Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 3 – 1912, 1918

1912 Oct 3 – Fined $50 and Costs

Fred Buchij, a Galician, had a row over cattle with another Galician at Valley River. In the melee Buchij ran a pitchfork into the other man. The case was tried before P.M. Munson on Wednesday and Buchij fined $50 and costs. He paid up.

1912 Oct 3 – Killed at Kamsack

Thos. Powell, formerly of Dauphin, was killed at Kamsack on Monday. He was a car repairer. He was working under a car when a train shunted on the track and shoved the car over him. He was badly crushed. Powell was at one time an employee in the railway shops here.

1912 Oct 3 – Threshing Progress

Threshing commenced in several parts of the district this week and will be general if the fine weather continues. A great deal of the grain is being stacked this fall with the object of going ahead with the plowing.

1912 Oct 3 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River on the 25th Sept. All members present.
The minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted.
Communications were read from Sarnia Bridge Co., Supt. Irwin, of C.N.R., the solicitors, the Highway Commissioner, J.P. Grenon and the Million for the Manitoba League.
A report of the public works committee condemning the Bailey Bridge unsafe for traffic was read.
Nicholson – Robertson – That the Minster of Public Works be asked to send an engineer to examine the site of the Bailey Bridge and that government aid be asked for to construct it.
Hunt – Nicholson – That the clerk write Supt. Irwin, of the C.N.R., re ditch from Mossey River north to the Sanderson Creek and also re crossing on Cocker Road.
Seiffert – Nicholson – That the council pass a by-law to expropriate a roadway sixty six feet wide along the west side of the C.N. through the N.W. 18-30-18.
McAuley – Robertson – That the clerk write the rural municipality of Dauphin and ask that some of the members of its council meet Reeve Lacey and Coun. Robertson at the bridge across the Mossey River on the boundary line between the two municipalities to consider what is best to be done as the bridge is becoming unsafe.
Nicholson – Toye – That no action be taken towards collecting the price of the Shannon road from Thomas Shannon till Dec. 1st, 1913.
Nicholson – Robertson – That the declarations of Councillors McAuley, Toye and Nicholson for $13.80, $17.70 and $24.30 respectively for letting and inspecting work be passed.
Nicholson – Robertson – That no person be allowed to dump garbage within 200 yards of any residence, street or road in the village of Fork River, and that the Armstrong Trading Co., be notified to remove the refuse deposited by them behind the Orange Hall immediately.
Nicholson – McAuley – That the Minister of the Interior re memorialized to throw the swamp lands in the municipality open for the homesteads.
Hunt – Nicholson – That the C.N.R. be asked to place an agent at Fork River during the shipping season.
A by-law to establish the rate for 1912 was passed, the rates being municipal rate, 12 mills; municipal commissioner’s rate ½ a mill, and the general school rate 4 mills.
McAuley – Toye – That the Council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis on November 1st.

1912 Oct 3 – Fork River

The Rev. H.H. Scrase visited Rural Dean Wiley and on his return visited Sifton on church business.
Thomas Shannon returned from a business trip to Winnipegosis.
The northern Elevator Co., has a gang here putting up an elevator. An elevator is needed here and it will fill a long felt want.
Archie McKerchar and W. Clarkson of Winnipegosis, spent Wednesday evening with the boys at the Orange Hall and report things booming among the fishermen there.
The cattle buyers are getting busy. One shipped part of a car of sheep last week.
Mrs. R. McEachern and son Donnie, visited Mrs. J.E. Morris, of Winnipegosis, last week.
Mrs. H. Scrase returned from Winnipegosis after spending a few days with her friends and while there attended the installation of officers of the W.A. at the point.
A large number attended the council meeting but no miracles have been performed so far to the satisfaction of the people as promised year ago.
Mrs. C.L. White, of Winnipegosis, is visiting at the home of Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Jim Parker is now living on the old Parker farm and keeps his gang moving. We are always glad to see new faces among us.
Rev. H. Scrase will hold divine service in All Saints’ Church every Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock at Fork River and Winnipegosis school house every Sunday at 7.30 p.m. and at Sifton on Mondays and Tuesdays evening as will be arranged there by next Sunday.
Nat Little arrived home on the special Saturday evening from his trip south. Specials seem to be the order of the day. Nothing like lots of train service, if they only come the same day as advertised. Nuff said.

