Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 14 – 1916

1916 Dec 14 – The Week’s Casualties

Pte. A.C. McPhee, Minitonas, killed. (Alexander Campbell McPhee, 1896, 425152)
Corp. H.A. Hickman, Dauphin, wounded. (???)
Pte. H.L. Pearson, Dauphin, missing. (Harry Lindley Pearson, 1896, 425194)

1916 Dec 14 – Fork River

Mr. Nat Little shipped a team of Shetland drivers to his daughter, Mrs. E. Cameron, at Neepawa.
The annual Christmas tree will be held in the Orange Hall under the auspices of All Saints’ S.S. on Friday night, Dec. 22nd. Everybody come and help the kiddies have a good time.
W. King, P.M., has received word from his son Edwin, who is a scout at headquarters in France, that he is well. Max, who is with the Scotch-Canadians, and was wounded at the Somme in September, is in the trenches again doing his bit. Aubrey the youngest son, is stationed in England, is reported getting on fine.
Mrs. Paul Wood has returned to her home at Sifton, after having spent a few days with Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
Mr. Birch, provincial constable, was here a week regarding the burning of A. Redurik’s stacks. P.M. Venables sentenced John Phycolo to $300 and to keep the peace for two years or six months in jail. John preferred the latter alternative.
Mr. Jasper, of Harding, Man., who has been visiting two weeks with Thos. Glendenning on his ranch, returned home on Thursday.
Messrs. Williams, Briggs, and Rowe, took a joy ride to Dauphin in “Billy’s automobilly.” They found the walking very good on the return trip from Valley River home.
Fred King and f. cooper are having a few days at Dauphin this week.
We are in the midst of a campaign for the reeveship. It is well to have our municipal affairs intelligently brought before the ratepayers every once in a while. It makes for a better condition of affairs.

1916 Dec 14 – Sifton

The Wycliffe School holds its Xmas concert and dance on Dec. 20th, Wednesday evening. The lunch will be in the form of a box social and promises to be a pleasing feature of the entertainment. The girls are busy making their boxes, so boys don’t forget the date. Everybody welcome. Program holders entitled to reserved seats. Come early and be prepared to revel in a good time. We present you with Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar tragedy, Red Riding Hood and all kinds of items suited to the varying hour.
Pte. Frank Mealing paid a flying visit to his home on Saturday to bid goodbye to his relations and friends here. At a previous visit his friends presented him with a handsome wristwatch, the time being visible in the dark. He carries with him our sincere best wishes for success at the front and a safe return.
Home Economic Society at the annual meeting five of the old officers with the addition of miss Munson were re-elected as follows:
Mrs. Paul Wood, president.
Miss Reid, vice.
Miss Baker, chairman of Red Cross committee.
Miss Munson, chairman program committee.
Mrs. J.A. Campbell, sec.-treasurer.
Mrs. Oulette kindly provided refreshments and she and Miss peal Ashmore gave musical selections.
The Society new has a membership of nineteen and regularly hold meetings for Red Cross work at different members’ homes. The next meeting will be at the home of Mrs. John Kennedy.
On Friday a social evening was given by the Society at the home of Mrs. Oulette, when the members have themselves up to unrestricted frivolities for one evening. The single ladies ran off with the prizes; the winners being Misses Munson, Baker and Wood.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 26 – 1914

1914 Nov 26 – Ethelbert Children Do Well

To the Editor of the Herald:
Please allow me some room in your paper to state how well the boys and girls in my room have done towards helping to relieve the suffering of the Belgium children. A little over a week ago I mentioned the subject to them and they immediately decided to try and do something. The result is that they have collected in the neighbourhood of $25. This, I think, is a credit to them and I am writing this to show how the boys and girls are willing to help if they are given the chance and how they will make good.
W.H. WHITE.
Principal Ethelbert School.

