Today in the Dauphin Herald – August 14, 1919

Fair Notes

Some of the ladies were quite disappointed that there was no baby show this year. The baby show was very popular in past years and it was undoubtedly an oversight that it was not held this year. Mr. John Gorby, who was had charge of this department in past years, is the champion of the ladies and the babies and it will not be his fault if the show is not held next year. The babies are out greatest national asset and their welfare is contributed to by information supplied by physicians and professional nurses at these exhibitions.
The directors worked hard for several weeks to complete the details of the fair and have the satisfaction of knowing their efforts were appreciated and the exhibition a success in every way.
Chas. Murray, the patient and tireless secretary, had a busy three days of it.
The stock parade, headed by the band of the 79th Cameron Highlanders, was a striking feature on Friday.
Over 5000 people passed through the turnstiles on Friday.
The War Saving and Theft Stamp advertising display was very much in evidence on the grounds. The entrance to the grounds, the main building, grand stand, ticket office and other places throughout the grounds were nicely decorated with different lines of posters. It was evident that Mr. Blackadar intended that the large crowds that gathered each day on the grounds should be thoroughly informed regarding this movement.

Successful Exhibition

The 28th annual fair of the Dauphin Agricultural society, held on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday of last week, was the most successful in its history. And this, too, in the face of the fact that the farmers were in the midst of the harvest. While it is true there was a falling off in most of the departments it is a noteworthy fact the exhibits generally were of a superior class. The livestock was the best ever shown here. Two notable herds were J.D. McGregor’s Aberdeens and John Graham’s shorthorns. In the Clydesdale, Percherons, Agricultural and light horses many fine animals were shown and nearly all the leading breeders of the district were represented.
The poultry section was by long odds the best in the history of the society. The exhibit was not only large but of the highest quality. Much credit is due the Poultry Association and its energetic secretary. Wm. Murray, for the success achieved.
The attractions were exceptionally good. The band of the 79th Cameron Highlanders from Winnipeg furnished the music on Friday and the splendid program was enjoyed by all.
Credit is due Mr. Wm. Rintoul for the manner in which the numerous young ladies executed the intricate dances. The little girls also did exceptionally well.
The Scotch dancing by the two little Simpson girls, to the music of the bagpipes played by their father, caught the fancy of the big crowd.
At 1.30 several hundred war veterans assembled in front of the grand stand and on behalf of the citizens Mayor Bowman extended them a hearty welcome. In his address he referred to the historic places in France where the Canadians made history and achieved undying fame. Robt. Cruise, M.P., also spoke, Major Williams, in the absence of Brig. Gen. Ketchen, replied on behalf of the men. Major Skinner added a few words in regard to a suitable memorial for those who had made the supreme sacrifice.

Fork River

E. Harris, formerly of Bracebridge, Ont., is visiting at the home of Fred Cooper.
Don’t forget to come to Fork River’s annual agricultural show, Friday, August 15th.
Rev. Harry P. Barrett, rector of St. Paul’s, Dauphin, will preach in All Saints’ Anglican church, Sunday afternoon, Aug. 24 h, at 3.
Mrs. J. Rice, teacher of North Lake school, has returned home from visiting at Cypress River and Neepawa and is feeling better after her trip.
The White Star Co.’s new elevator is nearly completed. Thus the commercial importance of this centre grows.
Owen Pruder is busy overhauling the Northern elevator so as to have it ready for the fall delivery of grain.

Sifton

The marriage of Miss Anna Farion, daughter of Fred Farion, merchant, of this place, to Mr. W. Belashta of Canora, was celebrated at St. Paul’s parish church, on Wednesday, the 6th inst., at 9 p.m. Bishop Budka, with the assisting priests, officiated. Some two or three hundred invited guests were present. The church had been very tastefully decorated with flowers, which blended very pleasingly with the handsome costumes of the bride and attendants. To the lively strains of a bridal chorus, sung in Little Russian, the bride and groom, showered with confetti, and guests repaired to the large Ruthenian hall, where en exceptionally well appointed supper was served. Covers for at least two hundred and fifty were laid and the tables were used for several relays of guests. The hall was very tastefully festooned and draped, with roses and asters as floral decorations. An orchestra, composed of Ruthenians, four brothers, from Winnipeg, played very pleasingly and tastefully. Bishop Budka, on behalf of the guess, toasted the bride and bridegroom, the latter responded very neatly both in Little Russian and English. Dancing was kept up until daylight. A. Kozak, one of the old national Cossack dances, given most artistically by Miss Belashka, of Winnipeg, and Mr. Dyk, of Dauphin, was much admired; also the tasteful fox-trotting of Mr. Assifat. A number of visitors from Winnipeg were present, amongst others, Mrs. Stefanyk, Mr. and Mrs. Badnac, Dr. Pasdrey, and Lieut. Kreman editor of the Canadian Ruthenian. Mr and Mrs. Belashta have left for Canora, their future home, where Mr. Belashta is in the legal profession.
During the evening Mr. —– spoke at some length about the conflict between the Poles and so-called Ukrainians, the West Galicians, stating that Premier Lloyd George had alone amongst the Allied powers at the peace conference, expressed himself in favor of an independent Ukraina, separate from the claims of the Polish aristocracy. He was followed by Mr. F. Taciuk, of Dauphin. A collection, totaling one hundred and twenty dollars, was taken up to be forwarded to Europe for use against the Poles.