1912 Oct 3 – Winnipegosis

Fine weather is again with us and our people are wearing pleasant faces. Do you know, people are a good deal like the weather, they change quickly. When the sun is shining all have pleasant faces; when it is dull and overcast long dismal countenance surround us. Give us the man who smiles whether it rains or shines. He’s the one worth while.

Friend, life will frequently grow
Dreary: no fortunate isles
Lie where time’s dun water flow
Give me the fellow who smiles.

Peter McArthur returned to town on Saturday from Dauphin.
All Saints’ Church was the scene of a pretty wedding on Monday, when William Christensen was united in the holy bond of wedlock to Marie Louise Lebel. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Father Derome of Makinak.
The “old-timers” sketches running in the Herald are quite interesting. Winnipegosis has a few men who are well worth writing up. They have seen the country under all conditions, and what’s more, have made good. We’ll name just a few. peter McArthur, Jos. Grenon, Sr., Tom Whale, and Hughie McKellar, the fish expert. To have Hughie tell the history of the little fishes from the cradle to the table, would prove a mighty interesting chapter. In a future issue of the herald Hugie will be asked to tell what he knows.
Capt. Coffey has been here during the past week. The Capt. is nothing if not optimistic. He looks for a good season fishing.

1918 Oct 3 – The Week’s Casualties

Pte. T. Grenier, Makinak, killed in action. (Telesphore Joseph Grenier, 1895, 291698)
Pte. Chas. W. Skinner, Dauphin, wounded and missing. (Charles Winstanley Skinner, 1898, 1001047)
Pte. Harold Tomalin, Dauphin, killed in action. Pte. Tomalin was a fireman on the C.N.R. when he enlisted last January. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Tomalin, reside at Magnet, Man. (Harold Tomalin, 1896, 2129193)

1918 Oct 3 – Dramatic Meeting on Battle Front

One of the Dauphin boys writes the Herald of a dramatic meeting he had with another local boy at night. “We were,” he writes; “on the move and had come to a stop on account of the congestion of traffic. A fleet of Fritz’s planes came out and dropped about fifty bombs around us. Looking around by the light that the bombs made I saw another Dauphin boy about ten feet away. We only had time for a handshake and wish for “good luck” when the traffic moved on.

1918 Oct 3 – Fork River

Mr. Pettit, of Winnipeg, paid this burgh a visit in the interest of the new Victory War Bond campaign.
Mrs. Tait, of Indian Head, Sask., is visiting at her parents, Mr. and Mrs. H. Timewell.
Mr. Love has arrived from Lake Manitoba and has taken charge of the Salada School, west of town.
Max King was a visitor to Winnipeg for a few days on business with the Military branch.
We notice Dauphin merchants are closing their stores at 6.30 p.m. What a contrast to some of our stores in this burg which are kept open much longer hours and sometimes on Sundays. The latter should be stopped at once.
James McDonald has finished his residence and moved into it.
T.A. Briggs has received a shipment of horses for Bonanza farm. The man who is able to receive a bunch of horses these days must have a bonanza bank account.
Fork River farms are in demand a good prices. Several deals are likely to go through shorty.
A Herald subscriber tells your correspondent he is mistaken when he states that “King potato” has not been crowned. He sure is the crowned potentate of this part of the country at any rate.

1918 Oct 3 – Winnipegosis

RED CROSS NOTICE.
The annual meeting of the Red Cross Society will be held on Tuesday evening, the 8th of October, at 8 o’clock, in Rex Hall. Every member is requested to be present. A report of work done during the year will be made by the secretary, and officers will be elected for the coming year. It is for the purpose of electing officers that a full attendance is requested.
Don’t forget that this work is for the wounded men of our army and navy, who have been winning the victories we are so jubilant about just now.

