Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 9 – 1913, 1919

1913 Oct 9 – Accidently Shot

Robt. Charlier, a young man 23 years of age, was brought from Ochre River on Monday to the hospital here. He was pulling a shotgun out of a wagon when it was accidently discharged, the contents lodged in his groin. He is reported progressing satisfactorily.

1913 Oct 9 – Fork River

Mrs. D. Kennedy and daughters were visitors to the Lake Town with Mr. Theo. Johnston.
E. Williams returned from Dauphin after attending the rural deanery meeting at that point.
Mrs. C. Bradley, of Winnipegosis, was visiting friends at Fork River and returned home on the “All Saints” special.
The long distance telephone gang are busy here getting ready to put up the wire which will fill a long felt want.
The elevator is in full swing, with John Clements, in charge he having moved his family from Dauphin here for the winter.
Miss N. Millidge, organizer and managing secretary of the Church of England Women’s Auxiliary, gave an address in the church to the W.A. members, which was well attended
Miss Millidge is the guest of Mrs. W. King, president of the W.A. until Tuesday when they both drove to Winnipegosis to hold a meeting with the members of the W.A. at that point. A successful meeting was held.
Mr. Monnington, of Neepawa, arrived here for a few days chicken shooting and is the guest of his uncle, John Robinson on the Mossey.
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. King and Mr. and Mrs. E.E. McKinstry and G.F. King paid our burg a visit in an automobile. They were after the fleet winged prairie chicken. The party were the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Dunc. Kennedy.
Mrs. Gordon Weaver, of Winnipegosis, spent a short time with her aunt, Mrs. T.N. Briggs lately.
John Robinson and Mr. Monnington have returned from a pleasure trip to Winnipegosis. Both were delighted with that hustling town.
We hear that the government dredge Laurier, which was been under the water for three years, was resurrected. Why was the dredge not left where it was as it was less expense to the country under water, as the other dredge has been all summer poking around a little island that Pat and Mike would take away in a wheelbarrow in less time. The sooner there is a change in the present management the better the settlers will like it as we have competent men around here who are able to run this part of the bis.
Mr. Brandon & Sons, of Mowat, have purchased a large gasoline threshing outfit and are in the field for business. With the number of machines at work if the weather continues fine, the threshing will wind up in another week.

1919 Oct 9 – Fork River

Miss Millidge, organizer of the Women’s Auxiliary of the Anglican Church, was a visitor for a few days with Mrs. W. King.
Mrs. Vinning and daughter, of Winnipeg, have returned home after spending a week with Mrs. J. Reid.
T.N. Briggs has invested in an oil pull tractor. This power will turn over the land more rapidly. It’s more speed that counts these times.
Bert Little has taken a trip to Chicago. Fred Tilt is in charge of the store during his absence.
The Cypress River paper, in a recent issue contains the following item:
“Mr. and Mrs. N. Little both old time residents of Cypress River and town this week. They left home in May for an overseas tour, and visited the battlefields of France and Belgium, securing many photos of great interest. They sailed to New York on a French boat and went from there to Toronto near which city Mr. Little purchased a new model 1920 McLaughlin 6 cylinder car and motored to Cypress. They are now on their way home. The same cherry Nat as of old looking as young as ever.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 9 – 1912

