Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 3 – 1914

1914 Dec 3 – Shot in Hand

A Galician named Lazar was brought to the hospital on Tuesday from the mountain with a bullet in his hand. The wound is not a dangerous one.

1914 Dec 3 – Boy Died

Sam, the 9-year-old son of S.J. Buchanan, of McCreary, was brought to the hospital on Monday, having been shot in the stomach and arm by a man who was hunting rabbits. The wound was a bad one and the boy died on Monday night. The remains were taken to McCreary on Tuesday for interment.

1914 Dec 3 – Soldiers Given Send Off

The departing soldiers on Monday morning were given a great send off at the station. The citizens turned out in large numbers and the town band was also present. Bunting and flags were displayed from all sides, and the military spirit was contagious. The special train the boys were to go odd on was over an hour late and this gave everyone an opportunity for a hand shake and chance to say good-bye. As the train steamed in with its long line of coaches the band struck up a popular air, and cheer followed cheer. The scene was one that will long be remembered.
During the short stay here the soldier boys from the west mingled with the crowd and the time was spent in a jolly way singing patriotic songs, waving flags and cheering.
As the train left the station the band played and the crowd simply went wild. Women shed tears, hats were thrown into the air flags and handkerchiefs were waved and cheer followed cheer.
It was a great send off the boys got and one not soon forgotten.

1914 Dec 3 – Sifton

We are glad to learn that miss Rowe, head nurse of the Presbyterian mission, is now on the way to recovery from a long illness.
Owing to bad roads there has been very little business done in the district of late.
The town will was completed last week and there is every indication of there being an abundance of water.
A party composed of our prominent business men paid a visit to Ethelbert last week with the view of inspecting the Kennedy Mercantile Co,’s new grist mill. They report the mill is running smoothly and doing excellent work.
Mr. and Mrs. F. Marantz celebrated on Tuesday the engagement of their daughter, Miss Ida, to Prof. Matoff, which was witnessed by their many friends and relations of the various ???.
Mr. Joe Clarke, late Sawyer-Massey salesman, paid us a visit on Monday. He reports thing quiet at present but he says business will be humming in the near future. Hoe is sure no pessimist.
The teacher and children of the Wycliffe School gave a fine entertainment in the schoolhouse on Friday evening. The one entitled “War Scenes,” consisting of four parts, namely part I, soldiers fighting; 2nd, arrival of Red Cross nurses dressing the wounded on the battlefield; 3rd, hospital scene; 4th, soldiers and Red Cross nurses tenting on the battlefield, was certainly good. The other part of the programme included solos, readings and plays, consisting of “Henry VIII” and “Britannia.” Several patriotic songs were sung during the programme. A dance concluded the evening. The whole thing proved a great success.

1914 Dec 3 – Winnipegosis

California weather.
F. Hechter arrived home on Monday’s train from Winnipeg.
Mr. and Mrs. and Miss McArthur left this week for Winnipeg, where they will reside for the winter.
Messrs. Thompson and St. John arrived last week from Portage for their annual big game shoot. J. McInnis and Walter Grenon accompanied them on the shoot.
Capt. Coffey spent the weekend at home at Dauphin returning on Monday.
Our train service is to be changed slightly. Instead of the train arriving on Saturday as heretofore, it will arrive on Friday, starting on the 4th inst., otherwise the schedule remains the same.
The fish are beginning to come in. The first loads arrived on the 25th, for the A.T.Co. From all reports the fishing is good.
Miss Emblem and miss Burrell spent the weekend at Snake Isle.
Doc. Medd, who has been attending the assizes at Portage, returned on Monday’s train.
Wm. Walmsley has been confined to the house through sickness. Better hurry, Bill, they’ve started curling.
Mr. Foley lost his residence through fire, last week, over heated stovepipes being the cause. Mr. Foley lost everything that was in the house, as the fire had gained too much head way before being discovered.
The entertainment and bazaar in the Methodist Church last Friday afternoon and evening was a grand success. The programme, though not a lengthy one, was of a classical nature and was fully appreciated by the large crowd present.
The municipal elections promise to cause some excitement, especially in Ward 5, where it is understood, “Old Reliable,” Tom Toye and J. Namarko will be the contestants.
The rink opened for skating and curling on Monday night. It is not every town of our size that has a curling and skating rinks open this winter. It should be fully appreciated and patronized by old and young, both skaters and curlers.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 1 – 1910

