Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 21 – 1916

1916 Dec 21 – The Week’s Causalities

Pte. J.D. James, Grandview, killed. (James Daniel Stanley James, 1892, 151767)

1916 Dec 21 – Frank Meader Wounded

Mrs. Meader received a telegram on Wednesday notifying her that her son, Pte. Frank Thomas Morris Meader was wounded on Dec. 7th, at Camlers, France. The wounds consist of a gunshot in the back and left thigh. (Frank Thomas Morris Meader, 1896, 425693)

1916 Dec 21 – Another Returned Soldier

The list of returned soldiers continues to grow. There are now five of these men in town. On Wednesday Pte. John Ball, who was recently wounded in France, reached home. He is suffering from paralysis on one side and it will be sometime before he is able to be about.
Pte. Bird McKinstry is expected to arrive this week.

1916 Dec 21 – Fork River

What are the Fork River farmers doing in the mater of the proposed Mossey Agricultural society? The Ruthenians and South Bay people seem to be setting them as example.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 3 – 1914

1914 Dec 3 – Shot in Hand

A Galician named Lazar was brought to the hospital on Tuesday from the mountain with a bullet in his hand. The wound is not a dangerous one.

1914 Dec 3 – Boy Died

Sam, the 9-year-old son of S.J. Buchanan, of McCreary, was brought to the hospital on Monday, having been shot in the stomach and arm by a man who was hunting rabbits. The wound was a bad one and the boy died on Monday night. The remains were taken to McCreary on Tuesday for interment.

1914 Dec 3 – Soldiers Given Send Off

The departing soldiers on Monday morning were given a great send off at the station. The citizens turned out in large numbers and the town band was also present. Bunting and flags were displayed from all sides, and the military spirit was contagious. The special train the boys were to go odd on was over an hour late and this gave everyone an opportunity for a hand shake and chance to say good-bye. As the train steamed in with its long line of coaches the band struck up a popular air, and cheer followed cheer. The scene was one that will long be remembered.
During the short stay here the soldier boys from the west mingled with the crowd and the time was spent in a jolly way singing patriotic songs, waving flags and cheering.
As the train left the station the band played and the crowd simply went wild. Women shed tears, hats were thrown into the air flags and handkerchiefs were waved and cheer followed cheer.
It was a great send off the boys got and one not soon forgotten.

1914 Dec 3 – Sifton

We are glad to learn that miss Rowe, head nurse of the Presbyterian mission, is now on the way to recovery from a long illness.
Owing to bad roads there has been very little business done in the district of late.
The town will was completed last week and there is every indication of there being an abundance of water.
A party composed of our prominent business men paid a visit to Ethelbert last week with the view of inspecting the Kennedy Mercantile Co,’s new grist mill. They report the mill is running smoothly and doing excellent work.
Mr. and Mrs. F. Marantz celebrated on Tuesday the engagement of their daughter, Miss Ida, to Prof. Matoff, which was witnessed by their many friends and relations of the various ???.
Mr. Joe Clarke, late Sawyer-Massey salesman, paid us a visit on Monday. He reports thing quiet at present but he says business will be humming in the near future. Hoe is sure no pessimist.
The teacher and children of the Wycliffe School gave a fine entertainment in the schoolhouse on Friday evening. The one entitled “War Scenes,” consisting of four parts, namely part I, soldiers fighting; 2nd, arrival of Red Cross nurses dressing the wounded on the battlefield; 3rd, hospital scene; 4th, soldiers and Red Cross nurses tenting on the battlefield, was certainly good. The other part of the programme included solos, readings and plays, consisting of “Henry VIII” and “Britannia.” Several patriotic songs were sung during the programme. A dance concluded the evening. The whole thing proved a great success.

1914 Dec 3 – Winnipegosis

California weather.
F. Hechter arrived home on Monday’s train from Winnipeg.
Mr. and Mrs. and Miss McArthur left this week for Winnipeg, where they will reside for the winter.
Messrs. Thompson and St. John arrived last week from Portage for their annual big game shoot. J. McInnis and Walter Grenon accompanied them on the shoot.
Capt. Coffey spent the weekend at home at Dauphin returning on Monday.
Our train service is to be changed slightly. Instead of the train arriving on Saturday as heretofore, it will arrive on Friday, starting on the 4th inst., otherwise the schedule remains the same.
The fish are beginning to come in. The first loads arrived on the 25th, for the A.T.Co. From all reports the fishing is good.
Miss Emblem and miss Burrell spent the weekend at Snake Isle.
Doc. Medd, who has been attending the assizes at Portage, returned on Monday’s train.
Wm. Walmsley has been confined to the house through sickness. Better hurry, Bill, they’ve started curling.
Mr. Foley lost his residence through fire, last week, over heated stovepipes being the cause. Mr. Foley lost everything that was in the house, as the fire had gained too much head way before being discovered.
The entertainment and bazaar in the Methodist Church last Friday afternoon and evening was a grand success. The programme, though not a lengthy one, was of a classical nature and was fully appreciated by the large crowd present.
The municipal elections promise to cause some excitement, especially in Ward 5, where it is understood, “Old Reliable,” Tom Toye and J. Namarko will be the contestants.
The rink opened for skating and curling on Monday night. It is not every town of our size that has a curling and skating rinks open this winter. It should be fully appreciated and patronized by old and young, both skaters and curlers.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 27 – 1913, 1919

1913 Nov 27 – Given Two Months

Peter Pandro, a Galician from the Fork River district, appeared before P.M. Munson on Friday, charged with stealing a gold watch from W. Lawson, with whom he had been working. Pandro acknowledged the theft and was sentenced to two months in jail at Portage la Prairie.

1913 Nov 27 – Had Nose Broken

A spread rail near Kamsack threw two cars of a freight train off the track on Wednesday and delayed traffic for several hours. Brakeman John McRae, of this town, had his nose broken in the accident.

1913 Nov 27 – Fork River

Miss Alice Clark, of Dauphin, is spending a shot time here among her friends.
John Mathews left for Winnipegosis, having taken a position with Frank Hector, storekeeper.
N. Slobojan, Mowat Centre, is a visitor to Dauphin on business.
Messrs. Forst and Howitson and others took in the dance at Winnipegosis on Thursday night and report a whale of a time, never to be forgotten.
Mr. and Mrs. Gordan Weaver, of Winnipegosis are spending the weekend at the home of T.N. Briggs.
Fred. King and S. Bailey returned from a trip north and report the fishing town exceptionally quiet.
“Say, Mike, run over to the store and get us a dozen fresh eggs while we unload.” Arriving at the store he shouted back: “Pat, there’s only eleven eggs and Biddy’s on the nest. Hold the train a minute.” Then biddy flies off and Mike arrives with the dozen eggs all O.K., and off we go for Dauphin. Next.
Fred. Cooper has arrived home from a few days vacation at Dauphin.
Wm. Stonehouse, carpenter and contractor, has returned home after spending the summer with the A.T. Co., at Winnipegosis and South Bay.
The members of the S.S. and Women’s Auxiliary of All Saints’ Church held a meeting on Wednesday and arranged for a Xmas tree and programme to be held in Dec. 23rd.
Mr. Elliot, Methodist student of Winnipegosis, is spending the weekend visiting members of his congregation.
Alfred Snelgrove has returned home from Yorkton, where he has been the last two months with his threshing outfit.
Dunc. Briggs and MAX King have left for the north to draw fish for the Armstrong Trading Co.