Winnipegosis

Geo. G. Spence, who was formerly manager for the Hudson’s Bay Company here, has bought T.H. Whale’s general store.
There is an average crop in this district in spite of the dry season. The grain is nearly all cut and threshing will soon commence.
All the fishermen in town are bustling getting in supplies and preparing for the fall fishing. Two of the companies large boats leave here within the next few days for points at the north end of the lake.
A party of forty business men came up from Dauphin Sunday and took a trip fifty miles up the lake, upon the steamer “Armenon.” The trip was an enjoyable one and everyone was delighted with it. A net was set on the voyage out and was taken in on the return voyage. Nineteen fish were caught and Mr. Dan Hamilton auctioneered them off and got as much as $2.00 for a “sucker.” A Dominion and a Provincial M.P. were among the party.
The English Church is holding a regular Sunday service at Winnipegosis.
The town council is planning for a new municipal hall and extensive sidewalks.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – April 24, 1919

Boys Plead Guilty to Robbery

On Sunday night, April 6th, the Clothes Shop, Mr. Benedickson’s store, was entered and a quantity of goods stolen. The matter was placed in Chief Bridle’s hands and he at once got busy with the result that two boys, about 17 years of age, were arrested at Wadena, Sask. The boys’ names are Fred Beach and Norman Clubb, and hail from Winnipeg. They were brought from Wadena on Tuesday and appeared before P.M. Hawkins on Wednesday, and pleaded guilty to the charge. They were remanded till Friday for sentence. The boys are known to the city police and their previous history is to be investigated. The most of the stolen goods were recovered.

G.W.V.A. Notes

A meeting of the above association was held on Thursday, April 17th, some 40 members being in attendance.
The question of a memorial for the fallen comrades was discussed by the comrades, and it was suggested that the memorial should take the shape of a home for the returned men, and that a committee be formed to confer with the memorial committee organized by the town.
It was moved by Comrade Armstrong, seconded by Comrade H. Harvey, “that this branch of the G.W.V.A. endorse the Imperial Veterans’ resolution, and request that the government take up the matter of insurance by the state for returned men who, owing to injuries received whilst in action, are at the present time unable to get insurance, or who have to pay excessive rates for such.
Moved by Comrade H. Harvey, seconded by Comrade Oliphant, that this branch endorse the resolution of the G.W.V.A. Winnipeg, and protest against the sect known as ‘Hutterites’ from being allowed to settle in this country.
A delegation was received from the Ladies’ Auxiliary, and arrangements made as to taking care of soldiers’ widows, who come to this town in connection with land, etc. It was decided that the auxiliary should provide rooms, as it was not considered that the G.W.V.A. rooms were suitable accommodation for ladies, and that they would be more comfortable in a separate house.

Mossey River Council

The council met at Winnipegosis on April 7th, all the members being present. The minutes of the previous meeting wee read and adopted.
Communications were read from the Children’s Hospital, Winnipeg; the solicitor, re passing of social legislation; R. Flett, re reduction of taxes; The Red Triangle Fund, R. Cruise, M.P., re Hudson’s Bay Railway; copies of letters from the weed commission, C.B. Martin, re seed grain, and Sawinski Bros., re car of plank.
Hunt-Reid – That in consideration of the large amount of money that has been expended in the buildings of the Hudson’s Bay railroad, and, further, very large amounts in construction of harbor accommodation on the bay, and, whereas, a comparatively small amount will be required to finish the railway and thus render the large expenditure useful; this council is therefore, of the opinion and most empathically recommends that the Hudson’s Bay railroad be completed as soon as possible, thus giving to Western Canada the benefits to be derived from it and for which it has waited so long. That a copy of this resolution be forwarded to Sir Thomas White.
Yakavanka-Namaka – That the council of the rural municipality of Mossey River hereby makes formal application to the Good Roads Board of the Province of Manitoba that the following roads within the municipality be brought under the provisions of “The Good Roads Act, 1914,” and amendments thereto;
Road from south boundary of the municipality, making connection with the Dauphin good road system; due north to the village of Fork River, and from that point north and easterly to the village of Winnipegosis.
Road from the village of Fork River due west to the western boundary of the municipality road from corner on Fork River-Winnipegosis road to west side of range 19, along township line between tps. 29 and 30. Also from corner on same road westerly two miles between tps. 30 and 31.
Road from n.w. corner 12-29-19, easterly six miles, thence south to Lake Dauphin and then following lake shore to south boundary of the municipality.
Road from Winnipegosis north-westerly through tp. 31, rge. 18, and continuing into tp. 31, rge. 19.
Road from Winnipegosis south-easterly through tp. 3, rge. 18, and continuing easterly across tp. rge. 17.
Hunt-Reid – That Coun. Paddock and Marcroft be a committee to inspect road northwest of Winnipegosis, and report what can be done in the matter of making it passable at net meeting.
Yakavanka-Namaka – That the municipal bank account be moved from the Bank of Ottawa, Dauphin, to the Winnipegosis branch of the same bank.
Yakavanka-Namaka – That the clerk write the rural municipality of Dauphin and ask its council of it is prepared to pass a bylaw similar to those passed for the last two years covering work on the boundary road between the two municipalities.
By laws authorizing a line of credit of $15,000, amending the collector’s bylaw by reducing the salary to $125 pre month, and a bylaw authorizing a vote of the ratepayers of the Mossey River School district to issue expenditures for the borrowing of $12,000 to purchase grounds and build and equip a school. The vote to be taken June 14th.
The council adjourned to meet at Fork River at the call of the reeve.

