Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 5 – 1912, 1918

1912 Dec 5 – Fork River

Miss M.B. Nixon left for Winnipeg, for a weeks visit among friends.
Miss Muriel Alterton, of Mossey River, and Miss Grant, of Pine View Schools attended the convention at Dauphin.
Mrs. Geo. Shannon and Mrs. Kennedy returned from a visit to Winnipegosis.
Wm. King expressed to E. Walker, of Dauphin, a trio of Mammoth Bronze turkeys for breeding purposes.
Fred Cooper, W. Williams and T. Shannon’s threshing outfits are busy these days.
D.F. Wilson, F.B. Lacey and J. Seiffert, members of the council, returned from a week’s trip to the Municipal Convention at Winnipeg.
Miss Lizze Clark returned to Dauphin after spending a few days at her home.
Mr. Monington, of Neepawa, is staying with J. Robinson for the hunting season.
Duncan Kennedy has received two shipments of pure bred Plymouth Rocks from Portage la Prairie last week and is now in the market with pure bred roosters.
Joe Lockhart was elected trustee for Mossey River School for the coming term in place of Wm. King, who retires this term.
Looking over the Herald we notice the annual statement of receipts and expenditures for ten months of the municipality of Mossey River. Just the same old two by four statement. Why not publish in book form in detail like Dauphin. Our council seems to be behind the times in this respect. Year after year we are asking for this to see where our money is expended and this year we cannot see where any of it has been expended on the roads.

1912 Dec 5 – Winnipegosis

The annual school meeting was held in the school house on Monday, a large number of ratepayers being present. Messrs. Grenon, Whale and Thomas were elected as trustees for the coming year and Mr. Shear continues as sec.-treasurer. Mr. Hulme’s engagement is for the year. The master of a new school to be erected was discussed. The lots have already been secured, as we hope it will not be long till they are build on.
Rev. H.H. Scrase remained in town from Sunday’s service till Tuesday.
Harry Grenon is preparing to open a business in the late Hudson’s Bay post.
The Misses Paddock had a party last night to entertain Miss Hazel Coffey who has been visiting the Misses Whale while Mr. and Mrs. Whale made a trip to Dauphin.
We are pleased to see certain patients are able to be out again.
The young people’s enjoyment on the lake will be curtailed since the snow has come.
A few of the men from the fishing camps took advantage of the recent glistening ice to make a trip back to town, an enviable one “on their steely feet so bright.”
Mrs. Bradley has enjoyed a most delightful visit from her sister, Mrs. Armstrong. Miss Charlotte accompanies her aunt back to Portage.
Mr. and Mrs. Hippesley, of South Bay, have returned from a trip to Dauphin. Regret is felt at the probability of their moving West to B.C.
A visit to Mrs. Johnston’s home would assure anyone of the benefit on illness to be gained by sojourning there.
Miss Hayes reports an interesting convention held in Dauphin.
Hunters are arriving in town in pursuit of the fleet footed game of the woods.

1918 Dec 5 – Blew Out His Brains

Telesphore Gagnon, who resided with his two sons at Valpoy, 15 miles northeast of Ste. Rose, committed suicide last week by blowing out his brains with a shotgun. Gagnon lost his wife a year ago, and also suffered lose to his property by fire. These matters preyed on him until his mind became unbalanced and led him to commit the rash act. He was 60 years of age.

1918 Dec 5 – Had Arm Amputated

Thos. Switzer, who resides in the Sandringham district, had the misfortune to accidentally discharge his rife, the bullet entering his left arm. He was brought to the hospital, where it was found necessary to amputate the arm below the elbow.

1918 Dec 5 – Major Barker Critically Ill

A cablegram from France to Mr. G. Barker at the end of the week states that the condition of his son William is critical.

1918 Dec 5 – Military Funeral

Pte. Wilbur Olsob, of the 226th Batt., who died of influenza, was accorded a military funeral, he arrangements being in the hands of the G.W.V.A. The funeral cortege assembled at 2.30 p.m. at Farrell’s undertaking parlours on Friday afternoon, where a service was conducted by Rev. J.A. Haw, who also officiated at the graveside. About 50 members of the association, under command of Capt. Scrase, attended. Lieut. Clark and Sergt. Chambers were in charge of he firing party.

