Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 7 – 1912

1912 Nov 7 – Fork River

George King, of Dauphin, was here renewing old acquaintances between trains.
Miss Grant of Pine View was visiting her friends at Valley River during the weeks end.
Thos. Ramsay, P.M. of Sifton, was here on business with D. Kennedy.
Walter Clark has returned staying for a short time at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. Clark.
Rev. H.H. Scrase, who has been visiting his brother at Swan River and attending the mission at Dauphin, returned on Saturday’s train.
S. Briggs, who was here renewing acquaintances for a short time, has returned to Dauphin.
Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy and family have returned after visiting friends at Ochre River and Dauphin.
Miss Olive Clark and miss Comber have returned from a visit to Winnipegosis.
Hallowe’en has passed, and to judge from the looks of the town next morning, those who too part in the the tricks, should be pleased with themselves if they call it fun. Even the church was made to pay toll, which is going the limit.
The elevator gang has left. The elevator is now open for business with Jack Clemens in charge.
What’s the matter with the Bay Centre correspondent of the Press. We must have touched him on a sore spot by the remarks he makes of the Fork River scribe. We would advise him to give up his Hooligan tactics of sandbagging people and to roost with the owls till it freezes up.
One of our enterprising citizens has surrounded his lot on Main Street with an ornamental fence.

1912 Nov 7 – The Fork River Settlement

Pretty much all the history of the Dauphin district dates from the advent of the C.N.R. The actual settlement of the northern part of the country, which includes Fork River and Winnipegosis, commenced in 1897, when the railway entered. It is true there were parties who squatted here and there, but the first settlement amounted to nothing when estimated in figures. It was not until three or four years later that the municipality of Mossey River, which comprises the territory described, was organized. Your correspondent spent a few house at Fork River the other day, and what is more important, spent them pleasantly. It is some fourteen years since the writer first visited the new thriving village of Fork River, and some of those he formed an acquaintance with then, were there to greet him last week. The village of Fork River is located on the Fork and Mossey Rivers, and within a mile or two of its centre, a considerable number of people reside. The land along the Mossey and Fork Rivers is as good as there is to be found anywhere on the American continent, which is saying much. It was but natural then that those who came in first selected the best farms, those along the rivers. The country about was at one time covered with a growth of timber, which included tamarack, spruce and poplar. The latter kind was the most frequently met with. Much of it, of course, has since disappeared before the axe of the lumberman and the wood chopper. Another destructive elements has been fire. In the early days wood had little value and no effort was made to preserve timber. Much timber was needlessly destroyed which would be of considerable value today. But most of us are like the German, if our foresight was as good as our hindsight, we would soon get rich. There is, however, much consolation in the fact that good land will soon produce enough grain to find money to purchase fuel. Like other new districts the Fork River settlement has been up against manta drawbacks, notably wet seasons and poor roads. But somebody remarks, are these not the condition which develop strong men? Yes, truly, but, at times, even the heart of the pioneer sinks. Take the present year as an example. Conditions were such as to try the metal most of us are made of. Even more, the loss of crop is bad enough, but add to this financial obligations incurred and can’t be met, and the burden seems too heavy to bear.
But enough of lamenting. Let us turn to the people themselves. We don’t know where one will find a finer band of pioneers than at Fork River. There is Tom Glendenning, who was there many a day before the railroad. A splendid specimen of the pioneer; good-hearted and a true friend.
Tom Briggs, another who was in the settlement before, we were going say, the war, but we mean before the railroad. The Briggs Bros., Dave and Tom, went though the worst of it, and still wear pleasant faces. Incidentally, it manta be mentioned that Dave is no longer following, like Cincinnatus, the low.
There’s Sam Bailey, who, while not in before the iron horse, has been there long enough to establish his sterling qualities. He’s a good fellow and one can’t meet too often.
Wm. King, pioneer farmer and stock breeder. Has faced difficulties, met them and overcame them. Besides farming on an extensive scale he is bending his energies to improve his own and other people’s stock. Truly a valuable man in any community.
D.F. Wilson – there’s no mistaking him; besides quality he’s got size, both important factors in a new country. He has farmed, is a breeder of stock and fills the important office of municipal clerk. Has also done his share to develop the district.
Nat Little, pioneer merchant. Has been there a long time, and, what’s better, has succeeded. A good fellow with a weakness for the Shetland pony.
Coun. Geo. Nicholson, too, has had the usual ups and downs, seen the rough and the smooth and is still staying with the job.
Reeve Lacey, not such an old-timer as some of the others, but has, in the time he’s been there established his worth and taken a willing hand in the work of development. For several years he has been in the council and is now its head.
W.T. Snelgrove can look quite a ways back. He has seen more than a little of the life of the pioneer. As a hunter he has quite a record in the deer line and can relate some interesting experiences. Some day, when we have time at our disposal and more space we may relate some of W.R.’s exploits.
While speaking of the Snelgroves its opportune to mention morally and Alf. There some pioneers, too.
Alex. Cameron is not exactly one of the prime old-timers, but has been in the distinct quite a few years. There is just this difference between Alex. and most of the other settlers, he had the “dough” and they didn’t. It don’t take long to tell this, but oh, what a world of meaning there is in it. Money is highly important to us all, but when we haven’t got any and need it, words fail to impress its importance on us. May every man who has a healthy pocketbook know how to use its contents as judiciously and generously as Alexander Cameron.
There are many others worthy of a word in this article, but space forbids. They have done their part and performed it well. What more can be said? There’s the Rowe brothers, A. Hunt, Geo. Tilt, W. Northam, C. Clark, F. Cooper, and Frank and Vivan Hafenbrak.
Then, what about the women? Are they, too, not pioneers in the true sense. Yes, indeed; they are worthy of a special article and even then justice could not be done them. They have taken their part, a part which carried its own burden. A burden, no matter how heavy, always cheerfully carried when the interest of their families and their homes was at stake.
Municipal organization should come in for a chapter. Its work is important in our advancement. The reeves and councillors help materially to make history. If they have done their part well and faithfully their names should be writ in large letters.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 28 – 1911, 1914, 1916