Winnipegosis

The regular monthly meeting of the Home Economic Society was held on Friday evening, April 18th, at 8 p.m., in the Union Church. It being Good Friday the musical part of the programme consisted of Easter hymns. Mrs. J.E. McArthur gave an excellent paper on “Ventilation and Well-Lighted Rooms,” and Mr. Hook spoke in his usual pleasing manner on the subject, “Associates for the Young,” bringing foremost in his speech the necessity of child training. Ten cent tea was served, proceeds in aid of the library fund, when the meeting was brought to a close by singing he National anthem.
The Home Economics Society library is open every Saturday from 3 o 5 p.m., in Mrs. Honchin’s ice cream parlor.
Mr. D.G. McAulay and family have moved from the farm into town and taken up residence in the house formerly owned by J. Alexander.
The executive of the Order of the Needle wish to thank all those who helped to make the bazaar on the evening of Monday, the 21st, so successful. Mr. J.R. Burrell and her assistants, Mrs. K. McAuley and Mrs. Thomas, are especially to be lauded for the efficient way in which they handled the tea room, which was very popular. Mr. Hamilton very kindly gave his time in arranging the booths, which were very prettily decorated by Mrs. Steele, Mrs. St. Amour, Mrs. J.E. McArthur and Mrs. J.A. Campbell. A number of ladies and gentlemen assisted on the programme of music for dancing after the booth closed. Mr. Ketchison acted as floor manager and as usual made things go. The receipts for the evening were $119.10. Paid out for working material $3.75, for decorations $1.40, cartage 75 cents, rent of hall $6; total $11.90. To be divided between Red Cross and Belgian Fund, $107.20.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 20 – 1910

1910 Oct 20 – Chapter of Accidents

Wm. Cruise has Ribs Broken
Wm. Ashmore Leg Broken
Gun Accident
Wm. Ashmore of Sifton, met with a serious accident Saturday. While felling a beef, the animal made an unexpected plunge and fell on one of Mr. Ashmore’s legs, breaking two bones below the knee. He was brought to the hospital, where he is doing as well as can be expected.

1910 Oct 20 – Had Ribs Broken

Robt. Cruise, who recently invested in a power gang plough and why is busy ploughing his farm south of the town, has among the crew operating the plough his son William, aged 17 years. On Saturday night, William attempted to jump from the engine to the plough and was thrown under the wheel and the weight of the plough passing over him, breaking four ribs and slightly injuring him internally. We are glad to report that the young man is now on a fair way recovery.

1910 Oct 20 – Arm Amputated

John Kolodichook of Pine River, was accidentally shot Sunday morning in the left forearm, which resulted in amputation of same just below the elbow. Mr. K was out shooting and had climbed a tree to see if there were any ducks on a nearby pond. Before climbing he laid his gun against the trunk of the tree. When part of the way up the tree he slipped and fell, discharging the gun with the above result. The unfortunate man had no attention for three hours after the accident, and bled from eleven o’clock in the morning until the arrival of Dr. Lineham that evening at seven. He was brought to Dauphin on a special Sunday evening, and taken to the hospital.

1910 Oct 20 – Fork River

Mrs. Lipsky and Mr. Shaffer, from St. Louis, are staying at Mrs. Clawson’s in this village.
Mr. Dallas having disposed of his farm intends to have a sale on November 2nd. Mrs. C. Bailey gave birth to a son last week.
A large congregation attended the English Church last Sunday night for Harvest Festival, when a very appropriate sermon was preached by the Rev. H.H. Scrase. The church was very prettily decorated by Mrs. Rowe, Mrs. Scrase, Miss Collins, Miss Gracie Little and Mr. King, Churchwarden.
Mr. Hugh Armstrong, M.P.P for Portage la Prairie and Provincial Secretary, paid us a visit last week and was accompanied by Mr. J. Grenon and Mr. D.F. Wilson looking over land in this district.
Mrs. C. Bailey gave birth to a son last week.
Mrs. Crouch and children who have been visiting Mrs. Kennedy, left for Winnipeg last week.
Mrs. Morris, who has been staying here for some time left for Winnipegosis last week.
Mrs. Johnson, from Winnipegosis, is staying with her daughter, Mrs. D. Kennedy.