1913 Nov 27 – Winnipegosis

Howard Armstrong, of Fork River, who was under remand on a charge of stealing, was brought up before the magistrate, Mr. Parker, on Monday, the case being dismissed for want of evidence, a verdict that was popular with all.
Miss Spence proceeded to Dauphin hospital on Monday, having to be conveyed to the station on an ambulance.
The government school inspector, conducted by Coun. Tom Toye, made a visit to all the schools in the district during the past week.
Mr. De Rouchess, of Pine Creek, has suffered a great loss through having some thousands of skins confiscated by the Inspector visiting his store.
A dance was given by the bachelors in conjunction with the spinsters (who supplied the refreshments) of this town on Monday night. Everybody enjoyed themselves immensely, the “turkey trot” and “bunny hug” being in great demand, the dancing lasting up to the wee sma’ hours of the morning. The music was supplied by Mr. Watson, being ably assisted by his wife. Noticeably among the guests present were Constable Hunkings, Messrs. Cunliffe, Paddock, Morton and Watson and their respective wives with Misses Stevenson, Goodman and many others. Numerous “boys” from Fork River took the opportunity of enjoying themselves on this occasion.
I. Foster, reeve of Landsdowne, near Galdstone, visited us on Wednesday for the purpose of buying a couple of car loads of cattle, but found that the surrounding country had been gleaned by previous operators who already left.
Mr. Graffe has taken over the Lake View hotel livery stable and no doubt this caterer for equine wants will make a success of it, as “Billy” Ford, proprietor of the hotel, has gone to considerable expense in renovating the barn and being a genial “Mine host” with a charming personality, both man and beast will be well provided for.
“Billy” Walmesley, pool room proprietor, intends standing as councillor for ward 4 in the coming election, and as he is greatly respected, it is hoped that everybody will give the support due to him, as he is an old timer, always to the front in all kinds of sport and making it his business to push forward the interests of the town on every occasion. “Billy” should do well in the council chamber as he has a most varied and vigorous style of speech.
Captain Reid, of Shoal River, is visiting the town after a considerable absence.

1913 Nov 27 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Nov. 21.
Frank Hechter was the delegate to the District Grain Growers convention at Dauphin. Frank is now a horny handed son of toil.
The snowstorm on Monday has put a stop to the stock grazing in the open.
The ratepayers from this section will attend the next meeting of the council, on Dec. 5th, in a body. This will mean a road to the school.
Mr. Wenger is contemplating holding an auction sale at an early date.

1913 Nov 27 – Ethelbert

Mr. A. McPhedran and wife have returned from Fort William, where they were visiting relatives.
Mr. Leary has been to Winnipeg interviewing the Returned Soldiers Pension Board.
Miss McLennan was a visitor to the hospital here this week.
The Victory Loan in Ethelbert sure was a success. The allotment was $25 000, but over $45 000 was subscribed. The canvassers did good work.

1913 Nov 27 – Winnipegosis

Monday, Dec. 22nd, at the Rex Hall, is the date fixed for the Union Sunday School Christmas tree and entertainment. The scholars are engaged upon the preparation of a comedy entitled “Santa Claus and the Magic Carpet,” and a good miscellaneous program.
Mr. F.G. Shears returned on Saturday from a trip to Dauphin.
The winter fishing season opened on the 20th.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 20 – 1913, 1919

1913 Nov 20 – Fork River

A number of farmers met at the municipal office on Saturday event, the 15th, to discuss the horse question. Q. King was appointed chairman and T.B. Venables secretary. The chairman stated the reason for calling the meeting, after which those present voted that we form an association to be known as the Fork River Horse Breeders’ Association and the flowing officers were elected: President, Thos. B. Venables; Vice, Wm. King; Sec.-Treas., D.F. Wilson. Directors: Ab. Hunt, Nat Little, A. Rowe and Geo. H. Tilt. The meeting adjourned to meet on Saturday night, Nov. 29, at 8 o’clock sharp to decide the most suitable breed to apply for a government pure bred stallion and to transact other business. Anyone can become a member of the association on the payment of one dollar membership fee. We wish the farmers every success in this worthy undertaking and it should have the hearty support of all in the district.
Dan McLean returned home for the winter months after spending the summer in charge of the government dredge at Regina.
Capt. Russell, of Cork Cliff, was a visitor in town on Saturday.
Mrs. F.B. Lacey of Mowat, returned from the wedding of Mr. Cain and Mrs. O’Neil at Dauphin. We wish them all kinds of happiness.
George Basham, postmaster of Oak Brae, was in town on Saturday. He still wears that genial smile.
Harcourt Benner is visiting at the home of his uncle, D.F. Wilson, on the Mossey.
Bert Steele passed through here on his way to take up his winter quarters at Mafeking for the A.T. Co. Bert is looking the picture of health and prosperity.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong, of Portage la Prairie, in company with the president and secretary of the Booth Fishing Co., paid the A.T. Co. store a visit last week.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, paid a visit to the home of his parents and Miss Bessie Wilson returned with him for a short visit among friends in Dauphin.
Mr. Almack, of Gilbert Plains, left for the west with two cars of cows and young stock for the ranch.
The ladies of the Union Church, of Fork River, will hold a fowl supper in the Orange Hall, on Friday, Nov. 28th. Admission, adults 35c, children 15c. Short programme, everybody welcome.

1913 Nov 20 – Sifton

The fine weather and good roads are making numbers of people visit our village and shopping and milling are the order of the day.
Mrs. J. Kiteley, of Toronto, Ont., who has been visiting her sons in Brandon, Moose Jaw and Calgary, was the guest of Miss Reid at the Presbyterian mission house for a week.
A much felt need is being met now by an enterprising shoemaker, who has opened a repair shop on Front Street. He should do well. A bank should be our next addition and would be a convenience to many.
A fatal accident occurred on Tuesday, when a nine year old son of Anton Sturcko lost his life. The child was taking a loaded gun down from the wall, where it was left, when the weapon discharged, shattering the boy’s left leg and the loss of blood was so great that when he was taken to the village about two hours later, he was in a state of partial collapse and died before he could be taken to a doctor.
The gross neglect of parents in allowing children the use of firearms is a matter of grave import, and some steps to set on foot a law imposing a heavy fine on such should be a good thing, and the means of saving other young and bright lives.
A band of boy scouts is being inaugurated and is a fine thing for the boys. Scout laws are just the kind needed here. Our best wishes for their success under the leadership of our esteemed neighbour, Mr. Paul Wood.
The quiet of the night is sometimes broken in upon the chug, chug, of our worthy section foreman’s gasoline hand car on patrol, up to the switch. Also several of our villagers have enjoyed a fast trip to Fork River or Winnipegosis.

