Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 3 – 1921

1921 Nov 3 – Fire at Winnipegosis

Fire early Wednesday morning destroyed the stores of Isaac Bradbery and Nate Kessler. The loss will be considerable. Some insurance was carried by the firms.

1921 Nov 3 – G.W.V.A. Notes

The next regular meeting will b held on November 9th –will the members keep this date in mind and attend the meeting.

Anyone who has a supply of magazines that they are done with and have no further use for will oblige by leaving them in the reading room of the home. The reading matter will be much appreciated. The magazines will also be sent to the homesteads where reading matter is always acceptable.

Only a year now left in which to take up the soldiers’ insurance. Have you taken up any of this insurance? Over five thousand returned men have taken up the insurance; there are many more who are entitled to take advantage of it and become insured. It is a good thing to take up while it is going.

Don’t forget to support the “Poppy Ladies” on Armistice Day. Every veteran should have a poppy on that day.

Don’t fail to attend the bazaar of the Ladies’ Auxiliary to the G.W.V.A. on Thursday, November 3rd, as well as the ball at night.

Will every member see to it that he is in good stand if with the local branch. We are trying to get the new home fitted up and need all the help that we can get it.

1921 Nov 3 – H.E. Hunt Loses His Leg

H.E. Hunt, who now resides at Stettler, Alta., met with a bad gun accident on Tuesday, 1st inst. he received the charge of the gun in his leg below the knee and later had to have the leg amputated. Mrs. Hunt left for Stettler this (Thursday) morning.

1921 Nov 3 – Jury Verdict Accidental Death

The coroner’s jury empanelled at Winnipegosis on the 27th ult., to enquire into the death of Duncan Crerar, who was thrown from a wagon when his horses ran away, brought in a verdict that his death resulted from the accident.

1921 Nov 3 – October Police Records

The police records for October show that these were 13 convictions for October as follows: Two were fined for speeding, four drunks, one for breach of license by-law, two for disorderly conduct, two for running autos with cut outs on, two for breach of traffic by-law. The town’s share of the fines amounted to $110.

1921 Nov 3 – Poppies! “Lest we Forget.”

With the world-wide call to prayer for the disarmament of the Nations, there comes through “The Imperial Order Daughters of Empire” a national call to service. The fingers that were used so long to plying the busy knitting needles are not content to remain idle. There is work yet to be done—great and noble work, and every loyal Canadian must feel it a privilege to share the responsibility which the Daughters of Empire have assumed. The Poppies bloom in Flanders Field over the graves of many an unknown hero, who, when he gave his life for his country, have his all; and somewhere under the British flag his children may be struggling through life without the advantages that would make of them men and women worthy to fill the gaps left by the war. Many an inventive genius, many a brilliant mind may be lost to the wold because of the lack of resources to finance an advanced education.

And herein lies the work of The Daughters of Empire for many future years—to maintain the fund established, by them for enabling the worthy sons and daughters of fallen British soldiers, sailors and aviators, to obtain the best educational advantages the country can afford, thus making of them an asset of which the nation may be proud.

Has any monument so grad yet been erected to the memory of our Canadian heroes?

To keep alive the spirit of patriotism, and inspire the sentiment in the minds of the young, the women of our National Chapter, and all its auxiliaries, have, during the past weeks been engaged in marking “Poppies”, which they expect will be purchased and worn on “Armistice Day” by every loyal British subject. Though it is “Only a scrap of paper” it will be the duty of every parent and teacher in the land to wear one and tell the children the “Old Old Story” of that for which the Poppy stands the story of—

“The day when our hearts were wrung

And our Country’s Banner a half-mast hung

For the loss of our lads in brown

‘Twas a Nation’s grief, but an Empire’s gain

For they fell, that Empire to maintain

And that peace and liberty still might reign

In every man’s home town.

How best can we honor our noble dead—

Can storied marble a halo shed

To glorify Khaki Brown?

No! Let us open the doors of learning wide

To the sons and daughters of those who died

At Ypres and Vimy and Somme’s red tide,

For the sake of their own home town.

And in future years when the mists roll by,

And a world shall ask the reason why

These sleep in Khaki Brown,

Old Time will flutter his hoary wing,

And say in a voice with a gladsome ring,

“They died that a nobler race might spring

From the boys of our own home town.”

1921 Nov 3 – Thieves Enter Tailor’s Shop

Solomon’s tailor shop was entered Sunday night and two pair of pants and a grey jacket taken. Entrance was gained through a window in the rear of the shop. The window was being repaired and had been left unsecured.