1910 Oct 20 – Sifton

Rev. Dr. Carmichael of Winnipeg and Dr. McLaren, of Toronto, stopped off at Sifton on Saturday on their way east.
Mark Cardiff, Dauphin, paid us a business visit last week.
Hugh Armstrong, M.P.P., passed through here a week ago on his way home from Winnipegosis.
J.G. Harvey, M.P.P., Robt. Hunt, and A.J. Rawson, Dauphin, were among the visitors to Sifton on Sunday.
Messrs. Kennedy & Barrie started up their flour mill on Monday for another season’s operations.
Wm. Ashmore met with a rather serious accident on Saturday last while felling a beef. The animal made an unexpected plunge forward, falling on Mr. Ashmore’s legs, breaking both bones below the knee in one leg. He was taken to the Dauphin General Hospital for treatment.
Everybody took advantage of the prevailing fine weather and drove in to the Ruthenian Church Services held by His Reverence Archbishop Sczeptycki, of the Greek Orthodox Church, on behalf of the adherents of that rite. The gathering was the largest in Sifton for years.
Mrs. Wm. Ashmore and John Kennedy were visitors to Dauphin on Sunday.
H.H. Scrase, Fork River, held services at the mission on Sunday, also Rev. Father Perhach at he Greek Orthodox Church.
Rev. Archbishop Scztepski and staff, left Monday evening for Prince Albert.

1910 Oct 20 – To the Herald:

SIR – In your issue of Oct. 6th, I noticed something about a missing post-office at Fishing River and a P.M. Re the missing P.O. That said P.O. was called Sobeiski and a man named Demko Kasczuk was duly appointed but owing to his moving to Sifton he would not accept that appointment therefore the post office was never opened so I fail to see where it was missing. Re the elevator. We heard a great deal about it in June but since then it has been hors de combat. Re the mail bag. I was always under the impression that the P.M. at the distributing office had the locking up of all mail bags leaving his office so as to prevent such things as tacks etc., getting mixed up with the mail and if that is so the mail carrier would be ignorant of what the mail bag contained.

A Subscriber

1910 Oct 20 – To the Herald:

SIR – In reply to, and for the information of, “A Fork River Correspondent” whose concoction of misrepresentations appeared in your issue of Oct. 6th, I beg to be allowed to state the following facts regarding the establishing of a post office at Fishing River. That on Sept. 25th, 1905, the post office that the farmers of Fishing River petitioned for on N.W. ¼ 33-28-19 west P. mer. was established under the name of “Sobieski,” and that Demko Kasczuk who was mentioned in the petition as a fit and proper person, was appointed as Postmaster. That the necessary papers, etc., for opening the office were taken to Kasczuk’s place of business at Fishing River, and it was found that Kasczuk had departed for Sifton and had barred the doors and windows, and that he did not intend to return to Fishing River to do business because the R.R. Company would not stop their trains at that point. That as there was no other person asking to take the office over, the matter was allowed to drop for a time; so it will appear that it was the postmaster that was lost, and not the post office as stated. I would also state that a postmaster has been found since in the person of one of Mr. Glen Campbell’s workers at last Dominion election, and that the Fishing River P.O. is in operation. Also on the same date (Sept. 25th, 1905) “Lacey” P.O. was established (since named Oak Brae) 5½ miles east of “Sobieski” and Fred Lacey was appointed Postmaster and still survive, much to the annoyance, it seems, of the Fork Riverite whose letter appeared on Oct. 6th. As to tacks and sugar being put into Oak Brae mail at Fork River, I may say that I am not responsible for what is put into the mail bag at Fork River. I would advise him to complain to Fork River postmaster or to the postmaster general at Ottawa, and state what damage has been done and I am confident he will get satisfaction, also if this correspondent will find out and inform me as to time of making up mail for Winnipegosis at Fork River I will try and get in on time and thus please him has he is the only one who seems to worry about the matter, we have yet to receive the first complaint on this score from any one who has mailed a letter from this office to Winnipegosis. If “A Fork River Correspondent” will call at Oak Brae I will produce documentary evidence to support the statement re establishment of post office which I am certain will convince this reckless individual.