1918 Dec 5 – Rural Nominations

MOSSEY RIVER
Reeve – T.B. Venables, F.B. Lacey, J.D. Robertson
Ward 1 – J. Yakavanka
Ward 3 – E.A. Marcroft
Ward 5 – J. Namaka

1918 Dec 5 – Victoria Cross for Barker

Major Wm. G. Barker has been awarded the highest honour possible for distinguished service at the front, the Victoria Cross.
Other Dauphin boys who have been decorated, include:
Military Cross – Lawrence Shand
Military Medals – Stuart R. Widmeyer (deceased), G.A. Jackson, Geo. F. King, N. Chard, A. Douglas and J. Fletcher

1918 Dec 5 – Fork River

Mrs. M. Angus has returned to Winnipeg after spending two weeks with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Craighill.
Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Brewer are patients in the hospital at Dauphin.
W. King, I.H.C. agent, has just finished a warehouse in which to store implements.
Mr. and Mrs. W. Northam have taken up their residence in the parsonage for the winter.
H. Swartwood, of Dauphin, was a recent visitor in our midst.
Sid Frost has left for Rathwell. Before leaving Wm. King, on behalf of Sid’s many friends here, presented him with a valuable violin and case in recognition of his services in a musical way.
Wm. Williams was a Dauphin visitor on Tuesday.
F.B. Lacey, T.B. Venables and J.D. Robertson are the nominees for the reeveship.
The Fork River, Mossey River and Pine View Schools are still closed.
Several of the hunters have returned. Which one shot the steer?

Pte. N. MacCauley, of Winnipegosis, was among the returned soldiers from overseas this week.

1918 Dec 5 – Winnipegosis

A special peace thanksgiving service was held in the Union Church on Dec. 1st. The church was well decorated with flags of the Allies, and was packed to overflowing. The hymns were of a joyful, patriotic and military character, and were heartily sung. The Rev. A.E. Hook conducted the service and took on his subject, “Trusting in God.” He gave a vivid description of the terrible struggle which had lasted over four years, and spoke of the murmurings which had sometimes arising during the war. People had doubted if there was a God and if there was he was not a righteous God. The termination of the war, however, had vindicated God as a righteous God. He said that we had many things to be thankful for because of the war. He mentioned principally that drink and practically been abolished and that nations had been awakened into prayer in a manner they had never done before.
The ban, which had closed down all public gatherings during he epidemic of influenza, was lifted last week and there are no cases in town, though there are a few in the rural districts.
The first load of fish from the lake arrived in town on Tuesday. The fishing has been delayed somewhat on account of the mild weather, but the prospects of a large catch are good.
D. Roy Grenon skated into town today from Waterhen, a distance of over 25 miles.
Winnipegosis reports over two crowns to its credit in the Victory Loan Drive.
Two carloads of wheat were shipped out of town this week.
The fishermen have started to put up ice for summer use.
The collectors report that subscriptions to the Mercantile Sailors’ Fund are coming in well.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 27 – 1914

1914 Aug 27 – Latest From Line of Battle

LONDON, Aug. 27 – Late reports to War office state that desultory fighting is occurring along French frontier.

ON EVE GREAT BATTLE

Germans are ready to strike great blow. The troops are fast advancing and one of the biggest battles of the war is in sight.

RUSSIANS ADVANCING

The Russians are advancing in German territory and clearing everything before them.

1914 Aug 27 – Volunteers Get Right-Royal Send-Off

It was truly a great night in Dauphin, the night before the volunteers went away. It was Friday night last, the boys leaving on Saturday morning. The people of the town were out in full force and their right royal patriotism was most marked. The reality of war is brought home to us when “Our Own” are called out for service and hence a subdued depth of pent up emotion which is not found on other occasions. The Band did their part well, and what could be done without the band at such a time as this.

Great Cheering

A crowd of enthusiastic men, joined by a host of boys, well supplied with Union Jacks, some Belgian and French flags, formed in procession headed by band and red-coats. Everywhere, from doors and windows, hotels and street corners, the volunteers were lustily cheered.

Meeting Held in Open

The procession reached the town hall about 9 o’clock. The ball had been packed for nearly an hour and the enthusiasm inside was no less than on the street. Patriotic music was indulged in led by Prof. Minnaert. Only a small portion of the crowd being able to hold the public meeting and send-off for the boys in the op. When all gathered in front and around the corner, as large a crowd as was ever seen in Dauphin, surrounded the group of thirty-two men, whom we have the honour of sending to the front. Again the Band did its part well and between the addresses gave without stint, sweet patriotic strains.

