Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 22 – 1921

Dog Race for Dauphin

The First Annual Dog Race will be held on Monday, January 2nd, in the afternoon, for boys and girls. The prizes will be given according to the support received from the public. It is the Committee’s object to have several races this winter and the first will be run on the above date, so the competitors will have time to train their dogs by then. Any subscriptions may be handed to Rev. Hamilton, Pat Muligan, Duncan Pearson or to F.C. Turland, who is acting Secretary-Treasurer, and who will also be pleased to give full particulars upon request. Help to boost the race Supress of the event will mean fun for the kiddies this winter.

Had Hands and Feet Frozen

Jerry Ravensburg, a homesteader in the Crane River district, was found by the provincial police last week, wandering around the lake in an aimless m[?] with his hands and feet badly frozen. Ravensburg had become insane and left his home. He was given medical attention and later taken to the asylum in Brandon.

Needy People in Town

Dauphin has more families in need this winter than in any year in its history. While in some cases it may be attributed to [falis?] of parents, a great deal of the distress can be accounted for by lack of employment. The Town Council, the churches and other organizations have the matter of providing for families well in hand, and their efforts are being supplemented by the endeavor of citizens. The officers of the Salvation Army, have applications for clothing and people who have cast off garments can make good use of same by notifying Capt. Johnson, who will distribute same to the right quarters.

Fork River Festivities

The season opened with a Hallowe’en party to be held in the school. The earliest arrivals, however, found all in darkness and thought that they were Tuck in when a glance down the street showed them the affair had taken a slight Tilt and landed across the way. The organization was well planned for a progressive game of whist fit into the Timewell and introduced the strangers. The sons of Williams, Richards and Will were present and gave a steadiness to the affair. Someone suggested that it would be as well to Lock (the) Wood as the unsteadier element might get Cooper in trouble over the dishes. However Prudens prevailed and the affair passed off quietly with a Little dance. Our worthy seedsman Briggs by name has been heard saying Harlow quite frequently but the young lady herself calls it Halo. His brother’s face is seen to Blanche with fear as he Hunts for a partner for a dance.

The following week a Thanksgiving supper was given and turkey figured largely on the bill of fare. Some hunters in the vicinity who were, commissioned to replenish the larder, report the choicer varieties of game to be very scarce but grouse to be fairly abundant. However a very sumptuous repast was served. The Irish of course could not get along without their Tait(ers). Parker(house) rolls, salads, etc., were served in a lavish manner and the tables fairly groaned under the weight of the good things provided. A Little dash of Curry added brightness as well as spice and flavor to the affair. The Winnipegosis orchestra played during the meal which added greatly to its enjoyment. After the supper they put on a very enjoyable program. The world renowned baritone Prof. Shears rendered a very classic selection in the truly pompus style of such celebrities. Unfortunately he could not Reid his music very well, in fact he read it upside down, i.e., the music; but otherwise it was artistically rendered and heartily encored. Another popular item was given by Mr. Roberts. Mr. Roberts has acquired a truly oriental style both in methods of procedure and delivery for he read it backwards and in a reverse position. A noted trio also figured largely on the program. A famous elocutionist was present and gave a very fine selection, but upon being encored she was so upset by some experience with a young man from Aldershot that she was unable to respond. Her troubled Browse won the sympathy of the audience. We hope that she will soon recover from her unhappy experience and be able to favor the public again in her usual capable manner.

The next event was a farewell to our esteemed friends, the Lockwoods. They will be greatly missed in our midst as they took a very active part in the social life. The evening’s performance opened with a game of whist. This created considerable excitement as the winners were nearing the goal. There was scarcely time to take a Brethour two and no time to Parker round the corners as the winning team was just two lengths ahead and making straight for the goal. The prizes presented were of a useful character. Some of our friends from the north were present for the first time this season and have a very Ven(er)able appearance as well as added distinction to the party. Our new station agent felt very Proud as he danced with the leading belles of the town. A very dainty lunch was served and four leafed clovers were seen among the viands. Later some recitations were given. Mrs. Lockwood gave some really good advice to girls which we hope will receive serious attention.

Sime nature study students from Snell’s Grove brought some specimens for identification. Among them was the lace wing, a very dainty insect with large Lacey wings, and which feeds upon the aphids. Another was the Dobson which is the aquatic larva of the order of insects known as neuropteran. In the larva stage of development it is used largely by fishermen for bait. It is well known along the banks of the Mossy. Eels are also reported to be found along this stream. The Meadows and Lees are full of such insects as the damsel and dragon flies.

