Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 2 – 1914

1914 Jul 2 – Damage by Hail Storm

A heavy ran storm accompanied by hail visited the Mountview district on Tuesday afternoon. The strip touched by the hail was a narrow one and only two farms were struck.
W.G. Lock last 45 acres of wheat and 15 of oats. Crop insured.
Jas. Scarff last 40 acres wheat and 20 oats. Not insured.
Mr. Lock had only insured his crop a few days before the storm and only received his policy from Winnipeg on Wednesday.

1914 Jul 2 – Latest From Sewell Camp

Sewell Camp, June 30.
The Sergeant-Trumpeter mounted a new steed on Tuesday and we were treated to a great display of fireworks from the horse’s heels, the sergeant’s tongue and also eventually from the part of his pants which struck the ground after a while. For a minute or so he was hear saying, “Going up! Going up!” When he struck the ground, Sergeant-Major Fletcher was heard to say, “Coming down, I fiddler.” Highfield after four days’ rest has still a stiff neck.
The boys look very smart in their new Indian service helmets, which were presented to us alone (the 32nd) as a distinction for our work last year. The boys are proud of them as they should be.
Someone caused an uproar on Sunday. He said the camp was being attacked by Suffragettes. On closer examination they proved to be Cameron Highlanders.
Our shoeing smith thought he would ride the Sergeant-Trooper’s broncho, but changed his mind at the same time as the broncho.
It takes Dave Cox to ride the bronchos and round-up the runaways.
We will leave here on Friday morning arriving at Dauphin in the evening.
Our regiment was inspected on Saturday by the honourary colonel, Dr. Roche.
We turned out on Saturday morning at 4.30 a.m. for shooting on the range. Major Walker very conveniently was absent having a blister on his heel, so stayed in bed.
The Ashville boys are a first-class bunch of rifle shots.
The Dauphin squadron has been nicknamed “The Devil’s Own,” and they are worthy of it.
Red noses are the fashion. It is the fault of the occasional sunshine, not the grog.
On galloping off the field two regiments collided, resulting in a bad smash, one man getting his collarbone broken and two others disabled.
Our boy troopers, Gordon Walker, Gordon Batty and Roy Wade, are constantly being court-martialled by Squad Sergeant-Major, for unsoldierly conduct; not being on parade at 5.30 a.m., catching gophers before cleaning up their tent, etc.
Our cook put up some fine apple pies, things which are comparatively unknown here. We have an idea that Frank Beyette can have his job every year if he likes.
We have had a number of lady visitors up to now, among whom was Mrs. Walker and little daughters.
We wonder what it is that makes the boys sit down so slowly and gently. Having had some ourselves they have our sympathy.
H.H. Allan, the photographer, came down here this year and he is doing roaring business.

1914 Jul 2 – Fork River

A. Cameron and F.B. Lacey, of Mowat, have returned from a trip to Dauphin.
Vote for Sam Hughes, the farmer, and you won’t make a mistake.
Miss Gertrude Cooper has returned from Dauphin and is with her parents on the Fork.
Mrs. Attwood, of Towell, Indiana, and her mother, are spending the summer months with Mrs. W. Davis on the farm.
Mrs. Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, is a visitor at the home of D.F. Wilson on the Mossey.
Messrs. J. Robinson and H. Hunter have put a three-horse power gasoline engine in their new boat. The water should fly now.
Several of the electors from her attended the Conservative meeting at Winnipegosis on Wednesday night. The speakers were Mr. Shears, and Mr. Grenon. The meeting was well attended. We hope to go again in the near future.
The Orangemen of Fork River have arranged for a grand celebration here on Monday, July 13th, when they will be a good programme of sports. The hall will be free to the public in the evening for a dance. All are cordially invited to come and have a good time. There will be a church parade at 3 o’clock on Sunday afternoon, the 12th.
On Saturday afternoon a Conservative meeting was held in the Orange Hall. W. King, president, presided, Mr. Sam Hughes have an account of his four years stewardship as member for Gilbert Plains, which was very satisfactory and well received. Hon. Hugh Armstrong, Provincial Treasurer, followed and gave a very satisfactory account of the financial standing of the province, which showed that the business was in good hands under the Roblin government.
Mr. Clopeck, of Winnipeg, addressed the Ruthenians for a short time and was well received. The hall was crowded and he gallery was taken possession of by a large number of ladies. Everything passed off quietly. It was a most successful meeting of the kind ever held in Fork River.
Mr. Green, late Liberal member for North Winnipeg, was here a short time Monday and later left for Winnipegosis accompanied by N. Little.
H. Woods, of Dublin Bay, was a visitor here on Saturday night attending the committee which is arranging for the Orange picnic.