1912 Sep 9 – Fork River

George Sumption, of Dauphin; is spending of short time with Mr. J. Clements on the Chase farm.
Miss Gertrude Cooper, who has been spending her holidays with her parents up the Fork, has returned to Dauphin.
Mrs. T.N. Briggs left for a two motions’ holiday with her friends at Brandon.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, spent a short time here lately taking in the sights.
Professor Gorden Weaver and N.H. Johnston returned from a trip to Winnipegosis on business and after the train run off the track. Misfortunes will happen to the best of regulated railways.
Frank Chase, of Dauphin, was here lately looking after his business interests.
The elevator builders have not arrived yet. We think it will be a mistake to build it on the site picked out. The building would be better if it were moved south on to the street next the cattle chute and
Mr. and Mrs. V.O. Weaver, of Vermont, are visiting their brother Gordon, of East Bay.
Wm. Geekie and son passed through here on their return trip from Strathclair to their home at Winnipegosis.
F. Lacey, of Oak Brae, has returned from a trip to Dauphin.
Will Davis, who has invested heavily in real estate in Texas, strongly advocates the use of drain tiles. Will always was practical, especially on mail days when its raining.
Mrs. C. Bradley is spending a few days with Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Several people from the Lake Town took in the dance in the Orange Hall on Thursday night past. Brother Robinson played the Fisherman’s Horn Pipe and a very pleasant time was spent.
Wm. Williams and Mr. Venables spent the week-end at Dauphin on business.
A meeting of the council will be held at Fork River on Monday, the 23rd inst.

1912 Sep 9 – Sifton

The wet season now appears to be over and all except to get on with the harvest at once.
Wm. Ashmore was a visitor to Dauphin on Tuesday.
Good progress is being made with the Kennedy-Barrie store. Once these gentlemen open they are sure of doing a good business.
Frequent shipments of cattle are being made from here. There’s nothing like mixed farming to bring in the cash between seasons.
Geo. Lampard, wholesale butcher, Dauphin, and W.A. Davis were in town on Monday. These gentlemen brought a number of cattle while here.
This end of the district is open to come under the Drainage Act. It pays at any time to make improvements whether they are drains or building better roads.
Paul Wood’s family are going to reside in Dauphin during the winter so that an opportunity will be afforded the children to go to school.
Now that the Herald is giving interesting personal sketches of prominent men who have resided in the district a long time, I hope the prosperous village of Sifton will not be overlooked. We have several pioneers here who had ouch to do with its development and are will known, viz., Paul Wood, John Kennedy, Coun. Peter Ogrislo, Postmaster Thos. Ramsay, Wm. Ashmore and quite a few others that could be named.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 12 – 1912

1912 Sep 12 – Arm Broken in Runaway

A spirited team belonging to Geo. Lampard ran away on Wednesday afternoon. The driver, Thos. McKay, was thrown out of the rig and had his left arm broken.

1912 Sep 12 – Infantry for Dauphin

A movement is on foot in town to organize a military regiment. A preliminary meeting was held in Harvey & Bowman’s office on Monday evening, when Dr. Walker was appointed chairman and L. Shand secretary. It is proposed to have four companies if possible. A public meeting will be held shortly at which Col. Steele will be the speaker and afterwards officers selected.

1912 Sep 12 – Ethelbert

The awful thunderstorm, and the great rain of Wednesday has left things in very bad shape here, and unless we have a spell of fine weather the prospects are none too good.
K. McLean is still improving and is able to be up and about, but he is still very weak and thin.
All the material and engine for the elevator are on the ground, but as yet no signs of the builders. They will have to get a hustle on.
There were two cases before R. Skaife on Saturday. Mrs. J. Rewniak asked that her husband, J. Rewniak, be bound over to keep the peace and be of good behaviour for twelve months. The evidence went to show that John had been persistently ill-treating her ever since their marriage over two years ago, and that he had very recently threatened to shoot her father, an old man who is close on seventy, with the handle of a hay fork twice on the arm, making it black because he tried to protect her. He was bound over to keep the peace and be of good behaviour for twelve months or forfeit $100.
The next case was a mixed up affair. Marko Dubyk sold a pig to N. Tkatchzuk, for five dollars, the pig to be delivered as soon as possible. Marko brought the pig to town, met some friends; they went and had drinks together, and entrusted the pig to Olexa Stassuk, to take to Tkatchzuk, but instead he took it home. Then he have it to S. Basaraba, who put it in his stye, and kept it for some weeks. Ultimely Olexa asked $3 for Tkatchzuk, and he should have his pig. This Tkatchzuk refused to give, but instead he wanted the pig, and $5.50 as a sort of fine for them keeping the pig. The case was decided as follows: Basaraba was ordered to take the pig to Tkatchzuk, and without any compensation for the feed of the pig. O. Stassuk had to pay the costs of the court, as his share of the fun, and Tkatchzuk as told that it was only the magistrate who had the privilege of extracting penalties.
Later Rewniak wanted the magistrate to order his wife to go back to him, but he was advised to treat her kindly in future, and then perhaps she might go back. But Maru says no, never.
The station has got the name “Ethelbert” printed in bold letters at both ends of the building, so that all who run can read.