The evening’s performance closed with a little dance and as the lights were low it finished up with a dance in the White, moonlight which was streaming in through the windows. Then there was a Russel for to get the wraps. The darkness acted as a Shield to some amusing episodes which were transpiring in the corridors.

The next important event was the recital given by the pupils of Prof. Williamson. The pupils reflected great credit on their teacher by the way the songs and instrumentals were given. Among them was the Flight of the Butterflies and The Thunderstorm. A little lassie of eight played a Scotch selection on the violin and was heartily encored. Representatives were presented from the various countries. The Irish were there from the Shannon while the McLean tartan represented the Highlands. Prof. Williamson represents the Toronto College of Music and his pupils were presented with diplomas from that college during the evening performance. Misses Reid, Bailey, Robertson, Hafenbrak, Munro and Hunt were the fortunate winners and nearly all passed with honors.

After these there was an adjournment and those who did not stay in their Ward at home set out on five year’s cruise on the Meighen and were shipwrecked.

–J.B.

Fork River

The Orangemen will hold their annual New Year’s Ball on January 6th. This is an annual affair and always has been one of the events of the season. Come out and enjoy yourself. The proceeds are to go to a member who lost his all by fire some days ago.

The U.F.M. has elected new officers for the year and will start out with a pie social on January 13th. Do not forget the date.

E.V. Lockwood and family have left for Englefeldt, where Mr. Lockwood will take charge of the C.N. station.

J. Schuchett is moving his old warehouse to the street and all old customers will find him open for business.

The “kiddies” are looking forward to the Christmas holidays with a grin.

Rats are becoming the pest of the village. We would like to see the council put a bounty on them. It might help rid the district of what will be the source of considerable loss of not checked.

See Fred Tilt for fire and life insurance. No one should go without insurance. The cost is small and the security is great.

Winnipegosis

The catch of fish at this point, so far, is below normal. The late mild weather made it very hard to handle the catch at all.

Enearson Bros. have taken a bunch of teams up to the northern part of the make and expect to return with fish about Dec. 20.

The Booth fisheries and the Independent Fisheries have finished storing ice for next season’s operations.

Hay and wood are coming in steadily, at $2.50 to $3 per load for hay and $3.50 to $4 per cord for seasoned poplar.

The trustees are advertising for a new principal of the school. Teachers seem to be ever on the move and keep the trustees guessing all the time. Some day the profession, like other professions, will become more permanent. Of course, in this statement I do not wish to include the gentler sex, whose chief aim (and a worthy one) is to get married.

The United Sunday school Christmas tree and entertainment on the 22nd promises to be a great success. A large number of our young people are taking part in the program. The work of training the children was no small job, and to those who gave their time the thanks of the community are due.

Inspector Martin, of the provincial police, Dauphin, arrived on Tuesday, to participate in a wolf hunt. He was joined here by Constable Black. Timber wolves are reported killing tock in the country north of the town and settlers want these dangerous animals exterminated. An Indian hunter will accompany the two constables on their expedition.

Our community, in sympathy with other places in the West has experienced a poor year. But, many of us in times gone by have seen worse days, so let us cheer up and plan for better things in the coming year.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 8 – 1921

Fine $200

Stanley Sawicki, of Sifton, appeared before magistrate Hawkins at the end of the week charged with having liquor in his possession, when arrested by chief of police Everett. He was found guilty and fined $200 and costs. The liquor was home brew and possessed a good kick Sawicki was but recently released from jail.

Fork River

The election is over, but we doubt if all are satisfied with the result. It was ever thus.

The annual meeting of the Fork River Agricultural Society will be held in the Secretary’s office, on Saturday, December 17th, at 2 p.m.

On Tuesday evening the pupils of Prof. Williamson gave a musical recital in the Orange Hall. There was a large attendance and the appreciation shown by the audience throughout the evening testified to the excellent merit of the performers. Amongst those who made their appearance for the first time were Hetty Richardson, piano solo; Mary Jane Little, piano solo; Bernice McLean, piano solo and Maisie Dobson, a little maid of 8 years whose well rendered violin solo earned for her two recalls. The style and technique displayed in the rending of the piano solos “La Papillion” by Kate Robertson, “Dance Gaciense” by Irene Bailey, “Artutus” by Blanche Hunt and “Silver Nymph” by Myrtle Munro, also the “Sonatma” by Edna Hafenbrak was above the average and gave evidence of the high standard of training those young students receive in the Fork River studio. The vocal solos by [?] Bailey and Edna Hafenbrak were well received, as were the piano duets by the misses Shannon, Richardson and Munro and pearl and Verna Reid. Congratulations and thanks were tendered Prof. Williamson for the great interest he takes in the progress of his pupils.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 20 – 1913, 1919