Farewell Speeches

The chairman, Mayor Bottomley, took his place on the front steps of the town hall and everyone, except the volunteers, stood up for over an hour’s programme of music and speeches.
The speakers were Messrs. D.S. Woods, Munson, Wiley, Flemming, Bethell, Major Walker and Captain Newcombe.
The words spoken by all were in accord with Britain’s position and in a deep serious vein set forth the new grave situation in which Canada and the Empire stand today.
The Boys were recipients of a box of cigars each, some wholesome advice, heartiest congratulations, with affectionate hopes for a safe return.
It was an evening never-to-be-forgotten in Dauphin and the warmth of the farewell, the deep subdued feeling, was only surpassed on Saturday morning, when the train actually pulled out, all hats and handkerchiefs waving, all eyes wet, and the Band paying “God be With You Till We Meet Again.”

1914 Aug 27 – Praise For Dauphin Boys

W.J. Rawson, of Brandon, who was in town on Wednesday, told a Herald representative, that the Dauphin contingent had the best appearance of any of the troops assembled at that point for transpiration to Valcartier.

DAUPHIN.
Lieut. A.E.L. Shand (Albert Edward Lawrence Shand, 1891)
Sergt. G. Fraser
Sergt. W. Code
Sergt. T.D. Massey
Corp. D. Wetmore (David Lee Wetmore, 1884, 346)
Corp. N.C. Chard (Norman Cyril Chard, 1894, 240 SGT)
Corp. C.S. Wiltshire
Pte. H.A. Bray (Harold Arthur Bray, 1891, LT)
Pte. H.H. Moore
Pte. A.J. Pudifin (Arthur James Pudifin, 1885, 322)
Pte. Garth Johnston (Garth Fraser Johnston, 1890, 718076)
Pte. Neville Munson (Neville Munson, 1892, 313)
Pte. W.S. Gilbert (William S. Gilbert, 1874, 265)
Pte. C. Curtis
Pte. H. Izon (Hubert Izon, 1885, 280)
Pte. S. Laker (Stephen Laker, 1895, 13)
Pte. J.E. Greenaway (Joseph Edward Greenaway, 1885, 269)
Pte. A.J. Johnson
Pte. D. Powell
Pte. E. Sonnenberg (Edward Sonnenberg, 1892, 335)
Pte. E. Classen
Pte. E. Herrick (Eliot Charles Herrick, 1887, 275)
Pte. E. McNab
Pte. J.E. Lewis (John Edmund Lewis, 1893, 27501)
Pte. C.S. Van Tuyll
Pte. D. McVey (Devon McVey, 1892, 302)
Pte. A.E. Pickering (Albert Edward Pickering, 1892, 320)
Pte. A. Redgate (Albert Redgate, 1889, 324)
Pte. F.A. Mathews
Pte. H. Pollard
Pte. T.A. Collins (Thomas Arthur Collins, 1887, 245)
Pte. Frank Norquay (Frank Norquay, 1891, 318)
Pte. F. Jauncey (Fredrick Jauncey, 1890, 282)

WITH 99TH BRANDON.
Pte. C. Lane
Pte. P. Mickleburg (Ernest Michleburgh, 295)
Pte. Jackson
Pte. W. Bubb (William Charles Bubb, 1884, 2140)

WINNIPEGOSIS.
Pte. E. Morris
Pte. A. Martin
Pte. A. McKerchar

SWAN RIVER.
Pte. D. Stringer (Dixon Stringer, 1890, 24178)

ROBLIN.
Corp. J.B. Shearer (John Buchanan Shearer, 1892, LT)
Pte. J. Hallam (Jonathan Hallam, 1878, 46973)
Pte. W. Day
Pte. W. Armstrong
Pte. R.J. Ritchie
Pte. F. Burt
Pte. A. Hay
Pte. E. Simpson