1913 Nov 20 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Frank Hechter returned on Monday after a considerable stay in Winnipeg.
Mrs. J.P. Grenon arrived here on Wednesday, having spent a pleasant vacation studying mink farming at Quebec. Winnipegosis will soon be able to boast of its Zoological Gardens at the rate it is going on. We only want a few live bears, but no mosquitoes, as we have plenty of them to spare, in season.
Capt. Dan. McDonald accompanied by his brother, arrived from Winnipeg on Wednesday.
Paul Paulson and family returned on Monday, having recovered from his attack of typhoid fever which he contracted while staying in Winnipeg. He proceeded to his fishing camp on Thursday.
Archie Stewart, proprietor of the well known livery stable, met with an accident by falling off his wagon.
A meeting of the Curling Club took place in Walmsley’s pool room on Monday evening, when it was resolved that practice would take place an soon as the skating rink was got into working order and on receipt of first instalment of subscriptions. The club would then be open to engage all comers, bar none.
The young ladies of this place are having great times of an evening, skating on river and lake, the latter being practically frozen over. Charley Langlois having skated over from is camp on Weasel Island on Tuesday, Mr. Johnston also walking in from Snake Island the previous day.
Charley reports that the fishermen up the lake have suffered a great loss, which is probably irreparable at this time of the year.
Howard Armstrong of Fork River, appeared before Mr. Parker, magistrate, on Friday morning to answer a charge of stealing various articles, too trivial to mention, and after Miles Morris had given evidence, his worship came to the conclusion that at present there was not sufficient incriminating evidence to connect the prisoner with the charge and adjourned the case till Monday morning, the accused being allowed out on his own recognizances. During the proceedings Capt. Dan McDonald made a minute inspector of the only and only cell and evidently admired the accommodation, although he passed no comment.
Frank Hechter has a fine display of furs in his store, which would make suitable presents to the “Old Country” and prospective buyers are warned that the supply being limited, they had better hurry up so as to secure specimens at most reasonable prices.
Mr. Bennie Hechter made a trip to Winnipeg on Wednesday for the purpose of supervising his house property in that city.
A progressive whist part was held on Thursday evening at Mr. Martin’s (station agent) home and after light refreshments and an enjoyable evening, the lucky participants returned to their respective homes in the early hours of the morn.
Mrs. Coffey returned to Dauphin on Friday, having spent a few days here with the jovial Captain.
Dick Harrison went to Winnipeg on Friday for purpose of disposing of surplus funds, which is a great loss to this rising watering resort, and as it is evidently entering a new era of prosperity, can do with every little help to give it a leg up.
Mr. Sturdy, Jr., from Fort Frances, Ont., is paying a week’s visit to his father, one of our most prominent citizens.
Tom Toye, our energetic Councillor, has brought in news of a big bear having killed a Galician round his part of the country, the animal having disembowelled the man. As a gallant Welshman why does not Tom uphold the traditions of his race and kill the brute, bringing the hide back as evidence. Tom Sanderson would act as guide and track the beast to his winter lair.

1919 Nov 20 – Fork River

Mr. and Mrs. John Dobson and family, of Winnipeg, are visiting at the home of Reeve Venables.
D.F. Wilson, sec. treasurer is attending the Union of Municipalities convention at Winnipeg this week.
Milton Cooper, who has been in the Dauphin Hospital, is improving.
F.F. Haffenbrak is on a visit to Ninette, Man.
With the milder weather the attendance at Sunday school has increased. 42 were in attendance last Sunday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 3 – 1912, 1918

1912 Oct 3 – Fined $50 and Costs

Fred Buchij, a Galician, had a row over cattle with another Galician at Valley River. In the melee Buchij ran a pitchfork into the other man. The case was tried before P.M. Munson on Wednesday and Buchij fined $50 and costs. He paid up.

1912 Oct 3 – Killed at Kamsack

Thos. Powell, formerly of Dauphin, was killed at Kamsack on Monday. He was a car repairer. He was working under a car when a train shunted on the track and shoved the car over him. He was badly crushed. Powell was at one time an employee in the railway shops here.

1912 Oct 3 – Threshing Progress

Threshing commenced in several parts of the district this week and will be general if the fine weather continues. A great deal of the grain is being stacked this fall with the object of going ahead with the plowing.

1912 Oct 3 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River on the 25th Sept. All members present.
The minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted.
Communications were read from Sarnia Bridge Co., Supt. Irwin, of C.N.R., the solicitors, the Highway Commissioner, J.P. Grenon and the Million for the Manitoba League.
A report of the public works committee condemning the Bailey Bridge unsafe for traffic was read.
Nicholson – Robertson – That the Minster of Public Works be asked to send an engineer to examine the site of the Bailey Bridge and that government aid be asked for to construct it.
Hunt – Nicholson – That the clerk write Supt. Irwin, of the C.N.R., re ditch from Mossey River north to the Sanderson Creek and also re crossing on Cocker Road.
Seiffert – Nicholson – That the council pass a by-law to expropriate a roadway sixty six feet wide along the west side of the C.N. through the N.W. 18-30-18.
McAuley – Robertson – That the clerk write the rural municipality of Dauphin and ask that some of the members of its council meet Reeve Lacey and Coun. Robertson at the bridge across the Mossey River on the boundary line between the two municipalities to consider what is best to be done as the bridge is becoming unsafe.
Nicholson – Toye – That no action be taken towards collecting the price of the Shannon road from Thomas Shannon till Dec. 1st, 1913.
Nicholson – Robertson – That the declarations of Councillors McAuley, Toye and Nicholson for $13.80, $17.70 and $24.30 respectively for letting and inspecting work be passed.
Nicholson – Robertson – That no person be allowed to dump garbage within 200 yards of any residence, street or road in the village of Fork River, and that the Armstrong Trading Co., be notified to remove the refuse deposited by them behind the Orange Hall immediately.
Nicholson – McAuley – That the Minister of the Interior re memorialized to throw the swamp lands in the municipality open for the homesteads.
Hunt – Nicholson – That the C.N.R. be asked to place an agent at Fork River during the shipping season.
A by-law to establish the rate for 1912 was passed, the rates being municipal rate, 12 mills; municipal commissioner’s rate ½ a mill, and the general school rate 4 mills.
McAuley – Toye – That the Council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis on November 1st.

1912 Oct 3 – Fork River

The Rev. H.H. Scrase visited Rural Dean Wiley and on his return visited Sifton on church business.
Thomas Shannon returned from a business trip to Winnipegosis.
The northern Elevator Co., has a gang here putting up an elevator. An elevator is needed here and it will fill a long felt want.
Archie McKerchar and W. Clarkson of Winnipegosis, spent Wednesday evening with the boys at the Orange Hall and report things booming among the fishermen there.
The cattle buyers are getting busy. One shipped part of a car of sheep last week.
Mrs. R. McEachern and son Donnie, visited Mrs. J.E. Morris, of Winnipegosis, last week.
Mrs. H. Scrase returned from Winnipegosis after spending a few days with her friends and while there attended the installation of officers of the W.A. at the point.
A large number attended the council meeting but no miracles have been performed so far to the satisfaction of the people as promised year ago.
Mrs. C.L. White, of Winnipegosis, is visiting at the home of Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Jim Parker is now living on the old Parker farm and keeps his gang moving. We are always glad to see new faces among us.
Rev. H. Scrase will hold divine service in All Saints’ Church every Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock at Fork River and Winnipegosis school house every Sunday at 7.30 p.m. and at Sifton on Mondays and Tuesdays evening as will be arranged there by next Sunday.
Nat Little arrived home on the special Saturday evening from his trip south. Specials seem to be the order of the day. Nothing like lots of train service, if they only come the same day as advertised. Nuff said.