Not many years ago we had in the British House of Commons a set of politicians known as “Little Englanders.” They were opposed to the progress and expansion of the empire and it seems to me that one or two of that party must have got their quietus in the old land and turned up at Fork River, for whenever anything is said or done having for its object the improvement and development of this part of Manitoba, this “Little Fork Riverite” and his kindred spirits oppose it, and set to work to frustrate any movement for the betterment of this country. We remember when a siding was asked for by the farmers of Fishing River district the “Little Fork Riverite clique saw ruination for Fork River in it, and suggested that something ought to be done to prevent that siding being constructed. The farmers of Fishing River and Fork River were encouraged to sign a petition just previous to the election last June, asking the Government to erect an elevator and were told again and again that an elevator would be erected this fall at Fork River is the Roblin Government was returned to power, have we got one? Not on your life and I charge that the action of the “Fork Riverite” clique has discouraged any of the Elevator companies from erecting an elevator at Fork River. I do not bow the knee to the Roblin Government but I signed the petitions for the erection of a Government Elevator and advised others to do the same and intended if it was built, to patronize it because it would be built with the people’s money and it is good policy the patronize any institution that our money is invested in and endeavour to get the best we can out of the investment, there are thousands of bushels of grain in our district this season and we have no local market, I repeat that the Government Elevator is lost to Fork River district and the famers have been fooled once again and I ask the disappointed farmers to become “knockers” along with me and we will get the elevator along with a lot of other good things such as post offices etc., etc.

Fred Lacey,
Post Master, Oak Brae.

1910 Oct 20 – Winnipegosis

On Monday last the “Manitou” left the landing stage at Winnipegosis, heavily laden with fishermen and their equipment. Part of this equipment, and one would think a very important part, consisted of the wives and children of some of the fishermen. Although so many have left the town, the toll of departure is not yet complete but it is expected that this week all the people occupied during the winter in fishing, will have left the town. We wish them luck.
On Sunday next the Rev. James Malley will conduct the service in the Fork River Methodist Church at 11 o’clock in the morning instead of 3 p.m.
On Sunday next the Methodist pulpit at Winnipegosis will be occupied by the Rev. Jas. Malley. The subject will be “Buried alive by Devils.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 19 – 1911, 1916

1911 Oct 19 – Fork River

Harvest festival was held in All Saints’ Anglican Church on Sunday. The church was tastefully decorated with flowers, grain and vegetables. The ladies and officers are to be congratulated on the fine display. The service was conducted by Mr. Littler, B.A.; Miss Nixon, organist. A large congregation took part in thanking the giver of all good things for a bountiful harvest.
Mr. Littler is leaving the mission to attend St. Johns College at Winnipeg. Mr. Harding of Algoma, will carry on the work in this mission this winter.
Our bonanza farmer, T.N. Briggs, is smiling. Wheat 37 1/2 bushels to the acre.
The C.N.R. should have an extra bonus for the grandly they handle our mail and express lately. It comes in an old box car with about two inches of coal dust all over the floor. Fancy mail bags and grapes with a nice coating of coal dust and baggage and express with syrup and dust. They might clean out the car but any old thing goes on this line.
John Newsdale is visiting his parents after spending the summer teaching in Saskatchewan.
Wm. Coultas’ team took a notion to run away the other day. The sudden stoppage in the river caused him to take a few graceful revolutions through the air. He received a good shaking up, however he is doing nicely.
Threshing is the order of the day this fine weather. There are four outfits working within two miles of town. The yield is very good.

1916 Oct 19 – Dauphin’s Population 3200

The recent census shows the population of the own to be 3200. Naturally this comes as a great disappointment. The falling off, however, can be to a large extent accounted for in the fact that over 1000 young men have been recruited from the town. The normal population must be close to the 4000 mark.

1916 Oct 19 – The Week’s Casualty List

Stuart Geekie, Winnipegosis, killed. (Stewart Geekie, 1893, 150410)
Wm. Patterson, Ochre River, killed. (???)
A. Stevenson, Minitonas, killed. (Albert Victor Stevenson, 1892, 425361)
Robin Cruise, Dauphin, killed. (Robert Wallace Cruise, 1899, 425650)
Jas. Brown, Dauphin, wounded. (James Evelyn Brown, 1896, 151554)
Pte. Younghusband, Dauphin, killed. (Francis Lloyd Younghusband, 1892, 81863)
Lance Corp. H.G. Alguire, wounded. (???)

1916 Oct 19 – Fork River

J. Schuchett and Mr. P. Zacks left for Winnipeg to arrange for taking over Mr. Zacks’ stock as he is leaving here. Zack brothers are taking three cars of potatoes to Winnipeg. They have purchased the spuds from the farmers here at 45 cents a bushel. The snow storm of Tuesday has delayed the thrashing for a few days. Farmers are busy loading grain from the platform and getting satisfactory results from their shipments. Wheat prices keep advancing. Truly the farmer is king this year.