1914 Aug 27 – Fork River

Mr. Vivian Hafenbrak and bride have returned from a month’s visit to Ontario. Mr. H. is of the opinion the crops in the Dauphin district are ahead of anything along the route he travelled.
It is said, “War is Hell.” So is the price of binder twine, when there is a difference of 1 to 4 cents on the same quality. How the war should affect twine now that was made in 1912 we give it up and leave it to other fellows to explain. Even the motorcar dare is doubted.
The fall fishing has started, so we are told, and while wages are lower our bonnie fishermen are head singing. “Rule Britannia” and “Britons never shall be Slaves.”
Some of our ratepayers are enquiring who is running the Mossey River School affairs at present.
Jack Chipla left for Winnipeg to work on the C.P.R.
D.F. Wilson returned from a trip west on business and reports crops light out there.
A. Snelgrove and Pat Powers have left for Yorkton for the threshing season.
Mrs. Johnston, of Port Arthur, is a visitor at the home of Mrs. Kennedy.
Mr. Clarkson, Winnipegosis, passed through en route for Yorkton.
The Winnipegosis contingent passed through here for the seat of war as happy as clams on their way to Dauphin.
Mr. Ramsay, of Sifton, paid the burgh a visit with a cattle buyer and is rustling a car of stock.

1914 Aug 27 – Winnipegosis

The fishing fleet has left for Spruce Island, a point about 40 miles north. There are between 15 and 20 boats engaged in the work. The catches so far are reported good.
Capt. Coffey arrived from Dauphin on Wednesday.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong was a late visitor.
To be or not to be, that is the great question. At the time of this writing the funds required to complete the school are not yet in sight. It is believed they are forthcoming but until they are the citizens are in a sate of doubt. The new school is needed that is one thing sure.
Architect Bossons, of Dauphin, was here on Saturday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 18 – 1914

1914 Jun 18 – Off for Camp Sunday

The 32nd Manitoba Horse leave on Sunday night for camp at Sewell. The Dauphin troop will go ?? strong this year. There are expected to be 2000 men all told at the camp. Moving pictures will be one of the sources of entertainment.
The officers of the Dauphin troop are as follows:
Major G.C.J. Walker
Captain H.K. Newcombe
Lieutenants E. Manby, M.F. Wilson, L. Shand, E.P. Millward
Regiment S.M., A.C. Goodall
Squadron S.M., Fistches
Sergeants T. Coghlan, G. Fraser, T.D. Massy, Alguire
Corporals W. Cede, H. Wade, Alguire, Chard
The ??? party consisting of C.N.S. Wade, Frank ???, cook, and Private W. ??? have on Thursday night for the camp.

1914 Jun 18 – Ethelbert

Court of revision will be held here Wednesday, 17th inst., with Judge Ryan presiding.
The old McLean flourmill is being overhauled and rebuilt. Another story will be added. The Kennedy Mercantile Co. now own the mill.
The school accommodation is now over taxed, the outcome of this will be that a new building will have to be erected, or an addition built. How would it do to have a consolidated school, and build an up-to-date building. Ethelbert is going to grow, let us anticipate the future.
Principal White is in Dauphin this week with five scholars writing on entrance, grade IX and grade X. The following are the pupils: Entrance, Jessie McMillian and Ben Brachman; grade 9, Maggie Wager and Willie Masticub; grade 10, Wsldmar Masticub.
The crops are looking well, but rain is now needed.
F.K. Slipets, our municipal clerk, is building a new house.
On Thursday night last there was a baseball match between the married and single men. The benedicts won by a nice margin. Ethelbert has some good ball material and will be heard of during the summer when they get more practice.
A petition is in circulation with the object of having the C.N.R. move their station at this point. The location of the building is such that it makes it very inconvenient for passengers and the public to reach it, having to cross the sliding to reach it. It is expected that the company will comply with this reasonable request.
N.A. Hryhorenznk, general agent for the International Harvester Co., went to Dauphin on Monday.

1914 Jun 18 – Fork River

Frank Hafenbrak spent a few days in Dauphin last week. While away he purchased a team of mares with foals at foot.
D. Kennedy was a visitor to Dauphin last week.
Wm. Murray, of Dauphin, provincial auditor, is staying with Clerk Wilson while auditing the municipal books.
W. King has returned from a trip to Winnipeg on municipal affairs. He reports the crops are looking well along the line.
Nat Little was unfortunate in losing one of his valuable brood mares last week.
A. McDonald is busy these days on the road from the A.T. Co. Ltd.
Cap. Coffey, of Dauphin, paid this burgh a visit in his automobile last week.
The boys got busy last week and organized a football club. The first game of the season was played on Saturday night between Mowat and Fork River, which ended in a draw.
John Angus, of Winnipegosis, spent the weekend here and is of the opinion this is the most restful place he has stuck in his travels. There are several others believe so, too.
Mr. Atkinson, of Prince Albert, has rented the Chase farm and is busy seeding it with barley.
Gen. Neil, of Rainy River, has returned to Mowat experimental duck farm for the summer.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 2 – 1912