1911 Sep 28 – Fork River

Miss Bertha Johnston of Dauphin, is on a visit to her sister, Mrs. Duncan Kennedy.
Glen Campbell’s committee rooms were set fire to at the wind-up of Cruise’s meeting by some political sore head. Not much damage was done.
Mr. Y.G. Littler was a visitor to Winnipeg on business.
Our Liberal friends had to import help from Saskatchewan and outside points, with boodle and slandering stories. It was quite unnecessary as they have proven to be past masters at the game themselves. However i was of no avail as we gave a majority of 20 for Campbell in sip of their unscrupulous tricks.
James Duff, of New Lowell, Ont. is visiting at the home of Mr. Noah Johnston of Mowat. He thinks we have a good district here.
The scribe in looking over the Press notices that our old friend Jackdaw, has been to Hell on a tour of instruction. He should now know something of what is in store for him and the cabinet ministers of the late Laurier Government and govern himself accordingly as the ways of the transgressors are hard.
The Liberal-Conservatives will hold a ball in the Orange Hall on Sept. 29th. Everybody welcome irrespective of political learning.
Hurrah for R.L. Borden, a tiger for Glen Campbell, although defeated will not be forgotten in the future.
Nicola Dinsercsim is under a quarantine for scarlet fever, having lost two of his family during the last week. He has our sympathy in his time of trouble.
Threshing is going on apace this week. No doubt the change of atmosphere is due to the reciprocity funeral on the 21st.
Mossey River Council meets at Winnipegosis on Tuesday, Oct. 3rd.
There are some people who prefer to keep dogs instead of fences and consequently their neighbours cattle suffer. One farmer who has had his cattle badly cut by dogs has found an ointment made of lard and strychnine a splendid thing for cattle’s sore heels. Put in plenty of strychnine and it has a most soothing effect on the cattle.