1912 Oct 3 – Winnipegosis

Fine weather is again with us and our people are wearing pleasant faces. Do you know, people are a good deal like the weather, they change quickly. When the sun is shining all have pleasant faces; when it is dull and overcast long dismal countenance surround us. Give us the man who smiles whether it rains or shines. He’s the one worth while.

Friend, life will frequently grow
Dreary: no fortunate isles
Lie where time’s dun water flow
Give me the fellow who smiles.

Peter McArthur returned to town on Saturday from Dauphin.
All Saints’ Church was the scene of a pretty wedding on Monday, when William Christensen was united in the holy bond of wedlock to Marie Louise Lebel. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Father Derome of Makinak.
The “old-timers” sketches running in the Herald are quite interesting. Winnipegosis has a few men who are well worth writing up. They have seen the country under all conditions, and what’s more, have made good. We’ll name just a few. peter McArthur, Jos. Grenon, Sr., Tom Whale, and Hughie McKellar, the fish expert. To have Hughie tell the history of the little fishes from the cradle to the table, would prove a mighty interesting chapter. In a future issue of the herald Hugie will be asked to tell what he knows.
Capt. Coffey has been here during the past week. The Capt. is nothing if not optimistic. He looks for a good season fishing.

1918 Oct 3 – The Week’s Casualties

Pte. T. Grenier, Makinak, killed in action. (Telesphore Joseph Grenier, 1895, 291698)
Pte. Chas. W. Skinner, Dauphin, wounded and missing. (Charles Winstanley Skinner, 1898, 1001047)
Pte. Harold Tomalin, Dauphin, killed in action. Pte. Tomalin was a fireman on the C.N.R. when he enlisted last January. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Tomalin, reside at Magnet, Man. (Harold Tomalin, 1896, 2129193)

1918 Oct 3 – Dramatic Meeting on Battle Front

One of the Dauphin boys writes the Herald of a dramatic meeting he had with another local boy at night. “We were,” he writes; “on the move and had come to a stop on account of the congestion of traffic. A fleet of Fritz’s planes came out and dropped about fifty bombs around us. Looking around by the light that the bombs made I saw another Dauphin boy about ten feet away. We only had time for a handshake and wish for “good luck” when the traffic moved on.

1918 Oct 3 – Fork River

Mr. Pettit, of Winnipeg, paid this burgh a visit in the interest of the new Victory War Bond campaign.
Mrs. Tait, of Indian Head, Sask., is visiting at her parents, Mr. and Mrs. H. Timewell.
Mr. Love has arrived from Lake Manitoba and has taken charge of the Salada School, west of town.
Max King was a visitor to Winnipeg for a few days on business with the Military branch.
We notice Dauphin merchants are closing their stores at 6.30 p.m. What a contrast to some of our stores in this burg which are kept open much longer hours and sometimes on Sundays. The latter should be stopped at once.
James McDonald has finished his residence and moved into it.
T.A. Briggs has received a shipment of horses for Bonanza farm. The man who is able to receive a bunch of horses these days must have a bonanza bank account.
Fork River farms are in demand a good prices. Several deals are likely to go through shorty.
A Herald subscriber tells your correspondent he is mistaken when he states that “King potato” has not been crowned. He sure is the crowned potentate of this part of the country at any rate.

1918 Oct 3 – Winnipegosis

RED CROSS NOTICE.
The annual meeting of the Red Cross Society will be held on Tuesday evening, the 8th of October, at 8 o’clock, in Rex Hall. Every member is requested to be present. A report of work done during the year will be made by the secretary, and officers will be elected for the coming year. It is for the purpose of electing officers that a full attendance is requested.
Don’t forget that this work is for the wounded men of our army and navy, who have been winning the victories we are so jubilant about just now.

E.L. MACARTHUR,
Sec.-Treasurer.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 2 – 1913, 1919

1913 Oct 2 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River, on Wednesday, 17th inst. Councillors Richardson and Seiffert absent. The minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted.
Communications were read from Union of Manitoba Municipalities, Dauphin Hospital, Heaton’s Agency Co., N.R., the solicitor, Dominion Lands Office, the Minister of Interior, the Department of Education, Standard Lumber Co., T.A. Burrows Lumber Co. and land commissioner of Hudson Co.
Hunt – Bickle – That the clerk investigate the Dauphin Hospital accounts and pay all claims for which the municipality is liable.
Hunt – Toye – That the clerk make the necessary entry with the Dominion government, paying the fees, for two acres of the S.E. 4-29-17 for cemetery purposes.
Hunt – Toye – That the reeve and clerk inspect ditch between sections 2 and 11, tp. 30, rge. 19, with a view to having it cleared out.
Bickle – Robertson – That the account for lumber of the Standard Lumber Co. amounting to $29.71 be paid and charged to ward 4.
Robertson – Toye – That the account authorized by Road Commissioner Bailey for deepening the Lockhart ditch and due J.W. Lockhart be paid.
Toye – Robertson – That the following resolution be forwarded to the secretary of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities to be brought before the annual Convention:
“That section 644, sub-section of the Municipal Act be amended by striking out the words “or any ward or any portion of a ward thereof” in the second and third lines thereof.”
Hunt – Bickle – That the following resolution be forwarded to Union of Manitoba Municipalities for consideration at the annual convention.
“That section 148 of the Municipal Assessment Act be amended by adding the words, “during the past two years” after the ‘taxes’ in the eighth line ??? ???.”
Toye – Robertson – That the accounts as recommended by the Finance committee be passed.
Toye – Robertson – That the clerk put up notices that all arrears of taxes must be paid before the first day of November, 1913, or proceedings will be taken to collect.
Hunt – Toye – That the clerk order one twenty-four inch corrugated culvert eighteen feet long for the Cooper crossing.
Hunt – Toye – That the clerk be authorized to have the pile driver repaired as soon as possible.
A by-law authorizing the purchase of a roadway along the south side of the N.W. 26 and a portion of the N.E. 27-29-19 was passed; also a by-law striking the rate for 1913 as follows: municipal rate 10 mills, municipal commissioner’s rate ½ mill and general school rate 5 mills.
Toye – Bickle – That the Council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the Reeve.

1913 Oct 2 – Fork River

Wm. Northam has returned from Weyburn, where he has been for the summer months. He reports good crops there.
Geo. Tilt paid the Lake Town a visit on important business lately.
Willie Johnston returned from the summer fishing up the lake and reports a fair catch.
E. Williams, of Liverpool, England, has arrived to take up the work of the Anglican mission here.
F.B. Lacey returned from a trip south.
Mrs. Paul Wood, of Sifton, is visiting her sister, Mrs. Ivor Humphreys.
Miss Pearl Wood has left for Winnipeg for a short stay with friends.
Mrs. O’Neill has arrived from Rainy River and is visiting her sister, Mrs. F.B. Lacey, of Mowat.
One of our Winnipegosis friends is of the opinion that the fishing at Fork River is ahead of Winnipegosis. We agree with him every time.
Mr. Weatherhead, of Dauphin, visited our burgh between trains.
Wm. Stonehouse left for Winnipegosis to follow his occupation as inspector for the A.T. Co.
Bert Cooper has returned from Winnipegosis, having spent the summer on the government dredge.
Mrs. Paul Pugon, of Lake Dauphin, while milking a cow was badly hurt, the cow having turned on her. Dr. Medd was sent for but could not go and by the time other assistance arrived it was too late, the woman died. She leaves a family of twelve children.
T.A. Worsey preached his farewell sermon on Sunday evening, the 28th, in All Saints’ Church. There was a good turnout. Mr. Worsey is leaving for St. John’s College to resume his studies. His many friends appreciate the good work he has done here this summer and all wish him prosperity.