E.L. MACARTHUR,
Sec.-Treasurer.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 23 – 1915

1915 Sep 23 – Recruits for Sewell

The following recruits have enlisted in the 45th Batt. from Dauphin since Aug. 15th, and are now in training at Sewell camp: Bird McKinstry, A. Schoole, Cunningham, J. Brown, F. Storrar, W.H. Johnston, J. Cahill, J. Bartrup, J. Angus, W. Young, A.L. Cocking, W. Rindholm, E. Smith, B.F. Sparks, G. Spoueer, W. Mealing, and J. Hutson.
Sergt. Weeks will be in Dauphin and district until Oct. 15th and expects to get more recruits as the battalion is listed for England at an early date.

1915 Sep 23 – Winnipegosis

There was a most enjoyable dance in the Rex Hall on Thursday evening last in honour of Mr. Barbour and Mr. Burby who are joining the colours to do their bit for their country.
Sam McLean held a bailiff sale of furniture on Saturday, which was well attended and he had no trouble getting bidders, especially on the organ.
Frank and Ben Hechter attended the Jewish services in Dauphin Friday and Saturday.
The Ladies’ baseball team had a practice game on Wednesday when the Browns beat the Blues by 16 runs. Miss Geekie had the misfortune to get hit in the eye by the ball.
D.F. Wilson, of Fork River, passed through here on Friday for South Bay with notices of election for councillor [1 line missing] the army lately.
Quite a number are up north after the ducks. Mr. McInnes took a party across the lake in his gasoline launch Thursday.
Private Walter Munro arrived from Brandon on Saturday to spend a few days leave here with his friends. He reports the boys all well.
Mr. Rutlege, of the Pas, is spending a few days in town.
W.B. Sifton arrived from the north with is gang, having completed his lumber cut.
There was a children’s hour held in the Church of England on Friday evening, which was a great success thanks to Mrs. Bradley.
Constable Clarkson is busy these days rounding up dogs without tags, parties with dogs at large without tags had better keep their eye on the pound.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 9 – 1915

1915 Sep 9 – Winnipegosis Council

Meeting of the Council of the Village of Winnipegosis held in the Council chambers at 7 p.m. on the 6th inst. Mayor J.P. Grenon in the chair and Councillors Walmsley, Levons, Morris and Hjalmarson present.
Walmsley – Morris – That the minutes of previous meetings be adopted as read. Carried.
Morris – Walmsley – That Dunc Kennedy be appointed sec-treasurer at a salary of $30 per month from Sept. 1st till end of the fiscal year. Carried.
Lyons – Hjalmarson – That Walter Clarkson be appointed constable for the Village of Winnipegosis at a salary of $40 per month. Carried.
Lyons – Morris – That the Mayor and Councillors walmsley and Lyons be a committee to secure a yard and feed for pound for Village of Winnipegosis. Carried.
Lyons – Hjalmarson – That the Mayor, Coun. Walmsley and the Sec.-Tresurer meet the committee appointed by the municipality to go over the matter of the appointment between the village and the municipality. Carried.
Morris – Walmsley – That the Council may for the transportation of Mr. [2 lines missing] such time as the Council are in a position to buy it our it is sold. Carried.
Morris – Walmsley – That the Council adjourn to meet at the call of the Mayor. Carried.