1911 Sep 28North Lake

Owing to an outbreak of scarlet fever, North Lake School has been closed. Mr. J. Spearing the teacher, was soon on the trail and located 10 cases. Dr. Medd of Winnipegosis, health officer for this municipality, quickly responded to the call for assistance. After a strict investigation he put five houses under quarantine much to the annoyance of the inhabitants, but joy to the surrounding district. He said something about the roads here but we’d rather not put it in less the Reeve and Councillor for this district gets hold of the paper.
The Doctor’s young; but he can certainly put the fear of the old gentleman into the Galicians in a case of this kind. We’re afraid he will have to be called again for an outbreak of nervous disorder.
Threshing has started in places around here. Mostly barley has been grown this year owning to the big prices it will bring?
Mrs. Jos. Spearing is visiting in the Oak Brae district this week.

1911 Sep 28 – Winnipegosis

D. McAuley made a shipment of cattle to Winnipeg on Tuesday.
Duck shooting this season has not been as good as in the past years. Sportsmen returning from the north end of the lake have fairly good bags, but not the large ones they use to be able to report.
Rev. Thorirason of Oak Point, near Brandon, held confirmation services on Sunday.
The Mossey River Council meets here on Oct. 3rd.
The fishing schooners are already leaving for the north end of the lake, to prepare for the winter season which opens on November 20th.
Something sure did happen here on the 21st. How the oracle was worked no one yet has been able to clearly state, but one thing is certain that there will be an election protect and from the revelations then, “just how it happened” will be explained and hot to the satisfaction of either the Liberals or Mr. Cruise.
Frank Hechter was a visitor to Dauphin on Saturday.
Miss Johnson of the Dauphin Hospital staff, who has been recuperating at her home here, leaves Saturday to again take up her duties a the hospital.

1914 Sep 28 – Nine Miles of Dead in Trenches

LONDON, Sept. 23 – The Daily Mail’s correspondent reports that the German right has been turned between Peronne and St. Quentin. He says wounded have been arriving at the unnamed place. They report that there are nine miles of dead in trenches between those town towns.

1914 Sep 28 – Ethelbert

Considerable wood is being shipped out.
Messrs. Geo. Marantz and H. Brachman, were at Dauphin in the early part of the week attending the Jewish New Year services.
Threshing will be pretty well wound up in this district by the end of the week.
Efforts will be put forth by most of the farmers to have as large an area of land as possible unfair crop next year in view of the high prices promised for grain.
K.F. Slipetz was a Dauphin visitor on Monday.

1914 Sep 28 – Fork River

Mrs. D. Kennedy returned on Monday from a visit to Dauphin.
Wm. Howitson has returned and is open for business again at the A.T. Co. store. He is of the opinion that Fork River is the right place.
In the gloaming Mr. Archie McDonald left for a few days trip and will take in Winnipeg. Archie needs a rest after such a strenuous summer’s work on the farm.
Jack Angus, of Winnipegosis, is taking a vacation for a week at Fork River. He says there are times that Toye’s dredges or schooners are out of the question.
Miss Grace Little has returned from a months visit with friends at Winnipeg and Brandon.
Mr. Thomas and family have arrived with a carload of furniture from Saskatchewan. He has charge of the Northern elevator and intends making this his home for some time.
F.C. Green, from England, has arrived to take charge of this mission for a time. He will hold service in All Saints’ Anglican Church, Sunday afternoon, Sept. 27th, at 2 o’clock.
In this time of war would it not look very much more loyal of Mossey River School district to have the good old flag flying say at least once a month irrespective of the reading of the School Act.

1916 Sep 28 – The Week’s Casualty List

The Dauphin boys are now in the midst of the active fighting along the Somme and the causality list grows daily.
Fred. I Pike, died from wounds.
Lorne Shand, arm shattered and eye injured.
Chas. Batty, wounded in chest and shoulder.
Fred. Grant, wounded.
Geo. Gray, gunshot wound

1916 Sep 28 – Dauphin Nurses Wanted For War Front

Miss Jackson and Miss Wilson, recent graduates of the Dauphin Hospital nursing staff, and miss Myers, have received notification that their services were accepted for overseas duty. Miss Myers will be connected with Military District No. 10 and leave Oct. 3rd. Miss Jakeman and Miss Wilson will be with the Queen Alexander Technical nursing staff and leave Oct. 7.

