Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 12 – 1914

1914 Nov 12 – Men for Second Contingent

The following have successfully passed the preliminary medical examination here this week conducted by Dr. Bottomley. The men are now drilling at the barracks under Sergeant-Major. Goodall and Sergeant Highfield. There are 50 men wanted from district No. 10., which territory is almost all in the Dauphin district, for the Second Contingent.
A.G. Cockrill, Dauphin. (Ashton Dennis Cockrill, 1887, 12656)
T. Boakes, Swan River. (Thomas Boakes, 1892, 81084)
A. Kerr, Swan River.
F. Conley, Benito.
S.J. Ellis, Dauphin.
W.J. Falconer, Dauphin. (William John Falconer, 1894, 106218 SGT)
J.L. Younghusband, Dauphin.
J.W. Cleaver, Dauphin. (John Wesley Cleaver, 1890, 106138)
Andrew Andrew, Dauphin. (Andrew Andrew, 1883, 81019 CSM)
J.W. Meek, Dauphin. (John Wilson Meek, 1892, 81578 QMS)
Glen H. Pettis, Dauphin. (Glen Haslome Pettis, 1893, 81704 SGT)
H. Knight, Dauphin.
A. Richmond, Swan River.
W.H.G. Cattermole, Grandview. (William Harry Gage Cattermole, 1879, 81140)
H. Wade, Dauphin.
D. Leigh, Ashville. (Duncan Blake Leigh, 1893, 106356)
A. Towns, Grandview. (Alfred Towns, 1893, 81894 LCP)
Jas. Walkey, Dauphin.

1914 Nov 12 – Fork River

Mr. R.M. Bell has left for a short vacation to Brandon and Russell.
Mr. and Mrs. Brown, of Alexandria, Ont., are visiting their daughter, Mrs. A. Snelgrove.
Mrs. Joe Hunter left for home at Severn Bridge, Ont., after spending a few weeks with her sons, Sam and Harry.
The school was closed on Wednesday. The kids enjoy a holiday in the middle of the week or at any other time.
Mr. T.B. Venables has left for a vacation trip to Boissevain. Major Humphries is in charge of the farm during his absence.
Mr. Sam Hunter has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Mr. Sydney Howlet, of Million, paid his friends of this burgh a visit, while passing through from Winnipegosis.
The Orangemen’s patriotic ball on November the 5th was admitted by all to be the best event of the kind ever held in this little burgh. There were fifty couple present, Dauphin, Dublin Bay, Sifton and Winnipegosis represented. The music was furnished by the Russell family and several others. From the opening at nine o’clock with the grand march till the “Home Sweet Home” waltz at 4:30, everything moved along pleasantly and most enjoyably. The ladies furnished a good supper. Speeches and songs were given during that interval. The song, “It’s a Long, Long, Way to Tipperary” by the three Russell children was well received. Ice cream was served by the ladies of the Women’s Auxiliary and a nice sum realized for the fund. The Orangemen wish to thank the public for the assistance given towards making it a success.

1914 Nov 12 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. Bradley is fast recovering from the effects of the burning she received on Hallowe’en night.
Mr. Grenon returned from Dauphin on Monday.
Dr. Medd took Mrs. R.C. Birrell to Dauphin on Monday for treatment. Mrs. B. has been in unsatisfactory health for some time past.
Capt. Coffey arrived on Wednesday’s train.
We see that Charlie White has been appointed fishery overseer for the province. We hope that this does not mean that our old friend may have to pull up stakes and locate elsewhere.
What Winnipegosis would be without a curling club it is hard to say. It is truly our chief winter sport. A meeting was held recently to organize and the feeling prevails that the game will be as popular as ever this season. Dr. Medd is president and Fred McDonald secretary-treasurer. The curlers have taken over the rink from Mr. Whale, and will manage it themselves this winter.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 2 – 1914

1914 Jul 2 – Damage by Hail Storm

A heavy ran storm accompanied by hail visited the Mountview district on Tuesday afternoon. The strip touched by the hail was a narrow one and only two farms were struck.
W.G. Lock last 45 acres of wheat and 15 of oats. Crop insured.
Jas. Scarff last 40 acres wheat and 20 oats. Not insured.
Mr. Lock had only insured his crop a few days before the storm and only received his policy from Winnipeg on Wednesday.