1915 Sep 9 – Winnipegosis

Miss Evelyn Barrell and Mr. Sidney Coffey were married in Winnipeg on the 30th August, and arrived in town on Saturday’s train. Their many friends wish them a long and happy wedded life.
G.O. Bellsmy, an old-timer, spent Sunday in town.
Geo. C. Nigh spent the week-end wit his wife and reports the crops in good shape at Grandview. He left on Monday’s train for Grandview.
Dr. Buttomley, accompanied by Tom Needham, arrived from Dauphin by auto Saturday, and left for Meadow Portage with Ern. Bickel to inspect the smallpox epidemic over there.
J.A. Ball, customs officer, spent Saturday in town.
T.F. Ganther arrived on Saturday’s train and is helping J.C. Adams with the completion of his residence.
Sergeant Jack Angus came up from Brandon on Saturday’s train and is looking well and reports the boys from here all well and happy and getting along splendidly. He left Joe Johnston in charge of his squad.
Jas. McInnes has purchased a gasoline launch and made a trip to Waterhen on Saturday with a survey party.
Hull Burrell took Mr. Loire and party to their ranch on Saturday, returning Saturday night.
The S.S. “Maniton” arrived from the north Sunday with a load of fish and report fishing quiet.
Donald Hattie returned from Snake Island and report fishing quiet.
W.H. Hunking left on Wednesday from Johnston, North Dakota, where he intends making his home. His family preceded him some time ago.
Harry and Walter Grenon returned on Saturday from an extended trip to Quebec and Eastern points and report a splendid vacation and a real good time.
Miss St. Vrain and Geo. Adams were married at the home of the latter’s parents last week and are receiving the congratulations of their many friends.
Mrs. Jne. Cain left on Wednesday’s train for her home in Rainy River, Ont.
The Mossey River Council met in the council chamber, Winnipegosis, on the 31st August. The reeve and all councillors present.
E.R. Black and Scotty Howatson had an exciting trip going to Grave’s Point in a gasoline boat. They were lost and were eleven days making their destination. Why they made the point they had only a few matches left.
Sam McLean made a flying visit to town on Friday by automobile. We don’t see much of Sam nowadays.
Mrs. W. Morton and children returned on Wednesday from a two months’ visit to her parents at Wadena, Sask.
Capt. Russell received a nice bull terrier from Kelwood recently. Experts Dunc Kennedy and Billie Walmsley will tell you all about it. These two can sure spot a good dog with half an eye open.
Mr. and Mrs. Woiff and family motored up from Ochre River on Sunday to visit Mrs. Kennedy.
Joe Alex left for Winnipeg on business on Saturday.
Wm. Flett, Hudson’s Bay agent, returned from the far north and has been spending a week in town. He left for Winnipeg Saturday.
C.L. White left for Waterhen River Friday, taking a canoe in tow on account of the low water in the rivers.
The new principal for our school arrived in town Wednesday last.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 27 – 1914

1914 Aug 27 – Latest From Line of Battle

LONDON, Aug. 27 – Late reports to War office state that desultory fighting is occurring along French frontier.

ON EVE GREAT BATTLE

Germans are ready to strike great blow. The troops are fast advancing and one of the biggest battles of the war is in sight.

RUSSIANS ADVANCING

The Russians are advancing in German territory and clearing everything before them.

1914 Aug 27 – Volunteers Get Right-Royal Send-Off

It was truly a great night in Dauphin, the night before the volunteers went away. It was Friday night last, the boys leaving on Saturday morning. The people of the town were out in full force and their right royal patriotism was most marked. The reality of war is brought home to us when “Our Own” are called out for service and hence a subdued depth of pent up emotion which is not found on other occasions. The Band did their part well, and what could be done without the band at such a time as this.

Great Cheering

A crowd of enthusiastic men, joined by a host of boys, well supplied with Union Jacks, some Belgian and French flags, formed in procession headed by band and red-coats. Everywhere, from doors and windows, hotels and street corners, the volunteers were lustily cheered.

Meeting Held in Open

The procession reached the town hall about 9 o’clock. The ball had been packed for nearly an hour and the enthusiasm inside was no less than on the street. Patriotic music was indulged in led by Prof. Minnaert. Only a small portion of the crowd being able to hold the public meeting and send-off for the boys in the op. When all gathered in front and around the corner, as large a crowd as was ever seen in Dauphin, surrounded the group of thirty-two men, whom we have the honour of sending to the front. Again the Band did its part well and between the addresses gave without stint, sweet patriotic strains.