1916 Oct 19 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. J. Mossington and children have returned home from a long visit to friends in Toronto.
The tug “Isabelle” left on Sunday morning towing a barge load of supplies and W.B. Sifton’s log camp outfit. W. Johnston was also a passenger with his fishing outfit, and L. Schaldemose took his family up for the winter.
The “Manitou” returned Monday. She has one more trip to make before the close of navigation.
Mr. Wm. Sifton, of Minitonas, is visiting his daughter Mrs. A.S. Walker.
Last week some fines were imposed on account of liquor. Geo. Bickle, who is not a householder, was found guilty, and Ed. Chermok, a general merchant here, was fined for having liquor in his store. The authorities are on the watch for others who are suspected.
The Red Cross Society had a very successful meeting at Victoria Hall last Wednesday [1 line missing] the entertainment will be given by Mrs. Paddock and Mrs. White.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 28 – 1911, 1914, 1916

1911 Sep 28 – Fork River

Miss Bertha Johnston of Dauphin, is on a visit to her sister, Mrs. Duncan Kennedy.
Glen Campbell’s committee rooms were set fire to at the wind-up of Cruise’s meeting by some political sore head. Not much damage was done.
Mr. Y.G. Littler was a visitor to Winnipeg on business.
Our Liberal friends had to import help from Saskatchewan and outside points, with boodle and slandering stories. It was quite unnecessary as they have proven to be past masters at the game themselves. However i was of no avail as we gave a majority of 20 for Campbell in sip of their unscrupulous tricks.
James Duff, of New Lowell, Ont. is visiting at the home of Mr. Noah Johnston of Mowat. He thinks we have a good district here.
The scribe in looking over the Press notices that our old friend Jackdaw, has been to Hell on a tour of instruction. He should now know something of what is in store for him and the cabinet ministers of the late Laurier Government and govern himself accordingly as the ways of the transgressors are hard.
The Liberal-Conservatives will hold a ball in the Orange Hall on Sept. 29th. Everybody welcome irrespective of political learning.
Hurrah for R.L. Borden, a tiger for Glen Campbell, although defeated will not be forgotten in the future.
Nicola Dinsercsim is under a quarantine for scarlet fever, having lost two of his family during the last week. He has our sympathy in his time of trouble.
Threshing is going on apace this week. No doubt the change of atmosphere is due to the reciprocity funeral on the 21st.
Mossey River Council meets at Winnipegosis on Tuesday, Oct. 3rd.
There are some people who prefer to keep dogs instead of fences and consequently their neighbours cattle suffer. One farmer who has had his cattle badly cut by dogs has found an ointment made of lard and strychnine a splendid thing for cattle’s sore heels. Put in plenty of strychnine and it has a most soothing effect on the cattle.

1911 Sep 28North Lake

Owing to an outbreak of scarlet fever, North Lake School has been closed. Mr. J. Spearing the teacher, was soon on the trail and located 10 cases. Dr. Medd of Winnipegosis, health officer for this municipality, quickly responded to the call for assistance. After a strict investigation he put five houses under quarantine much to the annoyance of the inhabitants, but joy to the surrounding district. He said something about the roads here but we’d rather not put it in less the Reeve and Councillor for this district gets hold of the paper.
The Doctor’s young; but he can certainly put the fear of the old gentleman into the Galicians in a case of this kind. We’re afraid he will have to be called again for an outbreak of nervous disorder.
Threshing has started in places around here. Mostly barley has been grown this year owning to the big prices it will bring?
Mrs. Jos. Spearing is visiting in the Oak Brae district this week.

1911 Sep 28 – Winnipegosis

D. McAuley made a shipment of cattle to Winnipeg on Tuesday.
Duck shooting this season has not been as good as in the past years. Sportsmen returning from the north end of the lake have fairly good bags, but not the large ones they use to be able to report.
Rev. Thorirason of Oak Point, near Brandon, held confirmation services on Sunday.
The Mossey River Council meets here on Oct. 3rd.
The fishing schooners are already leaving for the north end of the lake, to prepare for the winter season which opens on November 20th.
Something sure did happen here on the 21st. How the oracle was worked no one yet has been able to clearly state, but one thing is certain that there will be an election protect and from the revelations then, “just how it happened” will be explained and hot to the satisfaction of either the Liberals or Mr. Cruise.
Frank Hechter was a visitor to Dauphin on Saturday.
Miss Johnson of the Dauphin Hospital staff, who has been recuperating at her home here, leaves Saturday to again take up her duties a the hospital.

1914 Sep 28 – Nine Miles of Dead in Trenches

LONDON, Sept. 23 – The Daily Mail’s correspondent reports that the German right has been turned between Peronne and St. Quentin. He says wounded have been arriving at the unnamed place. They report that there are nine miles of dead in trenches between those town towns.

1914 Sep 28 – Ethelbert

Considerable wood is being shipped out.
Messrs. Geo. Marantz and H. Brachman, were at Dauphin in the early part of the week attending the Jewish New Year services.
Threshing will be pretty well wound up in this district by the end of the week.
Efforts will be put forth by most of the farmers to have as large an area of land as possible unfair crop next year in view of the high prices promised for grain.
K.F. Slipetz was a Dauphin visitor on Monday.