1913 Oct 2 – Winnipegosis

The fishing season closes on Oct. 1st. The catch has been good. Fifty cars have been shipped out.
A monster jackfish, weighing 35 lbs., was caught in one of the hauls in Dawson Bay.
A Galician is in the lock-up having stabbed his wife in the arm with a knife. His mind is supposed to be unbalanced.
Ducks are numerous and the shooting is good.
Jos. Grenon is having the grounds around his fine new residence laid out by Mr. Sadler, of Dauphin. The grounds will be planted with hardy perennials this fall which will bloom early in the spring and summer.
Theo. Johnston returned on Wednesday from a trip to Dauphin.

1919 Oct 2 – Women Killed by Tree

A sad fatality occurred last Friday during the heavy windstorm. Mrs. Wm. Lesiuk, of Venlaw, was out in the garden digging potatoes for the mid-day meal when she was struck on the head by a falling tree. A limb of the tree pierced the unfortunate woman’s skull and penetrated the brain. She leaves a family of several small children – Gilbert Plains Maple Leaf.

1919 Oct 2 – Fork River

The postponed Fork River fair was held on the 26th. Owing to rain the night before some of the farmers in the outlying districts did not exhibit as had been their intention. The exhibits in all classes were exceptionally good; the garden truck, I am told by those who were at both fairs, was even better than Dauphin. Taken all around Fork Rive did will and with the experience gained next year should be a top notcher.
The Boys’ and Girls’ Club held their fair the same day and the showing made by them was a credit to the children and their teachers.
A great deal of trouble is caused by the young people on the district in tricks played with the property of residents of the town. Unless this is stopped some of the younger generation may find themselves up before the local J.P. Boys will be boys, but the destruction of property is carrying fun too far. Placing a hayrack on the road, and piling barrels and boxes in the way of the automobiles is a pastime that may prove costly for the offenders.
Victory Loan Campaign starts Oct. 27th. This will give those who are applying for their naturalization papers a chance to show just how patriotic they are, and we are waiting to see how much they will put into victory bonds. Everybody should subscribe for some and help reconstruction.
I read with interest “Well Wisher’s” letter in last week’s Herald and think it well worthy of the thought and action of those having the welfare of the boys and girls of the district at heart.
Mrs. Jerry Frost and family have returned to Southern Manitoba, after having spent a month with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
The dance in the hall on fair night proved a success. Let us dance while we are young, as the time will come when we can’t.
Prof. Williamson and family have arrived from Southern Manitoba to take up their residence. The professor will teach music.
The Jewish New Year service was held on Thursday and Friday. Quite a number attended from Winnipegosis, Sifton and other points.
Mrs. McQuay and children were visitors at the home of Mrs. Fred. Cooper during the fair.
Mrs. Vining and G. Stuart, of Winnipeg, are visiting Mrs. Rice, who is on the sick list.

1919 Oct 2 – Zelana

Fork River, Sept. 23rd.
My last letter spoke of some nice weather for threshing. Perhaps I spoke too soon for there seems to have been very little nice weather since for threshing. But according to the old saying “It is an ill wind that blows nobody good,” so if people could not thresh then at least some of them can plow. A few around here have quite a bit turned over ready for next spring. If the fields could be sown now, there would surely be enough moisture to promote growth. In fact grain is sprouting in the stooks and in some of the stacks.
After threshing for Peter Drainiak on Saturday, Gaseyna’s machine was moved to their own place just before another rain. We understood that John Pokotylo’s machine held up at Mr. Craighill’s by the bad weather. The threshing outfit owned by Messrs. Bugutsky, Miskae and Lyluk had not been out at all this season.
Last Friday Mrs. Paul Lyluk had the misfortune to run a pitchfork into her foot. Our teacher, who has taken a course in “First Aid”, dressed the wound.
Jim Phillips lost a valuable cow recently from blackleg it is supposed. A number of animals have died around here from the same cause.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 13 – 1911

1911 Jul 13 – Four Fingers Taken Off

At the farm of D.E. Collison, Ochre River, on Monday, a young Galician lad had four fingers of his right hand taken off by a crushing machine. He was brought to town for medical treatment.

1911 Jul 13 – Fork River

Mrs. George Shannon was a visitor to Dauphin this week on business.
The annual meeting of the ratepayers of Mossey River School, 999, was held Tuesday the 4th, to elect a trustee, Mr. D.F. Wilson, retiring, Mr. A. Hunt was elected to fill the vacancy. The motion for moving the school house to Fork River was lost by the chairman giving the resting vote in favour of the present site; t is a pity as most of the scholars have 1 1/2 miles to walk to school.
Several famers here and Winnipegosis took a trip to Dauphin to hear R.L. Borden the great Conservative Leader speak. The Borden express passed through here on Friday morning with the ambulance car on behind in charge of Dr. Medd and a live Whale.
A large number of people from here took in the English Church Excursion from Gilbert Plains to Winnipegosis, among them the members of the Board of Trade who chartered a Winnipegosis liner for a sail and report the time of their lives.
In looking over the items published of the minutes of Mossey River Council it states they have taken over the Fork River Cemetery; and engaged Dr. Medd as health officer. As these two items are coupled together your correspondent would suggest our health officer get our cemetery committee together and confine them to their last resting place as the pigs and cattle are running over everything and half the summer gone and no fence to fit to keep stock out.
A heavy rain and hail storm passed through here on Friday evening, doing considerable damage.
Miss Finch and miss Hill ex-school teachers of the Mossey River School are spending their holidays at the home of Mr. and Mrs. C.E. Bailey.
Miss Pearl Wilson returned from a visit to Mr. Humphreys of Dauphin.
Mr. A. Hodgson stayed over to help the boys out with the Orange Picnic on the 11th.
Miss Alice and Ethel Finch of Carman are visiting friends at Fork River.

1911 Jul 13 – Sifton

Mrs. Wm. Riler and family left on Tuesday week for Netherhill, Sask., where they are intending to reside.
Miss Scott, who was a visitor at the mission for a few days, returned to Neepawa on Thursday. Miss Scott intents leaving for eastern Ontario shortly where she will spend the balance of the summer visiting with friends.
An electric storm passed over the village on Friday. Mr. Felix Marantz lost three valuable horses having been struck by lightening and the fourth one received a severe shock.
The wild strawberry season has about closed for this year. The strawberries seem to have been in much demand, much more than could be procured to supply.
Mr. Wm. Barrie is leaving on a business trip to Victoria B.C. and other coast points.
Mr. D.R. Barlow, contract of building the R.C. Mission Church here.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 15 – 1911

1911 Jun 15 – Died From Injuries

Anthony Lefia, a Galician, had both his legs taken off by a box car passing over them in the railway yards here on Sunday morning last. How the accident happened will remain a mystery as the unfortunate man could not speak the English language and was unable to make any explanation. It is suppose that he was attempting to steal a ride when he fell under the moving wheels.

