Today in the Dauphin Herald – September 11, 1919

G.W.V.A. Notes

Members of the above association are requested to note that a general meeting is called for Sept. 11th at 8 p.m. All members are asked to make an effort to be present as business of importance will be placed before the comrades.
Arrangements have been made with Wallace Graham for a series of concerts to be put on at the town hall, under the auspices of this association.
The dates are as follows:
The Castle Square Entertainers, Sept. 19th.
The Victorian Serenaders, Oct. 14th.
The Canadian Juveniles, Nov. 3rd.
The Varsity Sixtette, Dec 5th.
The Dixie Jubilee Singers, Dec. 15th.
The Rob Wilson Co., Jan 1st.
All of the above are first ate shows and have been to Dauphin on several occasions and are well known to the majority of the residents here. A start is made on Sept. 19th with the Castle Square Entertainers; it is proposed to have a short dance after the show for which the Castle Square orchestra has been retained. The idea of having these entertainments is to further the possibility of having quarters owned by this association and the support of the public is looked for and counted on in the usual manner that it has always been given.
The dance held on the 8th inst., by the Ladies’ Auxiliary as a success and the ladies are to be congratulated on their venture, which, like the above concert, is to help along the main plan of this association.

Roie Waters Drowned

A sad event occurred last week when Roie Waters, a returned man, was drowned through the upsetting of his canoe on Sarah lake, 10 miles south of Durban. The young man left his home on Friday morning Aug. 28th, and noting was seen of him until his body was recovered by his brother and Constable Tacuik, of Dauphin, last Saturday. From all appearances it would seem that the canoe was overturned on the discharge of his gun and being hampered with heavy clothing he was unable to extricate himself from the dangerous condition.
Deceased was well and favorably known in the Swan River Valley, and also leaves many friends in the Dauphin and Ste. Rose districts to mourn him untimely end.

Fork River

Pte. W. Pruden, lately from overseas, is visiting his brother, O. Pruden.
The station here had a little fixing done last week in the way of a signal and a lamp. It looks as if we were to have an operator. None to soon to suit the public.
G. Scriven, lay reader, who has been in charge of the Anglican mission this summer, will preach his farewell sermon in All Saints church at three in the afternoon, Sunday, Sept. 14th.
The Returned Soldiers’ Committee will meet in W. King’s office at 8 o’clock Saturday evening, Sept. 13th. All members are requested to attend as there is business of importance to transact.
Two elevators are now in running order.
The rain at the end of the week held up threshing for a few days.
Fred King caught a large rat in a trap on his farm. This is the first rat seen in this part of the country.
Some small minded persons, for the want of better employment, on Saturday night last decorated one of the church doors with rotten eggs. Such happenings are a disgrace to a community and the culprit should be apprehended and dealt with. This is not the first occasion such rowdyism has happened.

Zalana

Mossey River Municipality, Sept. 6.
Harvesting grain is practically over around here. Possibly a few have not quite finished stacking yet. Some have already threshed, mostly from the stook; the stacks can wait until later if necessary. This has been a nice week for threshing. Pokotylo’s machine seems to be the only one working just around here. John is quite an enterprising fellow and is deservedly popular. The prevailing price for threshing here seems to be 8 cents a bushel for oats and 12 cents a bushel for wheat. Although the farmers around here had more land under cultivation this year than last the average yield is not so good. The rust did considerable damage, especially to the wheat. There seems to be a pretty good yield of vegetables this year, though in some instances not quite so good as last year.
The Fork River Agricultural fair, which was advertised for Aug. 15th, but postponed on account of heavy rain that day, is now advertised to come off on Friday, Sept. 26th, in conjunction with the Boys’ and Girls’ club fair. An interesting feature of the fair will be a baby show. Two prizes are offered—1st prized $10; 2nd prize $5. There ought to be a lot of entries here, I wonder if Frank and the wife will show the big boy who arrived last week. It is to be hoped the weather man will be in good humor and favor us this time.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – August 14, 1919

