Today in the Dauphin Herald – February 5, 1920

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Feb. 2.
The political committee of the United Grain Growers met at Winnipegosis on Jan. 19th to transact business.
The G.G. held their annual meeting on Jan. 23rd, when officers for the present year were elected. There was a good turnout and prospects for the year look good. A committee of three was appointed to interview Mr. Bickle re threshing outfit. The next meeting will be held at Winnipegosis on Feb. 7th. This change has been made for the purpose of giving the members who reside at Winnipegosis a chance to attend the meetings. After the regular business was finished nominations were called for. The following were elected: President, Thos. Toye; vice, Duncan Crerar; sec.-treasurer, Frank Sharp. Directors – James Laidlaw, J. Haywood, A. Dumas, F. Girling, C. Bradley, G. Godkin. At this meeting the ladies’ section was well represented and refreshments were served.
By the way, what about the corduroy road leading to Bicton Heath school? There are fourteen children on the east side of the muskeg who will be compelled to go without any education another year if this work is not done immediately. It is high time that some of our worthy councillors should be getting busy?

Fork River

Miss McIntyre, of Dauphin, is visiting at the home of Mr. Cooper.
E.V. Lockwood is spending the week in Dauphin.
The question is frequently asked, what has become of the Member for Gilbert Plains. The people here never see him.
Donnie McEachern is spending the week in Dauphin with his mother, who is in the hospital at Dauphin.
Feed is scarce and all available will be needed for the stock at home.
The mid-week meeting in All Saints’ Church, January 28th, was in charge of the school teachers. The program was commenced with a solo from Mrs. A.J. Little and a story by Miss G. Cooper. The Fork River School debate, “Resolved, that a horse is better than a cow,” in charge of the teacher, Miss Ian Briggs followed. The members of the affirmative side were David Nowasod, Percy and Mildred Carlson, and the negative side Ben Schuckett, Bob Williams and Betty Williamson. Judges, Mrs. Lockwood, Miss Cooper and Miss Hess. Critic Professor J. Williamson. Decision was given in favour of the affirmative side. The debate was a lively one and a credit for school boys and girls, and was greatly appreciated by the large audience present. The evening was brought to a close with a piano solo by Mrs. A.J. Little, reading by Miss Cooper and the singing of the National Anthem.
The Debating Society is preparing something lively for Wednesday, February 11th. W. King, chairman.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – September 25, 1919

Dauphin Industry Checked

(From The Winnipeg Free Press.)
Some districts are dogged by misfortune. Here we have a proposal in the House of Commons to abolish hanging just as Dauphin was coming to the fore as a good place to grow help.

Farms Sold for Big Prizes

Frick brothers, from Illinois, purchased the Hambleton and Puchalski farms this week. Both are half sections and close to town. The price paid for the former was $30,500 and the latter $35,000.

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Sept. 23.
Duncan Crerar has returned home from Winnipeg after interviewing Hon. Dr. Thornton in regard to our school affair.
The Coffey and Grenon farm here was sold the other day to two American farmers for the sum of $7000.
Mrs. Sharp is leaving soon for England. Her absence will be regretted sincerely by her numerous friends.
The second lawsuit between Cooper and Russell will be heard before J.P. Tilt, of Fork River, on the 24th inst.
The Grain Growers’ of this district will hold a meeting at the house of Jas. Laidlaw on Friday, Oct. 2nd. Members are requested to be present.
Thos. Toye has purchased from Jas. Costello, of Alberta, the famous Clydesdale stallion “Gay Lad.”
Pte. John Heywad, of Virden, has taken up land in this district and has brought in his stock. He is busy securing a supply of hay for the winter.
Vacant land in this district is nearly all being taken up by returned soldiers.
Capt. Wm. Slater, of the Salvation Army, has gone to Brandon. He has been holding meetings here at different points.
The weather of the past week has been unfavorable for haying and harvesting operations.
The municipal grader working between Winnipegosis and Fork River does not seem to be making as good progress as we would like, but, before offering criticism, we will bide our time.