1916 Sep 28 – Fork River

All will regret to learn that Lieut. T.A. Worsey was killed in action on Sept. 7th. He was lay reader and in charge of Fork River mission in the summer of 1914. On his return to St. John’s College in the fall to take up his studies he enlisted in the Grenadiers as a Private and worked his way up till he got his commission of Lieutenant. He was highly esteemed by everyone for his sterling qualities.
Jas. Playford, of Dauphin, was a visitor here for a few days renewing acquaintances.
John Watson, of Dauphin, was among the recent visitors here.
S.B. Levins has sold his bunch of horses to Ben. Hechter, of Winnipegosis.
F.F. Hafenbrak was unfortunate in loosing the best team he had with pink eye. Horses are horses at this time of the year.
Wm. King has received a pair of registered Berks for breeding. Once our farmers commence to specialize in stock there will be a surer basis of the farming industry. Grain growing exclusively is too doubtful a source of income.
Steve Brazdon got his hand caught in a thrashing machine and had it badly crushed. Dr. Medd, of Winnipegosis, dressed the wound.

1916 Sep 28 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Hall Burrell’s boat was blown ashore near Hunter’s Island during the big blow on Friday last. He took to the small boat and pulled in for help. He got her safely off the rocks without much damage and brought her into port on Monday.
The Armstrong Trading Co. here are doing a lot of business these days. Fishing is good and trade is correspondingly good. Everybody is the store is busy.
Capt. W.B. Sifton was here last week. He made a trip up the lake and on his return took a party to Salt Point for shooting.
Dr. Medd made a trip to Dauphin on Saturday afternoon in his auto, returning on Sunday.
We hear that Sunday school is to commence at 2 o’clock during the [1 line missing] are again ??? ??? Methodist Church. Sunday, the 24th was the first day of the change.
Duck Hunter says there is very little sport this season. They sigh for the palmy days when the railroad first touched the lake at this point. Then it was usual thing to bring home from fifteen to twenty five ducks, now the man who gets seven is happy.
The Red Cross Society here have announced that they will meet on the first Monday of every month for the purpose of transacting business. This is outside of committee meetings, etc.
The Home Economics Society are planning heir program for the winter. Addresses are being arranged suitable to the season for each monthly meeting.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 8 – 1912

1912 Aug 8 – Thos. Spence Drowned

Thos. Spence, a half-breed, fell out of a boat he was crossing the Mossey River in at Winnipegosis a few days ago and was drowned. His body was recovered shortly after the accident.
Spence was formerly a resident of Dauphin and was about 35 years of age. He leaves a wife and several children.

1912 Aug 8 – Ethelbert

James Miles and family have gone to Stenan, Sask., to live. He is going into business there.
Kenneth McLean is seriously ill at the home of his brother, L.M. McLean. He is very sick and fears are entertained for his recovery. He expressed a wish to see his beloved niece, Cassie, who is at Arran and she came done on Sunday evening.
The new bridge entering the town is finished, and is a fair specimen of local work.
Police Magistrate R. Skaife had several cases before him on Saturday afternoon. Vonella Kuzzett, for threatening his brother-in-law, John Malyszyk, was bound over to keep the peace and he of good behaviour for twelve months. Also Vonella Kuzsyk was fined ten dollars and costs for shooting prairie chickens out of season, or in defaulting month. Nikola Kulchyski was also fined ten dollars and costs for an unprovoked assault on Audrian Skelkuoski, of Fork River, or in default one month.

