Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 29 – 1910

1910 Sep 29 – Buried in Well

Kamsack, Sask., Sept. 25 – A funeral service, attended by circumstances that are unique in the history of Canada, took place Saturday on the farm of John Bowes, sixteen miles south of here. At the top of a 73 foot shaft that had been sunk for a well and at the bottom of which lay the remains of Elwer Olson, aged 35, of Yorkton. Rev. J. Morrison conducted a service for the dead. The shaft has been closed up and the body will remain for ever in the deep and improvised grave. Hansen was overcome by gas in the well and attempts to recover the body were fruitless.

1910 Sep 29 – Died from Burns

Miss Mabel Gunn of Makinak, aged 28 years, died Tuesday from burns received last week through an accident in handling coal oil. The young lady was trying to squelch a blaze on the floor with a rug, when her clothing caught on fire, and before it was put out she received terrible burns.
The unfortunate lady lingered nearly a week and everything possible was done to relive her suffering.
The funeral to the Makinak cemetery took place Wednesday.
Miss Gunn was favourably known throughout the Dauphin district, being one of Makinak’s earliest residents and having, with her sister, run a boarding house there for years. Her demise is keenly felt by the citizens of that community.

1910 Sep 29 – Fork River

Mrs. Comber left here for her home in Selkirk last week.
Mr. Frame from Treherne has been visiting friends here.
On Sunday Sept. 18th, Mrs. E. Morris gave birth to a little girl.
Quite a large congregation attended the Harvest Festival Service at Winnipegosis last Sunday night when a special sermon was preached by the Rev. H.H. Scrase.
Car loads of wheat are being shipped from this point.
Tom Toye’s youngest child died last week and was buried at Winnipegosis. The burial service was taken by the Rev. H.H. Scrase.
Cattle buyers are busy in this district. Quite a number of cattle have been sold lately and shipped to Winnipeg.
Fleming Wilson from Dauphin paid us a visit last week.
Harvest Festival Service will be held at the English Church on Sunday evening, October 9th, at 7.30.

1910 Sep 29 – Sifton

Mr. F.E. Nex of Whitemouth, is visiting his father-in-law, Mr. Ludwig Zarowoney. Fred bicycled from Winnipeg to McCreary, where he boarded the train.
Rev. Sabourin was in Winnipeg last week on business.
School Inspector Walker of Dauphin, inspected the village school on Tuesday last.
Miss A. Griffith of Fishguard, Eng., is visiting her brother-in-law, Mr. W Carr.
Mr. and Mrs. W. Barrie have just returned home, after a couple months visit to his parents in “ye auld Scottish hielands” near Aberdeen. Bill reports a vey pleasant trip.
Theo. Stefanik of Winnipeg, addressed a large open air gathering here on Wednesday of last week in the interest of the community. Mr. Rawson of Dauphin was noticed in the gathering.
Charl Holinski is about completing the building of his new home. A fireside gathering is expected to initiate the new house when finished, so no doubt Mr. Jordan of Dauphin will be likely called upon to send up the necessary for the occasion, which is usually quite in evidence at such times.
Mr. and Mrs. T.A. Kitt and son of Valley River, visited Sifton on Sunday.
Miss Bessie Wilson of Fork River, is visiting her sister, Mrs. Paul Wood.
Mr. W. Carr went to Winnipegosis on Saturday on business.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 15 – 1910

1910 Sep 15 – Gold Find Reported

The following item is taken from the Free Press of Sept. 12:
Winnipegosis – Gold has apparently been found on the shores of Lake Winnipegosis. Joseph Grenon and party have just returned from a trip up the lake, bringing with them samples of rock which indicate a rich find. Several parties have left to investigate further.

1910 Sep 15 – Mossey River Council

The council met in the council chamber, Winnipegosis, on Friday, Sept. 2.
Councillors Hunt and Fleming absent.
The minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the clerk write the Manitoba Bridge Co. and ask for prices of second hand steel bridges delivered at Fork River.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the clerk advertise for tenders for completing the Cooper ditch in accordance with engineer’s profile.
Nicholson-Lacey – Re: Shannon Road – That the municipality pay all expenses connected with obtaining this road but that Thomas Shannon pay the actual price of road $200.00 in installments. $100.00 on December 15, 1910 and $100.00 on December 15, 1911 with interest at 8 percent and that the Reeve and councilor Nicholson be a committee to confer with Mr. Shannon to obtain the necessary security.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the Council is prepared to transfer the road allowance on the east side of the S.E. 19-30-18 to Mr. Champion in lieu of the proposed roadway parallel with the C.N.R. and adjoining that railroad on the west side, also that the clerk be instructed to settle all legal expenses so far incurred by Mr. Champion.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the clerk make inquiring regarding the acquiring of a roadway across the corner of the S.E. 30-30-18 adjoining the roadway.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the accounts presented by weed inspector Robinson, amounting to $40, for cutting thistles, be paid.
Lacey-Toye – That road commissioner Nicholson’s account for letting and inspecting work, $13, be paid.
Lacey-Toye – That Dr. Medd’s salary for services rendered the municipality, $200, be paid.
Lacey-Paddock – That the clerk advertise for sale all patented lands in arrears of taxes.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the tender of the Canadian Ingot Iron Culvert Company for twenty-two 12 inch culverts 18 feet long for the sum of $362.60 be accepted.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the Reeve and Councillors be paid their fees and mileage to date.
Lacey-Toye – That Campbell & Simpson’s account of $12.60 be passed.
A by-law authorizing a loan of $2,000 was passed.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the Council adjourn to meet at Fork River on Thursday, Sept. 29.