Fair Notes

Some of the ladies were quite disappointed that there was no baby show this year. The baby show was very popular in past years and it was undoubtedly an oversight that it was not held this year. Mr. John Gorby, who was had charge of this department in past years, is the champion of the ladies and the babies and it will not be his fault if the show is not held next year. The babies are out greatest national asset and their welfare is contributed to by information supplied by physicians and professional nurses at these exhibitions.
The directors worked hard for several weeks to complete the details of the fair and have the satisfaction of knowing their efforts were appreciated and the exhibition a success in every way.
Chas. Murray, the patient and tireless secretary, had a busy three days of it.
The stock parade, headed by the band of the 79th Cameron Highlanders, was a striking feature on Friday.
Over 5000 people passed through the turnstiles on Friday.
The War Saving and Theft Stamp advertising display was very much in evidence on the grounds. The entrance to the grounds, the main building, grand stand, ticket office and other places throughout the grounds were nicely decorated with different lines of posters. It was evident that Mr. Blackadar intended that the large crowds that gathered each day on the grounds should be thoroughly informed regarding this movement.

Successful Exhibition

The 28th annual fair of the Dauphin Agricultural society, held on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday of last week, was the most successful in its history. And this, too, in the face of the fact that the farmers were in the midst of the harvest. While it is true there was a falling off in most of the departments it is a noteworthy fact the exhibits generally were of a superior class. The livestock was the best ever shown here. Two notable herds were J.D. McGregor’s Aberdeens and John Graham’s shorthorns. In the Clydesdale, Percherons, Agricultural and light horses many fine animals were shown and nearly all the leading breeders of the district were represented.
The poultry section was by long odds the best in the history of the society. The exhibit was not only large but of the highest quality. Much credit is due the Poultry Association and its energetic secretary. Wm. Murray, for the success achieved.
The attractions were exceptionally good. The band of the 79th Cameron Highlanders from Winnipeg furnished the music on Friday and the splendid program was enjoyed by all.
Credit is due Mr. Wm. Rintoul for the manner in which the numerous young ladies executed the intricate dances. The little girls also did exceptionally well.
The Scotch dancing by the two little Simpson girls, to the music of the bagpipes played by their father, caught the fancy of the big crowd.
At 1.30 several hundred war veterans assembled in front of the grand stand and on behalf of the citizens Mayor Bowman extended them a hearty welcome. In his address he referred to the historic places in France where the Canadians made history and achieved undying fame. Robt. Cruise, M.P., also spoke, Major Williams, in the absence of Brig. Gen. Ketchen, replied on behalf of the men. Major Skinner added a few words in regard to a suitable memorial for those who had made the supreme sacrifice.

Fork River

E. Harris, formerly of Bracebridge, Ont., is visiting at the home of Fred Cooper.
Don’t forget to come to Fork River’s annual agricultural show, Friday, August 15th.
Rev. Harry P. Barrett, rector of St. Paul’s, Dauphin, will preach in All Saints’ Anglican church, Sunday afternoon, Aug. 24 h, at 3.
Mrs. J. Rice, teacher of North Lake school, has returned home from visiting at Cypress River and Neepawa and is feeling better after her trip.
The White Star Co.’s new elevator is nearly completed. Thus the commercial importance of this centre grows.
Owen Pruder is busy overhauling the Northern elevator so as to have it ready for the fall delivery of grain.

