to ask questions, which he would be pleased to answer.
Replying to the question, “Would returned men get a rebate on their taxes,” the answer was in the affirmative, it being explained that the provincial government would recoup the municipalities.
The Land Settlement Board, Post Office Building, Winnipeg, was the answer given to a question as to where returned men should apply for any and all information in connection with this scheme.
Col. Woods nominated a committee of ladies and gentlemen, Mr. F.T. Wright being mentioned as chairman.
A verse of the National Anthem brought the proceedings to a close.

Fork River

Geo. Tilt has bought from Jack Chipley his house and lots, and intends residing in town.
Wm. King has purchased the north half of 31/2 29 19, the Haryey farm and adjoining quarter.
Wm. Bollen, of Dauphin, is visiting this district selling medicines.
Fred Cooper has finished his contract for the gravel for the new schoolhouse and is now busy hauling gravel for the foundation for the new elevator which is to be built this summer.
On the 14th inst. a concert, box social and dance were held in the Orange Hall under the auspices of the baseball club. Each event was a distinct success and reflected great credit on the members of the dramatic society who was responsible for the entertainment. The sale of the boxes realized the sum of $146.

Fork River Criticism

To the Editor of the Herald
Sir, Some two weeks ago a box social was held at Fork River and at the beginning of the proceeding a statement was made on the platform that the proceeds were to be used by a baseball outfit and the balance was to go to the return soldiers fund. The bidding for the boxes was spirited, good prices obtained and some $135.00 over expenses realized. It now transpires that some of those interested in baseball intend to use the money not only to buy bats, balls, etc. but also baseball uniforms for the players. Should this be carried out how much will be left for the return soldiers fund. There is not a doubt that the free bidding was due to the majority of those present believing that the greater portion of the money they were giving was going to the return soldiers fund and it has been remarked that this fund should get the even one hundred. For the past four years the government has been supplying free uniforms and should there be any return soldiers on the baseball team no one will object to their being supplied with a baseball uniform but then again there will be no doubt the others who did not accept a government uniform and presumably being on a baseball team they are sound wind and limb and there is no doubt that the people who payed their money would object to it being used to supply them with free suits to play baseball in when they refuse to accept uniforms to serve their country in.
A contributor,
Fork River, March 24.

Fork River Agricultural Society

The first meeting of this society was held in the municipal office at Fork River on Saturday March 22nd and was well attended. T.B. Venables was in the chair and E.F. Wilson acted as secretary. The chairman spoke of the advantages that would be accrued to the district through a good live agricultural society and those present showed considerable enthusiasm over the prospect. D.F. Wilson provisional secretary also spoke and read portions of the agricultural society’s act. The officers elected were T.B. Venables president, J.H. Richardson vice and as directors J.D. Robertson, W. King, F.F. Halfinbrak, W. Greghill, J. Yakavanka, Panko Solomon, S.J. Perepeluk, D.F. Wilson, Mike A. Moyer. A discussion then took place as the advantages of purchasing grounds and it was the unanimous opinion that the society should join the Mossey River School District in securing grounds large enough for an agricultural show. A meeting of the members is called to [unknown] purchase of the grounds Tuesday April 22nd.