1914 Sep 28 – Fork River

Mrs. D. Kennedy returned on Monday from a visit to Dauphin.
Wm. Howitson has returned and is open for business again at the A.T. Co. store. He is of the opinion that Fork River is the right place.
In the gloaming Mr. Archie McDonald left for a few days trip and will take in Winnipeg. Archie needs a rest after such a strenuous summer’s work on the farm.
Jack Angus, of Winnipegosis, is taking a vacation for a week at Fork River. He says there are times that Toye’s dredges or schooners are out of the question.
Miss Grace Little has returned from a months visit with friends at Winnipeg and Brandon.
Mr. Thomas and family have arrived with a carload of furniture from Saskatchewan. He has charge of the Northern elevator and intends making this his home for some time.
F.C. Green, from England, has arrived to take charge of this mission for a time. He will hold service in All Saints’ Anglican Church, Sunday afternoon, Sept. 27th, at 2 o’clock.
In this time of war would it not look very much more loyal of Mossey River School district to have the good old flag flying say at least once a month irrespective of the reading of the School Act.

1916 Sep 28 – The Week’s Casualty List

The Dauphin boys are now in the midst of the active fighting along the Somme and the causality list grows daily.
Fred. I Pike, died from wounds.
Lorne Shand, arm shattered and eye injured.
Chas. Batty, wounded in chest and shoulder.
Fred. Grant, wounded.
Geo. Gray, gunshot wound

1916 Sep 28 – Dauphin Nurses Wanted For War Front

Miss Jackson and Miss Wilson, recent graduates of the Dauphin Hospital nursing staff, and miss Myers, have received notification that their services were accepted for overseas duty. Miss Myers will be connected with Military District No. 10 and leave Oct. 3rd. Miss Jakeman and Miss Wilson will be with the Queen Alexander Technical nursing staff and leave Oct. 7.

1916 Sep 28 – Fork River

All will regret to learn that Lieut. T.A. Worsey was killed in action on Sept. 7th. He was lay reader and in charge of Fork River mission in the summer of 1914. On his return to St. John’s College in the fall to take up his studies he enlisted in the Grenadiers as a Private and worked his way up till he got his commission of Lieutenant. He was highly esteemed by everyone for his sterling qualities.
Jas. Playford, of Dauphin, was a visitor here for a few days renewing acquaintances.
John Watson, of Dauphin, was among the recent visitors here.
S.B. Levins has sold his bunch of horses to Ben. Hechter, of Winnipegosis.
F.F. Hafenbrak was unfortunate in loosing the best team he had with pink eye. Horses are horses at this time of the year.
Wm. King has received a pair of registered Berks for breeding. Once our farmers commence to specialize in stock there will be a surer basis of the farming industry. Grain growing exclusively is too doubtful a source of income.
Steve Brazdon got his hand caught in a thrashing machine and had it badly crushed. Dr. Medd, of Winnipegosis, dressed the wound.

1916 Sep 28 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Hall Burrell’s boat was blown ashore near Hunter’s Island during the big blow on Friday last. He took to the small boat and pulled in for help. He got her safely off the rocks without much damage and brought her into port on Monday.
The Armstrong Trading Co. here are doing a lot of business these days. Fishing is good and trade is correspondingly good. Everybody is the store is busy.
Capt. W.B. Sifton was here last week. He made a trip up the lake and on his return took a party to Salt Point for shooting.
Dr. Medd made a trip to Dauphin on Saturday afternoon in his auto, returning on Sunday.
We hear that Sunday school is to commence at 2 o’clock during the [1 line missing] are again ??? ??? Methodist Church. Sunday, the 24th was the first day of the change.
Duck Hunter says there is very little sport this season. They sigh for the palmy days when the railroad first touched the lake at this point. Then it was usual thing to bring home from fifteen to twenty five ducks, now the man who gets seven is happy.
The Red Cross Society here have announced that they will meet on the first Monday of every month for the purpose of transacting business. This is outside of committee meetings, etc.
The Home Economics Society are planning heir program for the winter. Addresses are being arranged suitable to the season for each monthly meeting.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 14 – 1911, 1916

1911 Sep 14 – Political Meetings at Fork River

Glen Campbell held a meeting at Fork River on the 8th inst., which was well attended and much enthusiasm shown. There was no Government speaker and the Grits were conspicuous by their absence.
On the night of the 11th, Mr. Cruise held his meeting supported by Messer. McKinstry and McDonald, and quite unexpectedly Mr. Campbell turned up just before the meeting began. The Orange Hall was well filled as the Conservatives of Fork River were not afraid to hear both sides of the question for they did not know that Glen would be at the meeting. Had they not attended Mr. Cruise’s meeting would have been a small one.