1921 Nov 3 – Wife Beater Given Two Months

Edward Radford, a homesteader of the Shergrove district, appeared before magistrate Rheaume at Ste. Rose du Lac, on Saturday, October 29th, charged with beating his wife. He was found guilty and sentenced to two months in the Dauphin jail at hard labor.

1921 Nov 3 – Winnipegosis

The hatchery boat is now bringing in the roughfish which were caught while taking spawn.

Messrs. Toye, McDonald, Joe Bickel, Shears, Ketcheson, Sieffert, Denby, Brown, and Giggins attended the Union government convention at Dauphin, when Robert Cruise was again nominated as a government supporter.

A community club is being formed at this point, under the direction of Mr. Shears. Singing will be taken up as one of the first features of the winter’s programme.

Coroner’s juries do some funny things. In his evidence at the inquest of Duncan Crerar, Dr. Bottomley gave it as his opinion that deceased came to his death as a result of apoplexy. Yet in the face of this evidence the jury brought in a verdict that death was due to his being thrown out of a wagon, due to deceased’s horses running away.

Mrs. Theo. Johnson returned to town on Tuesday, from Dauphin. She shortly leaves for Fort William, where she will spend the winter.

The politicians are beginning to get busy. Handshaking has started, but the campaign cigar has not yet made its appearance.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – March 18, 1920

Death of Joseph P. Grenon

There passed away at Winnipegosis on the 11th inst. one of the most widely known men in northern Manitoba in the person of Joseph P. Grenon. Deceased contracted influenza and developed pneumonia. He was in his forty-second year. The Grenon family moved from Fort William, Ontario, to Winnipegosis almost a quarter of a century ago. The railroad reached Winnipegosis in 1897, and from that date the development of the village and the district commenced. At that period Lake Winnipegosis teamed with fish and with the facilities afforded of transportation by rail and the fishing industry soon developed. One of the first outside companies to become interested was the Armstrong Trading Company, which represented at that time the Booth interests of Chicago. Young “Josey” Grenon was appointed manager of the company and was not long in displaying business qualities of much more than the ordinary standard. The company carried on a general store in connection with the fish and for years the Armstrong Trading Company was a household word in the north. As can be readily understood a man of Mr. Grenon’s ability was note allowed to confine his efforts entirely to private business interests. When the municipality of Mossey River was organized some years ago he had the honour of being its first reeve, and a few years later when the village of Winnipegosis was incorporated he was chosen to fill the mayor’s chair.
In politics he was a Conservative and wielded considerable influence at election times. When Winnipegosis became part of the provincial constituency of Gilbert Plains he was one of those placed in nomination at the Conservative convention.
In an aggressive, though short short career, it could not but be expected that he had met with, in some cases, strenuous opposition, and, at times, relations became somewhat strained, but it would be hard to find one who had more friends and whose passing caused more real sorrow.
He is survived by a widow, two daughters and two sons.
The funeral took place on Saturday and was largely attended. About fifty went from Dauphin and others were in attendance from Portage la Prairie and Winnipeg.
The service was conducted by the Rev. Father Brachet, of Pine Creek, in the Roman Catholic Church.
Many beautiful wreaths covered the casket.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 2 – 1914

1914 Jul 2 – Damage by Hail Storm

A heavy ran storm accompanied by hail visited the Mountview district on Tuesday afternoon. The strip touched by the hail was a narrow one and only two farms were struck.
W.G. Lock last 45 acres of wheat and 15 of oats. Crop insured.
Jas. Scarff last 40 acres wheat and 20 oats. Not insured.
Mr. Lock had only insured his crop a few days before the storm and only received his policy from Winnipeg on Wednesday.