1914 Nov 26 – Soldiers Return Thanks

To the Editor of the Herald:
Sir – On behalf of the boys allow me, through the medium of your paper to thank all those very kind townspeople who have in such substantial and many ways subscribed to their welfare.
During the time of our enforced visit to Berlin or Constantinople we hope the town will prosper and so afford us some chance of again taking up a more peaceable occupation on our return.
Orders will be taken for scalps and other trophies.
ARTHUR C. GOODALL.
Reg. Serg. Maj., 32nd M.H.

1914 Nov 26 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River on Oct. 29th, all the members being present. The minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted.
Communications were read from the Good Roads Association, the health officer, G.A. Warringon, C.E., the secretary of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities and St. Joseph’s Orphanage.
Hechter-Lacey – That the clerk write Mr. McGilvray and ask him to come to this municipality and lecture on the Good Roads Act.
Lacey-Hunt – That in all cases where a contractor calls for inspection of work that is found incomplete, according to the terms of the contract, the contractor shall be charged with the cost of the inspection fees and mileage.
Lacy-Richardson – That the health officer’s livery account in connection with the diphtheria cases be certified to by Dr. Medd and paid, the said expense to be charged in the tax accounts of the parties involved.
Hechter-Lacey – That each councillor be authorized to collect voluntary subscriptions for the patriotic fund. All money so collected to be sent in to the treasurer of the municipality.
Toye-Bickle – That the clerk be instructed to credit Ward 1 with 23 pieces of tamarac pilling and charge the same to the public works account, the piles having been expended n the Bailey Bridge.
Hunt-Richardson – That all road commissioners’ certificates issued after this date be payable only to the parties to whom they are issued.
Lacey-Richardson – That any representatives of the council attending the convention of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities be allowed $15.00 for expenses.
Bickle-Toye – That the reeve and Coun. Hechter be representatives to the Convention.
Hunt-Richardson – That Coun. Lacey take the place of J.D. Robertson, resigned, on the public works committee.
Lacey-Richardson – That the council suggest to the Minister of Public Works that in future all grants to the municipality be paid through the office of the municipality and that a copy of this resolution be forwarded to our member, Mr. Hughes.
Toye-Lacey – That the clerk write the Minister of Public Works and ask that an engineer be sent to inspect the bridges recently completed over German Creek.
Hunt-Hechter – That the municipal collectors be bonded to the extent of $500 each.
Toye-Richardson – That the accounts as recommended by the finance committee be passed.
Hechter-Richardson – That the following accounts for letting and inspecting work, T. Toye $25.30, C.H. Bickle $39.10 and A. Hunt $28.70, be passed.
Toye-Lacey – That the council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the reeve.

1914 Nov 26 – Fork River

Reeve W. King and D.F. Wilson are attending the convention of the Union Municipalities at St. Boniface this week. Coun. Hechter, of Winnipegosis, is also attending the convention.
The company’s auditor, assisted by Messrs. John Sieffert and Jas. Campbell, is taking stock at the Armstrong Trading Co. store here this week.
A pie social was held at the home of Mrs. W. King for the W.A. of All Saints’ Church on the 18th inst. All report a pleasant time and the disposal of much pie.
Mr. Thomas, our grain buyer, is kept busy pretty much all the time. The quantity of what being marketed here this season is surprising considering the adverse conditions prevailing during part of the year.
Wood has started to come in since the snow arrived. It is expected that there will be considerable quantities brought in for shipment here this winter.
All old acquaintances hereabouts learned with regret of the misfortune which befell Thos. Glendenning last week in the burning of his barn last week. He had doors, windows and other material with which to erect a new house stored in the buildings when the fire occurred and all was burned. He also had about $1500 worth of grain burned. No insurance was carried on the building or the contents. With the true spirit of the pioneer he is starting to rebuild.
Many have taken out big game hunting licences and it looks as if the fleet-footed deer will have a warm time this season.
There is some talk of a contest for the reeveship. It seems only fair that the present reeve should have another term.
Mrs. Wm. Williams has just undergone a serious operation in the Dauphin Hospital.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 19 – 1914

1914 Nov 19 – Fatal Shooting Accident

A fatal shooting accident occurred five miles west of Sifton on the 18th, when Joseph Thomashewski, aged 30 years, lost his life. He was out hunting rabbits at the time. He wounded one and as the little animal started to run away he raised the gun and struck at struck at it. The gun was discharged by the act and the contents lodged in his stomach. The unfortunate man died on the spot.