Winnipegosis

The regular monthly meeting of the Women’s Institute was held in the Union church Friday evening, Sept. 10th. A goodly number of the members were present and the programme proved a very interesting one. Misses Ruth McCauley and Lottie Black gave a very pleasing duet. Miss Kathleen Dempsey delighted the audience with a recitation, Mrs. Houchin gave a splendid and well prepared paper on the subject, “Why Women Should be on the School Board.” Miss M. McMartin gave a talk, and illustrated the difficult subject, “Chilling of Childhood.” She explained in her usual intelligent manner what helps to make a beautiful life. Ten cent tea in aid of the library fund was served at the close by Misses Falconer and MacDougall, when the meeting closed with “God Save the King.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – March 6, 1919

King Decorates Maj. Barker

London, March 4 – King George held an investiture Saturday at Buckingham Palace and conferred eight Victoria Crosses and many other military honors.
The hero of the occasion was Major WM. G. Barker, of the Royal Air forces, of Dauphin, who received not only the Victoria Cross, but the Distinguished Service Order with bar and the Military Cross with two bars.

Major Barker Writes Major Bowman

Anglo-Chilian Hospital,
6 Grosvenor Square.
London, W. 1, 7, 2, 19.
Dear Mr. Bowman:
I received your very kind and most welcome cablegram while in the hospital in France, but owing to the difficulty I have in writing I have delayed answering it till now.
I have been on my back for 15 weeks, but will soon be getting about now. The wound in my right thigh is doing well; but the one in my left hip is pretty bad yet. My left elbow is missing but the arm is doing well.
I am of course, anxious to get back to Canada and Dauphin again, and hope to be able to travel in about three months’ time if no complications set in.
I remain sincerely yours,
W.G. BARKER

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, March 1.
A meeting of the farmers of the district was recently held for the purpose of organizing a branch of the Grain Growers’ Association. The meeting was addressed by Ernest Marcroft, who outlined the objects of the association in a very clear and concise manner. The officers elected are as follows: President Thomas Toy; vice, D. Crerar; sec.-treasurer, Frank Sharp. Six directors were appointed with James Laidlaw as chairman.
A social was held on the 21st alt. in connection with the association and was a very successful affair.
The meetings of the branch will be held on the first Friday in each month. All farmers who are interested in the Grain Growers movement are invited to attend the meetings. The ladies are also invited to attend.
Adelard Dumas, of North Dakota, arrived here last week and is staying with Mr. Laidlaw for a short time. His family and stock will arrive later on.
Walter Cooper is still keeping up his reputation as a worker. He has cleared up most of his farm this winter and shows remarkable vitality for a man of 72 yeas of age.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 19 – 1912, 1918

1912 Dec 19 – Fork River

Herman Godkin, real estate agent of Dauphin, spent a few days with W. Williams.
We have been informed that Mr. Walter Clark was fortunate to get a moose. The head is said to be the finest seen in these parts with a spread of forty-four inches.
Sid. Gower, engineer, returned from Dauphin and intends working with W. Williams this winter.
We were pleased to meet Peter Robinson, an old-timer, in town. He is spending a short time with his parents on the Mossey River.
The C.N. telegraph gang is here renewing the poles, which work was needed.
The Newell moving picture show that was booked for Tuesday and Wednesday did not come off at the orange Hall for lack of accommodation. We need a good boarding house here for the travelling public.
There was not a very large turner to the masquerade ball in the Orange Hall on account of the farmers being busy threshing.
Mr. McIntosh, of Valley River, was here on business.
The Rev. H.H. Scrase will hold a Xmas service in the school house, Winnipegosis on Xmas morning at eleven o’clock, and in All Saints’ Church, Fork River, in the evening at eight o’clock.