1912 Sep 12 – Fork River

Sydney Howlett, of E. Million, spent a few days here and took a trip to Winnipegosis on business.
Garent Lacey has returned home after a few months vacation south looking for a high spot.
“Bishop” McCartney took a trip to Winnipegosis hunting his carriage. “Bejiggered if they get it again,” says the Bishop.
Nat Little has returned from a week’s visit to the States.
Our Mowat friend seems surpassed to see a gasoline boat about the size of a coffee pot, go from Winnipegosis to Lake Dauphin and return, and pats himself on the back, as its the dredge that did the trick. Why good sized boats loaded with freight passed up and down the Mossey, fifteen and twenty years ago.
Mrs. Wm. King who has been visiting at Vancouver and California. She says the Fork looks more like home.
D. Kennedy has purchased another “gee gee” for his delivery wagon. Just see the dust fly.
Duck shooting is the order of the day. It’s hard on the feathers.
Rev. H.H. Scrase has returned from a visit to Dauphin and Sifton.
Thomas Shannon has been treating fall wheat for the farmers for seed and several have commenced sowing it.
We are informed some one is looking for a schooner to find the levels after the storm and he is not alone. There’s schooners and schooners.
Lost or strayed, the minutes of three or four council meetings.
Teacher, “What is it Tommy.” “Dad says we will get them all right if we had an assistant. We must not expect too much after such an electric storm. It’s so depressing.”
John Clements and family of Dauphin, arrived to take off his crop in the Chase farm.
Nat Little has put on a new wagon for delivering cream at the station.
The planer has started up again, and Billy Williams is making the shavings fly.

1912 Sep 12 – Sifton

Stephen Kosy’s stable was struck by lightening last Thursday. There were in the stable, a team of horses, harness and fifty hens. Fortunately the horse broke the board and ran out but the harness and hens were burned. Stephen had his stable insured.
On the same date Hnat Skarnpa’s stable was burned, lightening being the cause.
The harvest has been checked for a few days by bad weather.
Four of our well-known citizens have formed a company and will build a big store. Our Fedor of Blue Store does not like to see any more stores in own. He would rather buy out Pinkas and have the while business to himself.
The rumour is abroad that in a short time some of the Ruthenians intend to organize a co-operative store. Building is to begin next week.
Thos. Ramsay is busy building a new postoffice and boarding house.
Paul Wood has bought three lots in block one from Nicola Haschak.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 2 – 1914

1914 Jul 2 – Damage by Hail Storm

A heavy ran storm accompanied by hail visited the Mountview district on Tuesday afternoon. The strip touched by the hail was a narrow one and only two farms were struck.
W.G. Lock last 45 acres of wheat and 15 of oats. Crop insured.
Jas. Scarff last 40 acres wheat and 20 oats. Not insured.
Mr. Lock had only insured his crop a few days before the storm and only received his policy from Winnipeg on Wednesday.