1911 Sep 14 – Fork River

Mr. A. Harvey, an old timer who still owns property in this district, is on a visit to Mr. S. Bailey and renewing acquaintances.
T.N. Briggs’ threshing outfit arrived on Tuesday’s train and is guaranteed to thresh anything in sight from pumpkins to gerkins.
Reciprocity seems to have upset even the clerk of the weather, as we are having very poor harvest weather and a slight tinge of frost.
Mr. Glen Campbell held a meeting in the Orange Hall on the 8th, which was well attended. There were over 100 farmers and a large number of ladies present. Mr. Campbell spoke on reciprocity from a farmer’s standpoint in a plain telling way. His arguments were convincing and plainly showed the audience the reciprocity pact in its true colour and that it would be to Canada’s disadvantage. Mr. Cruise was invited bout did not put in an appearance.
Mr. Forbes of Rivers, has been in the district a few days looking over the land. He is well satisfied with Fork River and is likely to invest in a farm.
The following are a few reasons why the scribe cannot support Cruise, the non-resident candidate and why he objects to the Laurier Government. Look them over and see how few of the ministers retain public confidence. Has there ever been anything worse than Mr. Pugsley in public life in Canada. The corruption exposed in his department exceeds the McGreevy scandal during the Conservative regime. Sir Wilfred has not retired Pugsley as Sir John Thompson retired Langevin. A commission of Liberals has declared the Marine Department under Mr. Broduer, corrupt from end to end, yet he has been retained and now goes not he Supreme Court Bench. The administration of the Militia Department has been as bad as any. The printing bureau scandals have been covered up. The Oliver charges were sidetracked by the dissolution of parliament, notwithstanding pledges given by the Government upon which an adjournment was secured. Sir Wilfred Laurier made the late Mr. Prefontaine, his minister of Marine, when he knew he was corrupt. In fact he had a national reputation for corruption. But Sir Wilfred gave him one of the big spending departments. Mr. Fielding allowed the Farmers’ Bank to open its doors when he had abundance of evidence that it was a crooked organization from its very inception. Look over the ministers in the Laurier Government as it appeals for supper in 1911 and compare the administration with that of 1896 and see how are they mighty fallen. What a descent from Sir Oliver Mowat to Pugsley; from Sir Louis Davis to Broduer; from Sir Henri Joly to Oliver. Sir Wilfred does not want such a comparison to be made. He has introduced the reciprocity issue to cover up the corruption of his colleagues. The Press would try to persuade farmers to vote for the Grit candidate and put back into power Laurier and the most corrupt Government in existence. They might fool a few Jackdaws. The scribe’s advance is turn them out and try a new broom which in our experience always sweeps clean.

1916 Sep 14 – Fork River

P. Zack, of Winnipeg, has purchased the stock of J.S. Nowosad and intends carrying on the business. Mr. Nowosad has accepted a position with the A.T. Co., Winnipegosis.
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Sergant, of Kamsack, and late of Dauphin, are spending a short time with Mr. and Mrs. W. Coultas on the Fork River.
Miss Pearl Wilson is teaching the Pine View School for the present.
On Sunday morning Mrs. Archie McMillian passed away after a period of illness. Deceased was one of the old settlers. The last three years the family resided at Kindersley, Sask. Of late Mrs. McMillian has been residing with her daughter, Mrs. C.E. Bailey.
The harvest home festival services in All Saints’ Church were well attended and the services were interesting throughout. The church was tastefully decorated for the occasion with flowers, fruit and vegetables and those who took part deserve credit. Mr. Butler preached his farewell sermon. He left for Wycliffe College on Monday to take up his studies. His departure is regretted.
Rain has delayed thrashing operations.
The duck pond opposite the post office is increasing in area. There should be good shooting when the season opens.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 25 – 1912

1912 Jul 25 – Fork River

Mrs. Richardson who has been visiting her sister, Mrs. S. Bailey on the Mossey, has returned to her home in Ontario.
C. Cameron and daughter of Neepawa, are spending their holidays with his brother, A. Cameron, of Mowat.
Max and Edwin King have received a six horse power gasoline farm engine from the Grey Motor Co., of Detroit.
Robert Hunt, timber inspector, paid a trip to Fork River between trains on business lately.
Stanley A. King, of Togo, and Ern Munroe of Brandon, left for their respective homes after spending the holidays here with friends.
R. Cruise M.P. and Wm. Sifton, are visiting up north looking for the “missing link.”
Miss Bessie Wilson returned from Winnipeg fair after a week’s stay and enjoyed the outing very much.
William Fraser, formerly of Winnipegosis, has accepted a position here with the Armstrong Trading Co. “Bill” is a hustler.
Mr. and Mrs. A. Snelgrove have left for a trip to Brandon fair.
Stanley A. King, of Togo, and Ern Munroe of Brandon, left for their respective homes after spending the holidays here with friends.