Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 14 – 1915

1915 Oct 14 – Arrested

Two young Ruthenians were arrested in the Ethelbert district this week charged with setting fire to two stacks of wheat on Michael Buyar’s farm. The case against them appears to be a strong one. Detective John Parn worked up the case and made the arrests.

1915 Oct 14 – Ethelbert

Harry Cope Nash, of Cowan, was a visitor in town Monday.
We have failed to announce for the last week or two that Mr. Wm. Barrie was appointed as justice of peace for and in the province and Mr. Geo. C. Smith as a provincial constable.
Threshing is just beginning ere and if we only get a few nice days there would be quite a portion of it done.
The average is very good, but the wheat grades somewhat low.
Brachman’s have enloaded this week a carload of flour. It looks as if they alone are going to stock flour this fall.
We had a temperance meeting here this last Sunday. There was a big crowd gathered in the town hall and Mr. Farley, from Winnipeg put up a strong speech and made an impression on the Ruthenians, which were in the majority at the meeting and it looks as if they might join the temperance forces.
Mr. White, from Grandview, is doing a big cattle business in this locality. He has shipped four cars in two weeks.
Mr. Kenneth McLean has built an addition to his house on the farm and has fixed up the house first class. Kenneth, I’ll be you expect company!
Mrs. A. Clarke, of Munson, Alta., returned home on Monday.
Ethelbert will be the chief centre of the wood business again this winter.

1915 Oct 14 – Fork River

Private A.J. Storrar, of the 45th Batt., has returned to Sewell camp after spending a few days with friends. [1 line missing].
Miss Robinson, of Dauphin, is a visitor at the home of Mrs. Dewsbury.
Mr. Sam McLean, of Dauphin, was here on a business trip lately. He had his little gun with him. Some say he was up for chickens, others think it was for larger game.
Mr. Hosey, horse dentist, spent a few days here fixing up the company farm horses.
T.N. Briggs’ outfit is threshing the company’s crop. The yield is such a surprise to Archie that it keeps him busy; in fact, he has not time to sleep as they thresh night and day.
Fred. Coop and Billy Williams are hard at the threshing also and the elevator is busy these days.
John Watson, bailiff of Dauphin, was a visitor here for a short time last week getting the lay of the land.
Capt. Alex. Russell is home from Kelwood and is spending the Thanksgiving holidays with his family.
Mr. and Mrs. Somerfield, from Ontario, are visiting at the homes of their nephews, F.F. and Vivian Hafenbrak, on the Fork River.
Prairie chickens are not near so numerous as in past years in this vicinity.

1915 Oct 14 – Sifton

Football match – 1st Sifton Patrol Boy Scouts vs. Revd. Father Sabourin’s school. Thanksgiving day was celebrated here by a football match between the above trams. The scouts made the challenge, which was kindly accepted and by the permission of Father Sabourin, the scholars marched to the Wycliffe School grounds in charge of the teacher. The Scouts played with dash and vim and although much less in stature and outweighed, steadily kept the ball in the enemy’s quarters and finally succeed in placing the leather. A large number of spectators enjoyed the dun. Score: Scouts, 1 goal; Father Sabourin’s school, nil. Scout team: Leslie Kennedy, (captain), John Gillis, Max Marantz, G. Marantz, Joe Reid, John Terchennik, Roy Kennedy, Louie Kennedy, Roddy Gillis, Mike Setchiabin, Stanley Gillis.

1915 Oct 14 – Winnipegosis

Last week was a busy week in town, every night being filled by a concert, dance or moving picture show and we all feel the better for it.
There was a most enjoyable dance in honour of our soldier boys on he occasion of their leaving for their regiment. Everybody was there and seemed to have a great time.
On Wednesday evening Mr. and Mrs. Sid. Coffey gave a dance in the Rex Hall, which was well attended and a most enjoyable evening was spent.
The concert in aid of the Red Cross Fund was held in the Rex Hall on Friday, the 8th, inst., and the hall was crowded; the program was a good and varied one and was much appreciated. The proceeds amounted to $57.10.
The ten-cent tea at the home of Mrs. White last Wednesday netted the handsome sum of $11.75.
Don’t forget the masquerade ball in the Rex Hall on Friday, the 22nd Oct. or you will sure miss a good time. Tickets on sale from Dunc Kennedy.
Three cars of settlers’ effects arrived on Saturday from the east. This northern country is rapidly filling up. We are glad to welcome all comers.
Miss Dolly Geekie and Miss Eva Fredrickson left on Saturday’s train for Winnipeg to spend a few days with friends.
[1 line missing] few days with Miss McMartin, left on Monday’s train for Neepawa.
Mr. Wiseman, of Roblin, has opened up a jewellery store and repair shop in the Rex Hall block.
Mr. Goodman, of Winnipeg, has opened up a second hand clothing emporium in the old Hunking house across the track.
The council met as a court of revision on Wednesday the 6th inst., and adjourned to meet again on the 14th October at 9.30 a.m.
Mayor J.P. Grenon returned Friday from a business trip to Winnipeg.
Frank Hechter left on Saturday for Dauphin on business.
The Field Day at the schoolhouse on Wednesday last, the 6th Oct., was a great success but the cold weather prevented quite a number from attending. Much credit is due Principal Davis and Miss McMartin and Miss Whitemore for the good time the children had. The singing of “O Canada” deserves special mention.
All the fishermen are busy these days getting their outfits ready for leaving for the north this week.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 25 – 1913