1914 Jul 2 – Latest From Sewell Camp

Sewell Camp, June 30.
The Sergeant-Trumpeter mounted a new steed on Tuesday and we were treated to a great display of fireworks from the horse’s heels, the sergeant’s tongue and also eventually from the part of his pants which struck the ground after a while. For a minute or so he was hear saying, “Going up! Going up!” When he struck the ground, Sergeant-Major Fletcher was heard to say, “Coming down, I fiddler.” Highfield after four days’ rest has still a stiff neck.
The boys look very smart in their new Indian service helmets, which were presented to us alone (the 32nd) as a distinction for our work last year. The boys are proud of them as they should be.
Someone caused an uproar on Sunday. He said the camp was being attacked by Suffragettes. On closer examination they proved to be Cameron Highlanders.
Our shoeing smith thought he would ride the Sergeant-Trooper’s broncho, but changed his mind at the same time as the broncho.
It takes Dave Cox to ride the bronchos and round-up the runaways.
We will leave here on Friday morning arriving at Dauphin in the evening.
Our regiment was inspected on Saturday by the honourary colonel, Dr. Roche.
We turned out on Saturday morning at 4.30 a.m. for shooting on the range. Major Walker very conveniently was absent having a blister on his heel, so stayed in bed.
The Ashville boys are a first-class bunch of rifle shots.
The Dauphin squadron has been nicknamed “The Devil’s Own,” and they are worthy of it.
Red noses are the fashion. It is the fault of the occasional sunshine, not the grog.
On galloping off the field two regiments collided, resulting in a bad smash, one man getting his collarbone broken and two others disabled.
Our boy troopers, Gordon Walker, Gordon Batty and Roy Wade, are constantly being court-martialled by Squad Sergeant-Major, for unsoldierly conduct; not being on parade at 5.30 a.m., catching gophers before cleaning up their tent, etc.
Our cook put up some fine apple pies, things which are comparatively unknown here. We have an idea that Frank Beyette can have his job every year if he likes.
We have had a number of lady visitors up to now, among whom was Mrs. Walker and little daughters.
We wonder what it is that makes the boys sit down so slowly and gently. Having had some ourselves they have our sympathy.
H.H. Allan, the photographer, came down here this year and he is doing roaring business.

1914 Jul 2 – Fork River

A. Cameron and F.B. Lacey, of Mowat, have returned from a trip to Dauphin.
Vote for Sam Hughes, the farmer, and you won’t make a mistake.
Miss Gertrude Cooper has returned from Dauphin and is with her parents on the Fork.
Mrs. Attwood, of Towell, Indiana, and her mother, are spending the summer months with Mrs. W. Davis on the farm.
Mrs. Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, is a visitor at the home of D.F. Wilson on the Mossey.
Messrs. J. Robinson and H. Hunter have put a three-horse power gasoline engine in their new boat. The water should fly now.
Several of the electors from her attended the Conservative meeting at Winnipegosis on Wednesday night. The speakers were Mr. Shears, and Mr. Grenon. The meeting was well attended. We hope to go again in the near future.
The Orangemen of Fork River have arranged for a grand celebration here on Monday, July 13th, when they will be a good programme of sports. The hall will be free to the public in the evening for a dance. All are cordially invited to come and have a good time. There will be a church parade at 3 o’clock on Sunday afternoon, the 12th.
On Saturday afternoon a Conservative meeting was held in the Orange Hall. W. King, president, presided, Mr. Sam Hughes have an account of his four years stewardship as member for Gilbert Plains, which was very satisfactory and well received. Hon. Hugh Armstrong, Provincial Treasurer, followed and gave a very satisfactory account of the financial standing of the province, which showed that the business was in good hands under the Roblin government.
Mr. Clopeck, of Winnipeg, addressed the Ruthenians for a short time and was well received. The hall was crowded and he gallery was taken possession of by a large number of ladies. Everything passed off quietly. It was a most successful meeting of the kind ever held in Fork River.
Mr. Green, late Liberal member for North Winnipeg, was here a short time Monday and later left for Winnipegosis accompanied by N. Little.
H. Woods, of Dublin Bay, was a visitor here on Saturday night attending the committee which is arranging for the Orange picnic.