1910 Dec 1 – Fork River

D.F. Wilson, clerk of the Municipality has been to Winnipeg this week to attend a conference of the different municipalities.
C. Parks opened up a grocery store in this village this week.
W. King returned from visiting several districts in Swan River Valley and seemed pleased with the trip and all that he saw.
The several school trustees are called to transact business in this district on December 5th at 10 o’clock sharp. All persons with children should make an effort to attend.
The nomination papers are out for the election of Reeve and Councillors for this district to be held at Winnipegosis, Dec. 6th.
W. Cooper’s hounds killed a wolf this week.
Charley Clarke paid Dauphin a visit last week.
J. Spearing, teacher of North Lake School, seemed to be getting on very well. He bought a farm just lately and erected a house on it. He speaks highly of the land in this district, but what is most needed is more settlers.
Mr. Barber from Winnipeg was up here this week on business.
D. Briggs killed three bears near here this week.

1910 Dec 1 – Winnipegosis

The Rev. James Malley held services as usual in the church at Winnipegosis and Fork River. His subject was “The Power of the Men of Vision.”
The weather here is mild, but skaters are not debarred the pleasure so much enjoyed by them. Dog trains are now arriving from time to time from up the lake, and it is expected that the ice will soon be strong enough for freighting.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 13 – 1919

1919 Nov 13 – Soldiers Tendered Banquet

A year ago Tuesday the bells of the town were ringing and the whistles blowing. It was a day long to be remembered. The Germans had started the war with the object of conquering the world and had, after the great struggle, hoisted the white flag and asked for the cessation of hostilities. It was a different scene that greeted the eye as one entered the town hall on Tuesday night, November 11th, 1919. Here were tables stretched the full length of the hall, artistically arranged and simply groaning under the load of good things that weighed them down.
The occasion was a banquet tendered the returned boys, their wives and lady friends by the Ladies’ Auxiliary of the G.W.V.A. and it was worthy of them. The members of the Auxiliary have been tireless workers for the welfare of the men and this banquet crowned their efforts.
There were between three and four hundred present.
During the dinner hour Major Skinner extended a welcome to all on behalf of the Auxiliary.
A vote of thanks was tendered the ladies on motion of Comrades Bates and Batty.
After the tables were cleared there was a short program followed by a dance. Those taking part were Mrs. Grobb, violin selection; Mrs. R. Hawkins, solo; Rev. H.P. Barrett, song; Miss H. Clarke, recitation. The McMurray orchestra furnished the music for the dance.

1919 Nov 13 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Nov. 10th.
Mr. Shield and bride arrived last week and have rented John Hayward’s residence on the Mossey River.
John Judge and Mr. Gourlay from Virden, have arrived. They have rented Briggs brothers’ buildings.
A basket social will be held in the school on the evening of Nov. 21st. The proceeds will be devoted to a fund for the purchase of an organ for the school.
The work on the road that leads to the school is still undone. Children from this district east of the muskeg have not been able to attend school of late on this account. The Dept. of Public-Works has provided a special grant from this road. In view of this it seems strange that an effort has not been made to have the work performed.

1919 Nov 13 – Fork River

A meeting of the directors of the Agricultural Society was held on the 5th inst. It was decided to pay the prize money at once. As this was the first show held by the society the directors are to be congratulated on its success.
Mrs. Rice, for a number of years was teacher at North Lake School has sold her property and has left the community. Mrs. Rice has lived a number of years in the district and has done good work as a teacher. Her departure from our midst is a matter of regret.
Mr. and Mrs. Caswell, of Hartney, Man., are visiting at the home of Mr. T.N. Briggs. The young people attended the banquet to the returned soldiers.
Mrs. Gordon Weaver, of Magnet, is visiting her aunt, Mrs. Briggs.
All Saints’ S.S. staff held a public meeting on the night of the 6th. About 50 were present. Rev. H.P. Barrett presided. Arrangements were made for the annual Christmas tree, and also to hold a social evening every Wednesday at which there will be a varied program.
A public meeting is called for Friday, 14th inst., for the purpose of organizing a branch of the Grain Growers’ Association.