1912 Dec 19 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Malley, from Brandon, arrived in town Tuesday. We trust the weather will be favourable for his trip up the lake.
The municipal elections are on now. May we hope that the wiser promises made by the candidates be fulfilled by the successful ones. We certainly need more passable roads, and here be it remarked that if our church wardens finds transportation between here and Fork River too difficult to accomplish in the future, the vision of the rectory, seen here, will have to materialize.
A Christmas morning service will be held in the school house 11 a.m. Come and help sing the carols insuring a “Merry Christmas.”
The Santa Claus fund seems to be a popular one. Perhaps it is because he is such an adept of minding his own business. He is remembering our bachelors with many plum puddings.
The Card Circle will be closed this week for the year. It is a matter of serious consideration if it should be reopened as so many lovers of the game do not enter before 9 p.m., which is near the time when wise and honest heads seek their rest; besides beige started to while pleasantly away a couple of hours, thus inviting congenial spirits, and finding ourselves entertained by a stranger proves a mental lack which should more advantagely be supplied at home, nevertheless we trust for a closing game this week that will reveal its true merit and may the winners of the prizes make good use of them. A certain Mr. Webber is to be thanked for the gentleman’s, which is a gun metal watch.
If we hurt ourselves as much by falling when climbing up hill, as we would so doing when running down hill, no one could be blamed for refusing to climb; but one of nature’s mercies is that we cannot.
The Christian League held a very successful meeting ask week.
The hunting season being closed may the stronger sex once more settle down to “the daily round.”
No moose, no heads, no tales.
Wm. Parker, of this Armstrong Trading Co. is up the lake or out to Pine Creek auditing books.
The young people of our town have a bond of sympathy with Dauphin ones in the difficulty (met here) of preparing a skating rink – see the lake.

1918 Dec 19 – Had Both Legs Crushed

Orval McInnes, a boy about 15 years of age, met with a bad accident at Winnipegosis on Tuesday. The boy was assisting to put ice in an ice house when the block that was being raised slipped from the grippers and fell on his legs, crushing them badly. He was brought to the hospital here the same afternoon.

1918 Dec 19 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Dec. 14.
Heath Officer Dr. Medd was through this district this week and has closed the school for the time being as some of the scholars are down with influenza.
D. Crerar has sold the Hudson’s Bay farm for a good figure. What about the herd law now?
Mr. Laidlaw has finished threshing. The cattle will have a chance to feed considerable land next spring.
Hechter Bros.’ gasoline tractor has arrived and they intend to turn over considerable land next spring.
W. Paddock has broke considerable land this year. Steam and gasoline engines materially aid in preparing the land for crop.
Mr. Winger has sold his flock of sheep to Mr. Venables for a good figure. There is no doubt but sheep pay well and in the future more will be kept in the district.
Mr. Waddell, from Missouri, is the new teacher engaged for the Bicton Heath School. It is up to us to “show Mr. Waddell.”
F. Sharp has completed his house and stable. The buildings are the right type for the farmers and we hope to see more of them erected.
Thos. Toye, our local weather prophet, says the winter will be a mild one. Tom, it may be said, does not make his observations from charts, but seeks his weather lore from wild animals, such as the muskrat, which he says you can depend on.

1918 Dec 19 – Fork River

Chas. Bugg, of Ochre River, was in town lately renewing acquaintances.
Pte. Arthur Shannon is home, having received his discharge.
The election is over and we are now already to shake hands and enter into the Christmas spirit, good will toward all men.

1918 Dec 19 – Winnipegosis

The Dominion Government is making headway with the cutting of a canal at Meadow Portage which, when completed, will open up a waterway with Lake Winnipegosis and Lake Manitoba. The land through which the canal will run has already been cleared and boarded and in the spring about 600 men will be employed doing excavation work.
A card party, in aid of the Red Cross, is being held every Wednesday evening in the Rex theatre. A good musical program is provided and refreshments are served.
A special Xmas service will be held on Sunday, Dec. 22nd, in the Union Church. Special Xmas hymns and solos will help to make the service attractive. Subject will be “The Brotherhood of Man.” A hearty welcome is extended to all.
On the afternoon of Xmas day a Xmas tree entertainment will be held in the above church and a huge tree loaded with toys and decorations will be exhibited to delight the hearts of the children. Santa Claus has arranged to give every child a present from the tree.
A bank will shortly be established at Winnipegosis.
A recent traveller on the Dauphin and Winnipegosis express complains bitterly of having to have an extra washing day in the same week owning to the dirty condition of the train.
The Armstrong Independent Fisheries is sending ten teams up the lake this week to bring in fish. Other companies also have teams employed bringing down fish.