1914 Jul 2 – Winnipegosis

Coun. Frank Hechter went to Winnipeg on Monday in connection with the good roads movement. He was joined by some of the delegates from the other municipalities at Dauphin.
Mrs. Kenneth McAulay, and children, and her sister, Miss Smith, left for Kamsack on Monday.
The big political guns, Hugh Armstrong and Sam Hughes left for Dauphin on Sunday.
Capt. Coffey returned on Sunday to Dauphin with his automobile, taking with him several of the politicians.
R. Morrison has finished the foundation for the new school.
Mrs. T. Johnston returned on Monday from a visit to Dauphin.
Mrs. W. Johnson and Mrs. McIntosh, of Fort William, are visiting with Mrs. Johnston.
The big political meeting on Saturday night was held in the new Rex Theatre. This building seats over 300 and a great many were obliged to stand during the speaking.
The weather has been rather on the cool side for boating and the usual umber of crafts are not seen on the lake. With the warm weather of July many will seek cool breezes of the water.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 20 – 1912

1912 Jun 20 – Mossey River Council Minutes

Meeting of the Council held in the Council Chamber, Winnipegosis, Tuesday, June 4, 1912. All members present, Reeve Lacey and Councillor Nicholson arriving late.
Coun. Hunt was appointed chairman of the meeting in the absence of the reeve.
The minutes of previous meeting were adopted as read.
Sieffert – McAuley – That R.E. Broadfoot be allowed penalty off his 1911 taxes owing to his cheque to Municipality having been lost in transit. Carried.
Seiffert – Robertson – That Paul Wood be asked to pay taxes on sec. 21-31-18 up to and including the year 1910. Carried.
Seiffert – Robertson – That J.W. McAuley and Thos. Toye be appointed to investigate conditions in Cork Cliff S.D. with a view to constructing a road there; the cost of said road to remain within the bounds of Ward 5 appropriation for the year 1912. Carried.
Robertson – Nicholson – That arrears of taxes due on N.E. 10-29-18 and N.E. 14-29-18, be cancelled. Carried.
McAuley – Seiffert – That arrears of taxes on S.E. 28-31-19 be cancelled. Carried.
McAuley – Robertson – That the clerk notify C. Humphreys that arrears of taxes due on N.W. 16-29-18 must be paid forthwith. Carried.
Nicholson – Robertson – That all bridges of 20ft. or over be built, kept in repair, and generally looked after by Municipality. Carried.
Sieffert – Hunt – That the Armstrong Trading Co. be allowed the use of two wheel-scrapers, to be used in removing earth from their cellar and putting same on the streets of Winnipegosis, as directed by the Councillor; scrapers to be returned when required in good order. Carried.
McAuley – Hunt – That the Council secure, as soon as possible, the services the of government engineer to take the levels and estimate the cost of constructing ditches throughout the Municipality, with a view to borrowing money for the same. Carried.
Hunt – Robertson – That J.W. McAuley and J.S. Seiffert be appointed a committee to look after the fencing Winnipegosis cemetery. Carried.
McAuley – Nicholson – That Councillor for Ward 4 be allowed to accept Peter McArthur’s proposition regarding the sidewalk on block 7, all material to be chargeable to Ward 4, appropriation for the year 1913. Carried.
Nicholson – McAuley – That each road commissioner be authorized to spend his ward appropriations in such work and by what means he considers most advisable. Carried.
McAuley – Robertson – That statute labour be abolished, and that the amount of money represented by the statute labour commutation in each ward at $4.50 per quarter section, be added respectively to the ward’s appropriation. Carried.
McAuley – Nicholson – That clerk state the case regarding Gensor lands to municipal solicitors and ask that action be taken at once to enforce the payment of arrears of taxes on the same. Carried.
Hunt – Seiffert – That F.B. Lacey, G.E. Nicholson and J.D. Robertson be a committee to inspect Fishing River bridge and decide what is best to be done with same. Carried.
Toye – Robertson – That Frank Slywoski’s taxes on S.W. 18-30-17 be reduced to $17. Carried.
Wm. Paddock was appointed fence viewer for Ward 4, and George Shannon for Ward 6 for the year 1912.
Hunt – Seiffert – That all buildings and other obstructions be removed from the streets of Winnipegosis within 30 days. Carried.
Seiffer – McAuley – That arrears of taxes on the N.E. portion of the S.E. quarter of section 10-31-18 be cancelled up to the year 1910. Carried.
Nicholson – Robertson – That the Council new adjoin to meet again at the call of the reeve. Carried.