Sifton

Subscriptions to the Great War Veteran Association of Dauphin from the Ruthenian citizens in the Sifton district. The subscriptions were given after a public meeting held on the 9th under the auspice of the Canadian Patriotic Association.
W. Mazuryk, 5, S. Stichishon 5, M. Litowetz 50 cents, K. Choloweky 4, H. Konowalchuk 5, Kostesky 5, J. Stifanuk 5, F. Guiazdowsky 5, A. Stifanuk 5, N. Dudar 5, P. Sawchyn 10, P. Trach 5, O. Burawkyo 5, N. Ogryalo 10, J. Korolyk 5, M. Nakonechny 5, A. Herman 1.50, G. Nikikchuk 2, M. Kuzyk 2, J. Kuyk 1, H. Dundar 1, O. Hrimak 5, W. Blenduk 25 cents, J. Feduk 5, D. Wasilishen 4, J. Wasilyshen , F. Kostur 5, T. Mostowy 5, T. Belesky 5, E. Pankiw 5, W. Jarema 5, M. Hafichuk 5, T. Bayduza 10, W. Kuzyk 1, N. Popelta 5, C. Bayduza 2, N. Zubreaky 1, N. Hnatuk 1, A. Atamanchuk 2, P. Brazchul 2, S. Harema 1, P. Hrushowy 75 cents, PO. Nakonechny 2, D. Heschuk 2, M. Kolcun 1.25, P. Lukenko 1, P. Swerbyos 15, W. Shimansky 5, F. Farion 15, Sopunik 5, D. Kindrat 6, H. Kindrat 5, J. Atamanchuk 1, H. Sokal 2, P. Kuzyk 5, Hryhorchuk 10, J. Rola 10, J. Burtniak 10, S. Lozinesky 5, S. Lusko 5, N. Xabiaka 5, A. Basurba 5, S. Halinsky 5, W. Brazchuk 5, S. Atamanchuk 5, H. Stasiuk 5, W. Paulak 5, H. Kopychuk 5, J. Zarusky 5, Miss P Xarusky 5, N Dozinsky 1, M. Pasieka 1, Mrs. A. Dolhun 1, S. Marsenuk 2, Pulak 5, S. Pulak 5, S. Jasentuk 2, P. Burtnial 5, W. Lilik 1, L. Waly 1, N. Jasentuk 5, C. Atamachuk 5, G. Shimanszy 2, S. Nabozak 1, Mrs. Merenchuk 2; Mrs. Shimansky 1, Mrs. A. Basaraba 2, Miss C. Basaraba 1, A. Weselowsky 2, J. Weselowsky 2, F. Bunka 1, P. Nabozniak 5, M. Komarnisky 2, B. Komarnisky 2, S. Weselowsky 1, H. Lysak 3, Mrs. Potosky 5, W. Lulashni 3, S. Dowbush 5, M. Lulashnik 2, J. Rafalsky 5, H. Shmigarowsky 5, M. Harasym 1, W. Kalita 5, M. Kwolik 5, J. Kwolik 5, N. Rokush 4, N. Pawlowsky 10, A. Jakamisky 5, S. Ganchar 2, K. Horodnisky 5, J. Ganchar 5, J. Lucharawy 4, S. Stadnyk 5, J. Zagrodny 2, P. Spoel 5, F. Kalychak 1, S. Jakamisky 1, N. Dirkach 1, A. Ganchar 5, J. Zagrodny 5, J. Ganchar 1, J. Jakilashek 2, A. Kruk 5, A. Kruk 5, N. Lukowich 2, Ganchar 2, Werbisky 1, Werbisky 2, J.A. Polowy 3, R.T. Edwards 1, M. Shachinger 7, S. Antoski 2, N. Uskowsky 2, O. Dirhak 2, N. Martinuk 4, S. Jasentuk 5, M. Jarema 1, N. Rizok 1, Z. Plawusky 1, J. Shmenduk 1, F. Burtniak 1, M. Saruk 2, W. Kinzersky 1, N . Brezdin 1, S. Brezdin 1, M.P. Berezyuski 5. Total $548.25.

Winnipegosis

The regular monthly meeting of the Home Economic Society, held Friday, March 21st, took the form of a social evening. Owing to our regular club room being burned down some short time ago the meeting was held in the Union Church. An excellent address was given by Dr. Medd, touching on skin diseases and the hospital question, but the main question was “Infant Feeding.” The subject is a practical one and we feel that by having our local physician speak to us we are getting deeper into community life, which is the real aim of the society.
Mr. CH. Dixon, our local lawyer, gave a very interesting talk on law, and la-making and we feel very grateful to Mr. Dixon for having so favored us. Then followed a musical programme of choruses, duet, reading and a pleasing solo by Miss Ida Rintoal. Tea was served at the close by the ladies, and we felt that our social evening’s quarterly would prove a success not only to our members but to all interested in the town.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – March 20, 1919

5 Cases on Assize Docket

The spring assizes for the Dauphin Judicial District opened on Tuesday with Mr. Justice Metcalfe, presiding. There are five cases on the docket, which are as follows:
King vs. F.B. Race, theft of liquor from railway car.
King vs. H. Porteous, Roblin, assault occasioning actual bodily harm.
King vs. Geo. Kuzio, Winnipegosis, sedition.
King vs. John Bouazuv, Roblin, posting obscene letter.
King vs. W.B. Dempsey, Winnipegosis, forcible entry upon land.