Sifton

The marriage of Miss Anna Farion, daughter of Fred Farion, merchant, of this place, to Mr. W. Belashta of Canora, was celebrated at St. Paul’s parish church, on Wednesday, the 6th inst., at 9 p.m. Bishop Budka, with the assisting priests, officiated. Some two or three hundred invited guests were present. The church had been very tastefully decorated with flowers, which blended very pleasingly with the handsome costumes of the bride and attendants. To the lively strains of a bridal chorus, sung in Little Russian, the bride and groom, showered with confetti, and guests repaired to the large Ruthenian hall, where en exceptionally well appointed supper was served. Covers for at least two hundred and fifty were laid and the tables were used for several relays of guests. The hall was very tastefully festooned and draped, with roses and asters as floral decorations. An orchestra, composed of Ruthenians, four brothers, from Winnipeg, played very pleasingly and tastefully. Bishop Budka, on behalf of the guess, toasted the bride and bridegroom, the latter responded very neatly both in Little Russian and English. Dancing was kept up until daylight. A. Kozak, one of the old national Cossack dances, given most artistically by Miss Belashka, of Winnipeg, and Mr. Dyk, of Dauphin, was much admired; also the tasteful fox-trotting of Mr. Assifat. A number of visitors from Winnipeg were present, amongst others, Mrs. Stefanyk, Mr. and Mrs. Badnac, Dr. Pasdrey, and Lieut. Kreman editor of the Canadian Ruthenian. Mr and Mrs. Belashta have left for Canora, their future home, where Mr. Belashta is in the legal profession.
During the evening Mr. —– spoke at some length about the conflict between the Poles and so-called Ukrainians, the West Galicians, stating that Premier Lloyd George had alone amongst the Allied powers at the peace conference, expressed himself in favor of an independent Ukraina, separate from the claims of the Polish aristocracy. He was followed by Mr. F. Taciuk, of Dauphin. A collection, totaling one hundred and twenty dollars, was taken up to be forwarded to Europe for use against the Poles.

Winnipegosis

Geo. G. Spence, who was formerly manager for the Hudson’s Bay Company here, has bought T.H. Whale’s general store.
There is an average crop in this district in spite of the dry season. The grain is nearly all cut and threshing will soon commence.
All the fishermen in town are bustling getting in supplies and preparing for the fall fishing. Two of the companies large boats leave here within the next few days for points at the north end of the lake.
A party of forty business men came up from Dauphin Sunday and took a trip fifty miles up the lake, upon the steamer “Armenon.” The trip was an enjoyable one and everyone was delighted with it. A net was set on the voyage out and was taken in on the return voyage. Nineteen fish were caught and Mr. Dan Hamilton auctioneered them off and got as much as $2.00 for a “sucker.” A Dominion and a Provincial M.P. were among the party.
The English Church is holding a regular Sunday service at Winnipegosis.
The town council is planning for a new municipal hall and extensive sidewalks.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – July 31, 1919

Charged with Rape

Robt. Lambert, aged 17, of Minitonas, appeared before P.M. Hawkins on the 25th inst., charged with rape. The girl is 16 years of age. He was remanded for trial.

Notes of the Fair

It is now only a week until the Dauphin fair will be in full swing. A large number of entries have already been made in vegetable and other hall exhibits. The early harvest is not interfering to any great extent with the entries in other classes so much as was at one time feared. They are assured of some good entries in cattle and horses as entries have already been received from J.D. McGregor, Brandon; John Graham, Carberry; C. Moffatt and J.I. Turner, Carroll. J.C. Crowe, Gilbert Plains, and W.H. Devine are expected with exhibits of Pereherons.
The unfortunate accident to Lieut. Kerr’s aeroplane at Portage la Prairie will prevent his appearance, but Lieut. Casewell, of Brandon, will fly in his stead. The public are thus assured of a threat in aeronautice.
The 4rd Cameron Highlanders band, of Winnipeg, will be in attendance.
It is understood that Thursday and Friday afternoons will be declared civic holidays in town.
See the Farmerette girls. They are the latest sensation.
It is almost certain Col. Barker, V.C., will be among the visitors.
Cheap rates are offered on the railway. A fare and one-third for return tickets.
All the leading baseball teams of the district are entered in the tournament. $450 are offered in prizes.
The entries for the horses races are large, and the speeding contest will be the [missing] in Dauphin.
Lieut. Casewell and Lieut. Bennett will make flights in their airplane and do the latest stunts.
Prospects for the Poultry Department are very bright. Entries are coming in from many outside points.
All entries for the Poultry section, including eggs, must be in by Aug. 2nd, and other sections by Aug 5th.
Racing Program
Thursday, Aug. 7th
2.30 pace, 2.25 trot, purse $500
Half-mile running race, purse $200
Friday, Aug. 8th
2.12 pace, 2.07 trot, purse $700
5-8ths mile running race, purse $200
2.20 trot, purse $700

In Memoriam

Meston—In loving memory of Pte. Walter Russell Meston, 1st Depot Batt., who died at Winnipeg, July 22nd, 1918, aged 23 years.
We miss thee from thy place, dear;
We miss thee from our home;
But thou art called to better things,
The whyfor should we mourn.
Inserted by his parents, sisters and brothers.