1914 Nov 19 – Fire at Mossey River

Thos. Glendenning, whose farm is at the mouth of the Mossey River at Lake Dauphin, had his stables destroyed by fire on Friday last, the 13th isn’t. All the contents of the stables were burned. There was no insurance.

1914 Nov 19 – Had Hand Taken Off

Leslie Nash, a boy 14 years of age, was brought from Roblin on Tuesday and placed in the hospital here. He was out hunting rabbits at Roblin, when his gun was accidentally discharged, the contents lodging in his left arm. The wound was a bad one and was found necessary to amputate the hand. The boy is doing as well as could be expected.

1914 Nov 19 – Little Girl Smothered

A sad fatality happened at Gilbert Plains on Wednesday, when Thos. Poole’s two-year-old daughter was smothered. The little girl, 2 years old and her brother, 4 years, were left in the home, while Mrs. Poole was absent for a short time. In the meantime fire started with the result that the little girl was smothered. The boy will recover.

1914 Nov 19 – Ethelbert

The sleighing is fine. Farmers are bringing in wood now.
The Ethelbert mill is running all right now. This is what is wanted, a good mill.
Henry Brachman was a passenger to Dauphin on Monday.

1914 Nov 19 – Fork River

Mr. Geo. Lyons, of Winnipegosis, municipal tax collector, spent a short time here on business lately.
Mr. Fleming, of the Northern Elevator has returned from a few days visit to his old home in Veregin, Sask.
Mr. D. Kennedy, manager of the A.T. Co., returned from a short vacation south and reports having enjoyed his outing.
Mrs. C. Clark’s friends will be pleased to hear she has arrived safely at her home in Paswegan, Sask.
The threshermen’s annual ball came off on Friday night and proved an enjoyable affair. Everyone enjoyed the outing. “It’s a Long Way to Tipperary” and we trust all arrived safe.
The Rev. A.S. Wiley, rural dean of Dauphin, took the service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon.
Mr. Sid Gower, who has been spending the summer at Winnipeg, is renewing acquaintances here.
Mr. Green has returned from Dauphin, having taken Mr. Wiley’s place at St. Paul’s on Sunday.

1914 Nov 19 – Winnipegosis

Miss Bernice Walker, of Dauphin, who has been visiting her cousin, Miss Ross, returned home by Monday’s train.
Hon. Hugh and Mrs. Armstrong are visiting at the home of Mrs. Bradley.
Mr. and Mrs. Bert Steele arrived in town on Saturday’s train from Warroad, en route to Mafeking. They are visiting at the home of Mrs. J.P. Grenon.
A number of young folks took this season’s first sleigh ride to Fork River to the Threshermen’s ball. All report having a good time.
The curling and skating rinks are fast getting into shape. E.R. Black has the contract for making the ice.
The bachelor apartments were the scene of an enjoyable evening last week. A whist drive and any oyster supper finished a very pleasant evening.
Ed. Cartwright and family left on Monday’s train for Mafeking, where Mr. Cartwright looks after the interests of the Canadian Lakes Fishing Co.
Ben Hechter has been laid up trough sickness for the past few days.
When are we going to have the formal opening of the new school?
Jos. Grenon, manager of the Winnipegosis hatchery, left on Monday’s train for Fort Qu’Appelle, with sixteen million whitefish eggs, for the new government hatchery there.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 17 – 1910

1915 Nov 17 – Burglary at Sifton

On the night of November 8th, the office of Paul Wood, Sifton, was broken into and some $1500 in notes stolen. The lock was wrenched and broken from the door, showing how admittance was gained. As soon as the robbery was known, Provincial Constable Rooke was telegraphed for. Up to the present no clue has been found, but it is generally thought to have been done by someone familiar with the premises.