Farewell Speeches

The chairman, Mayor Bottomley, took his place on the front steps of the town hall and everyone, except the volunteers, stood up for over an hour’s programme of music and speeches.
The speakers were Messrs. D.S. Woods, Munson, Wiley, Flemming, Bethell, Major Walker and Captain Newcombe.
The words spoken by all were in accord with Britain’s position and in a deep serious vein set forth the new grave situation in which Canada and the Empire stand today.
The Boys were recipients of a box of cigars each, some wholesome advice, heartiest congratulations, with affectionate hopes for a safe return.
It was an evening never-to-be-forgotten in Dauphin and the warmth of the farewell, the deep subdued feeling, was only surpassed on Saturday morning, when the train actually pulled out, all hats and handkerchiefs waving, all eyes wet, and the Band paying “God be With You Till We Meet Again.”

1914 Aug 27 – Praise For Dauphin Boys

W.J. Rawson, of Brandon, who was in town on Wednesday, told a Herald representative, that the Dauphin contingent had the best appearance of any of the troops assembled at that point for transpiration to Valcartier.

DAUPHIN.
Lieut. A.E.L. Shand (Albert Edward Lawrence Shand, 1891)
Sergt. G. Fraser
Sergt. W. Code
Sergt. T.D. Massey
Corp. D. Wetmore (David Lee Wetmore, 1884, 346)
Corp. N.C. Chard (Norman Cyril Chard, 1894, 240 SGT)
Corp. C.S. Wiltshire
Pte. H.A. Bray (Harold Arthur Bray, 1891, LT)
Pte. H.H. Moore
Pte. A.J. Pudifin (Arthur James Pudifin, 1885, 322)
Pte. Garth Johnston (Garth Fraser Johnston, 1890, 718076)
Pte. Neville Munson (Neville Munson, 1892, 313)
Pte. W.S. Gilbert (William S. Gilbert, 1874, 265)
Pte. C. Curtis
Pte. H. Izon (Hubert Izon, 1885, 280)
Pte. S. Laker (Stephen Laker, 1895, 13)
Pte. J.E. Greenaway (Joseph Edward Greenaway, 1885, 269)
Pte. A.J. Johnson
Pte. D. Powell
Pte. E. Sonnenberg (Edward Sonnenberg, 1892, 335)
Pte. E. Classen
Pte. E. Herrick (Eliot Charles Herrick, 1887, 275)
Pte. E. McNab
Pte. J.E. Lewis (John Edmund Lewis, 1893, 27501)
Pte. C.S. Van Tuyll
Pte. D. McVey (Devon McVey, 1892, 302)
Pte. A.E. Pickering (Albert Edward Pickering, 1892, 320)
Pte. A. Redgate (Albert Redgate, 1889, 324)
Pte. F.A. Mathews
Pte. H. Pollard
Pte. T.A. Collins (Thomas Arthur Collins, 1887, 245)
Pte. Frank Norquay (Frank Norquay, 1891, 318)
Pte. F. Jauncey (Fredrick Jauncey, 1890, 282)

WITH 99TH BRANDON.
Pte. C. Lane
Pte. P. Mickleburg (Ernest Michleburgh, 295)
Pte. Jackson
Pte. W. Bubb (William Charles Bubb, 1884, 2140)

WINNIPEGOSIS.
Pte. E. Morris
Pte. A. Martin
Pte. A. McKerchar

SWAN RIVER.
Pte. D. Stringer (Dixon Stringer, 1890, 24178)

ROBLIN.
Corp. J.B. Shearer (John Buchanan Shearer, 1892, LT)
Pte. J. Hallam (Jonathan Hallam, 1878, 46973)
Pte. W. Day
Pte. W. Armstrong
Pte. R.J. Ritchie
Pte. F. Burt
Pte. A. Hay
Pte. E. Simpson