G.W.V.A. Notes

Formal Opening of Club Rooms
The new club rooms of the G.W.V. association, in the Lilly block, were formally opened by Mayor Bowman on Tuesday, the 18th.
In opening the proceedings Mayor Bowman said it gave him great pleasure to be with them that evening. He regretted the absence of the president who was indisposed and hoped that he would soon be restored to his usual good health. He paid a high complement to the officers of the association for undertaking an enterprise of such magnitude and to the ladies of the auxiliary, who had done so much to help forward the good work. The aims of the association needed no explanation, it being well-known that it was formed for the betterment and uplift of veterans of the great war just ended. In closing his worship said that public opinion would be behind any association formed for the help and assistance of the returned men and extended the best wishes of the citizens of Dauphin and district to the association. He then formally declared the club rooms open.
A short programme followed, Miss Maggie Stark giving a humorous reading and Mrs. Heaslip a song, for which she received a well-merited recall. Major Skinner gave an address in which he touched on many subjects of great interest to the veterans and townspeople. The McMurray orchestra contributed several selections and its presence at any function is always heartily welcomed.
Dancing at once commenced, while in the assembly and recreation rooms a series of games of progressive whist were strongly contested. Mrs. Nash won the ladies’ prize, the gentleman’s prize going to Comrade Jack May.
The Ladies’ Auxiliary provided an abundance of toothsome delicacies, which were enjoyed, and for which they received hearty thanks. Dancing was kept up with spirit till an early hour, McMurray’s orchestra furnishing the magic.
There was a large gathering and the function was voted one of the best ever held in Dauphin.

Race Case Proceeding

The grand jury found a true bill in the King vs. Race, and the evidence of a number of witnesses for the crown was heard. This (Thursday) morning the case for the defence was started. The trial is attracting much interest. F.B. Simpson is the crown prosecutor and J.L. Bowman is defending Race.

Mossey River Council

The council of the municipality of Mossey River met at Fork River on the 5th inst., as a court of revision. After the numerous appeals were disposed of the minutes of the last council meeting were adopted as read.
Communications were read from the Reparation Committee, Ottawa, the solicitors re. Hartman account, H. Houchin re use of council chamber for War Veterans, H. Shannon asking for refund of taxes, the secretary of the Weed Commission, A. Gunmunderson asking to be struck off the assessment roll, J.C. Adam re taxes on lot in Winnipegosis, the rural municipality of Wallace re equalized assessment, the Manitoba Returned Soldiers’ Commission.
A petition praying for the dismissal of the collector and another asking for the building of a road on the correction line; also two applications for the position of weed inspector.
Hunt-Reid – That Simpson, McGirr & Co., solicitors for the municipality, be instructed to apply to the legislature of the province of Manitoba at the present sitting for a special act legalizing the assessment for the yea 1918, and that the council approve of the draft form of act hereto appended and authorized the solicitors to consent to such amendments of revision thereof as may be required by the law amendments committee of the legislature.
That W.B. Findlater, M.P.P. for Gilbert Plains, be requested to introduce the said special act to the legislature.
Hunt-Namaka – That the clerk write solicitors re Hartnian account with the village of Winnipegosis.
Hunt-Yakavanka – Whereas, the Union of Manitoba Municipalities, at its recent convention in Winnipeg, pledged the co-operation of all municipal councils and officials in Manitoba to the Returned Soldiers’ Manitoba Commission in its work of reestablishing in civil occupations soldiers returning from the war; and, whereas, the municipality of Ochre River has regarded I as a patriotic duty to do everything possible to assist in this commendable purpose; therefore, be it resolved, that this municipality hereby undertakes to obtain satisfactory employment for all returned soldiers who were residents of this municipality at the time of enlistment, or, in the even of it being found impossible so to do, to promptly report to the commission, giving reasons for such failure and the address where the returned unemployed soldier may be found. The clerk is hereby directed to give such assistance to the commission as is necessary for the carrying out of the purpose of this resolution. Carried.
Hunt-Reid – That Edwin W. King be appointed weed inspector for year 1919 at a salary of $125 per month, and that is duties begin on the 15th day of May, and continue up to the 15th day of October, and that the clerk in notifying him of his appointment, ask him to attend the convention of weed inspectors to be held in Winnipeg.
The council adjourned to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the reeve.

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, March 17.
Robt. Marsland was here last week with his sawing and crushing outfit.
Frank Sharp has been on the sick list for a few days.
Mrs. Russell has received the good news that her son, Pte. Walter, is on his way home from overseas.
The chips will soon begin to fly as there is quite a number of new buildings going up in the spring.
The Grain Growers meet the first Friday in each month. At the last meeting matters of importance were dealt with. Resolutions were passed asking for a reduction in the tariff and refusing concessions to the liquor interests.
There has been considerable land cleared of scrub during the winter, and breaking will be pushed forward in the spring.
The school questions is the burning issue of the hour.