1915 Nov 17 – Fork River

Miss Pearl Wilson is visiting her sister Mrs. Ivor Humphreys in Dauphin.
Miss Millidge, Organizing Secretary of the Women’s Auxiliary of the English Church paid us a visit this week and gave an excellent magic lantern entertainment in the Orange Hall. The subjects given were views of Japan and Bunyan’s Pilgrims Progress etc. A large crowd turned out and all were satisfied with the evening’s enjoyment.
Mrs. M. Snelgrove paid Dauphin a visit this week.
The young people around this district are now busy skating and having a good time.

1915 Nov 17 – North Lake

John Strasdin was up before P.M. Munson last week, for shooting on Sunday. He is going around singing a song entitled “There will come a time some day.”
Inspector Walker visited the schools around here.
Although Councillor Lacey gets mixed up with missing Post Offices, we notice he did not get mixed up with missing the tamarac swamp, on sec. 17, this year for we can now get through it with ease.
W. Williams has finished threshing around here.
Thos. Glendenning shipped the finest car of wheat this year, that ever went out of Fork River. Tom says its better than “our’n” and we guess he’s rights.
Jack Robertson still knocks around although he had a nasty smash.

1915 Nov 17 – Sifton

About four inches of snow fell on Saturday night. The sleighs are making a good showing already.
Isaac Silverwood, Dauphin, who had the contract of moving the R.C. Greek Rite Chapel at Sifton has successfully complete moving it to its new foundation across the road from its former position.
Craig Bros., of Dauphin, who are building the new R.C. mission building, having the building well under way. It is quite a credit to the appearance of the village or will be when finished.
W. Hewey, of Dauphin, who was in this vicinity boring wells, returned to Dauphin last week after a couple of days at unsuccessful attempts at penetrating the earth’s crust.
A C.N.R. bridge gang outfit were here for a few days building a much needed stock yard which will be a great convenience to stock shippers.
The daily train service lately inaugurated on the Winnipeg Prince Albert line via Dauphin is being much appreciated and marks another accommodation and is a credit to the management.

1915 Nov 17 – Winnipegosis

The Council met at Winnipegosis last week when some important business was done.
Dr. Medd, who has been in this district for some time, residing at Winnipegosis, left here this week for pastures new.
Miss Millidge, Organizing Secretary of the Anglican Women’s Auxiliary, gave an entertainment, in the schoolhouse, which was attended by a large crowd. During the interval Miss Doris Hurst and Miss D. Parker sang some songs. Mrs. Bradley and several ladies of the local auxiliary had a chat with Miss Millidge.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 17 – 1912, 1918

1912 Oct 17 – Committed for Trial

One night last week several windows were broken in the store of Katz & Brackman at Ethelbert. I.J. Katz, who happened to be in town, swore that he saw Peter Pundy and another party that he could not recognize in the dark, break the windows with an axe. Pundy was brought before Magistrate Skaife, on the charge, and after two nights were consumed in hearing and evidence, was committed for trial. F.E. Simpson appeared for the prosecution and J.L. Bowman for the defence.