Sent Up for Trial for Incest

Henry Bracher, a farmer from the Minitonas district, was before the police magistrate on the charge of incest. The evidence warranted his being remanded for trial.

Fork River

Wm. Northam has moved out of town on to his farm a mile south where he has had a considerable amount of land broken this summer.
Fred Cooper, A. Hunt and Sam Reed, who have had a two weeks’ vacation in the west, returned home this week satisfied that there are worse places to farm than Fork River.
George Shannon has purchased a Happy Farmer tractor.
The annual meeting of the Mossey River School district was held on the 22nd. W. King, sen., was elected trustee for the coming term, Mrs. A. Rowe retiring.
Geo. Tilt has sold his farm to Mr. Steffesen.
Fork River residents are always well represented at the Dauphin fair and the attendance will be increased this year. When you have a good car and good roads the trip is only a jaunt.
Flying machine stunts will attract us all. Looping the loop and all the rest is new to the people of the north.

Winnipegosis

The municipality of Mossey River has a powerful new grader, which is at work building the road from Fork River to Winnipegosis.
Geo. Klyne, the teacher engaged by the School District of Don, who died suddenly last week, was buried on the 26th inst. F.B. Lacey the government representative, attended the funeral. The deceased came from North Dakota.
The ladies’ baseball team from Dauphin played the Winnipegosis team on Friday last. The Dauphin team won out.
The J.J. Crowe Lumber Co., Ltd., has bought out A.C. Bradley and is erecting a large lumber yard here.
Mr. Shaunnessey, general manager of the Booth fisheries, was a visitor last week and inspected the company’s property here.
Quite a number of our citizens, will leave on Thursday next to attend the Dauphin fair.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – April 17, 1919

The Coming Dauphin Fair

The directors of the Agricultural society take this opportunity of making an announcement regarding the fair to be held on August 6th, 7th and 8th. The directors hope in time to develop a fair which will be representative of Northern Manitoba and second only to Brandon. In an endeavor to carry out this project they hope to get the support of the citizens of Dauphin and the surrounding district.
Representatives from the board attended the Brandon Winter Fair and interviewed some of the big breeders in the south, several of whom, including J.D. McGregor, Brandon; John Graham, Carberry; J. Hume, Souris; J. Turner, Carroll. The Shorthorn Breeders association and others intimated their intention of bringing up exhibits.
Fully $3000 will be set aside for attractions, including a full programme of horse races, a baseball tournament and a platform of attractions. The grounds and buildings will be lighted and evening performances given. The directors fell that thy will be in a position to put on a fair which will be a credit to the district and they solicit the cordial support of rural and town citizens.

Mounted Police for Dauphin

Information from Ottawa is to the effect that six mounted policeman are to be located at Dauphin. These will comprise a sergeant and five men and they will cover the territory within the hounds of the Dauphin Judicial District, which extend from McCreary to the Pas on the north and to the Saskatchewan boundary on the west.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 9 – 1913

1913 Jan 9 – Engineer Wm. Bowman Killed

Engineer Wm. Bowman, who was running for Engineer Wm. Graham on No. 4 train was killed in the Winnipeg yard on Saturday afternoon last. The train reached Winnipeg safely from Dauphin and Mr. Bowman was running to the roundhouse light when another engine ran into the tender, smashing it and driving the tender into the cab with such force that the boiler was injured in such a way that the steam escaped and scalded Bowman so badly that he expired on the spot.
Jack Cobb, the fireman, escaped through the cab window without suffering any injury.
Engineer Bowman was well-known in Dauphin and sympathy is felt for the family in their great sorrow.