1913 Nov 20 – Fork River

A number of farmers met at the municipal office on Saturday event, the 15th, to discuss the horse question. Q. King was appointed chairman and T.B. Venables secretary. The chairman stated the reason for calling the meeting, after which those present voted that we form an association to be known as the Fork River Horse Breeders’ Association and the flowing officers were elected: President, Thos. B. Venables; Vice, Wm. King; Sec.-Treas., D.F. Wilson. Directors: Ab. Hunt, Nat Little, A. Rowe and Geo. H. Tilt. The meeting adjourned to meet on Saturday night, Nov. 29, at 8 o’clock sharp to decide the most suitable breed to apply for a government pure bred stallion and to transact other business. Anyone can become a member of the association on the payment of one dollar membership fee. We wish the farmers every success in this worthy undertaking and it should have the hearty support of all in the district.
Dan McLean returned home for the winter months after spending the summer in charge of the government dredge at Regina.
Capt. Russell, of Cork Cliff, was a visitor in town on Saturday.
Mrs. F.B. Lacey of Mowat, returned from the wedding of Mr. Cain and Mrs. O’Neil at Dauphin. We wish them all kinds of happiness.
George Basham, postmaster of Oak Brae, was in town on Saturday. He still wears that genial smile.
Harcourt Benner is visiting at the home of his uncle, D.F. Wilson, on the Mossey.
Bert Steele passed through here on his way to take up his winter quarters at Mafeking for the A.T. Co. Bert is looking the picture of health and prosperity.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong, of Portage la Prairie, in company with the president and secretary of the Booth Fishing Co., paid the A.T. Co. store a visit last week.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, paid a visit to the home of his parents and Miss Bessie Wilson returned with him for a short visit among friends in Dauphin.
Mr. Almack, of Gilbert Plains, left for the west with two cars of cows and young stock for the ranch.
The ladies of the Union Church, of Fork River, will hold a fowl supper in the Orange Hall, on Friday, Nov. 28th. Admission, adults 35c, children 15c. Short programme, everybody welcome.

1913 Nov 20 – Sifton

The fine weather and good roads are making numbers of people visit our village and shopping and milling are the order of the day.
Mrs. J. Kiteley, of Toronto, Ont., who has been visiting her sons in Brandon, Moose Jaw and Calgary, was the guest of Miss Reid at the Presbyterian mission house for a week.
A much felt need is being met now by an enterprising shoemaker, who has opened a repair shop on Front Street. He should do well. A bank should be our next addition and would be a convenience to many.
A fatal accident occurred on Tuesday, when a nine year old son of Anton Sturcko lost his life. The child was taking a loaded gun down from the wall, where it was left, when the weapon discharged, shattering the boy’s left leg and the loss of blood was so great that when he was taken to the village about two hours later, he was in a state of partial collapse and died before he could be taken to a doctor.
The gross neglect of parents in allowing children the use of firearms is a matter of grave import, and some steps to set on foot a law imposing a heavy fine on such should be a good thing, and the means of saving other young and bright lives.
A band of boy scouts is being inaugurated and is a fine thing for the boys. Scout laws are just the kind needed here. Our best wishes for their success under the leadership of our esteemed neighbour, Mr. Paul Wood.
The quiet of the night is sometimes broken in upon the chug, chug, of our worthy section foreman’s gasoline hand car on patrol, up to the switch. Also several of our villagers have enjoyed a fast trip to Fork River or Winnipegosis.