1912 Oct 17 – Ethelbert

A preliminary hearing was held before Police Magistrate R. Skaife on the evenings of the tenth and eleventh of Oct. An information, charging Peter Pundy, was laid by H. Brachman of the firm of Katz & Brachman, with breaking four panes of glass and other damages, amounting to over $20, during the night of Oct. 10th, to their store on Main Street. Considerable interest was manifested by the Ruthenian population, the court being crowded each night until midnight and feeling ran high. Mr. Simpson, of Dauphin, put the case for prosecution, and Mr. Bowman for the defence. After a prolonged and careful hearing, it was thought by the magistrate, the charge needed further investigation and Pundy was remanded for trial at Portage la Prairie. He was allowed at large, after entering into bail himself in $200, and two others for $150 each, for his appearance at Portage to stand his trial.
The Elevator is nearing completion and will need only a few more days to make it ready to receive the crop.
Norman Booth, the buyer for the Elevator Co., went west a few days ago, where he was united in the bonds of matrimony to Miss Olive Ward, the daughter of Cross Ward, postmaster of Deepdale. Mr. Booth and his wife have returned to Ethelbert, where they will reside until the grain season is over. Cross Ward is an old resident of Ethelbert and our hearty congratulations are given to the newly wed couple, that they may live long, and prosper in their new undertaking.
Geo. Marantz has commenced business in John McLean’s store, and is doing his best to attract customers by a good display of new goods in his windows.
J. McLean expects to transfer the balance of his stock still unsold at an early date. He retains the grist mill which he hopes to run as usual this winter.
The ever present and crying need of the hour, is now, and ever will be, good roads to move the crops.
There are rumours that something will be done, in this direction, by the Council availing themselves of the government’s offer to pay two-thirds of the cost of constructing main roads through the district.

1912 Oct 17 – Fork River

J. McCaulay, Massey-Harris travelling agent, was here a few days on business with D. Kennedy.
Peter Ellis, after spending the week-end with his family, has returned to Kamsack.
Samuel Bailey took a trip to Dauphin on business last week.
Clem Kennis, who has been at Prince Albert for some months, returned home and states the harvest very late all over the West.
Robertson & Snelgrove are shipping their threshing outfit to Yorkton for the season and Pat Powers is going along. Nothing like lots of “Power.”
Miss L. Clark, of Dauphin, is visiting at the home of her parents.
Rev. H.H. Scrase paid Winnipegosis a visit lately to meet some persons from Meadow Portage on church business.
Mrs. G. Tilt, of Dauphin, is spending a few days on the farm on the Mossey.
Miss Margaret and Gertrude Kennedy are visiting with Mrs. Chas. Wilkes of Winnipegosis.
Mr. Scelly was up last week from Dauphin visiting Mr. Clemons.
Mr. Glendenning is visiting his uncle, Thos. Glendenning, on the Mossey for a few days.
Next Sunday, Oct. 20th, special children’s service at the English church at 3 o’clock, and on Sunday, Oct. 27th, the annual harvest festival service will be held and a suitable sermon for the occasion will be preached by the Rev. H.H. Scrase. All are welcome to the services.
Rev. Sam. Cruch, late of Glenella and family, are visiting at the home of Mrs. Kennedy for a few days on their way to Tullesford, Sask.

1912 Oct 17 – Sifton

Church of England services are held regularly every fortnight at Sifton (Tuesday evening) and also at other times by arrangement.

1912 Oct 17 – Winnipegosis

Harvest festival service will be held at Winnipegosis school house at 7.30 on Oct. 20th. Collection will be made for the Home Mission Fund. The sermon will be preached by the Rev. H.H. Scrase, minister in charge.
J.R. Parker, of the Standard Lumber Co., has gone to Winnipeg to endeavour to secure men for work in the woods.
Jos. Birrell took his child to the hospital at Dauphin on Monday.
Active preparations are being made for the winter’s fishing. The prospects for fishing are said to be exceptionally poor.
The cattle industry in these parts is proving most profitable. Several shipments were recently made to Dauphin. Campbell Benson was the purchaser.