1914 Aug 27 – Fork River

Mr. Vivian Hafenbrak and bride have returned from a month’s visit to Ontario. Mr. H. is of the opinion the crops in the Dauphin district are ahead of anything along the route he travelled.
It is said, “War is Hell.” So is the price of binder twine, when there is a difference of 1 to 4 cents on the same quality. How the war should affect twine now that was made in 1912 we give it up and leave it to other fellows to explain. Even the motorcar dare is doubted.
The fall fishing has started, so we are told, and while wages are lower our bonnie fishermen are head singing. “Rule Britannia” and “Britons never shall be Slaves.”
Some of our ratepayers are enquiring who is running the Mossey River School affairs at present.
Jack Chipla left for Winnipeg to work on the C.P.R.
D.F. Wilson returned from a trip west on business and reports crops light out there.
A. Snelgrove and Pat Powers have left for Yorkton for the threshing season.
Mrs. Johnston, of Port Arthur, is a visitor at the home of Mrs. Kennedy.
Mr. Clarkson, Winnipegosis, passed through en route for Yorkton.
The Winnipegosis contingent passed through here for the seat of war as happy as clams on their way to Dauphin.
Mr. Ramsay, of Sifton, paid the burgh a visit with a cattle buyer and is rustling a car of stock.

1914 Aug 27 – Winnipegosis

The fishing fleet has left for Spruce Island, a point about 40 miles north. There are between 15 and 20 boats engaged in the work. The catches so far are reported good.
Capt. Coffey arrived from Dauphin on Wednesday.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong was a late visitor.
To be or not to be, that is the great question. At the time of this writing the funds required to complete the school are not yet in sight. It is believed they are forthcoming but until they are the citizens are in a sate of doubt. The new school is needed that is one thing sure.
Architect Bossons, of Dauphin, was here on Saturday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 15 – 1913

1913 May 15 – Baran to Hang on Tuesday

A Portage la Prairie dispatch says: All hope of reprieve for John Baran under sentence of death for the murder of Constable Rooke, has been given up, and preparations will be started the latter part of the week for the carrying out of the sentence that he be hanged on Tuesday, May 20. Portage is without a sheriff and for that reason none of the new officials are to discuss the matter, but the duty will probably devolve on George Muir, the duty sheriff although he has yet received no definite instructions to prepare to carrying out the death sentence. It is known, however that the gallows will be erected in the jail yard the latter part of this week, and it is understood that a government official will arrive about Saturday to superintendent this week. Portage has never had a hanging and the official are not versed in what is really necessary.

1913 May 15 – Fork River

Mrs. W. Williams as returned from Dauphin hospital, where she has been for some time.
Mrs. J. Rice, of North Lake, is visiting Dauphin on important business.
Sandy Cameron, one of the bonanza farmers of Mowat Centre is through seeding. Got a hustle on and left the rest of us.
Mrs. C. Clark has returned from the south after spending a month there. She is greatly benefited in health by the trip.
J.D. Robinson, of Mowat Centre who had been ailing for some time, passed away May 9th at the ripe age of 80 years. The several members of his family have the sympathy of the people of this settlement in their sad bereavement. The funeral took place from the homestead on Sunday he 11th.
Rev. H.H. Scrase returned from Sifton, having held service there on Friday night.
We are informed that Fred. Tilt has rented the house on Nat Little’s farm and intends going into market gardening. We wish Fred. success in his venture.
Capt. Douglas passed through here on his way to Winnipegosis with his trotter.
Dunk Kennedy was a visitor to Dauphin on Tuesday.
Rev. W.A. Fyles, B.A., S.S. Field secretary, will hold Communion services at All Saints’ Church at 3 o’clock and at Winnipegosis at 7:30.

1913 May 15 – Winnipegosis

The ice is still in the lake but there are now indications of warmer weather and its disappearance will be hailed with satisfaction. Once the water is clear the gasoline and sail boats will again dot the water. This is a joyful time but altogether too short in this northern climate. Boating is a splendid pastime the world over. Winnipegosis, I may say, has some capable skippers, and time is destined to become a summer resort.
Frank Hechter returned last week from a trip to Dauphin and Canora.
J.P. Grenon and daughter returned from a brief visit to Dauphin and Winnipeg on Saturday.
It is understood the Commissioner of telephones has under consideration the extension of the telephone line from Sifton to Winnipegosis. Whether the old line will be utilized o an entirely new one constructed deponeth saith not.
Miss Parker, who spent a few days visiting in Dauphin, returned home on Tuesday.
Miss Bertha Johnstone is visiting at her home here.
With the approach of June wedding bells will peal.
Mr. Clarkson returned from Dauphin on Saturday with Mrs. Clarkson, who has been in the hospital there for a couple of weeks.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 20 – 1913

1913 Mar 20 – Baran Now Praying

John Baran, condemned to be hanged for the murder of Constable Rooke, now spends his time in prayer.