He was taken to the hospital immediately after the accident and everything possible was done for him but Dr. Harrington, who had charge of the case, held out little hope for recovery and as anticipated he passed away early Wednesday morning.

Lefia had been out from Austria but a few months and leaves a wife and family in that country.

1911 Jun 15 – Struck by Lightning

Jas. Bedard, who had been employed on the Burrows’ lumber drive at Grandview, was returning from driving a number of men to the camp on Wednesday last, when he was caught in a thunderstorm and struck by lightning. The electric fluid struck him on the back of the head and ran down his back and side, severely burning him. When discovered Bedrad was unconscious and was immediately taken to Grandview and afterwards brought to the hospital here, where he received treatment and is now on a fair way to recovery.

Bedard is well-known in Dauphin, having been connected with Clark Bros. livery stable the greater part of last year.

1911 Jun 15 – Fork River

Miss M. Nixon; teacher of Pine View School is taking a trip to Winnipeg on business.
It has been raining everyday for about a week and the roads are bad, yet Mr. A. Hunt is smiling, twin girls.
Mr. C. Clark is visiting Dauphin this week.
W. Williams is busy making the sawdust fly. The mill is in full swing under the management of Pat Powers, of Missouri.
The Rural Dean, Rev. S. Wiley, of St. Paul’s Church, Dauphin, will hold a service in All Saints’ Church, Fork River, on Sunday, June 18th, at 3 o’clock and at Winnipegosis in the evening at 7:30.
A. Hodgeson is visiting among his numerous friends at the Fork. He says mosquitoes are a nuisance.
E.H. Walker, school inspector of Dauphin, is here visiting the schools.
Mr. McLeod of Winnipeg is busy buying fat cattle for shipment.
The ladies of All Saints W.A. held a meeting at the rectory recently, considerable business was arranged for the coming years work.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 9 – 1912

1912 May 9 – Girl Made Good Escape

A young Galician girl who has been employed in several Dauphin homes lately, seems to have a kleptomania habit of purloining articles which takes her fancy. From one home she carried off a suitcase, from another a couple of dresses and at her last place of employment a roll of bills. Her home is in the Valley River district and the police have been watching trains for her to come back. Tuesday morning night police Levins captured her, though not without considerable resistance as she got off the Prince Albert flyer. Steel cells are being innovated at the station and for the time being the firemen’s bathroom was used for the accommodation of the prisoner. About an hour after Levins and another young man had occasion to go to the proviso cell, only to find that the bird had vanished. It did not take long to find out her mode of escape. The young woman had broken a pane of glass out of the fanlight and crawled through the aperture. She evidently cut herself in doing so from evidence of blood left.
It has since been learned that she was met two miles from town and driven to her home at Valley River. A constable will be sent up to bring her back.

1912 May 9 – Fork River

Thomas Shannon one of out enterprising farmers is taking a trip west to Saskatchewan on business.
Nat Little is a busy man on train days shipping cream for a Winnipeg firm.
Wm. King is on a trip north posting registration posters. registration commences on May 21st at Winnipegosis.
Frank Merritt one of Winnipegosis old-timers, passed through here on his way west. He bid his numerous friends here good-bye. We are sorry to see Fran go as he was a good sport. We wish him and his family the best of luck in their new home.
John Seale, Dominion timber inspector, was here last week on business at the mill.
The new chairs arrived for the council chamber without cushions. Some one will get concussion of the brain if the sittings are anyway lengthy. Get cushions boys.
Roland King left for Togo, Sask., on a visit to his brother at that point. He intends having a look around this summer.
Rev. S. Wilkinson of the Methodist Church, Dauphin, held communion service in the church on Sunday. He was assisted by Mr. Malley of Winnipegosis.
Mrs. D. Kennedy and Mrs. C. Clark, returned from a trip to the Lake Town Saturday.
Mrs. John Richardson and family of Winnipegosis, are visiting for a few days at her brothers, Mr. F.F. Hafenbrak.
Professor Robinson, a prominent leader of the town band, is contemplating a visit to his old home at Pittsburg, U.S.A.
The rainy weather last week seems to have put on the usual display of fireworks in the Press. The scribe is still doing business at the old stand.

1912 May 9 – Reply to Fork River Scribe

In reply to the scribe’s thrust in the Herald of May 2nd, the “Parrot” (unwisely so-called by the scribe) wishes to state that he now sees his mistake and regrets it, though no detriment was meant to the church. The leaders referred to should, as he says, be allowed to manage their own affairs also to fight their own battles.
To “Wellwisher” the Parrot has nothing whatsoever to say, for in him he recognizes one of the flock and is proud to own him as such. “Wellwisher” is to be complimented on his masterly representation of facts, and the “Management” (which in this instance has apparently developed itself to a membership of one) may justly feel proud in the possession of a bird of such excellent qualities and one that has so aptly learned the virtue of obedience.
THE PARROT.
Fork River, May 7th.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 17 – 1913

1913 Apr 17 – Petition For Commutation of Baran’s Sentence

John Baran was sentenced to be hanged on May 20th so that unless something it done to have his sentence commuted the gallows will be his fate. Baran’s friends, realizing this, set to work a couple’s weeks ago in the Galician settlement in the Riding Mountain, to circulate a petition asking the Minister of Justice to commute his sentence to imprisonment for life. The petition has between 200 and 300 signatures on it and will be sent in at once to the minister of justice at Ottawa to receive his consideration.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 4 – 1915

1915 Mar 4 – Playing Joke and is Head

Swan River, Feb. 26 – J. Hoey, a homesteader living near here, is dead as the result of playing the leading part in a practical joke. He was at some distance from his shack when he saw his chum come out. He thought it would be a good joke to imitate a wolf and see what happened. He crouched down low and began to howl like a wolf. The other man immediately got his rifle and shot. The bullet struck Hoey in the thigh. He was rushed to the hospital, where the leg was amputated. The shock, however, was too much and he died shortly after.

1915 Mar 4 – Thought He Had to Carry a Broom

A Galician seeing so many on the streets this week carrying brooms, asked a citizen if this was a new war regulation. He was jocularly told it was. The man then went into a store and bought a broom and proudly walked up Main Street with the “weapon” elevated over his shoulder at 45 degrees.

1915 Mar 4 – Fork River

Mr. G. O’Neil, of Mowat, is off on a visit to Rainy River.
Miss S. Lacey has returned from a few weeks’ visit with friends at Rainy River.
Mr. Munro and daughter, of Winnipeg, are spending a short time with Mr. and Mrs. A. Hunt.
Mrs. R. McEachern spent a few days at the Lake Town lately visiting he sister, Mrs. E.J. Morris.
J. Denby and Tom Sanderson, of Winnipegosis, paid this burgh a visit on business and are looking hale and hearty after their winter up the lake fishing.
Mr. Steede, lay reader, paid a visit to Sifton in connection with church work last week.
Mr. Wm. Howitson have a dance to his many friends on Friday night in the hall. A very good time was spent.
W. King returned from attending the 43rd annual session of the Provincial Grand Orange Lodge of Manitoba at Winnipeg, on Friday. He reports the largest meeting in the history of the lodge. Arrangements were made for entertaining the Triennial Council of Ireland and the Grand Lodge of British North America next summer.
Reeve Lacey and D.F. Wilson are attending the Trustees’ Convention at Winnipeg this week.