1918 Oct 17 – This Week’s Casualties

Pte. William Alfred Cleland, Dauphin, killed. (William Alfred Cleland, 1894, 865829)
Pte. Chas. Gray, Dauphin, killed. (???)
Pte. Francis Ingram Rogers, Asheville, wounded. (Francis Ingram Rogers, 1899, 1001239)
Pte. Harold Allan Dunlop, Dauphin, wounded. (Harold Allan Dunlop, 1897, 718788)
Pte. Campbell, Winnipegosis, wounded. (???)
Pte. Chris Benson, Dauphin, wounded. (Christian T Benson, 1887, 1000081)
Pte. Orval Wood Struthers, Dauphin, gunshot wound in right leg. (Orval Wood Struthers, 1895, 151250)
Pte. J.H. Paulson, Winnipegosis, wounded. (Johann Hannibal Paulson, 1891, 2504017)
Pte. W.S. Hamilton, Dauphin, gassed. (???)
Pte. George Edward Buchannon, Dauphin, wounded. (George Edward Buchannon, 1894, 1000633)
Pte. Ray Neely, Dauphin, wounded. (Ray Neely, 1897, 1000556)
Pte. William Meldrum, Dauphin, wounded. (William Meldrum, 1897, 1000280)
Pte. Harry Hamilton Olson, Dauphin. (???)
Pte. E.N. Humphries, Dauphin, wounded. (???)

1918 Oct 17 – Churches and Schools Closed

By order of the health officer of the town all churches, schools and public places of amusement have been closed on account of the Spanish influenza epidemic.

1918 Oct 17 – The Man of the Hour
Gen. Spanish Flu.

1918 Oct 17 – TOWN OF DAUPHIN
SPANISH INFLUENZA
WARNING TO THE PUBLIC

This disease is very prevalent in some parts of the world today, and has reached our Town. It is therefore advisable that people generally should know something about it, its symptoms, and the measure and method of its communicability; and should be advised as to the general rules for its restraint and cure.
Spanish Influenza is generally believed to be a variety of the old type of Influenza with which we have been long familiar, with in addition possibly some increase of virulence, due to the conditions and places in which this present epidemic had its origin.
It is a “Germ” disease, and is conveyed from one suffering from it to others, by the secretions of the mouth, nose, throat and lungs. The use of towels or cups in common will readily spread it. Coughing, spitting or sneezing by anyone who has it, in the company of others, will readily spread it. Crowded and ill ventilated living rooms and sleeping places, as well as ill ventilated and insanitary places of work are conductive to its dissemination.
The following are the symptoms which generally accompany an attack:
Fever, headache, backache, inflamed throat, and often bleeding from the nose. In addition to these symptoms, in more severe cases a troublesome cough with a sense of constriction in the chest follows. From these develop the case of Broncho-Pneumonia which is the feature of the disease mainly responsible for deaths.
If cases should come to your neighbourhood, think first of Prevention. Don’t go to any house or place in which there may be persons with the above symptoms. Don’t let any person suffering from these symptoms come to your home or place of business. Don’t use common towels or drinking cups in any place. Keep away from people who have the disease, if you do you won’t get it. If on the other hand, you mingle with people who have it there is no known method of disinfection which would prevention your taking it. Therefore stay away and keep in he open air and sunlight as much as possible.
If you should be attacked by the disease, go to bed at once. Rest and Warmth are very important factors in its cure. Take warm drinks, live on fluids, and send for your Physician. Having done these things promptly, there is usually little danger. Not doing them, and taking chance, may turn a very mild illness into a very serious and sometimes a fatal one.
Attendants on all cases should wear gauze masks.

E. BOTTOMLEY,
Health Officer, Town of Dauphin.

1918 Oct 17 – Fork River

Mr. Hanson, auditor for the Armstrong Trading Co., spent a few days in town lately.
Leo Beck has purchased the threshing outfit of Charles Bugg and is making the straw fly.
There are now five outfits threshing within a radius of three miles so good progress is being made with the work.
Potatoes, yes sir. From a pound of Victory seed 50 lbs. were produced. When I comes to grain or vegetables Fork River district stands at the top.
Mrs. Moxam, from Winnipeg, is visiting at the home of Mr. Sam Reid.
So far the Spanish Flue has laid its hand lightly on us. However, we must not be behind the times or out of fashion, so that anyone from now on who gets a cold will claim to have had an encounter with His Nibbs King Flu. But, say, if we could only resort to the remedy of happy memory, hot toddy, wouldn’t the male portion of the population be suddenly afflicted.