1914 Jul 2 – Latest From Sewell Camp

Sewell Camp, June 30.
The Sergeant-Trumpeter mounted a new steed on Tuesday and we were treated to a great display of fireworks from the horse’s heels, the sergeant’s tongue and also eventually from the part of his pants which struck the ground after a while. For a minute or so he was hear saying, “Going up! Going up!” When he struck the ground, Sergeant-Major Fletcher was heard to say, “Coming down, I fiddler.” Highfield after four days’ rest has still a stiff neck.
The boys look very smart in their new Indian service helmets, which were presented to us alone (the 32nd) as a distinction for our work last year. The boys are proud of them as they should be.
Someone caused an uproar on Sunday. He said the camp was being attacked by Suffragettes. On closer examination they proved to be Cameron Highlanders.
Our shoeing smith thought he would ride the Sergeant-Trooper’s broncho, but changed his mind at the same time as the broncho.
It takes Dave Cox to ride the bronchos and round-up the runaways.
We will leave here on Friday morning arriving at Dauphin in the evening.
Our regiment was inspected on Saturday by the honourary colonel, Dr. Roche.
We turned out on Saturday morning at 4.30 a.m. for shooting on the range. Major Walker very conveniently was absent having a blister on his heel, so stayed in bed.
The Ashville boys are a first-class bunch of rifle shots.
The Dauphin squadron has been nicknamed “The Devil’s Own,” and they are worthy of it.
Red noses are the fashion. It is the fault of the occasional sunshine, not the grog.
On galloping off the field two regiments collided, resulting in a bad smash, one man getting his collarbone broken and two others disabled.
Our boy troopers, Gordon Walker, Gordon Batty and Roy Wade, are constantly being court-martialled by Squad Sergeant-Major, for unsoldierly conduct; not being on parade at 5.30 a.m., catching gophers before cleaning up their tent, etc.
Our cook put up some fine apple pies, things which are comparatively unknown here. We have an idea that Frank Beyette can have his job every year if he likes.
We have had a number of lady visitors up to now, among whom was Mrs. Walker and little daughters.
We wonder what it is that makes the boys sit down so slowly and gently. Having had some ourselves they have our sympathy.
H.H. Allan, the photographer, came down here this year and he is doing roaring business.

1914 Jul 2 – Fork River

A. Cameron and F.B. Lacey, of Mowat, have returned from a trip to Dauphin.
Vote for Sam Hughes, the farmer, and you won’t make a mistake.
Miss Gertrude Cooper has returned from Dauphin and is with her parents on the Fork.
Mrs. Attwood, of Towell, Indiana, and her mother, are spending the summer months with Mrs. W. Davis on the farm.
Mrs. Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, is a visitor at the home of D.F. Wilson on the Mossey.
Messrs. J. Robinson and H. Hunter have put a three-horse power gasoline engine in their new boat. The water should fly now.
Several of the electors from her attended the Conservative meeting at Winnipegosis on Wednesday night. The speakers were Mr. Shears, and Mr. Grenon. The meeting was well attended. We hope to go again in the near future.
The Orangemen of Fork River have arranged for a grand celebration here on Monday, July 13th, when they will be a good programme of sports. The hall will be free to the public in the evening for a dance. All are cordially invited to come and have a good time. There will be a church parade at 3 o’clock on Sunday afternoon, the 12th.
On Saturday afternoon a Conservative meeting was held in the Orange Hall. W. King, president, presided, Mr. Sam Hughes have an account of his four years stewardship as member for Gilbert Plains, which was very satisfactory and well received. Hon. Hugh Armstrong, Provincial Treasurer, followed and gave a very satisfactory account of the financial standing of the province, which showed that the business was in good hands under the Roblin government.
Mr. Clopeck, of Winnipeg, addressed the Ruthenians for a short time and was well received. The hall was crowded and he gallery was taken possession of by a large number of ladies. Everything passed off quietly. It was a most successful meeting of the kind ever held in Fork River.
Mr. Green, late Liberal member for North Winnipeg, was here a short time Monday and later left for Winnipegosis accompanied by N. Little.
H. Woods, of Dublin Bay, was a visitor here on Saturday night attending the committee which is arranging for the Orange picnic.

