Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 4 – 1914

1914 Jun 4 – Killed by Stroke Lightning

In the midst of life we are in death. The words of the Psalmist were fully realized on Tuesday when a telephone message from Dublin Bay, a point about 15 miles north of town, conveying the sad message that Thos. R. Baylis, a well-known farmer, had been killed by lightning. It appears that decreased was walking along the road at the time carrying a hoe over his shoulder during the prevalence of a thunderstorm that morning when he was stuck by lightning and instantly killed.

HOE BLADE ATTRACTED LIGHTNING

It is believed that the steel blade of the hoe was the means of attracting the lightning. When found on the roadway his clothes were literally torn to tatters, and the tops of the leather of his boots separated from the soles.

DEATH INSTANTANEOUS

The body was at once removed to the home and Dr. Culbertson telephoned for. Mr. Gurton’s automobile was secured and the Dr. and Mrs. Lys, his daughter, made the trip in fast time. After examining the body Dr. Culbertson gave it as his opinion that death was instantaneous.
Deceased has been a resident of the Dublin Bay district for over 12 years and formerly resided at Madoc, Hastings county, Ontario. He was of retiring disposition, but well liked by all who enjoyed his acquaintance. Besides a window he leaves two daughters and four sons, all grown up. The daughters are Mrs. Hugh Lys, of the town, and Mrs. Wm. Dempsey, of Tisdale, Sask.; the four sons all reside at Dublin Bay, and are William, Fredrick, Arthur and Percy. He was 70 years of age.

BURIED AT RIVERSIDE

The funeral took place today from the late residence of deceased to St. Paul’s Church. After service the body was taken to Riverside Cemetery for interment. The service at the church and grave was conducted by the Rev. A.S. Wiley.

1914 Jun 4 – Winnipegosis

Two of our popular young people Miss Mary A. McArthur and Dr. E.A. Medd, were quietly married at the home of the bride’s parents on the 29th inst. They have the best wishes of all for their future happiness. A ball will be given in their honour at the Hotel Winnipegosis on Friday night.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong was a visitor in our midst lately, returning to Winnipeg on Monday.
Capt. Coffey returned to Dauphin on Monday.
Mr. and Mrs. Pennycock and little daughter left for Winnipeg on Monday.
Mrs. D. Kennedy returned on Monday to Fork River.
Large shipments of fur were sent out on Monday by the Armstrong Trading Co. and Joe Alex.
Rev. F. Elliott is retiring from the Methodist mission here on account of his health.
The Standard Lumber Co. is running their planning mill steadily at present.
The funeral of the late Richard Harrison took place on Sunday and was largely attended. The Rev. F. Elliott conducted the service. Deceased was an old-timer, having settled in this neighbourhood some twenty years ago. He followed stock raising on the considerable scale. He was liked by all who knew him and his death cast a gloom over the community. Two automobiles brought friends from Dauphin on Sunday to attend the funeral. Among the visitors were Thos. Needham, Stuart Geekie, W.A. Brinkman, Dr. Bottomley, J.B. McIntyre, G.L. Irwin and Ross Walker.
Nurse Cummings, who was called here to nurse the late R. Harrison, returned to Dauphin on Monday.
The telephone and post office have been moved to the old Hudson’s Bay Co. store.
The contract for the new school has been let to Neely & Co. of Dauphin.
Pilgrim & Co. recently put down about 900 feet cement floor in the fox ranch here.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 27 – 1913

1913 Feb 27 – Fork River

Wm. Paddock spent several days here among the farmers buying and dressing beef and pork for his meat emporium at Winnipegosis.
Rev. H.H. Scrase has returned from Sifton, where he held divine service. He states that he has good congregations at that point.
The Fork River correspondent in the Press states one of our citizens changed his office from the Armstrong T. Co., which is not so, as he is quite at home at the A.T. Co. Don’t get annoyed friend because he didn’t move right over your way. Come in and warm yourself, we don’t mind it if you don’t want to talk.
Mrs. T. Johnson, who has been spending two weeks with friends, returned home to Winnipegosis last week.
“Say, Mike, did you hear the latest? A customer from the country went into one of our department stores and “Buttons” stepped up and asked him if he would take the elevator. He accepted; “elevate it. I’ll take it without any water” and it was elevated. “Buttons” is there anything else we can do for you. We have some fresh case goods and we take in minors and flats, where we can.”
Several of the councillors took the train to attend the municipal meeting at Winnipegosis. “Admiral Turnover” accompanied them and they returned on a special.
Fred. and Max King took a business trip to Winnipegosis this week.
Wm. Davis and Sid Craighill are home from the fish haul. Too much snow to fish now.
We wish to say to the Mowat correspondent that his scurrilous remarks are not true. We wish to remind him before he was a member of the council he was the one that set the ball rolling by his weekly tirade against the council because he could not get what he wanted. Any remarks we have made are mild compared to opinions we hear from other ratepayers regarding the blunders and unbusinesslike transactions that have been done and we are sorry to say we have to admit what they say is true in most cases. As you have told us before you don’t wish to hurt people’s feelings, but just do it to remind us, so its up to you to take it in the same spirit. You say, “hands off.” Don’t get alarmed M.C. as we are never anxious to touch pitch as it sticks. Kind regards M.C. and we trust you will be all right after the change of the moon.
F.B. Lacey went south on the train and intends combining pleasure with business while absent. A pleasant time, Fred.
The Lenten services are held in All Saints’ Church Tuesday nights at 8 o’clock. Everyone welcome. Service at 3 o’clock Sunday, March 2nd.
The weekly dance party came off at the home of Mr. and Mrs. S. Reid over the Mossey River and a pleasant time was spent and that tired feeling chased away for the time being.
“Say, Mike, a stranger wanted to know what those pipes were for on the river bank and what they were worth to the people as a money maker.” “Can’t say Pat, what they are worth but the “Admiral” ordered them we believe to do duck shooting with.”
Miss M. Shannon, of Winnipegosis, paid a visit to her parents on the Mossey on Friday.