1919 Nov 13 – Fork River

Mrs. Emma Rice wishes to thank all who were kind and considerate to her during her recent illness. She is now comfortably provided for in Dauphin and hops to be able to return to our midst within a short time.

LETTER OF APPRECIATIONS.
On behalf the returned boys of the Fork River district we wish to express our appreciation of the banquet tendered us, the gifts of watches and purses and the uniform kindness shown us upon all occasions. We further wish to acknowledge the efforts of the ladies in preparing the excellent supper provided us. The banquet was a most enjoyable event, the pleasure being shared by a number of friends from outside.
THE COMMITTEE.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 14 – 1915

1915 Oct 14 – Arrested

Two young Ruthenians were arrested in the Ethelbert district this week charged with setting fire to two stacks of wheat on Michael Buyar’s farm. The case against them appears to be a strong one. Detective John Parn worked up the case and made the arrests.

1915 Oct 14 – Ethelbert

Harry Cope Nash, of Cowan, was a visitor in town Monday.
We have failed to announce for the last week or two that Mr. Wm. Barrie was appointed as justice of peace for and in the province and Mr. Geo. C. Smith as a provincial constable.
Threshing is just beginning ere and if we only get a few nice days there would be quite a portion of it done.
The average is very good, but the wheat grades somewhat low.
Brachman’s have enloaded this week a carload of flour. It looks as if they alone are going to stock flour this fall.
We had a temperance meeting here this last Sunday. There was a big crowd gathered in the town hall and Mr. Farley, from Winnipeg put up a strong speech and made an impression on the Ruthenians, which were in the majority at the meeting and it looks as if they might join the temperance forces.
Mr. White, from Grandview, is doing a big cattle business in this locality. He has shipped four cars in two weeks.
Mr. Kenneth McLean has built an addition to his house on the farm and has fixed up the house first class. Kenneth, I’ll be you expect company!
Mrs. A. Clarke, of Munson, Alta., returned home on Monday.
Ethelbert will be the chief centre of the wood business again this winter.

1915 Oct 14 – Fork River

Private A.J. Storrar, of the 45th Batt., has returned to Sewell camp after spending a few days with friends. [1 line missing].
Miss Robinson, of Dauphin, is a visitor at the home of Mrs. Dewsbury.
Mr. Sam McLean, of Dauphin, was here on a business trip lately. He had his little gun with him. Some say he was up for chickens, others think it was for larger game.
Mr. Hosey, horse dentist, spent a few days here fixing up the company farm horses.
T.N. Briggs’ outfit is threshing the company’s crop. The yield is such a surprise to Archie that it keeps him busy; in fact, he has not time to sleep as they thresh night and day.
Fred. Coop and Billy Williams are hard at the threshing also and the elevator is busy these days.
John Watson, bailiff of Dauphin, was a visitor here for a short time last week getting the lay of the land.
Capt. Alex. Russell is home from Kelwood and is spending the Thanksgiving holidays with his family.
Mr. and Mrs. Somerfield, from Ontario, are visiting at the homes of their nephews, F.F. and Vivian Hafenbrak, on the Fork River.
Prairie chickens are not near so numerous as in past years in this vicinity.

1915 Oct 14 – Sifton

Football match – 1st Sifton Patrol Boy Scouts vs. Revd. Father Sabourin’s school. Thanksgiving day was celebrated here by a football match between the above trams. The scouts made the challenge, which was kindly accepted and by the permission of Father Sabourin, the scholars marched to the Wycliffe School grounds in charge of the teacher. The Scouts played with dash and vim and although much less in stature and outweighed, steadily kept the ball in the enemy’s quarters and finally succeed in placing the leather. A large number of spectators enjoyed the dun. Score: Scouts, 1 goal; Father Sabourin’s school, nil. Scout team: Leslie Kennedy, (captain), John Gillis, Max Marantz, G. Marantz, Joe Reid, John Terchennik, Roy Kennedy, Louie Kennedy, Roddy Gillis, Mike Setchiabin, Stanley Gillis.