1913 Jan 9 – Frozen to Death

Tuesday was Christmas according to the Galician custom and there was the usual festivities on that day and the following two days. John Kuruk, a Galician about 45 years of age, imbibed freely on Tuesday and Wednesday and on the later day he lay down at the C.N.R. tool house near the bridge and (Thursday) morning was found there frozen to death.
Deceased came from Austria about three years ago and has been working on the railway as a section man. He leaves a wife and two grown-up sons.

1913 Jan 9 – Suffered Bad Cut

Mrs. E.H. Walker was carrying a crock in her hands on Tuesday at the farm three miles south of the town when she slipped and fell. The crock broke and one of the pieces cut a bad gash on her left wrist. An artery was severed and she bled freely for quite a time. A phone message hurriedly brought Dr. Culbertson to the scene when the wound was dressed and Mrs. Walker brought to the hospital. It is expected she will be out in the course of a day or two.

1913 Jan 9 – Fork River

Mr. French, of Grandview, is spending a few days with Mr. and Mrs. J. Clemens.
W. Williams has taken his outfit out to his limits east of Lake Dauphin.
Frank Bailey left for Winnipeg after spending his New Year’s holidays with his parents on the Mossey.
Miss M. Nixon left for Findlay, having accepted the position of teacher in that district.
Miss Bessie and Miss Pearl Wilson left on a visit to friends at Sifton.
Professor S. Biggs returned to Dauphin after spending Xmas week among friends.
M. Sturdy, assistant manager of the A.T.Co. store, left on a short vacation. We wish him a good time.
Edwin King, who if with the C.N.R., was a visitor at the home of his parents lately.
Mrs. Willis Miller, of Mowat, who has been under the doctor’s care at Winnipegosis, has returned home.
The C.N.R. surveyor paid a visit and took the measurement of the elevator here.
Mr. Howatson, from Winnipegosis, is relieving Mr. Sturdy at the Armstrong Trading Co. for a few days while Mr. Sturdy is on holiday.
The annual meeting of Purple Star, 1775 was held on Tuesday, Dec 31st. The auditors’ report was most satisfactory, showing a balance in hand, after meeting all expenses for 1912.
The following officers were elected for 1913.
W.M. – Bro F.F. Hafenbrak
D.M. – Bro. W.J. King
Chaplain – Bro. H.H. Scarse, re-elected
Recording Secretary – Bro. W. King, re-elected
Financial Secretary – Bro. C.E. Bailey, re-elected
Treasurer – Bro. C. Bailey, re-elected
D. of C. – Bro. F. Cooper, re-elected
Lecturer – Bro. A Hunt
Dept. Lecturer – S.B. Reid
1st Committeemen – Edwin King, re-elected; C. Clark
Committeemen – J. Frost, Joe Bickle, J.E. Morriss, S.B. Munro, J.C. Bickle
Installation of officers at next regular meeting.

1913 Jan 9 – Winnipegosis

The Standard Lumber Co.’s mill is closed for the season.
The Armstrong Trading Co. has started their snow-plow with ten teams on its first trip up the lake to haul down fish.
Alex McArthur’s steam engine invention is also on a trip for the same purpose.
J.P. Grenon made a trip to Winnipeg on Saturday on business.
There was no Anglican Church service last Sunday owing to the recent storms impeding velocipede transition.
The Christian League held their social evening at the home of Mrs. J.J. Burrell last week. A very enjoyable time is reported.
Mr. Noble has returned to Dauphin to continue his studies after spending a week here visiting his adherents.
Mr. Malley returned on Saturday to Winnipeg.
The school was opened on Friday by Miss Hayes on account of Mr. Hulme not returning till Saturday.
Inspector Charles White has been away to Waterhen.
Miss Bradley has returned to Winnipeg to pursue her studies at St. Mary’s Academy.
Mrs. Bradley last Saturday received a letter from a Greek lady of Athens giving an account of the war raging in the Balkans. The letter was dated Dec 12th.