1912 Aug 8 – Fork River

Professor J. Spearing, of Valley River, spent some time here renewing old acquaintances.
Mr. Stevenson, government engineer, inspected the work done by the dredge and we have been informed that A. Munro has been appointed dredge master for the present and his work so far is satisfactory.
Miss Joyce Sergant returned home after spending a week’s stay with Mrs. W. Coultas in Fork River.
Gorden Weaver has accepted a position of master mechanic at the Armstrong Trading Co. store.
Miss Grant arrived and will wield the rod of correction at the Pine View School for the coming term.
Miss Cameron who was been spending her holidays at her uncle’s, A. Cameron, of Mowat, returned to Neepawa.
We were pleased to see the Rev. H.H. Scrase walking around town with W. King, warden, the other day and hope that he will be able to take up his work this fall.
Mr. Moxam and family, of Winnipeg, are having a week’s vacation with Noah Johnston, at Mowat Centre.
H. Armstrong has branched out in the contracting and building line and is building an addition to Mr. Nowsade’s residence.
The ratepayers are of the opine that it is time that an itemized statement of accounts of all ward appropriations and general expenditures, as demanded by the status, be got out in pamphlet form.
Mr. Tubath and family are enjoying their vacation at S. Reid’s on the Mossey River.
Mrs. Chapman and daughter are visiting with W. Coultas.
A very pleasant evening was spent in Orange Hall on Friday. Dancing was indulged till daylight.
The Misses Tindall, of Rathwell, are having a pleasant time at their uncle’s, Me. T.N. Briggs, on the Mossey.
The stores are doing a rushing business these days in raspberries and blueberries.
The postponed picnic at Lake Dauphin was held on the 30th. It was a fine day. Although there was not as large a turnout as usual a very pleasant time was spent in sports and boating.

1912 Aug 8 – Mowat Picnic

Those who chanced their luck at the Mowat picnic, which took place at Dauphin Lake on Mr. T. Briggs’ land, by his kind permission on Tuesday, July 30th were not sorry they put in an appearance. The rain, which came the previous Tuesday no doubt dampened the spirits of some, otherwise we should have had a much larger turnout; despite the fact that one or two of our Fork River worthies would have liked it to be a failure. Dame nature smiled upon us and we had a roaring good time. Nat Little’s oranges and candies were in good demand. Fortunately everyone’s ice cream freezers are not so easily broken and Mrs. C. Clark’s came in fine and handy. Even the lemons were made to “spin out,” no doubt much to the annoyance of some individuals. Hard lines, some of the folks had to leave early and therefor missed most of the sport. The Fairville boys enjoyed themselves immensely to say nothing of the ladies. We tender our hearty thanks to them for their cooperation and sympathy. They came off well in the sports, except in the football match. Keep smiling, better luck in this line next time. Our best thanks are extended to all who tried to make it a success, especially to the Lacey family, Briggs family and Sandy and Mrs. Cameron. Need I add some of the boys did not forget to look sheep’s eyes at the girls. It’s a habit handed down.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 10 – 1913

1913 Jul 10 – Greek Church Burned

The Greek Catholic Church at Fishing River, near Fork River, was struck by lightning during an electric storm sat week and was burned to the ground. There was no insurance on the building.

1913 Jul 10 – Ethelbert

K.F. Slipetz, sec.-treasurer is visiting Winnipeg this week and taking in the exhibition.
Fine rains of late and crops looking good.
Road work is progressing throughout the municipality. We all want good roads.
Wild strawberries are coming in small quantities. The crop will be a light one this season, although the late rains have improved the berries some.
Ethelbert is preparing for a big celebration on the 18th inst. There will be races and other sports and we invite all our neighbours to come and have a good time.