1913 Mar 20 – Fork River

Geo. Esplen was a visitor with W. King on his return from Mafeking, where he spent the winter in charge of one of the fishing posts on the north end of the lake.
Mrs. Morley Snelgrove left for Dauphin to visit among friends on her way to Dryden, Ontario.
Miss Pearl Wilson is taking a short vacation among friends at Sifton.
John Bykilo returned home after a two months rest for the good of his health at Portage.
Fred Storrar, of Mowat, has resumed his duties as assistant manager of the A.T. Co. Fred’s all right, a pleasant smile for everyone.
Miss Ena Fredrickson and Miss Kennedy returned from a visit to their folks at Winnipegosis.
We are informed that Professor Ike Robinson was scalded the other day while experimenting with a boiler, which exploded throwing the contents in his face. He is doing nicely. Ike says he don’t mind having solved the tea experiment.
The C.N.Ry. bridge gang is busy renewing the bridge on the creek north of town.
The vaudeville performance which the Laurier troupe has been putting on at the National Play house on Parliament Hill, is costly for the country. Ten thousand dollars a day or sixty thousand dollars for the week is the bill which the people of the Dominion will have to foot for the little game of politics which the Opposition has been staging for the first week in the opposition to the navy bill. That’s Liberal economy and loyalty everytime.
“Say, Mike, we overheard the Admiral trying to explain the need of that boundary bridge the other day and several took a hand in the debate.”
“Well, Pat, by what I see of the affair it is a fraud to take our taxes to build a bridge to accommodate one man and it on private property. He must have caught the rest of them napping to be able to carry such a measure.”
“Now, you’ve put your foot in it, Mike, sure. The Fork River Philosopher’s idea is to bridge the whole municipality and throw the dirt on top. Gee, what next.”
Rev. Dr. Page, travelling missionary for this diocese, held Communion and Baptismal service at All Saints’, Fork River, Winnipegosis and Sifton. There were large congregations at each service. The Rev. H.H. Scrase assisted.

1913 Mar 20 – Winnipegosis

Charles Johnson, of Makinak, was a visitor to Rev. Father Derome last week. He was much interested in his visit and inspected the hatchery on Snake Island, where he enjoyed himself. His father is interested in the management of a hatchery in Norway, Europe.

1913 Mar 20 – Winnipegosis

The ball in the Winnipegosis hotel on the 17th proves that the anniversary of St. Patrick is becoming very dear to the hearts of some, it being patronized by the elite, graced by those who love to trip the light fantastic, and enlivened by an appreciative crowd of onlookers. Many wore a souvenir badge supplied by willing workers of the W.A. and assistants. Fork River social element added materially to its success.
At the Christian League last Thursday Mr. Scott read a paper on “Commerce” touching on the German menace, that was worthy of a much larger crowd of understanding. He defined minutely the fundamental principles of commerce making it more interesting by apt illustrations, ably leading one’s interest up to appreciate the Empire’s present position. His reflections on England from Germany’s attitude served to illuminate her domain and in no way detracted from her greatness.
Mr. Mullens was the recipient of a handsome gift from his many friends in Winnipegosis last Wednesday evening as a token of their esteem and regret at his departure.
Mr. Hulme returns home for Easter holidays.
Mr. and Mrs. Clarkson are rejoicing in the possession of a young son, which was privileged to be baptized by the Rev. Dr. Page, archdeacon and general missioner of the diocese. A baptismal service was also held in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Walmsley on Sunday evening last.