1912 Jun 20 – Fork River

J. McKie of the Iowa Dairy Separator Co., Fargo, was here on business.
F.B. Venables returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Councillor J. Robinson, of Ward six is spending a few days at Dauphin.
We hear the buzz of the plairey once more. Mr. Williams having put in a new plant, is turning out some very good stuff in that line. Give him a trial oiler.
Mrs. Wm. Coultas let for a few days visit to her numerous friends in Dauphin.
The government dredge in charge of Capt. McLean is making good progress on the Mossey River.
Mr. Malley, Methodist student, will be absent a week or ten days attending conference in Winnipeg.
A. Cooper left for a trip to Lloydminster, Sask.
S. Gower left for the south to take a long earned vacation.
Panko Solomon of Mowat, returning from a trip to Dauphin on the Swan River train, undertook to get off at Sifton Junction while the train was running and had to misfortune to break his ankle and is laid off work for some time.
We asked “Billy” if anything unusual had happened. He remarked with a smile. “Don’t you know the Good Shepherds have gone to Winnipeg as we are in for a whole week of rest, which is very acceptable after the corpedo launched at Sifton, Fork River and Winnipegosis, which places were specially mentioned on Sunday regarding party politics, as it’s like football, one is one is apt to get a crack when you are not looking for it. Cut when you are not looking for it. Cut it out friend and be satisfied with the achievements of the 17th of March, as after such fusillades, singing “Peace, perfect peace, seems out of place.”
Mr. Darroch, Dominion homestead inspector, paid a visit to Fork River in the interest of homesteaders apply for their patents.
We were informed that one of the leading farmers of the south part of this district is in search of a hired man and we were asked if we could tell of one. The qualifications are he must be well up in cow, pig and horse logy; preference will be given to one who had been used to a “Jackass” as there is one on the farm and it usually starts braying about four o’clock in the morning, when not on a visit to the summer resort. The said braying means get up and milk the “keys.” Salary will be the same as given to his predecessors. Five dollars per annum; half cash and half in patent medicines and lots of fresh air exercise and the promise of a further rise in salary of five dollars per annum when the Liberals get in power again. So be good as this is the chance of your life if accepted.
Mr. Clements of Dauphin who is farming on a large scale at Fork River, is spending a few day overseeing the work on the farms.

1912 Jun 20 – Winnipegosis

Arrangements are being made for the reception of the Oddfellows excursion here from Grandview on the 28th.
Mike Whotan cut his knee while working up the lake. He was brought to town by boat by Dr. Medd and T. Whale and was taken to Dauphin Hospital on Wednesday.
Thos. Whale, Dr. Medd and F.R. McDonald were visitors to Dauphin on Wednesday.
Dugald McAuley shipped a carload of cattle to Winnipeg on Wednesday.
Mr. and Mrs. Archie Stewart left on Wednesday for a trip to Dauphin and Minitonas.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 26 – 1914

1914 Mar 26 – Fined $60

Nicola Brattiko, who accidentally shot Mike Kuzyk several weeks ago south of Winnipegosis, was fined $60 and costs a few days ago, for hunting out of season. W.H. Joyce, deputy provincial game guardian of Dauphin, was the prosecutor.