1913 Jul 10 – Fork River

R. Bell is taking a vacation with his friends at Dauphin.
Miss Weatherhead, teacher of Mossey River School is spending her holidays at her home in Dauphin.
Mr. Noble, Methodist stunt who has had charge of the circuit during the last 12 months, left to take up his summer’s work at Mafeking mission.
Miss C. Grant, teacher of Pine View School, is spending her holidays at Foxwarren.
Mr. Comber was a visitor to the Lake Town on business last week.
Miss. M. Nixon is spending her summer holidays with her sister, Mrs. A. Rowe.
Mrs. D. McLean and Mrs. A.J. Snelgrove are taking a month’s holiday’s visiting friends at Regina.
Mrs. J. Rice, of North Lake district, was in town on important business lately.
James Johnston and family, who have been spending the winter at the government hatchery on Snake Island, have returned to the farm for a time.
July 1st was warm and bright, just the day for a holiday and quite a number took advantage of it. Where were all those teams loaded with old-timers and their wives going? Why, to help Mrs. Wm. Northam to celebrate her 62nd birthday to be sure. On arriving at her beautiful place on the banks of the Fork River our hostess conducted us to a pretty grove beside the house, where tables were laid for dinner. The tables were decorated with flowers and were well loaded with turkey, chicken and other good things to temp the inner man. Dinner over, the afternoon was spent in talking over old times and other pleasant themes. Mrs. Northam was the recipient of many ??? ??? ??? ??? the good wishes of all conveyed to her. After supper all left for home having had a very pleasant time. We trust this will only be one of such pleasant gatherings.
A severe electric storm passed over this district last week. The Greek Catholic Church at Fishing Rive was destroyed by lightning and the brick chimney on the Armstrong Trading Co.’s store here was badly shaken up and it will have to be rebuilt. The water is higher than it has been for years.
James Campbell and W. Foley, of Winnipegosis, are starting to summer fallow the Snelgrove farm lately purby F.P. Grenon, of the A.T. Co.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 27 – 1913

1913 Mar 27 – Military Men For Winnipeg

Dr. Walker, Percy Willson, and Ed. Manby, officers, and A.C. Wade, Geo. Astley, T. Coghlan and D.C. Boire, non-commissioned officers, left this morning for Winnipeg, where they will take a two weeks’ course at the military school. The men belong to the 32nd Manitoba Light Horse with headquarters at Dauphin.

1913 Mar 27 – Fork River

B. Venables shipped by express a very fine yearling Holstein bull to a farmer in Saskatchewan.
Miss Grant, of Pine View School and Miss Weatherhead left for their homes where they intend spending the Easter holidays.
“Say, Mike, did you hear the opposition bluffed Borden about that memorandum?”
“No, Pat.”
“Well, one fine morning Borden laid it on the table and the opposition took a chill and dear Wilfy took a cold after and did not go down to the house for several days. Bill Pugsley undertook to run the opposition and the government too, but the Hon. Bob sat on him. Micky Clark, of Red Deer, got fresh and the speaker threatened to name him. Jack Turriff, says, name and be damned, and there was the divel to pay, just like old Dounybroos. Next day Bill Pugsley and some more kinder smoothed it over and in the meantime Bob, having nothing to do, took a Cruise home for Easter holidays, where we hope he’ll have a good time.”
“Well, Pat, if Glen had been there to throw a little Cree into them the Naval bill would have been passed long ago. There’s nothing like education.”
Edwin King is spending Easter at his home and renewing acquaintances.
Easter service was held in All Saints’ Church in the evening last Sunday and Rev. Scrase preached a most appropriate sermon, the text being, “He is risen.” The alter was tastefully decorated with beautiful white Easter lilies supplied by Mr. A.C. Bradley, of Winnipegosis.
The farmers are rushing the grain into the elevator as it is to close next week.
Harcourt Benner, one of Dauphin’s prominent real estate agents, is renewing old acquaintances here.
We now have a veterinary surgeon which is a long felt want in this burgh and being proficient in wood work, artificial limbs can be supplied on shortest notice.
Ed Morris and family, of Winnipegosis, spent the weekend with Mrs. Wm. King.
D. Kennedy received a nice bunch of barred Plymouth Rock fowl from C.F. Brewer of Ashville, and F. Hafenbrak received a fine pair of black Minorcas from an Eastern breeder.
Quite a number from here took in the St. Patrick’s ball, given by Mr. McInnes, of the Winnipegosis hotel. They report a swell time.
Miss Gertrude Cooper and Miss Clark, of Dauphin, are spending their Easter holidays with their friends.
The Fork River correspondent in the Press of the 20 inquires for his friends Joe Fahey and Bishop Langevin. They are well. Can our friend tell us if there is any profit keeping a pig after paying Cox’s fee of one hundred and forty dollars. They keeping heifers, friend, and don’t get too fresh.
Miss Pearl Wilson and Miss Woods returned from Sifton, where they have been visiting friends.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 2 – 1913