1914 Jul 2 – Winnipegosis

Coun. Frank Hechter went to Winnipeg on Monday in connection with the good roads movement. He was joined by some of the delegates from the other municipalities at Dauphin.
Mrs. Kenneth McAulay, and children, and her sister, Miss Smith, left for Kamsack on Monday.
The big political guns, Hugh Armstrong and Sam Hughes left for Dauphin on Sunday.
Capt. Coffey returned on Sunday to Dauphin with his automobile, taking with him several of the politicians.
R. Morrison has finished the foundation for the new school.
Mrs. T. Johnston returned on Monday from a visit to Dauphin.
Mrs. W. Johnson and Mrs. McIntosh, of Fort William, are visiting with Mrs. Johnston.
The big political meeting on Saturday night was held in the new Rex Theatre. This building seats over 300 and a great many were obliged to stand during the speaking.
The weather has been rather on the cool side for boating and the usual umber of crafts are not seen on the lake. With the warm weather of July many will seek cool breezes of the water.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 22 – 1914

1914 Jan 22 – Killed His Companion

A fatal shooting accident occurred in the Riding Mountain near Laurier on Friday last. Charles Jolivet and Frank Turpot were out shooting, when an animal suddenly came in sight and in the excitement of adjusting his gun. Jolivet shot Turpot through the head, killing him instantly.
Coroner Harrington went to Laurier and after investigating the circumstances surrounding the shooting decided that an inquest was not necessary.

1914 Jan 22 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River on Tuesday, Jan. 6th; all members present.
The reeve and three newly-elected councillors were sworn in by the clerk.
Hechter-Hunt – That a vote of thanks to tendered the retiring reeve for the good services given to the municipality throughout his term of office.
Hunt-Toye – That the minutes of the last meeting be adopted as read.
By Laws No. 106, councillors fens and mileage; No. 107, secretary-treasurer, and by-law No. 24, solicitor, were confirmed for 1914.
Hechter-Bickle – That Dr. Medd be engaged as health officer for 1914 at a salary of $600.
Toye-Richardson – in amendment – That Dr. Medd be appointed health officer with a salary at the rate of $600 per year for the year of 1914. Should the village of Winnipegosis be incorporated before the end of the year his term of office to expire on the date of the first meeting of the council of that village and that during the time he remains health officer of this municipality, he to visit Fork River one day each week. Amendment carried.
Hunt-Hechter – That the Clark pay the balance, $20, required to make up the price in full, $100, for lots 15 and 16, bloc 4, in Fork River.
Hechter-Hunt – That we subscribe for eight copies of the Western Municipal News for the use of the members of the council.
Richardson-Toye – That Coun. Hunt, Bickle and Hechter be the Finance Committee for 1914, and that the first named be chairman.
Bickle-Hechter – That Coun. Toye, Richardson and Robertson be the Public Works Committee for 1914, and that the first named be chairman.
Toye-Hunt – That the declarations of Councillors Robertson, $49.30, and Richardson, $25.20 he passed.
Robertson-Richardson – That the councillors’ fees and mileage be paid to date.
Robertson-Toye – That the accounts as recommended by the Finance committee he paid.
Hechter-Hunt – That the secretary put up notices requesting all persons who have municipal scrapers in their possession to notify the clerk within thirty days from date of notice.
A by-law was passed cancelling a little over $2000 of taxes.
Bickle-Hechter – That the Council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the reeve.

1914 Jan 22 – Ethelbert

Wood is coming in freely since the snow came. Quotations are weaker if anything. Prices per cord on track are $3 to $3.25 for tamarac, according to quality.
Business is very good considering the money stringency.
It is reported that John McLean is disposing of his grist mill at this point.
Robt. Wilson has purchased Leander Hill’s farm. We hope this don’t mean the departure of Mr. Hill from the neighbourhood as he is one of the old timers and has been with us from the first.
Wm. Stevenson, a former resident here, but now of [1 line missing] renewing acquaintances in town.
Harry Brachman returned on Monday from a short trip to Dauphin. He says the whole excitement at the place was the arrest of Krafchenko. [1 line missing] these dull days to keep us from hibernating.

1914 Jan 22 – Fork River

Elliott Brandon bought a carload of cattle here and shipped some to Lloydminster on Friday.
A well-attended surprise party took place at the home of D.F. Wilson on the Mossey and a good time is reported.
Country Master W. King is out on his annual visit of inspection to all Orange Lodges in his jurisdiction.
J.S. Nowosad and wife, from Aberdeen, Sask., are visiting at the home of the former’s parents.
J.D. Clements is in Dauphin on business.
J. Reid and Mrs. Wood were visitors here on Sunday.
W. Coultis is busy these days break-in a nice colt.
There will be no services in All Saints’ Church next Sunday, the 25th, owing to Mr. Williams being called to Dauphin to attended the opening of the New Anglican Church at that point. Sunday school will be held as usual at 2 o’clock.
Mr. Fergus, inspector of Quebec Fire insurance Co., was a visitor at D. Kennedy’s on Wednesday.
Wood is coming in briskly now and the A.T. Company’s store is kept busy; but Scotty and Dunc can handle lots of this, the more the better.
We are glad to hear that I. Hafenbrak is at home again and improving in health daily.
Fred King is busy these days sawing wood with his gasoline outfit.
W. Williams has a number of teams drawing lumber from his limits to town these days.
The A.T.C. shipped a nice bunch of dressed hogs to their Winnipegosis store on Monday
Sam Reid and J.W. Lockhart are up the lake hauling fish again and we hope no ill luck with happen this time.
What is the matter with the C.N.R.? Our tri-weekly train arrived here ahead of time.
Mrs. Gunners is leaving on Monday for a two weeks’ visit with friends in Paswegan, Sask.