1918 Oct 17 – Sifton

Sunday automobile travelling is just as prevalent as ever. The writer counted nine in town last Sunday. There are lots of places where yellow paint and rotten eggs could be used a plenty.
The foundations for the large Ruthenian hall has been laid and the material is on the ground.
It is about time the foreigners (and most of them are still foreigners and pride themselves on it) learned to take notice of our national statutory holidays. On Thanksgiving Day may loads of grain drove into market, the owners knowing nothing of the day, caring less, and most indignant at not being able to unload. But let an Anglo-Saxon try t hire one on a saint’s or holy day – nothing doing!
Philip Wood and Leslie Kennedy and Miss Lottie Isaacovitch and enjoying a short holiday here.
This district is not behind most of the districts in grain yields. Thirty bushels to the acre is quite common, and as high as 40 and even 50 bushels to the acre has been threshed.
W. Terin still delivers fresh fish to town, easing up the H.C.L.
An average of two car loads of live stock are shipped from here each week throughout the year, excepting possibly three months.
Several gas tractors have been sold at this point, with a promise of many more next season.
Our roads, and especially our culverts, are generally speaking, a disgrace. The wear and tear to rolling stock and automobiles, not to mention horse flesh, is beyond calculation. A culvert one foot or more above the grade was responsible for a small automobile wreck on Saturday in ward 6. The council will be asked to pay the damages.
Glorious Indian summer, with a forecast of winter within the next two months at least.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 1 – 1914

1914 Oct 1 – Fork River

Mr. Lintick and F. Storrar attended the Teachers’ Convention and report an interesting time. What with summer, Christmas, Easter and Bank holidays and conventions, there are very few teaching days left, and yet we are told the teachers have a hard time and are underpaid and grant us a favour to teach our rural schools a few weeks for a year’s pay. Where does the farmer’s holidays come in who has to pay the piper.
George Lyons, weed inspector for ward 5, paid this burgh a visit on business with the necessary documents.
A fire set out by some of our western friends has been raging the last week and considerable hay has gone up in smoke. Where are all our fire rangers? They generally turn up in winter time.
Mrs. Venables and daughter, who have been spending a few weeks with Mr. T. Venables, on the Mossey River, left for their home at Boissevain.
Mr. D. Kennedy has received from Winnipeg another bow wow for his dog emporium. No doubt a large cash prize will be offered for a suitable name for his dogship.
Miss Brady left for her home at Winnipegosis, the health officer having closed the Mossey River School for a short time on account of chicken pox. The kiddies are having a high old time singing “everyday will be a holiday in the sweet by and by.”
Mr. Swartwood, agent for the International Harvester Machine Co., is here taking stock of the surplus machinery and repairs.
Mrs. R. McEachern has returned from a few days visit with friends at Winnipegosis.
We are informed that D.F. and F.R. are to draw cuts to see which shall climb and fix the pulley on to of ??? staff. The gate receipts are to be donated to the ??? fund. It will be quite a climb for such featherweights. Next.
One day last week some evil disposed person broke into the house of Mr. T. Glendenning at Lake Dauphin and turned everything over, but failed to find what they were looking for. We trust the parties will be found and made an example of.