1913 Jan 2 – Fred Nex Killed

Fred. Nex, formerly publisher of the Dauphin News, and who afterwards kept a store at Sifton, was killed near Whitemouth, Man., not long since. He and two other parties were riding on the C.P.R. on a gasoline motor, when it collided with a train. All three were killed. Deceased of recent years held the position of secretary-treasurer for the Municipality of Whitemouth. He leaves a widow and several small children.

1913 Jan 2 – Fork River

John Chipla and family returned from Canora, Sask., for the holidays.
Bert Williams left for Moose Jaw to see his brother, who resides there.
Miss Olive and Alice Clark are visiting friends at Laird, Sask., during the holidays.
Miss Muriel Alterton, who taught the Mossey River School the last three years, has left for Winnipeg.
Miss Grant, teacher of Pine View School, has gone home for the holidays.
A. Hunt has gone to Ottawa to spend the holidays with his parents.
There was quite a family re-union at the homestead of D.F. Wilson last week. Paul Wood and family, of Sifton; Fleming Wilson and family of Dauphin and others. It was cheering to see so many familiar faces at Christmas Tide.
Miss Bertha Johnston, of Dauphin, Mrs. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, were the guests of D. Kennedy during the holiday.
Peter Ellis, of Kamsack, is home on a two weeks’ vacation.
Abe Shinks returned from his homestead in Sask., and intends to remain the rest of the winter at Fork River.
The Christmas tree and concert in the hall on Christmas Eve, under the auspices of All Saints’ W.A. and S.S. was a success. It being a nice evening there was a large turnout. Wm. King, warden, was chairman. A good programme of songs, recitations, and drills by the children, after which Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus arrived and distributed the gifts among the children. We congratulate Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus on the able manner they filled the position. We take this opportunity of thanking all those who took part in the concert and tree. It is encouraging to see everyone turn out on Christmas Eve to give the little folks a good time.
We wish all a Happy New Year.
Rev. H.H. Scrase held service on Christmas morning at Winnipegosis, and at All Saints, Fork River, in the evening.
In the Press we notice our Mowat friend twitting Mr. Borden and his followers for opposing the Transcontinental Railway when they were in opposition. Do you remember Laurier’s election cry in 1904? A national Transcontinental Railway for thirteen million dollars. What do we now find? The National Transcontinental Railway is going to cost us, including interest and charges, payable by the people, nearly eighty million and a cash outlay of close on three hundred million by the time we are through with it. Is it any wonder it was opposed at the time considering the unbusinesslike method adopted by the Laurier government. Our M.C. objects to Borden’s scheme of giving thirty-five millions to England for Dreadnaughts to be manned by Englishmen instead of Canadians. We consider Borden’s scheme the only possible one under the circumstances and far superior to the one Laurier has being playing with for years. What did his amount to? He, Laurier, wanted a strictly Canadian fleet, part on the Atlantic coast, the other half on the Pacific coast. That’s just what he handed down to Borden when he went out of power. The Niobe in the east and the Rainbow in the west. The boats are so powerful you have to take a magnifying glass to see them on a fine day. As for manning our warships with Canadians our friend is talking through his hat. The Marine Department at Ottawa could not find recruits enough in Canada to run those two little steamboats, the Niobe and the Rainbow. They had to be tied up for want of men. Finally they had to import them. Take a rest friend, you must be tired of jumping the fence so often.