1914 Jul 2 – Latest From Sewell Camp

Sewell Camp, June 30.
The Sergeant-Trumpeter mounted a new steed on Tuesday and we were treated to a great display of fireworks from the horse’s heels, the sergeant’s tongue and also eventually from the part of his pants which struck the ground after a while. For a minute or so he was hear saying, “Going up! Going up!” When he struck the ground, Sergeant-Major Fletcher was heard to say, “Coming down, I fiddler.” Highfield after four days’ rest has still a stiff neck.
The boys look very smart in their new Indian service helmets, which were presented to us alone (the 32nd) as a distinction for our work last year. The boys are proud of them as they should be.
Someone caused an uproar on Sunday. He said the camp was being attacked by Suffragettes. On closer examination they proved to be Cameron Highlanders.
Our shoeing smith thought he would ride the Sergeant-Trooper’s broncho, but changed his mind at the same time as the broncho.
It takes Dave Cox to ride the bronchos and round-up the runaways.
We will leave here on Friday morning arriving at Dauphin in the evening.
Our regiment was inspected on Saturday by the honourary colonel, Dr. Roche.
We turned out on Saturday morning at 4.30 a.m. for shooting on the range. Major Walker very conveniently was absent having a blister on his heel, so stayed in bed.
The Ashville boys are a first-class bunch of rifle shots.
The Dauphin squadron has been nicknamed “The Devil’s Own,” and they are worthy of it.
Red noses are the fashion. It is the fault of the occasional sunshine, not the grog.
On galloping off the field two regiments collided, resulting in a bad smash, one man getting his collarbone broken and two others disabled.
Our boy troopers, Gordon Walker, Gordon Batty and Roy Wade, are constantly being court-martialled by Squad Sergeant-Major, for unsoldierly conduct; not being on parade at 5.30 a.m., catching gophers before cleaning up their tent, etc.
Our cook put up some fine apple pies, things which are comparatively unknown here. We have an idea that Frank Beyette can have his job every year if he likes.
We have had a number of lady visitors up to now, among whom was Mrs. Walker and little daughters.
We wonder what it is that makes the boys sit down so slowly and gently. Having had some ourselves they have our sympathy.
H.H. Allan, the photographer, came down here this year and he is doing roaring business.

1914 Jul 2 – Fork River

A. Cameron and F.B. Lacey, of Mowat, have returned from a trip to Dauphin.
Vote for Sam Hughes, the farmer, and you won’t make a mistake.
Miss Gertrude Cooper has returned from Dauphin and is with her parents on the Fork.
Mrs. Attwood, of Towell, Indiana, and her mother, are spending the summer months with Mrs. W. Davis on the farm.
Mrs. Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, is a visitor at the home of D.F. Wilson on the Mossey.
Messrs. J. Robinson and H. Hunter have put a three-horse power gasoline engine in their new boat. The water should fly now.
Several of the electors from her attended the Conservative meeting at Winnipegosis on Wednesday night. The speakers were Mr. Shears, and Mr. Grenon. The meeting was well attended. We hope to go again in the near future.
The Orangemen of Fork River have arranged for a grand celebration here on Monday, July 13th, when they will be a good programme of sports. The hall will be free to the public in the evening for a dance. All are cordially invited to come and have a good time. There will be a church parade at 3 o’clock on Sunday afternoon, the 12th.
On Saturday afternoon a Conservative meeting was held in the Orange Hall. W. King, president, presided, Mr. Sam Hughes have an account of his four years stewardship as member for Gilbert Plains, which was very satisfactory and well received. Hon. Hugh Armstrong, Provincial Treasurer, followed and gave a very satisfactory account of the financial standing of the province, which showed that the business was in good hands under the Roblin government.
Mr. Clopeck, of Winnipeg, addressed the Ruthenians for a short time and was well received. The hall was crowded and he gallery was taken possession of by a large number of ladies. Everything passed off quietly. It was a most successful meeting of the kind ever held in Fork River.
Mr. Green, late Liberal member for North Winnipeg, was here a short time Monday and later left for Winnipegosis accompanied by N. Little.
H. Woods, of Dublin Bay, was a visitor here on Saturday night attending the committee which is arranging for the Orange picnic.

1914 Jul 2 – Winnipegosis

Coun. Frank Hechter went to Winnipeg on Monday in connection with the good roads movement. He was joined by some of the delegates from the other municipalities at Dauphin.
Mrs. Kenneth McAulay, and children, and her sister, Miss Smith, left for Kamsack on Monday.
The big political guns, Hugh Armstrong and Sam Hughes left for Dauphin on Sunday.
Capt. Coffey returned on Sunday to Dauphin with his automobile, taking with him several of the politicians.
R. Morrison has finished the foundation for the new school.
Mrs. T. Johnston returned on Monday from a visit to Dauphin.
Mrs. W. Johnson and Mrs. McIntosh, of Fort William, are visiting with Mrs. Johnston.
The big political meeting on Saturday night was held in the new Rex Theatre. This building seats over 300 and a great many were obliged to stand during the speaking.
The weather has been rather on the cool side for boating and the usual umber of crafts are not seen on the lake. With the warm weather of July many will seek cool breezes of the water.