Sifton

A very crowded meeting was addressed by Mr. R. Fletcher and others in Wycliff School last Thursday, the 13th inst., on the question of “Municipal Schools.” Much interest was shown in the bylaw and it is thought that it will be supported on the 25th. Mr. Dyk spoke in Ruthenian and Paul Wood occupied the chair.
Three carloads of lumber are being unloaded by local farmers.
It is proposed to build a municipal public hall here and a bylaw will to all probability by voted on to sanction the borrowing of a sum of money on debentures for that purpose.
From all accounts Sifton is not proud of its new liquor detective or spotter. Nor is he of much practical use here as we are all on the “water wagon” just now.
It is expected that the new government trunk highway, Winnipeg to Swan River, will run through Sifton. No better route could be found.
Logs, hay, straw, fence posts, etc., are being feverishly drawn. If the snow held until June – which heaven forbid! – there would still be that last load to draw.
Our local barber recently did 43 shaves and 17 haircuts from 7 p.m. until closing time. A pretty good records – but then, he only opens on Saturday evenings.
Mr. Thos. Winshy has replaced Mr. Wheeler as manager of the Bank of Commerce. He thinks Sifton has a bright future, and with a few mines, factories and so on opened up may make quite a city. Joking aside, we have a first-class site for an up-to-date creamery. Who will build it? Not tow, only one. We have two mills.
A progressive whist drive is advertised for next Friday evening in Wycliff School. Refreshments, prizes and a good time – all for 25 cents.

Breathe gentle zephyrs o’er snow-covered state,
Blow steady south wind, cross forest and lake
Urge spring-time sun they perennial power,
Burst waiting bud and unfold bashful flower.

Lines of winged strangers flock up from the south.
Sound calls and carols from many a mouth.
Fiel is long time white turn your black into green,
Gild fruitful autumn with glorious sheen.

Winnipegosis

One of the brightest events of the social season was a tea given by Mrs. Steele on the 17th. The decorations in the spacious drawing room were appropriately Irish in honor of the Saint and the same bright spring color prevailed throughout all the rooms and even reflected in the costumes of the young ladies serving and prepared out from the sandwiches. The event took the form of a shower to assist the young ladies of the Order of the Needle with a bazaar which the are planning.
Andrew Lunn, who has been hauling stone on a contract for the Manitoba Gypsum Company, will be through next week.
Mr. Hamilton returned last week with his family and will shortly move into the Bradley house.
The Red Cross Committee are planning a box social on the 27th in Rex Hall.
A large crowd was at the station to welcome Charlie Burrell on is return from overseas. He was somewhat exhausted from the trip up but is resting nicely now and will be glad to see his friends.
S. Coffey has his moving picture show in full swing again.

Winnipegosis

The second production of the Winnipegosis Dramatic Society which took place on the 7th inst., was a very creditable one. The play chosen, “The Arrival of Kitty,” is a 3-act farce of good construction, smart action and bright dialogue, and amused the house greatly. The cast was well balanced, so well balanced that special mention of individual’s would be out of place, each one of the players, including the Pup, having earned his or her meed of praise. The production showed marks of greater experience on the part of the promoters, and improvement in this direction is not yet complete.
The gross receipts amounted to $121, the allocation of which, and plans for the future, will be discussed at an early meeting of the society.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – March 13, 1919

Flogging Advocated

The problem of dealing with the small boy who smokes is troubling many of the teachers, the members of the school board and even the members of the town council, which body, at its last meeting appointed Coun. Houston and Katz to cooperate with the trustees as to the best means of remedying this undesirable sate of affairs.

Flogging Advocated
A correspondent writes: “We hear a great deal about the small boy who goes to school smoking and having tobacco on his person and the regrets expressed that the trouble can’t be remedied. If these boys attended school in England they would soon be disciplined, and in no namby-pamby style either. They would simply be flogged, and if one application was not sufficient the second strapping would effect the cure. But, after all is the small boy to blame when he sees the bigger boys parading the streets smoking both pipe and cigarette? Perhaps now that we have a committee to investigate they will bring in a report which will offer suggestions concerning the big boy as well as the small boy as to the bad effects of tobacco on the developing youth.”