1915 Mar 4 – Sifton

Mr. James McAuley and Mr. Eberby of the Massey-Harris Co., were visitors in town last week.
Sid Coffey was in our midst last week and gave a good show with is moving pictures, but unfortunately there was a very poor attendance. Cheer up, “Sid,” better luck next time.
Mr. Oliver Abraham has been busy hauling wheat to the elevator for the last few days. He is putting about two carloads through the elevator. We trust he will be successful in getting a top price as the wheat is of good quality.
There was half a carload of cattle shipped out of here this week. We would like to know what has become of Robt. Brewer this last week or two. Surely his smiling face would be welcomed back again.
Mr. Walters, Mr. Kitt and Mr. Onlette, of this burgh, visited the Grain Growers Association concert and dance at Fairville last Friday and report having had a good time.

1915 Mar 4 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. J.P. Grenon is in Winnipeg undergoing an operation.
J. Denby, Wm. Denby, Sr., and W. Johnson, are Winnipeg visitors this week.
Mr. Chas. Stewart, of Dauphin, was in town on business, and left on Friday’s train.
Government officials, Sweny and Taylor, were here on Friday inspecting the works.
Mrs. Jack Denby has been on the sick list for a few days, but is around again.
Mrs. Theo Johnston left on Monday for Dauphin to visit Mr. and Mrs. King.
Mr. Ed. Morris left for Dauphin on Friday’s train.
Mrs. Wm. Williams, of Fork River, is a visitor in town.
Mr. and Mrs. Himie Cohen, of Winnipeg, are visiting Mr. and Mrs. F. Hechter this week.
Jim McInnes had a run for his life on Friday evening. A call was made to the rink that there was a deuce of a rumpus at the hotel, and, of course, Jim can home on the bound to settle the dispute, but to his surprise he found about 25 o 40 lads and lassies waiting for him and Mrs. McInnes in parlour. On their entering the brunch demanded the dining room cleared out, which was done in short order. It being Mr. McInnes’ birthday a dance was enjoyed till the wee sma’ hours of the morning. Jim has not given his age away yet, imitating the ladies in this respect.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 30 – 1913

1913 Jan 30 – Constable Rooke Shot
CONDITION CRITICAL

Thursday Jan. 30th, 11:30 a.m. – Constable Rooke’s condition critical, but he is holding his own well considering the wound is of such a dangerous character.

Constable Chas. Rooke was seriously shot Sunday by John Baran. A Galician, whom he was attempting to arrest, and is now in the general hospital. Mr. Rooke left early Sunday morning, taking a livery team and driver to arrest John Baran, who lives some twenty miles southwest of town, in the municipality of Gilbert Plains.
Baran has been giving considerable trouble of late and had deserted his wife, who has been a public charge for several years and was living with another woman at his farm in the Riding Mountain.
In driving out Sunday morning Rooke left his team at a neighbour’s a mile from Baran’s, and proceeded on foot accompanied by J. Tomaski, his driver, expecting that he would be able to approach and capture his man without giving him the alarm and perhaps escaping in the woods. After carefully approaching the house he rapped on the door but was told by the woman, who came to a window, that Baran was not at home. Rooke then proceeded to affect a forcible entrance, when three shots were fired in rapid succession through the door, the weapon used being a rifle.
The first shot struck the officer in the left breast over the heart.
His driver attempted to assist him to walk back to where the team was left, but after proceeding a short distance was compelled to leave him and hasten on for his team. Returning, with the assistance of the neighbour, he conveyed the wounded man to this neighbour’s house, but had to leave him there as he could not stand the jolting of the cutter. The driver drove down the mountain about nine miles to the home of H. McCorvie, who has a telephone, and summoned medical aid from town.
Upon receiving advice Dr. W.J. Harrington at once drove out, using all possible haste and getting a fresh team at McCorvie’s. A sleigh was fitted out in which to ring the injured man to the hospital and followed the doctor out.

WAS NOTORIOUS CHARACTER

Baran is a notorious character. He had been sent to jail two years ago for assaulting his wife. Baran deserted her and was living with another woman and his wife has to be supported as a charge on the town. It was only two years ago that Constable Rooke drove thirty-three miles in the coldest day of January, through a storm, in order to rescue Baran’s two little children, who were reported to be destitute and starving to death. These children were committed to the Winnipeg Children’s Aid Society by Magistrate Munson. Baran was summoned to appear before the magistrate for the non-support of his wife and children, and having disobeyed the summon, the magistrate issued a warrant and it was this warrant that Constable Rooke was endeavoring to arrest Baran on when he was shot.

THE INQUEST

The inquest on the death of the Baran baby, who was shot Monday by the police posse which went to the Galician settlement, was held, on Tuesday in the town hall. Evidence was taken from Dr. Ross, Chief of Police Bridle, F. May, W. Evans, W. Knight, E. Turland and Fred Little, members of the posse who did the shooting. The evidence produced showed that the child was killed almost instantly, the bullet passing through the body, causing a shock and hemorrhage.
The following jurymen were empanelled: Geo. King, foreman; Thos. Shaw, N. Taylor, E. Batty, H.F. Caldwell, D. Sutherland, T. Jordan, J.F. Neeley, R.G. Ferguson, F. Copeland, F.J. McDonald, H.R. Morrison.
After viewing the remains of the child and hearing the evidence, they returned the following verdict: –

VERDICT OF JURY

“We, the jury empanelled to take evidence as to the death of the baby Baran, on Jan. 27th, find that the baby came to his death by being shot with a rifle in the hands of one of the posse under Chief Bridle, organized for the purpose of arresting John Baran, suspected of having shot Constable Rooke, and the death of the baby, while regrettable, was purely accidental under the circumstances and we attach no blame to any member of the posse.”

1913 Jan 30 – Woman Placed Under Arrest

Annie Chisyk, who is a patient in the hospital suffering from a bullet wound, was formally placed under arrest on Wednesday, charged with shooting Constable Rooke. Her trial was set for Feb. 4th.