1912 May 2 – Fork River

Archie McMillan and family left here with a carload of stock and settlers’ effects as he intends taking his homestead duties at Kindersley, Sask.
Mr. Briggs of Mowat, has moved into Fork River and his friend Mr. Culverhouse lately arrived from Yorkshire, England, is staying with him for a time.
Wm. Davis, one of our bonanza farmers, returned from a few days visit to Dauphin on business.
J. Robinson took a trip to Winnipegosis on business and we are informed that since a Board of Trade has been formed in that burg. the citizens have nothing to do but sit on the sidewalk and sun themselves waiting for the golden tide to roll in. Good luck Winnipegosis.
Captain McCartney returned from a trip to Dauphin, where he was give a magic lantern lecture of the Roll Call.
There was a very good turn out at the last ball of the season in the Orange Hall. The Honourables A. Hunt, T.N. Briggs, The King and Senator Kennedy and others were present and a good time was spent. Professor Robinson and other supplied the music and kept it up till the morning.
Mr. Chard was here in connection with his business.
The scribe is inclined to think the item in he Press of the 25th by a Fork River correspondent was out of place. Surely the leaders of the Episcopal elements as he calls them should be allowed to manage their own affairs without his interring through the Press. He must be hard up for news. If the students must have a parrot to voice their opine,. they should train it up in the way it would go before sending him out on a pilgrimage in the Press.
Captain McLean, foreman of the Government dredge and his gang are busy getting the dredge in shape for the summer’s work on the Mossey River.
Jack Clemence’s gang is up putting Frank Chase’s and Alf. Snelgrove’s places into shape for this year’s crop.

1912 May 2 – ANSWER TO FORK RIVER CORRESPONDENT IN DAUPHIN PRESS.

The Fork River correspondent for the Dauphin Press of the 25th April makes the following most unwarranted remarks regarding our Church of England Parsonage. “Some of our church leaders are agitating for a parsonage in connection with the Episcopal Element here. It seem an unwarranted expense.” now the writer of this cannot possible belong to that body or his remarks would never have been uttered and if he was at all cognizant of facts in connection with what he refers to he would have worded his phrases quite differently. The Church of England congregation and management are not agitating but are going to build a parsonage and should be glad of any help financially from the press correspondent. Perhaps our friend is one of the few who objected to our building a church a few years ago, yet the church is built and fully equipped and out of debt. Also under the same management a ten team stable is almost completed and also paid for as are the lots in connection with same. We should like to say the wardens and congregation should be proud of what they have done and as they know what they are doing and can overlook any disparaging remarks of an enterprising news correspondent who passes disparaging statements re the good work going on.
The management of All Saints’ Church have found through experience it is better to build than to pay from $60 to $100 a year for rent for an unsuitable house and by so building they will have something permanent. If the correspondent in the Press has anything to say in regard to the present or past management of this church I am sure they will gladly listen to him and receive any donation as there is nothing proud about this management. If the corespondent has nothing but wind to offer her should utilize this on a football field as we already had a sufficient supply of that commodity to the detriment of this church. It is good actions they want, not wind.

Wellwisher

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 4 – 1915

1915 Feb 4 – Remains Found

Some time last fall Paulo Jura, a one-armed young Ruthenian, disappeared at Ethelbert. An investigation was held but no trace of the young man could be found. He went out shooting with another young man named Timothy Nakonectiny, and at the time and considerable money on his person. Recently his remains were found in the Duck Mountain, but the flesh had just about all disappeared from the bones. His clothes, however, were identified. No trace of the money could be found.
Detectives are now again investigating the case.
Nakonectiny, Jura’s companion, has disappeared from the district.

1915 Feb 4 – Third Contingent Complete

The 110 men allotted to the Dauphin district to be raised for the Third Contingent has just about been enrolled, the number now reaching 106. Taken altogether the men are a fine lot and compare favourably with the first that enlisted here. The following is a summary of the nationality of the men:

Canadian 37
English 43
Scotch 20
Welsh 1
American 3
South Africa 1
Danish 1

CANADIAN.
J.D. Munson, single. (Jack Devereux Munson, 1895, 424039)
G. Prieur, single. (Gabriel Prieur, 1896, 425219)
A.A. Day, single. (Arthur Archibald Day, 1896, 424013)
J.E. Welch, single. (John Edward Welch, 1891-1916, 74199)
C.W. Shaw, single. (Charles Wallace Shaw, 1875-1916, 424037 or A/24015)
W.C. Mitchell, single. (William Charles Mitchell, 1885, 74202)
I. Zufelt, single. (Isaac Zufelt, 1891, 425518)
H.W. Gardiner, single. (Hugh William Gardiner, 1894-1916, 424020)
J. Gallant, single. (Joseph Gallant, 1892-1916, 424019 or A/24019)
B.A. Whitmore, single. (Burton Alfred Whitmore, 1890, A/24250)
H.L. Pearson, single. (Harry Lindley Pearson, 1896, 425194)
J. Payne, single. (John Payne, 1892, 424066)
F.W. Clark, single. (Francis William Clark, 1890, 424671)
C.J. Ivens, single. (Charles John, xxx-1917, 424952)
G. Wildfong, single. (Gordon Wildfong, 1892, 424079)
S. Day, single.
J. Hicks, single. (John Hicks, 1895, 154745)
A.E. Arnold, single. (Albert Edward Arnold, 1895-1916, 424002 or A/24002)
P.E. Chard, single. (Percy Edwin Chard, 1896, 424657)
J.A. Justice, single. (James Amos Justice, 1896, 424028)
H.W. Minish, single. (Herbert Whitfield Minish, 1893, 424061)
G. Stewart, single. (Garfield Stewart, 1895-1916, 425364)
H. Bidak, single.
C.C. Stacey, single. (Clarence Crozier Stacey, 1896-1916, 425349)
J.E. Wells, single. (Joseph Edward Wells, 1889, 424076)
J.E. May, married.
J.J. Troyer, single. (Joseph James Troyer, 1887, 425428)
J.A. McLean, single.
J.S. Willis, single.
Jas. E. Cain, single. (James Edward Cain, 1894, 154744)
John Ball, single. (John Ball, 1895, 424539)
Edward Gordon, single. (Edward Gordon, 1893, 425870)
J.M. Crossland, single. (John Marshall Crossland, 1887, 154737)
Victor Lavalle, single.
John R. Levins, married. (John Richard Levins, 1880, 424033)
L.A. Campbell, single. (Lorne Alexander Campbell, 1879-1916, 460743 or A/60743)
Henry C. Batty, single. (Henry Charles Batty, xxx-1916, 424320)

ENGLISH.
A. Grove, single.
W.F. Percy, single. (William Freeman Percy, 1886, 425202)
P.E. Millard, single. (Percy Edward Millard, 18781916, 74190)
A.H.G. Whittaker, married. (Albert Henry Guilym Whittaker, 1891-1916, 424077 or 424245)
A.G. Sanderson, married.
Wm. Coleman, single. (William Coleman, 1876, 424688)
R. Smith, single. (Richard Smith, 1889, 74196)
F. Clark, married. (Frank Clark, 1883, 424009)
J.S. Blundell, single. (James Stuart Blundell, 1893-1916, 74201)
A.J. Middleditch, married. (Albert John Middleditch, 1892, 425078)
J.W. Thompson, single. (John Walter Thompson, 1891, 424072)
Ivo Osman, single. (Ivo Isman, 1892, 74204)
T.L. Radway, single.
H. Marchant, single. (Harry Marchant, 1891, 424194)
G.J. Dickason, single. (George James Dickason, 1887, 424035)
P. Cowley, married. (Paul Cowley, 1886, 74186)
G. Burkett, married. (George Burkett, 1870, 154735)
J.A. Hurst, married. (J Arnold Hurst, xxx, 424339)
T.W. Swannell, single. (Frank Walton Swannell, 1893-1918, 425389)
C. Recknell, single. (Cuthbert Bradshaw Recknell, 1890, 425232)
F. Pexton, single. (Fred Pexton, 1887, 424067)
A. Wood, single. (Arthur Wood, 1897, 424375)
A.E. Weeks, single. (Arthur Edward Weeks, 1880-1917, 425472)
C.P. Webb, single. (Charles Peter Webb, 1895, 424374)
W. Weeds, single. (Walter Weeds, 1894, 424371)
A. Baldwin, single. (Andrew Baldwin, 1889, 74184)
W.E. Ridley, single. (William Ernest Ridley, 1891, 74205)
R.E. Richards, single. (Robert Edmond Richards, xxx, 74207)
R.W. Watson, single. (Robert William Watson, 1891-1917, 424075 or 24229)
F. Pickup, single. (Frederick Pickup, 1893, 424068 or A/24068)
T. Pedley, married. (Thomas Pedley, 1878-1918, 425197)
A. Spence, married.
J. Gomme, single. (John Gomme, 1890, 424021)
C. Heather, single. (Charles Robert Heather, 1887, 424896)
B. Cheesmore, single. (Benjamin Cheesmore, 1887-1916, 424327)
W.J. Hill, single. (William James Hill, 1880, 74189)
P. Boam, single. (Percy Boam, 1883-1916, 74185)
T. Brown, single.
Herbert Townson, single. (Herbert Townson, 1896, 425426)
R.C. Crowe, single. (Roland Charles Crowe, 1897, 424012 or A/24066)
H.F.B. Percival, single.
Wm. J. Hickman, married. (William James, 1881, 424910)
F.L. Pearce, single.
Benj Dilworth, married. (Benjamin Dilworth, 1884-1916, 74187)