1913 Sep 25 – Fork River

John Robinson spent a few days here among his friends after returning from the north end of the lake.
Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Weaver left for Winnipegosis, where Mr. W. intends residing having taken a position in the A.T. Co.
Mrs. F.F. Hafenbrak and family returned from a week’s visit to her sister, Mrs. E. Morris, of Winnipegosis.
Miss Buie and Miss Weatherhead, of Dauphin, spent the week-end here the guests of Miss Weatherhead, teacher.
Miss M. Millidge, ravelling organizer of the Woman’s Auxiliary for the English church, will address the members of the W.A. of All Saints’ Church on Monday, September 29th, at 3 o’clock in the afternoon in the church.
W. Williams has received another separator, which makes four threshing outfits working within a radius of two miles and all are busy these days, the trouble is to get men to run the machines to their full capacity.
John Richardson is going around with a broad smile. It’s a bouncing boy.
Mr. and Mrs. F. Coomber of Selkirk, are visiting R. Coomber, on the Fork River for a few days.
The Harvest festival was held in All Saints’ Anglican Church on the 21st. The church was very tastefully decorated with grain, leaves, fruit and flowers by the ladies and the congregation was the largest on such an occasion. T.A. Worsey, of St. John’s College, preached a very appropriate sermon. There was a good offertory to the Home Mission Fund.
Miss Ena Fredrickson, of Winnipegosis, has taken a position at the A.T. Co. store here.
The C.N.R. telegraph gang are repairing old poles and putting up new ones between here and Winnipegosis.
The members of All Saints’ W.A. are holding an ice cream social in the Orange Hall on Friday night, September 26th. Everybody welcome.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 5 – 1912

1912 Sep 5 – Heavy Rain

A heavy rain set in early this (Thursday) morning and canted for several hours. The rain has put a stop to harvesting operations for this week at least. Indications now point to better weather.

1912 Sep 5 – A Note of Warning

There has been issued, by direction of the Minister of Agriculture at Ottawa, a conspicuous poster calling the attention of potato growers to the importance of examining their crop to ascertain whether or not is infected with potato canker. The hanger shows in natural colours a potato plant the whole yield of which is affected by the ideas. It also shows the appearance of individual tubers in which the canker has started to work. Growers who discover suspicious symptoms of the ideas in their crop are requested to send affected specimens to the Dauphin Botanist, Experimental Farm, Ottawa. The poster is issued as farmers’ circular No. 3 of the Division of Botany and is being distributed by the Publications Branch of the Department of Agricultural.

1912 Sep 5 – Fork River

The crops around this district are now looking excellent and the binders are now busily at work. If only we have good weather from now on we shall have a good average. If this district had a good ditch made to let off the water from the west, the farmers would not have to complain of so much water on their land. Perhaps something will be done one of these days.
Miss Alderton, teacher of Mossey River School, spent a few days in Dauphin last week.
Nat Little and his daughter, Gracie, are taking a little holiday in the States. We all hope they will have a pleasant time.
Wm. King is busy these days finishing off that new stable he has been building. It looks fine.
Mr. H.H. Scrase spent a few days visiting friends in Dauphin. He looks well.
Miss Fredrickson, of Winnipegosis, is now helping at the Armstrong Trading Co. in place of Miss Pearl Wilson resigned.
Mrs. F. Hafenbrak gave birth to a little son last week.
Mr. and Mrs. C. Bradley, of Winnipegosis, came to Fork River, last Sunday and visited Mr. and Mrs. H.H. Scrase.
We are glad to see the ??? ??? the elevator and hope to see ??? this fall.
Mrs. S. Bailey, who spent a month with friends in Ontario, has returned reports having a pleasant time there.
John Stacey, of Snowflake, Man., is visiting at S. Bailey’s and renewing old acquaintances.
S.E. Briggs, who had the misfortune to lose his horse with fever, has purchased another driver.
Hugh Armstrong spent a few days at the Company’s store on his return from the Pas.
Sydney Gower, electrical engineer, was renewing old acquaintances for a few days.
Mrs. A. Snelgrove and family returned home after a visit to her home at Brandon.
Theodore Johnston has returned from the south and is staying a few days with Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Professor John Robinson has returned and is looking well. We expect to see the band out in full force in future.
[1 line is rubbed out] the position of municipal critic. Not at all; we just noted a few remarks that were brought to our notice ??? friend don’t seem to relish ???. Before he ??? into the council ??? [9-10 lines are rubbed out] and all is forgotten ??? ??? ??? then they strike ??? ???. “Anything else Tommy.” “Yes, dad says the taxes amount to a rent and there ain’t no ex-rays powerful enough to discover where they go.” “That will do Tommy, dear; you must have meant beaver instead of municipality, as the beaver’s head looks wise and his tail is to carry the mud. The M.C. goes on to say we should suggest something. What’s the use. Several grants were got for the south road and the M.C. sent a three page letter to the man in charge and stopped the work as laid out by the Government engineer because he was not in the council he was held up and yet the M.C. whines about not getting assistance to overcome these difficulties. Rats, keep quiet M.C. and things will be all right later on and we’ll meet you on the south road with the band.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 8 – 1913