1913 Jan 2 – Winnipegosis

The W.A. entertainment last Friday evening was a success and though the proceeds, were small, more was not anticipated. The orchestra selections render by the Messrs. McArthur, Mrs. A. McArthur, and Mr. Shears were most appropriate, and the representation of Mr. and Mrs. Candle was amusing, while the comedy “Box the Cox” demonstrated the fact that theatrical talent is not lacking amongst us.
If a young “Lochinvar” appears in our midst let no one say they were fully warned.
Mr. Malley, lately from college, addressed the Christian Endeavor League last week.
Harry Parker had the misfortune to sprain his ankle while coming down the lake freighting fish. Hope he will soon be about again.
J.P. Grenon’s youngest son, also sustained an injury from an accident, the nature of which has not been learned.
Mrs. Johnston, of Minitonas, is visiting her friends, the Stuarts. A little one made the festive season.
We are pleased to hear Mrs. Graff has recovered from her illness under Mrs. Johnstone’s efficient nursing.
A.C. Bardley’s late indisposition was the result of cold.
The card circle last Wednesday evening was a pleasing character. Mrs. Burrell now possesses a good time-keeper and we trust Mrs. Crannage may find her work basket useful considering her aptitude with the meddle which was effectively displayed in the doll dressed for the W.A. competition, and won by Miss Hansford. See “Whilimina”.
Mr. Seaforth made a business trip to Dauphin on Saturday.
Miss Browne also made a trip to meet a friend from Winnipeg.
The Presbyterian S.S. entertainment on the 27th (the most anticipated event of the season), was very successful owing to Santa Claus’ generosity, whom the children admirably presented in a Cantata. It was regretted that Mr. Malley was unable to perform the duties of chairman, but Mr. Noble very kindly filled the place.
The Anglican Christmas service was harmonious. Rev. H.H. Scrase delivered a fine sermon.
This weather might inspire a spring song, considering the gulls are circling up the lake, but undoubtedly the storm that follows such illusive calm is liable to occur any time.
We wonder what the presence of pure white partridges may prognosticate. It is easy to obtain them, and they should look very pretty mounted.
The Armstrong Trading Co. lost a valuable team in the lake last week, and a horse dropped dead the week before. Fortunately they are not likely to feel the loss.
Mr. Ruthledge, formerly of Winnipegosis, spent Christmas in town.
The Misses Bradley spent Christmas here with their parents, and Mr. and Mrs. Saunders enjoyed the company of their sons with a friend from Winnipeg. A dance was given by the latter in Victoria Hall on Thursday evening.
Mr. and Mrs. Johnston, of the Lake View hotel, returned from Winnipeg on Christmas Eve, where they spent a week on business and visiting.
Mrs. Bradley spent a delightful week-end in Dauphin, and attended the Anglican S.S. entertainment, of which he “Washing Day Cantata” was a particularly enjoyable feature. The trip from their home was suggestive of wedding bells resulting in poetic effusion.
Miss Johnston returned home for the Christmas holidays.

1913 Jan 2 – A REVERIE.

Ye children of the heavenly king,
Imagine that the angels sing,
Send peace on earth for men and driven
To doubt that women have earned a heaven.

As everyone of us should hold,
The truth that’s better far tan gold’
Let dissension meet a final doom,
And perversity by refused a room.

Then trust the Savour’s power to do
All that he said, which well he knew
Would be doubted by impatient men,
Though women believe faithfully till – when!

The world shall be forced to cry, “well done”!
In Him we live, the kingdom’s won!
To exercise faith within the soul
Makes humanity’s love perfectly whole.

1913 Jan 2 – Winnipegosis

James McNicholl passed quietly away on Friday afternoon last Dec. 27th, after a lingering illness, having been tended faithfully by his wife for whom he showed much affection. The funeral rites were performed by Father Derome on Monday morning. Deceased’s wife, two sons and two daughters were among the mourners.
Miss Clara Bradley is away on a visit to her aunt in Portage la Prairie. Miss Dolly having returned with her.
Miss Shannon has returned from Fork River where she spent the Christmas holidays visiting her parents.
Mr. Scott is leaving on Thursday for Mafeking on business for the Standard Lumber Co.
Mr. and Mrs. Shears are wished joy of their young daughter, born to them on the 28th inst., at the home of Mrs. Johnstone.

1913 Jan 2 – Gulls at Lake Winnipegosis

Numerous sea gulls have, of late, made their appearance at Lake Winnipegosis. It is not known that those birds have ever appeared here at so late a date in any year in the past.