1913 Feb 27 – Winnipegosis

The fishermen are arriving down the lake each day. At present Mr. and Mrs. Christianson, Mr. and Mrs. Arrowsmith, Mr. and Mrs. Holly Burrell, Mr. and Mrs. Schaldermouse and family, Leo Hjalmarson, and Jack Angus have arrived.
H. Burrell has opened a pool room at the north end of the town.
R. McLean, an old timer freighter, is back in town on business.
Mrs. J. McAuley, of Dauphin, is the guest of Mrs. Whale since the 22nd.
Mr. Lloyd Younghusband, of Dauphin, is a guest of Mrs. Bradley.
Miss Irma Bradley, of Bowsman, is making a few weeks visit with Miss. C. Bradley.
Some of the young folk are greatly enjoying snowshoe tramps.
J. McArthur recently spent a few weeks in Winnipeg and saw his parents off on a southern trip from which we hope they will return greatly befitted.
Mr. Mullens, station agent, is leaving us for a more lucrative position in Minitonas. His departure is to be regretted.
Mrs. Grenon, Sr. is enjoying the visit of her brother from Montreal.
Last week the Christian League’s monthly social meeting was held in the Methodist Church, where a large number gathered to hear a debate on Woman’s Suffrage. It is to be hoped the parties wishing to espouse the movement (which might better be ignored as one of our prominent young men thinks) are not greatly in earnest. Mr. Grenon, Mr. Hechter and Mrs. Dempsey acted as judges, giving honors to the negative side.
Being the Lenten season it is regretted that an arrangement has not been made for weekly services here; we know Rev. Mr. Scrase does his best.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 14 – 1915

1915 Jan 14 – This is a Record

A Prince Albert woman gave birth to three girls and a boy on Tuesday of this week.

1915 Jan 14 – Mossey River Council

First meeting of the council of 1915 held in the council chamber, Winnipegosis, Jan. 5th. There were present Reeve Lacey, and Councillors Yakavanka, Hunt, Bickle, Hechter and Namaka.
The clerk swore in the new Reeve and councillors.
The minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted as read with a clause added giving the names of the councillors voting for and against.
Communications were read from W.B. Dempsey, Dr. Medd, F.E. Simpson and the Highway Commissioner.
The Reeve explained that it was rumoured that Winnipegosis was already incorporated as a village and that the two eastern townships had been taken from this municipality and were now a part of the new municipality of Lawrence; but in neither case had there been any official notification from the municipal commissioner and if either of these rumours were correct it would have a bearing on the appointment of the officers of the year.
Hunt-Hechter – That D.F. Wilson be secretary-treasurer at the same rate of salary as last year till the next meeting of the council.
Bickle-Namaka – That Dr. Medd be health officer till the next meeting of the council at the same rate of salary as for 1914.
Hechter-Yalavanka – That the finance committee of 1914 continue in officer till the next meeting of the council.
A by-law appointing F.E. Simpson solicitor at a salary of $50.00 was passed.
Hechter-Hunt – That Coun. Bickle issue a Ward certificate for $18.00 to J. Bickle, Jr., to replace a certificate issued by ex-councillor Fleming which has been lost.
Hunt-Hechter – That the council adjourn to meet at Fork River at the call of the Reeve.