1913 May 8 – Fork River

Seeding is the order of the day. The land is getting in good order and everyone is as busy as bees and expects to put in a large crop if the fine weather continues.
John Clemens, of Dauphin, was up inspecting his farm and intends putting in a crop.
“Say, Mike, did yees notice the state of the crossing in front of the express office? It looks like Paddy’s pants, “more holy than righteous.” Some one will get hurt there yet.”
“Well, Pat, I am told it is caused by the heavy mail passing over it to the municipal office. Shure they are mistaken as I notice all the crossings in Winnipegosis are about busted up, too. They have only been down one year.”
“Well, Mike, its either those heavy draft horses of Josies that’s playing the divel with them crossings or their not built right. We’ll have to see the reeve about it. Fancy building crossings on Main Street with two inch spruce plank.”
We notice in last week’s issue a paragraph about early hatching of eggs in Manitoba given as the 11th April and we would like to inform our readers that Dunc Kennedy had chicks out on the 1st of March and are now well grown. What about Fork River for poultry raising. There were raised by the hen.
Mrs. A. Cameron and Mrs. G. Shannon of Mowat Centre were visitors to the Lake Town this week.
R.C. Sparling, real estate agent of Dauphin, paid us a short visit on business.
Mrs. Wm. King returned from a two weeks’ visit to her daughter, Mrs. E. Morris, at Winnipegosis.
W. Williams, lumber merchant, returned from Dauphin and states Mrs. William is improving in health.
Miss Ena Fredrickson has been transferred to the Armstrong Trading Co. store at Winnipegosis. She will be missed her and her numerous friends wish her a pleasant time in her new position.
Rev. H.H. Scrase has received word from the Synod that he and his family are to be transferred to Kinisota on Lake Manitoba as soon as arrangements are completed.
We are pleased to see Sam Baily around town again after being confined to the house for some time.
Wm. King, having been appointed registration clerk for this district, is busy posting up the bills and starts registration at Winnipegosis, on May 27th.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 1 – 1915

1915 Apr 1 – Boy Run Over

Robert, the 11-year-old son of Mr. Alf. Coombos, whose farm is seven miles north-east of town, was run over by a heavy wagon containing about a ton of hay on Saturday afternoon last. The wheels of the wagon passed over the boy’s body in the region of his stomach, and strange to relate, the little fellow suffered no serious internal injury and is recovering.

1915 Apr 1 – Fork River

Archie McDonell and family, of Winnipegosis, have arrived and are intending to put the summer in on the A.T.Co. farm.
Mr. F.O. Murphy held a successful sale at Sifton on Monday.
Mr. McFadden, solicitor of Dauphin, spent a short time at this point lately. He will attend to professional business on Wednesday of each week.
D.F. Wilson has returned from spending a few days at Sifton and Dauphin on business.
Captain Lyons, of Winnipegosis, collector for the Municipality, is on his rounds and paid a visit to D.F. Wilson, clerk, this week.
Harry Hunter has the contract for finishing the Lacey Bridge.
It is rumoured that there has been more deaths lately in the Weiden district and that the people are running from house to house at their own sweet will. Where’s the health officer?
Mr. Timewell has arrived here and is spending a few days in this vicinity looking for a farm to settle his family if one can be got suitable. It should not be a difficult matter as there is plenty of vacant land here waiting for settlers.
W. King is building a house on his lot east of Main Street.
Mr. Lane, government engineer, was up taking levels in the vicinity of Mr. Wilson’s farm.
Miss R. Armstrong has returned from a few days visit at her home in Dauphin and the school is running again.