1915 Oct 14 – Winnipegosis

Last week was a busy week in town, every night being filled by a concert, dance or moving picture show and we all feel the better for it.
There was a most enjoyable dance in honour of our soldier boys on he occasion of their leaving for their regiment. Everybody was there and seemed to have a great time.
On Wednesday evening Mr. and Mrs. Sid. Coffey gave a dance in the Rex Hall, which was well attended and a most enjoyable evening was spent.
The concert in aid of the Red Cross Fund was held in the Rex Hall on Friday, the 8th, inst., and the hall was crowded; the program was a good and varied one and was much appreciated. The proceeds amounted to $57.10.
The ten-cent tea at the home of Mrs. White last Wednesday netted the handsome sum of $11.75.
Don’t forget the masquerade ball in the Rex Hall on Friday, the 22nd Oct. or you will sure miss a good time. Tickets on sale from Dunc Kennedy.
Three cars of settlers’ effects arrived on Saturday from the east. This northern country is rapidly filling up. We are glad to welcome all comers.
Miss Dolly Geekie and Miss Eva Fredrickson left on Saturday’s train for Winnipeg to spend a few days with friends.
[1 line missing] few days with Miss McMartin, left on Monday’s train for Neepawa.
Mr. Wiseman, of Roblin, has opened up a jewellery store and repair shop in the Rex Hall block.
Mr. Goodman, of Winnipeg, has opened up a second hand clothing emporium in the old Hunking house across the track.
The council met as a court of revision on Wednesday the 6th inst., and adjourned to meet again on the 14th October at 9.30 a.m.
Mayor J.P. Grenon returned Friday from a business trip to Winnipeg.
Frank Hechter left on Saturday for Dauphin on business.
The Field Day at the schoolhouse on Wednesday last, the 6th Oct., was a great success but the cold weather prevented quite a number from attending. Much credit is due Principal Davis and Miss McMartin and Miss Whitemore for the good time the children had. The singing of “O Canada” deserves special mention.
All the fishermen are busy these days getting their outfits ready for leaving for the north this week.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 14 – 1910

1910 Jul 14 – Carmen Strike Still On

The Carmen on the Canadian Northern Railway system are out on strike, and at the present indication the strike will be a protracted one as both sides are being firm. The number of men out on strike at Dauphin is 15. The situation here is quiet and the men are behaving orderly.

1910 Jul 14 – Fork River

Miss L. Collins teacher of Pine View School left here last week to spend her vacation at McCreary.
Mrs. J. Rice teacher of Mowat School left here last week to spend her vacation in Ashville.
Harcourt Benner is visiting friends on Saskatchewan.
Fork River Conservatives gave Mr. Hughes a handsome majority.
Harold Clarke came up from Dauphin last week.
Eva Clarke is visiting friends at Duck Lake.
Mrs. Scrase spent a few hours in Dauphin on Tuesday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 10 – 1910

1910 Mar 10 – Find Baby in Bundle

At Mr. Mark Cardiff’s home about 11 o’clock Tuesday night there came two sharp rings at the front door bell. Mr. Cardiff happened to be in the backyard at the time and Dr. Beauchamp who was in the house, went to the door and discovered a bundle on the veranda. He brought it in and when Mr. Cardiff came in they at once examined the bundle and to their surprise found it contained a well-developed baby boy about two weeks old. The baby was wrapped in an old shawl with note attached. “Please look after baby – mother in trouble.” Chief Hillman was notified, but except the shawl and note there is no clue to its identity. Mr. Cardiff has had several offers from persons wishing to adopt the little stranger but those a home seem loth to part with it.