Memorial Committee Busy

Chairman W. Rintoul, of the memorial committee, states that progress is being made. No definite plans have been considered as yet. A suggestion that an up to date skating and curing rink be built as a “memorial” is meeting with much favor in some quarters. Some favor a “community building,” others a monument, and so forth.

Opening G.W.V. Club Rooms

The new club rooms of the Great War Veterans will be opened on Tuesday evening next, the 18th inst. There will be a short musical program at which Mayor Bowman will preside. Later there will be dancing and cards. Refreshments will be served. The McMurray orchestra will furnish the music. The public are invited to attend.

“Still” Operators Fined

For some time past there has been an increasing supply of what is known as “domestic’ manufactured liquor. The manufacture was exclusively in the hands of the foreign element. Almost any tin vessel from a teapot to a ten gallon can was improvised as a “still.” And despite the crudeness of the particles used to manufacture the “liquor” a fairly good brand is said, by those who sampled it, to have ben produced in some cases. But the promoters’ dreams of accumulating wealth in an easy manner, were destined to failure. Collector Ball was soon wise to the operation of the “stills” and with the assistance of the local police, rounded up three parties who were either operating or connected with the enterprises.
The parties were Mike Torharczuk, Fred Moranczuk and M. Silverman. Informations were laid under the Inland Revenue act, and they appeared before P.M. Hawkins on Monday and were found guilty. Torharczuk and Moranczuk were each $200 and costs, and Silverman $250 and costs.

War Bride to Arrive

The first war bride that is to come to Dauphin is expected to arrive about the first of next week. During the month of December Sergt. Harold Crowe was married to a young lady in London. The young couple sailed on the Grampian, which was due to arrive at Halifax on Wednesday.

Fork River

Pte. Eales and his war bride have arrived from overseas. They are visiting at the home of H. Pearson.
The manager of the Northern Lumber Co. was a recent visitor to our town. The company may open a lumber yard here.
Mr. Osborne, municipal auditor, is auditing the books of the municipality. When he is through we shall expect the council to have the report printed. This is the only way the ratepayers have of knowing how their money is being spent and the law directs that the report be published.
Mr. Martin, homestead inspector, was here last week in connection with the applications of returned soldiers for land.
The stork visited the home of H. Little last week and left a wee girlie.
Wm. King is visiting Dauphin and Winnipeg this week.
Jack Richardson has purchased a registered Holstein bull, having sold his old sire to Thos. Toye, of Bicton Heath.
The committee which is looking after the interests of the returned soldiers has been organized and is now composed as follows: Owen Pruder, S.L. Gower, A. Hunt, J. Shuchett, J.D. Robertson, Thos. Briggs, F. Cooper, and W. King, sec.-treasurer.

Ethelbert

At a well attended meeting of the Ukrainian farmers held at Ethelbert on March 1st, the following resolution were unanimously passed. Over $100 was collected at the gathering which will be devoted to assisting the returned men.

RESOLUTION NO. 1
1. Having experienced the hardship of the newcomer, we therefore wish to help the returned men to settle with their families on the land. We are ready to volunteer at any time to graciously help any returned soldier settling in our district on the land by offering at least one day’s work on his farm in plowing or doing any required improvements, and will also arrange to have his family and luggage brought from the station to his respective land.
2. We also wish to assure such newcomers that friendly and neighborly assistance will always be at their disposal and that such returned men shall not suffer an want or hardship of a beginner. Carried.

RESOLUTION NO. 2
That we, as one of the Dominion Communities of Canada, do express our belief and faith in the principle of the League of Nations which has recently come into being at the Peace Conference at Paris.
That while believing in the self interim nation of nationalities, we cordially support the idea of human brotherhood and the new international order expressed in its terms.
That we look to the League as the ultimate solvent of the barriers which have hitherto divided mankind and plunged them in recurring strife.
That we also believe the protection of customs tariff the most potent and evil of all the barriers against the unity of mankind must be broken down to insure the permanence of political peace and the continued effectiveness of the League.
That we hold the Farmers’ platform as adopted by the Grain Growers’ conventions recently held in the Provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, to be a welcome step in the direction of that universal free trade which must be chief buttress of a stable international order.
And also that we cordially support the other reforms contained in the same platform.

RESOLUTION NO. 3
That we wish that a committee be appointed whose duty it will be to help the returned men coming into our midst. Carried.