1914 Mar 26 – Fork River

Colin Inkster, of Dauphin, one of the old-timers, was a visitor here renewing acquaintances for a short time.
Sam Reid left for a week’s holiday in the south.
Coun. F. Hechter, of Winnipegosis, stayed over after the council meeting, the guest of Mr. Kennedy. Frank is contemplating using an aeroplane next time as the “automobilly” got stuck in the snow and he had to do a little sprinting to get here but he arrived smiling.
W. Bell returned from spending the winter with his friends at Russell. He is looking hale and hearty.
Reuben Coombers returned from a month’s visit at Selkirk and reports a pleasant time.
A. Shinks, who has been working all winter with the Williams Lumber Co. Ltd., arrived in town and has left for his homestead at Vonda, Sask.
Dr. Medd visited a family out west that was said to have the fever, which rumour upon investigation was found to be incorrect. This is too bad as the doctor had a long trip for nothing.
The Lake Dauphin fishermen’s ball proved a success, the hall being well filled. Several from Winnipegosis attended and all report a good time, although it was stormy.
Sid Coffey, of Winnipegosis, put on his moving picture show on Saturday. Judging from the crowd it had, there being hardly standing room, it was satisfactory to all when attended.
While it is a delicate subject we can’t help noticing the contrast of these turnouts in comparison with the congregations attending the two churches. Any excuse is made for not attending divine service. It is poor encouragement to young students who give their services to these [1 line missing] existence.
We notice our Mowat friend is still grinding out his imaginary P.O. troubles. He ought to take to the woods now.
James Gunness has received a 3 horse power gasoline engine for his track car. It certainly can go some when Jim and Conductor Sid get behind it.
Frank Hafenbrak has returned from Rochester, Minn., with his farther, I. Hafenbrak. We are sorry to hear he is not improving as fast as expected.
John Clements was in town for a short time Monday on business.
Nat Little is busy drawing stone for foundation for a new stable.

1914 Mar 26 – Fork River

J.T. Wiggins representative of the Steel Granary & Culvert Co., of St. Boniface, interviewed some members of the council regarding graders and road machines. Before leaving he appointed D. Kennedy, of the A.T. Co., their local agent.
Mrs. D. Robinson, of Mowat, returned from spending the winter months among friends in Eastern Ontario.
Nurse Tilt arrived fro Dauphin and intends spending some time on the farm.
Mrs. Theo. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, is staying a short time with her daughter, Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Frank Hafenbrak received a telegram on Friday from his father’s doctor that he was wanted at once at Rochester, Minnesota, where Mr. Hafenbrak is receiving treatment. He left at once for the south.
The Shetland pony, Hamlet, was shipped to Cypress River by express, the little fellow being a trifle too heavy for parcel post. Romeo and Juliet are left behind. Mr. Little has plenty more to pick from.
Mrs. McWilliams has left for the south to recuperate after her illness. We trust she will be benefited by her trip.
Joseph Lockhart is off on a visit and will no doubt take in the Kerfanko trial as a variety during his absence. Joe likes to be up-to-date.
C.O. Allen, Dominion Land Survey or, is back in these parts in connection with water power or the town of Dauphin.
Don’t forget the Lake Dauphin Fishermen’s Ball in the Orange Hall on Friday evening, the 27th March, or you will miss a good time.
The weather is mild again and if this continues we will soon be on the land ploughing.
Mrs. D. Kennedy is visiting at Dauphin.

1914 Mar 26 – Winnipegosis

About one hundred couples attended the St. Patrick’s Ball, given by Mr. and Mrs. McInnis, in the Hotel Winnipegosis, and all had a very enjoyable time. The ballroom was beautifully decorated for the occasion and the guests tripped the light fantastic until the wee small hours of the morn. We haven’t space here to give a description of all the beautiful dressers worn by the ladies, so will just say they were the best dressed lot of ladies that ever graced a ball room in Winnipegosis. Mr. and Mrs. McInnis are ideal entertainers.
The fishermen’s ball was held Tuesday night, March 24th, in Victoria Hall.
It is reported another hotel will be built here this spring on the corner where the Lake View was burned.
There is talk of a bank being opened up here this spring and we hope he report is true. A bank is very much needed.
Frank Hechter has returned from Winnipeg. We understand he engaged a teacher for the third room that is to be opened up.
A party of surveyors arrived on arrived on Monday. They are leaving on Wednesday to inspect the work done by J.E. Jackson this winter.
A meeting of Conservative Association was held in Cohen’s hall on Monday might for the purpose of electing officers and appointing delegates to attend the convention at Gilbert Plains. A very large number were in attendance and the great interest taken in the meeting shows that the Conservatives are anxiously awaiting the coming election. J.P. Grenon was elected president.
Miss Phoebe Denby, who has been visiting friends in Winnipeg and Selkirk, returned last Monday. Her sister Ethel stopped in Winnipeg to attend college.
Coun. Hechter motored to Fork River on Tuesday morning to attend the council meeting
Mr. Finlayson, inspector of Dominion fish hatcheries paid our Sake Island hatchery a visit this week and reports everything in a very satisfactory condition.
Geo. Cunliffe has returned from spending a few days in Winnipeg.
Archie McDonnell has the gold fever and is going to the Pas to seek his fortune. If Archie makes good we will all get a piece of it.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 13 – 1913