1915 Jan 14 – Fork River

Mr. E. Thomas manager of the Northern elevator, this winter, left with his family for his home in Verigen, Sask. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas made many friends during their stay here and we wish them prosperity.
Mr. F. Hafenbrak and J. Richardson are spending a few days at Dauphin.
Mr. N. Little and his daughter, Miss Grace, have left for Rochester. A pleasant trip to them.
Mr. E. Humphreys has left for Dauphin on a short holiday.
Mrs. Sam Reid and daughters are spending a week with friends in Winnipeg.
Mr. T. Jordan, of Dauphin, passed through here returning from Winnipegosis. His automobile took a rest outside the town limits. Billy Williams pulled it into the storehouse. Judging from the number of expects around the machine, they will soon fix it or leave it so no one else can.
We notice a Winnipegosis correspondent has been ringing the changes for the last three or four weeks about that “gigger” that runs between Winnipegosis and Fork River. There is nothing very wrong with it, it only wants a little elbow grease. We heard no complaints when the educational department was aboard. We know of an old fellow about sixty who used to tote his former friends around Sunday after Sunday and our Winnipegosis friends thought it alright. It’s amusing to hear them lament about the “weary fisher of men.” We would suggest the cutting out of the hair pin brigade and ring off about the gigger.
A large gathering of the neighbours surrounding our little burgh stormed the castle of Mr. and Mrs. D.F. Wilson on the Mossey River on Thursdays night and had a very merry time. There was dancing, recitations and songs. The ladies put up a good supper and all left for their homes at 3 o’clock in the morning a tired but happy bunch to meet at Dublin Castle, the home of Mr. and Mrs. A. on Wednesday night, the 13th, at a farewell party to Mr. and Mrs. Harnets.
Sam Reid was elected councillor for Ward 6 by acclamation.
Don’t forget the pie social and dance at W. King’s on Friday night, January 22nd.

1915 Jan 14 – Winnipegosis

In all the winters of the past this winter stands out as the nest we remember.
The town is shortly to be incorporated. This will bean severance from the rural municipality of Mossey River with which we have been connected since it became a municipality. Our connection with the municipality, I might mention, has not been satisfactory of late. Town and rural affairs are different, which is natural. The town people want to strike out and go a little faster than our rural neighbours, that’s all.
The fishing keeps up well. The snow plow arrived this week with a big load. The weather has been great for the hauling. The prices paid the fishermen remain steady. Whites are worth 5c a lb; yellows 4 ½ and Jacks 2 1/2c. It is expected that the fish companies will cease operations about the end of the month.
Dr. Wm. Hosey, horse dentist of Dauphin, was in our midst this week. We don’t know how a horse feels with the toothache but between suffering from a jumping toothache and going to face German bullets send me to the front every time.
We hear it frequently asked who is to be our first mayor? Well, your correspondent don’t know, but of course, he must be good looking, affable, popular with the ladies and have a few other qualifications. Does this point to Joise or Frank.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 11 – 1912

1912 Jan 11 – Fatal Accident

A sad accident occurred in the south-western portion of the town on Friday last when Hugh, the seven year old son of Homer G. Dempsey, was struck in the head with the tines of a pitch fork in the hands of his uncle. It appears that the boy was going into the stable just as his uncle was throwing a forkful of hay and received one of the prongs in the forehead, which penetrated the skull. A physician was at once sent for and the wound attended to. The tines of the fork was in a filthy condition and this made the wound dangerous and which afterwards resulted in the boy’s death.
The family have the sympathy of the community in their sad bereavement. The funeral took place on Tuesday to Riverside cemetery.

1912 Jan 11 – Had Part of Ear Bitten off

Two Galicians, Anthony Genik and John Genik, of the Riding Mountain settlement, had a fight last Friday, in which the former had part of his ear chewed off. John, it appears, is married to a young woman, and Anthony thought, had been paying too much attention to his wife when he was away from home. This started the row. Constable Rooke arrested John on Sunday and took him to Gilbert Plains, where he arraigned before magistrate N.B. Nicholson, on Monday on a charge of unlawfully wounding Anthony Genik.
The case was heard on Wednesday, and after hearing the evidence the Magistrate committed the defendant for trial.
He was afterwards released on bail.

1912 Jan 11 – Fork River

The Canadian Northern Ry. Co. is putting in an Express Office at this point with Mr. Nat Little in charge, which will fill a long felt want as every Little helps in this town.
The New Year’s ball held in the Orange Hall by the Nobs of the town was pronounced to be the most successful event of the year.
Miss Gertie Cooper, who has been spending her holidays at home returned to Dauphin this week.
The first meeting of the new council was held in the municipal office on the 2nd.
Fred King was unfortunate enough to have a valuable pair of wolfhounds poisoned last week by some careless or malicious person putting out poison.
Wm. King, county master, left here on Saturday for his annual visit to L.O. Lodges of Dauphin county as far west as Togo.
“Senator” Kennedy and Fred Storrar paid a visit to the Lake Town on business.