SCOTCH.
T.M. Ray, single. (T.M. Ray, xxx, 74206)
W.J. Wallace, single. (William John Wallace, 1895, 74200)
W. McDonald, single. (John Elliott McDonald, 1882, 424064)
Wm. Donaldson, married. (William Donaldson, 1885, 74188)
J. Nicol, married. (James Nicol, 1884, 74194)
J. Armstrong, married.
T. Latta, single. (Thomas Latta, xxx, 424031 or A/24136)
J.A. Craig, married.
A. Wilson, single. (Allan Wilson, 1895, 74198)
I. MacGlashan, single. (Isaac MacGlashan, 1885, 74193)
Wm. Miller, single. (William Miller, 1883-1916, 74191)
J. Alexander, single. (John Alexander, 1890, 425896)
R. Morrice, single. (Robert Morrice, 1892, 424343)
J.A. Whyte, single. (Joseph Alexander Whyte, 1893, 424078)
Wm. Lyon, single. (William Lyon, 1883, 424034)
R.L. Adams, single. (Robert Lawson Adams, 1896, 424001)
Wm. Munro, single. (William Munro, xxx, 74192)
Thos. Martin, single. (Thomas Martin, 1892, 424046)
N. McLeod, single.
T. Woodhouse, single. (Thomas Woodhouse, xxx, 425906)

WELSH.
E. Burnett, single. (Edwin Burnett, 1896, 424323)

U.S.A.
E. Engebretson, single. (Elmer Rudolph Engebretson, 1890-1918, 424015)
Wm. Madden, single. (William Madden, 1878, 424341)
C.B. Shales, single. (Chester Berdell Shales, 1896, 622436)

TRANSVAAL S. A.
H.E. Lys, married. (Hugh Ernest Lys, 1875-1876, Capt.)

DENMARK.
A. Peterson, single.

1915 Feb 4 – Fork River

Mr. Nat Little and daughter, Miss Grace, have returned from a two weeks’ trip to Rochester, Minn.
Mr. W. Walmsley was in town last week.
Archdeacon Green spent a few days in Dauphin on church business last week.
W. King county Orange master, is away on his annual tour among the various lodges and expects to return to Dauphin in time for the annual county meeting to arrange business for the coming term.
Wm. Northam, one of the standby subscribers of the Herald at Fork River, sends in the following verse when remitting his subscription. We take it that Mr. Northam intends the lines as a warning to delinquents:
He who doth the printer pay
Will go to Heaven sure some day;
But he who meanly cheats the printer
Will go where there is never winter.

1915 Feb 4 – Winnipegosis

Five men are working on the dredge fitting her out for the summer.
A large number of the fishermen are back in town again, and things are moving a little faster than usual.
J.W. McAulay was a visitor to Dauphin on Wednesday to attend the trainmen’s ball.
Dancing is one of the chief pastimes in this town. Lately, hardly a week goes by without one or two dances being held. A surprise dance was given at the home of Hos. Grenon on Friday last and another dance on Tuesday night in the Rex Hall.
Will Morton, station agent, whose life was despaired of, is getting better.
Mr. and Mrs. Ravelli, left on Wednesday for Portage la Prairie, where they will enter the employ of Hugh Armstrong.
Mrs. Theo. Johnson was a visitor to Dauphin on Wednesday.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Litwyn on the 28th ult., a son.
Mrs. (Dr.) Medd returned on Monday from a visit to Winnipeg.