1915 Apr 1 – Winnipegosis

Mud Scrow No. 2 was lowered on to the skids Saturday, and was slid on to the ice where she wills stay till the river opens.
Mrs. John McAulay, of Dauphin, is visiting in town this week.
Mr. Gunar Fredrickson and family have moved out to their old home at the point and are fitting it up for the summer.
Mrs. D. Kennedy arrived from Dauphin Friday.
Mrs. A. Johnson and her son Kari have left for North Dakota to visit friends there.
Mr. J.P. Grenon arrived home Friday from an eastern trip.
Mrs. Thos. Needham, of Dauphin, is visiting with Mrs. C. White this week.
Mr. Wm. Mapes and family are back to town from their winter camp.
Miss Grace Saunders left for Winnipeg on Friday.
The Winnipegosis Football Club held their first meeting last week when officers were elected, and it was decided to have two teams on the field this year, with Glen Burrell and Bert Arrowsmith as captains. We expect to see some fast football here this summer as the boys are already chasing the ball.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 20 – 1913

1913 Mar 20 – Baran Now Praying

John Baran, condemned to be hanged for the murder of Constable Rooke, now spends his time in prayer.

1913 Mar 20 – Fork River

Geo. Esplen was a visitor with W. King on his return from Mafeking, where he spent the winter in charge of one of the fishing posts on the north end of the lake.
Mrs. Morley Snelgrove left for Dauphin to visit among friends on her way to Dryden, Ontario.
Miss Pearl Wilson is taking a short vacation among friends at Sifton.
John Bykilo returned home after a two months rest for the good of his health at Portage.
Fred Storrar, of Mowat, has resumed his duties as assistant manager of the A.T. Co. Fred’s all right, a pleasant smile for everyone.
Miss Ena Fredrickson and Miss Kennedy returned from a visit to their folks at Winnipegosis.
We are informed that Professor Ike Robinson was scalded the other day while experimenting with a boiler, which exploded throwing the contents in his face. He is doing nicely. Ike says he don’t mind having solved the tea experiment.
The C.N.Ry. bridge gang is busy renewing the bridge on the creek north of town.
The vaudeville performance which the Laurier troupe has been putting on at the National Play house on Parliament Hill, is costly for the country. Ten thousand dollars a day or sixty thousand dollars for the week is the bill which the people of the Dominion will have to foot for the little game of politics which the Opposition has been staging for the first week in the opposition to the navy bill. That’s Liberal economy and loyalty everytime.
“Say, Mike, we overheard the Admiral trying to explain the need of that boundary bridge the other day and several took a hand in the debate.”
“Well, Pat, by what I see of the affair it is a fraud to take our taxes to build a bridge to accommodate one man and it on private property. He must have caught the rest of them napping to be able to carry such a measure.”
“Now, you’ve put your foot in it, Mike, sure. The Fork River Philosopher’s idea is to bridge the whole municipality and throw the dirt on top. Gee, what next.”
Rev. Dr. Page, travelling missionary for this diocese, held Communion and Baptismal service at All Saints’, Fork River, Winnipegosis and Sifton. There were large congregations at each service. The Rev. H.H. Scrase assisted.

1913 Mar 20 – Winnipegosis

Charles Johnson, of Makinak, was a visitor to Rev. Father Derome last week. He was much interested in his visit and inspected the hatchery on Snake Island, where he enjoyed himself. His father is interested in the management of a hatchery in Norway, Europe.

1913 Mar 20 – Winnipegosis

The ball in the Winnipegosis hotel on the 17th proves that the anniversary of St. Patrick is becoming very dear to the hearts of some, it being patronized by the elite, graced by those who love to trip the light fantastic, and enlivened by an appreciative crowd of onlookers. Many wore a souvenir badge supplied by willing workers of the W.A. and assistants. Fork River social element added materially to its success.
At the Christian League last Thursday Mr. Scott read a paper on “Commerce” touching on the German menace, that was worthy of a much larger crowd of understanding. He defined minutely the fundamental principles of commerce making it more interesting by apt illustrations, ably leading one’s interest up to appreciate the Empire’s present position. His reflections on England from Germany’s attitude served to illuminate her domain and in no way detracted from her greatness.
Mr. Mullens was the recipient of a handsome gift from his many friends in Winnipegosis last Wednesday evening as a token of their esteem and regret at his departure.
Mr. Hulme returns home for Easter holidays.
Mr. and Mrs. Clarkson are rejoicing in the possession of a young son, which was privileged to be baptized by the Rev. Dr. Page, archdeacon and general missioner of the diocese. A baptismal service was also held in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Walmsley on Sunday evening last.