1913 Mar 13 – Baran to Hang

Joh Baran, the man who shot Constable Rooke, was found guilty of the crime at the assizes and sentenced to be hanged on May 20th.

1913 Mar 13 – Fork River

Mr. W. King, County Master, returned form Winnipeg, where he attended as delegate the provincial Grand Orange Lodge of Manitoba.
Rev. H.H. Scrase was elected deputy grand chaplain for Dauphin country L.O.L.
John Clements spent a few days in Dauphin last week.
Everyone is busy trying to get their hauling done before the snow leaves us.
Dr. Page will hold baptismal and Communion services in All Saints’ Church, Fork River, at 2:45 o’clock next Sunday, the 16th March.
Mrs. W.R. Snelgrove returned from a visit to friends in Dauphin.
Miss Pearl Cooper left for Dauphin on a visit to friends.
D.F. Wilson has returned from the Brandon fair and reports a good time.
Mr. Vivian Hafenbrak has returned after spending a few days in Dauphin on important business.
We notice the Fork River correspondent in the Press has coupled the named of some of our esteemed citizens to his untruthful items the last two weeks. He must be hard up for news. But then he reminds us of the man who kept his spirits by pouring spirits down because he got pinched for keeping a pig within the two limits against the law. Take a tumbler, friend, and don’t be so anxious to use other people’s names.
Professor J. Robinson, who has been up the lake fishing all winter, has returned from Mafeking and is taking charge of the Fork River Quadrille club.
Rev. A.S. Wiley, rural dean of St. Paul’s Church, Dauphin, paid, Mr. H. Scrase a visit lately.

1913 Mar 13 – Winnipegosis

Rev. Dr. Page, of Winnipeg, is expected in town on the 16th to administer Holy Communion and baptismal services will also be held Sunday next, in the school house.
P. McArthur will be back shortly to town. Mrs. McArthur will probably remain in Winnipeg some time longer owing to having recently been suffering from a painful fall while south.
Mrs. Benoit, of Dauphin, who has been the guest of Mrs. Hall Burrell the past week, has returned home. Her visit was greatly enjoyed.
We’re glad to see Miss Evelyn Burrell looking well again, only minus roses. Get strong quick, Evelyn, there’s a good time coming.
Dr. Medd is rather a ? but confirms finally the fact that there are enigmatical people even here.
Mr. Scott says he would not have come to stay in this town but for its great attractions. Dear old, Winnipegosis! If we only had a daily train service.
St. Patrick’s anniversary will be celebrated by a ball in the Winnipegosis hotel.
The play, “when Greek meets Greek” is being practiced for the concert on the 28th promises to be exceptionally good.
A meeting of the W.A. will be held at the home of Mrs. Bradley on Friday evening.
Nearly all the families are down from the north end of the lake. Possibly about 20 people have yet to return. “Dad” Danby is as brisk as ever; a fine example of 70 years young.
The snow plough has made its best trip. It can transport 10 or 50 tons of fish on a single trip, and leaves the lake somewhat picturesque. A trip on a dog sled to Snake Island is fine and a visit to the hatchery most interesting.
Anyone keeping vigils now will have the dreamy canine cries as an accompaniment. ‘Tis a pity the dogs are not treated more as man’s true friends.