1913 Nov 20 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Frank Hechter returned on Monday after a considerable stay in Winnipeg.
Mrs. J.P. Grenon arrived here on Wednesday, having spent a pleasant vacation studying mink farming at Quebec. Winnipegosis will soon be able to boast of its Zoological Gardens at the rate it is going on. We only want a few live bears, but no mosquitoes, as we have plenty of them to spare, in season.
Capt. Dan. McDonald accompanied by his brother, arrived from Winnipeg on Wednesday.
Paul Paulson and family returned on Monday, having recovered from his attack of typhoid fever which he contracted while staying in Winnipeg. He proceeded to his fishing camp on Thursday.
Archie Stewart, proprietor of the well known livery stable, met with an accident by falling off his wagon.
A meeting of the Curling Club took place in Walmsley’s pool room on Monday evening, when it was resolved that practice would take place an soon as the skating rink was got into working order and on receipt of first instalment of subscriptions. The club would then be open to engage all comers, bar none.
The young ladies of this place are having great times of an evening, skating on river and lake, the latter being practically frozen over. Charley Langlois having skated over from is camp on Weasel Island on Tuesday, Mr. Johnston also walking in from Snake Island the previous day.
Charley reports that the fishermen up the lake have suffered a great loss, which is probably irreparable at this time of the year.
Howard Armstrong of Fork River, appeared before Mr. Parker, magistrate, on Friday morning to answer a charge of stealing various articles, too trivial to mention, and after Miles Morris had given evidence, his worship came to the conclusion that at present there was not sufficient incriminating evidence to connect the prisoner with the charge and adjourned the case till Monday morning, the accused being allowed out on his own recognizances. During the proceedings Capt. Dan McDonald made a minute inspector of the only and only cell and evidently admired the accommodation, although he passed no comment.
Frank Hechter has a fine display of furs in his store, which would make suitable presents to the “Old Country” and prospective buyers are warned that the supply being limited, they had better hurry up so as to secure specimens at most reasonable prices.
Mr. Bennie Hechter made a trip to Winnipeg on Wednesday for the purpose of supervising his house property in that city.
A progressive whist part was held on Thursday evening at Mr. Martin’s (station agent) home and after light refreshments and an enjoyable evening, the lucky participants returned to their respective homes in the early hours of the morn.
Mrs. Coffey returned to Dauphin on Friday, having spent a few days here with the jovial Captain.
Dick Harrison went to Winnipeg on Friday for purpose of disposing of surplus funds, which is a great loss to this rising watering resort, and as it is evidently entering a new era of prosperity, can do with every little help to give it a leg up.
Mr. Sturdy, Jr., from Fort Frances, Ont., is paying a week’s visit to his father, one of our most prominent citizens.
Tom Toye, our energetic Councillor, has brought in news of a big bear having killed a Galician round his part of the country, the animal having disembowelled the man. As a gallant Welshman why does not Tom uphold the traditions of his race and kill the brute, bringing the hide back as evidence. Tom Sanderson would act as guide and track the beast to his winter lair.

1919 Nov 20 – Fork River

Mr. and Mrs. John Dobson and family, of Winnipeg, are visiting at the home of Reeve Venables.
D.F. Wilson, sec. treasurer is attending the Union of Municipalities convention at Winnipeg this week.
Milton Cooper, who has been in the Dauphin Hospital, is improving.
F.F. Haffenbrak is on a visit to Ninette, Man.
With the milder weather the attendance at Sunday school has increased. 42 were in attendance last Sunday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 7 – 1911, 1916

1911 Sep 7 – Fork River

Pathmaster Briggs and his gang are busy laying a sidewalk from the post office to the station and stores, which is quite an improvement this muddy weather.
Mrs. H.H. Scrase and son returned from Dauphin after a two weeks’ visit.
The C.N. Ry. is building a stock yard here. We sincerely hope they will provide a raft to float them over the ditch to the shoot.
Mr. McLeod is busy buying cattle and shipping a car a week.
Mr. J.M. Littler returned from Gilbert Plains on Wednesday.
Mr. Glen Campbell, M.P., will hold a meeting in the Orange Hall on Friday night, September 8th.

1916 Sep 7 – Fork River

Mr. Ducker, engineer, was here for a few days inspecting roads and bridges.
Mrs. Dobson, of Winnipeg, returned home after a two weeks’ visit with Mrs. Cameron on the Mossey River.
Mr. E. Hunter, of Severn Bridge, Ont., is visiting his brothers, Harry and Tom Hunter at Lake Dauphin.
Mr. Joe McMillian, of Lac du Bonnett, returned home after a few days’ visit to his mother at Mrs. C. Bailey’s.
Mr. Hawkins, P.M. of Dauphin, and Mr. McCaul, of the Bank of Commerce, spent a short time touring the district in a motor lately.
Mr. W. Williams started thrashing on the farm of John Mushoski.
The heavy rain on Saturday night has stopped the harvesting and thrashing a couple of days.
Rev. Mr. Price, of Swan River, and rural dean of Dauphin, held Holy Communion and baptismal service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon, which was well attended. He left in the evening for Winnipegosis.
The annual Harvest Festival service will be held in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock on September 10th. This will be Mr. Butler’s farewell sermon as he leaves for Wychiffe College, Toronto, on Monday. A cordial invitation to all to come and take part in this service.