1914 Oct 1 – Winnipegosis

The school will be finished this week.
Frank Hechter was a passenger to Dauphin on Tuesday.
D.G. McAuley returned from Dauphin on Wednesday.
The teachers from these parts who attended the convention at Dauphin returned home on Saturday.
The fishing season closes this week and the fishermen are returning. The fishing was exceptionally good and everyone appears to be satisfied. Forty cars were shipped out. About 175 men were engaged in the work.
Boys shooting about the neighbourhood make it dangerous for parties who are about. A bullet the other day struck Harold Bradley’s house. The gun was taken from the boys.
John Tidsberry, high constable of Dauphin, was here on Wednesday. John says “we’ll lick the Germans or know the reason why.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 22 – 1910

1910 Sep 22 – Serious Accident

Scaffold Collapses With Three Men – Arthur Milner Has Back Broken
While engaged Wednesday afternoon in shingling the first rows of Engineer R.T. Perkin’s new residence on 3rd Ave. S.W. the scaffold from which they were working suddenly collapsed with A. Milner, Wesley and Wallace Cleaver, throwing the former two to the ground 20 feet below. Wallace Cleaver managed to catch on to a window sill and saved himself. The crash of the falling scaffolding was heard some distance and brought several neighbours to the spot at once. The unfortunate men where extricated from the fallen timbers and carried to the home of Mr. Geo. Sergant and on the arrival of Dr. Bottomley taken to hospital. On examination of the two men it was found that Cleaver had several ribs broken, while Milner was more seriously injured, his spine being broken between the shoulders, and it is feared he has slim chances of recovery.
Milner is a young Englishman and came to Dauphin from Gladstone two years ago. He has taken an active art in he town band as solo cornet player. His father resides in the north of England and is being communicated with.

1910 Sep 22 – Fork River

The funeral of Mrs. S. Lowry took place last Saturday. Quite a large number of friends came to pay their respects, the service was conducted by Rev. W. Rowan.
Mrs. W. Stonehouse who has been away in Ontario for some time returned last Saturday.
Threshing is in full swing and crops are turning out well.
Mr. A.B. Hodgson who has been here for some time left last Saturday for Winnipegosis to enter the employ of the Armstrong Trading Co.
W. Stonehouse is building a house for himself in this village.
Mrs. Northam of Weyburn came here last Wednesday and intends to stay here.
Harvest Festival will be held at Mowat on Sunday, Sept. 25 at 11 o’clock, preacher Rev. H.H. Scrase.

1910 Sep 22 – North Lake

Messrs Hunter and Glendenning have commenced threshing and report wheat turning out good.
Settlers of this district tender their sympathy to Mr. Sam Lowry in his bereavement.
Councillor Lacey is now getting ready to ditch some of the main roads leading to Fork River and Winnipegosis.
Rev. H.H. Scrase preached an impressive sermon at Mowat last Sunday, touching on the death of Mrs. Sam Lowry. Quite a number were present.

1910 Sep 22 – Sifton

Fine weather prevails and is greatly appreciated by every one just now, at this time of the year, as it will either 3 northern or 1 northern. Threshers are busy everywhere about.
W. Kyscyzks new outfit was considerably disabled for a couple of days. Some culprit carefully distributed old iron, taking great pains to well place it in the centre of the sheaves in many of the stooks on Paul Wood’s farm. The separator was somewhat crippled a number of times and had to undergo repairs.
H.L. Troyer, Secretary of the Toronto Bible training school, Toronto and Miss E. Spargue, who have been visiting the mission house for a couple of days left for the east on Tuesday last.
Rev. Sabourin returned last week from Montreal where he has been attending the Eucharistic Congress.
A Mr. White of Winnipeg has been viewing the district in search of land to buy. There’s plenty of land to be had if you’ve got the money. Certainly a good locality for mixed farming.
The Manitoba Government telephone gang have unloaded a couple of cars of telephone poles and other material. We can certainly appreciate such things in sight.
To Mr. and Mrs. H.J. Gillis, a bouncing boy. “Be it ever so humble there’s no place like home.”
Soapy looks as happy and pleasant as ever as he gracefully strides down the street. Who said he was married four times to one woman?