1913 Jan 30 – Fork River

Mr. W. Murray, Municipal Auditor, has been here auditing the books of Mossey River Municipality and it has been a busy week for Clerk Wilson.
Wm. Northam, who has been spending a few months at Weyburn, Sask., returned home last week.
Fred Storrar and William Johnston returned from the north end of the lake and report the fishing not to good lately as some of the men are off work.
Dunk Kennedy and John Richardson attended the Masonic banquet at Dauphin and report a good time.
Fred Cooper has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Wm. King returned from a two weeks’ trip west on business.
The cordwood has been coming in lively of late and the place looks like a wood camp; wood bring piled on all the streets.
At the inter-diocesan examinations of the Church of England Sunday School, Mrs. H.H. Scrase teacher of All Saints’ S.S. was sixth place in first class work, securing a diploma and book. Mrs. C. Bradley, of Winnipegosis, passed with first class diplomas as teacher of Winnipegosis Anglican S.S. We congratulate these ladies.
Wm. Parker was at the Armstrong store on business Thursday and Friday.
Mr. Cockerill of the Peabody Company, was a visitor at Dunk Kennedy’s on Saturday.
Howard Armstrong’s nephew has arrived on a visit from Ontario.
J.W. Johnston has moved up with his family to the hatchery on Lake Winnipegosis and Miss Eva Storrar accompanied them for a visit.
Sandy Munro was a weekend visitor at home on Saturday and Sunday.
Billie Coultas is sporting around with a new cutter these days and seems right in line with the Educational Department in the speeding line and guarantees to take the curves safely.
We must ask our readers to excuse the want of news last week as our correspondent was off for a week’s trip and our motto is while we are alive we will crow.
Service will be held in All Saints’ Anglican Church Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock, February.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 11 – 1912

1912 Jan 11 – Fatal Accident

A sad accident occurred in the south-western portion of the town on Friday last when Hugh, the seven year old son of Homer G. Dempsey, was struck in the head with the tines of a pitch fork in the hands of his uncle. It appears that the boy was going into the stable just as his uncle was throwing a forkful of hay and received one of the prongs in the forehead, which penetrated the skull. A physician was at once sent for and the wound attended to. The tines of the fork was in a filthy condition and this made the wound dangerous and which afterwards resulted in the boy’s death.
The family have the sympathy of the community in their sad bereavement. The funeral took place on Tuesday to Riverside cemetery.

1912 Jan 11 – Had Part of Ear Bitten off

Two Galicians, Anthony Genik and John Genik, of the Riding Mountain settlement, had a fight last Friday, in which the former had part of his ear chewed off. John, it appears, is married to a young woman, and Anthony thought, had been paying too much attention to his wife when he was away from home. This started the row. Constable Rooke arrested John on Sunday and took him to Gilbert Plains, where he arraigned before magistrate N.B. Nicholson, on Monday on a charge of unlawfully wounding Anthony Genik.
The case was heard on Wednesday, and after hearing the evidence the Magistrate committed the defendant for trial.
He was afterwards released on bail.

1912 Jan 11 – Fork River

The Canadian Northern Ry. Co. is putting in an Express Office at this point with Mr. Nat Little in charge, which will fill a long felt want as every Little helps in this town.
The New Year’s ball held in the Orange Hall by the Nobs of the town was pronounced to be the most successful event of the year.
Miss Gertie Cooper, who has been spending her holidays at home returned to Dauphin this week.
The first meeting of the new council was held in the municipal office on the 2nd.
Fred King was unfortunate enough to have a valuable pair of wolfhounds poisoned last week by some careless or malicious person putting out poison.
Wm. King, county master, left here on Saturday for his annual visit to L.O. Lodges of Dauphin county as far west as Togo.
“Senator” Kennedy and Fred Storrar paid a visit to the Lake Town on business.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 9 – 1913

1913 Jan 9 – Engineer Wm. Bowman Killed

Engineer Wm. Bowman, who was running for Engineer Wm. Graham on No. 4 train was killed in the Winnipeg yard on Saturday afternoon last. The train reached Winnipeg safely from Dauphin and Mr. Bowman was running to the roundhouse light when another engine ran into the tender, smashing it and driving the tender into the cab with such force that the boiler was injured in such a way that the steam escaped and scalded Bowman so badly that he expired on the spot.
Jack Cobb, the fireman, escaped through the cab window without suffering any injury.
Engineer Bowman was well-known in Dauphin and sympathy is felt for the family in their great sorrow.

1913 Jan 9 – Frozen to Death

Tuesday was Christmas according to the Galician custom and there was the usual festivities on that day and the following two days. John Kuruk, a Galician about 45 years of age, imbibed freely on Tuesday and Wednesday and on the later day he lay down at the C.N.R. tool house near the bridge and (Thursday) morning was found there frozen to death.
Deceased came from Austria about three years ago and has been working on the railway as a section man. He leaves a wife and two grown-up sons.

1913 Jan 9 – Suffered Bad Cut

Mrs. E.H. Walker was carrying a crock in her hands on Tuesday at the farm three miles south of the town when she slipped and fell. The crock broke and one of the pieces cut a bad gash on her left wrist. An artery was severed and she bled freely for quite a time. A phone message hurriedly brought Dr. Culbertson to the scene when the wound was dressed and Mrs. Walker brought to the hospital. It is expected she will be out in the course of a day or two.

1913 Jan 9 – Fork River

Mr. French, of Grandview, is spending a few days with Mr. and Mrs. J. Clemens.
W. Williams has taken his outfit out to his limits east of Lake Dauphin.
Frank Bailey left for Winnipeg after spending his New Year’s holidays with his parents on the Mossey.
Miss M. Nixon left for Findlay, having accepted the position of teacher in that district.
Miss Bessie and Miss Pearl Wilson left on a visit to friends at Sifton.
Professor S. Biggs returned to Dauphin after spending Xmas week among friends.
M. Sturdy, assistant manager of the A.T.Co. store, left on a short vacation. We wish him a good time.
Edwin King, who if with the C.N.R., was a visitor at the home of his parents lately.
Mrs. Willis Miller, of Mowat, who has been under the doctor’s care at Winnipegosis, has returned home.
The C.N.R. surveyor paid a visit and took the measurement of the elevator here.
Mr. Howatson, from Winnipegosis, is relieving Mr. Sturdy at the Armstrong Trading Co. for a few days while Mr. Sturdy is on holiday.
The annual meeting of Purple Star, 1775 was held on Tuesday, Dec 31st. The auditors’ report was most satisfactory, showing a balance in hand, after meeting all expenses for 1912.
The following officers were elected for 1913.
W.M. – Bro F.F. Hafenbrak
D.M. – Bro. W.J. King
Chaplain – Bro. H.H. Scarse, re-elected
Recording Secretary – Bro. W. King, re-elected
Financial Secretary – Bro. C.E. Bailey, re-elected
Treasurer – Bro. C. Bailey, re-elected
D. of C. – Bro. F. Cooper, re-elected
Lecturer – Bro. A Hunt
Dept. Lecturer – S.B. Reid
1st Committeemen – Edwin King, re-elected; C. Clark
Committeemen – J. Frost, Joe Bickle, J.E. Morriss, S.B. Munro, J.C. Bickle
Installation of officers at next regular meeting.

1913 Jan 9 – Winnipegosis

The Standard Lumber Co.’s mill is closed for the season.
The Armstrong Trading Co. has started their snow-plow with ten teams on its first trip up the lake to haul down fish.
Alex McArthur’s steam engine invention is also on a trip for the same purpose.
J.P. Grenon made a trip to Winnipeg on Saturday on business.
There was no Anglican Church service last Sunday owing to the recent storms impeding velocipede transition.
The Christian League held their social evening at the home of Mrs. J.J. Burrell last week. A very enjoyable time is reported.
Mr. Noble has returned to Dauphin to continue his studies after spending a week here visiting his adherents.
Mr. Malley returned on Saturday to Winnipeg.
The school was opened on Friday by Miss Hayes on account of Mr. Hulme not returning till Saturday.
Inspector Charles White has been away to Waterhen.
Miss Bradley has returned to Winnipeg to pursue her studies at St. Mary’s Academy.
Mrs. Bradley last Saturday received a letter from a Greek lady of Athens giving an account of the war raging in the Balkans. The letter was dated Dec 12th.