1910 Mar 10 – Former Dauphinite Suicides

Harry Smith, residing 15 miles south of Tisdale, met a tragic death Thursdays. He was found by a neighbour suspended to a beam in his stable and quite dead. No reason can be assigned for the act. His financial standing was good and nothing strange was noted in his demeanour.
Smith left Dauphin last spring for Tisdale to take up homestead duties. He sold his farm here, which was situated on the Vermillion River, three miles south of town.
He leaves a young widow and child and our months old.

1910 Mar 10 – Ethelbert

A very pretty wedding took place in the Methodist Church on Wednesday evening, March 2nd, before a crowded church of interested spectators, guests and relations. The bride was Miss Annie Eastman, youngest daughter of Allan Eastman of Garland. The bridegroom was Frank A. Hoare of Pine River. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Mr. Greig of Minitonas. Kenneth Eastman acted as best man, and was supported by Miss Pearl Mills as bridesmaid. The bridge was attired in pale blue silk, trimmed with white lace, and wore a wreath of orange blossoms and a net veil. The bridesmaid was dressed in pale pink silk and white lace.
After the marriage the guests, numbering 150, adjourned to the pool-room where a sumptuous repast had been prepared by Mrs. Neil Mills, to which ample justice was done. The room was then cleared for dancing, the music being provided by the McMurray Orchestra of Dauphin. Dancing continued to the wee sma’ hours of the morning, with just an interval at midnight for the refreshments. The presents were both numerous and valuable.
There was a nice gathering of young people at the manse on Thursday evening, the 3rd inst. to give a farewell to Miss M. McCauley, who is leaving the mission for a time owning to ill health. There were about fifty persons present, including a few families, amongst whom were Mr. and Mrs. Leander Hill, the sec.-treas., Mr. and Mrs. Skaife, postmaster, and Mr. A. McPhedrian, station agent. During the evening a testimonial of appreciation was read by Gordon Hill to Miss McAulay, and a present is to be forthcoming shortly as a token of the esteem in which Miss McCauley is held by the “Conquerors Club” of young people. After joining hands to the tune of Auld Lang Syne, the meeting broke up, some singing “She’s a jolly young fellow.”
Ethelbert is busy these days shipping cordwood, lumber and cattle. Donald McLean, brother of John McLean, is loading two cars of lumber, stock, etc. for his farm out west.

1910 Mar 10 – Fork River

After the general routine of business the Orangemen of this district last Thursday held a supper at Mrs. Clarke’s in honour of Mr. and Mrs. Northam, old timers.
Dr. Ross, from Dauphin, was up here last Friday.
The Williams’ Bridge, across the Mossey River, is now finished. This will open the district out East, and should be a great help to the farmers there.
S. McClean has been visiting this district of late.
D.F. Wilson is visiting Brandon Fair this week.
Mrs. Rowe and child are at Dauphin this week.
Mrs. Wilson and Miss Bessie Wilson are visiting Dauphin this week.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 24 – 1910

1910 Feb 24 – Cold Weather

The government thermometer in possession of R.C. Brown, shows the weather this week to be the coldest of the winter Sunday it registered 15 below, Monday 35, Tuesday 30, Wednesday 26, and this morning 20.

1910 Feb 24 – Killed at Kamsack

Clarence McKellar, a brakeman running on the C.N.R. express was killed Tuesday. He did not notice an engine switching and stepped from a passenger coach in front of the engine. The body is badly mutilated, and death must have been instantaneous. Deceased father lives at Marshall, Sask.

1910 Feb 24 – Fork River

Mr. C. Clarke paid Dauphin a visit last week.
Mrs. D.F. Wilson returned from paying a visit to her daughters at Dauphin and Sifton.
Mr. A.B. Hodgson from Fishing River paid Mr. W. King a visit last weekend.

1910 Feb 24 – NOTICE

The Assessment Roll of the Rural Municipality of Mossey River has been deposited in the office of the clerk and may be examined by the ratepayers.
The Council will sit as a Court of Revision hear any complaints that thee may be against the said roll.
All appeals against the Assessment Roll must be filed in the office of the clerk on or before March 29th, 1910.
D.F. Wilson. Sec.