1914 Jul 2 – Winnipegosis

Coun. Frank Hechter went to Winnipeg on Monday in connection with the good roads movement. He was joined by some of the delegates from the other municipalities at Dauphin.
Mrs. Kenneth McAulay, and children, and her sister, Miss Smith, left for Kamsack on Monday.
The big political guns, Hugh Armstrong and Sam Hughes left for Dauphin on Sunday.
Capt. Coffey returned on Sunday to Dauphin with his automobile, taking with him several of the politicians.
R. Morrison has finished the foundation for the new school.
Mrs. T. Johnston returned on Monday from a visit to Dauphin.
Mrs. W. Johnson and Mrs. McIntosh, of Fort William, are visiting with Mrs. Johnston.
The big political meeting on Saturday night was held in the new Rex Theatre. This building seats over 300 and a great many were obliged to stand during the speaking.
The weather has been rather on the cool side for boating and the usual umber of crafts are not seen on the lake. With the warm weather of July many will seek cool breezes of the water.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 4 – 1914

1914 Jun 4 – Killed by Stroke Lightning

In the midst of life we are in death. The words of the Psalmist were fully realized on Tuesday when a telephone message from Dublin Bay, a point about 15 miles north of town, conveying the sad message that Thos. R. Baylis, a well-known farmer, had been killed by lightning. It appears that decreased was walking along the road at the time carrying a hoe over his shoulder during the prevalence of a thunderstorm that morning when he was stuck by lightning and instantly killed.

HOE BLADE ATTRACTED LIGHTNING

It is believed that the steel blade of the hoe was the means of attracting the lightning. When found on the roadway his clothes were literally torn to tatters, and the tops of the leather of his boots separated from the soles.

DEATH INSTANTANEOUS

The body was at once removed to the home and Dr. Culbertson telephoned for. Mr. Gurton’s automobile was secured and the Dr. and Mrs. Lys, his daughter, made the trip in fast time. After examining the body Dr. Culbertson gave it as his opinion that death was instantaneous.
Deceased has been a resident of the Dublin Bay district for over 12 years and formerly resided at Madoc, Hastings county, Ontario. He was of retiring disposition, but well liked by all who enjoyed his acquaintance. Besides a window he leaves two daughters and four sons, all grown up. The daughters are Mrs. Hugh Lys, of the town, and Mrs. Wm. Dempsey, of Tisdale, Sask.; the four sons all reside at Dublin Bay, and are William, Fredrick, Arthur and Percy. He was 70 years of age.

BURIED AT RIVERSIDE

The funeral took place today from the late residence of deceased to St. Paul’s Church. After service the body was taken to Riverside Cemetery for interment. The service at the church and grave was conducted by the Rev. A.S. Wiley.

1914 Jun 4 – Winnipegosis

Two of our popular young people Miss Mary A. McArthur and Dr. E.A. Medd, were quietly married at the home of the bride’s parents on the 29th inst. They have the best wishes of all for their future happiness. A ball will be given in their honour at the Hotel Winnipegosis on Friday night.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong was a visitor in our midst lately, returning to Winnipeg on Monday.
Capt. Coffey returned to Dauphin on Monday.
Mr. and Mrs. Pennycock and little daughter left for Winnipeg on Monday.
Mrs. D. Kennedy returned on Monday to Fork River.
Large shipments of fur were sent out on Monday by the Armstrong Trading Co. and Joe Alex.
Rev. F. Elliott is retiring from the Methodist mission here on account of his health.
The Standard Lumber Co. is running their planning mill steadily at present.
The funeral of the late Richard Harrison took place on Sunday and was largely attended. The Rev. F. Elliott conducted the service. Deceased was an old-timer, having settled in this neighbourhood some twenty years ago. He followed stock raising on the considerable scale. He was liked by all who knew him and his death cast a gloom over the community. Two automobiles brought friends from Dauphin on Sunday to attend the funeral. Among the visitors were Thos. Needham, Stuart Geekie, W.A. Brinkman, Dr. Bottomley, J.B. McIntyre, G.L. Irwin and Ross Walker.
Nurse Cummings, who was called here to nurse the late R. Harrison, returned to Dauphin on Monday.
The telephone and post office have been moved to the old Hudson’s Bay Co. store.
The contract for the new school has been let to Neely & Co. of Dauphin.
Pilgrim & Co. recently put down about 900 feet cement floor in the fox ranch here.