1910 Sep 15 – Ethelbert

Ethelbert is all right. Such is the verdict of Bob Wilson and Ike Hewitson. Some three months ago Bob and Ike, thinking that a fortune was to be made at Kindersley, Sask., pulled out of Ethelbert with a car of stock and farm utensils. After getting there they were soon convinced that they had made a big mistake, and pulling out of Kindersley re-shipped to Edmonton. After wandering about for some time looking up the country, and travelling about the one thousand miles, living in a tent the meanwhile, they again headed for the old home at Ethelbert. The trip lasted three months and they never slept in a house all that time. They arrived at Ethelbert last Thursday, having payed fully $500 to be convinced at last that Ethelbert might be bad, but a jolly sight better than many places they had seen in their search for a nice soft spot to make their fortunes in.
What we want at Ethelbert is good progressive farming, to make it one of the best and most productive district in the province. Then with an intelligent and progressive council, able and willing to make needed improvements all over the municipality, all the vacant land would soon be taken up and an era of prosperity would set in, making the district an ideal one for the poor man to make a comfortable home for himself.
“All change here!” is the cry of the conductor at the big terminals. That is what is taking place here.
Rumour has it that the Queen’s Hotel is about to change hands, also one of the stores.
M. Wollochachuck has been appointed buyer for the Crystal Farmers’ Elevator Co., N.D.
O. Myska has sold his store to Peter Kuzzyk, who expects to act as agent for the Massey-Harris Co.

1910 Sep 15 – Sifton

Threshing is again in full swing although it has been delayed somewhat by rain.
The British American elevator is open again for the coming grain season with Paul Wood in charge as buyer.
H.L. Troyie from Ontario is visiting friends in the village.
Miss E. Sprague, mission nurse at Wakan, Sask., is spending a few days at the mission house the guest of nurses Reid, Maker, and Goforth.
H.J. Gillis is home from Grandview for a visit to his family.
Milton Ross of Irma, Alta., brother of the station agent made a short visit to the village last week.
Rudolph Spruhs had the misfortune to run a nail through his foot although lamed he is able to be around.
The Rev. Sabourin is away attending the Eucharist Congress in Montreal.
W. Carr has sold his stock and we understand intends moving to Winnipeg. He has had the misfortune to loose his wife and we all extend our heartfelt sympathies in his bereavement.
A couple of our local sports drove out to the lake in their automobile on Saturday in search of the feathery game. On their return however, walking seemed too good to resist any such temptation so the auto was abandoned by the roadside in order that the more healthy exercise might be indulged in.
The whooping cough epidemic is about subsided much to the relief of the little ones.
By the goodness of all the mosquitos and toads that remain our “man behind the gun” has a new red auto. One of the more common type such as is propelled by ox power.
The railway is rapidly completing the fencing of their right of way through the community which no doubt will be a considerable relief to adjoining settlers, protecting them from loss of cattle by straying on the track as was formerly the case.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 10 – 1910

1910 Sep 10 – Gold Find Reported

The following item is taken from the Free Press of Sept. 12:
Winnipegosis – Gold has apparently been found on the shores of Lake Winnipegosis. Joseph Grenon and party have just returned from a trip up the lake, bringing with them samples of rock which indicate a rich find. Several parties have left to investigate further.

1910 Sep 10 – Mossey River Council

The council met in the council chamber, Winnipegosis, on Friday, Sept. 2.
Councillors Hunt and Fleming absent.
The minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the clerk write the Manitoba Bridge Co. and ask for prices of second hand steel bridges delivered at Fork River.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the clerk advertise for tenders for completing the Cooper ditch in accordance with engineer’s profile.
Nicholson-Lacey – Re: Shannon Road – That the municipality pay all expenses connected with obtaining this road but that Thomas Shannon pay the actual price of road $200.00 in installments. $100.00 on December 15, 1910 and $100.00 on December 15, 1911 with interest at 8 percent and that the Reeve and councilor Nicholson be a committee to confer with Mr. Shannon to obtain the necessary security.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the Council is prepared to transfer the road allowance on the east side of the S.E. 19-30-18 to Mr. Champion in lieu of the proposed roadway parallel with the C.N.R. and adjoining that railroad on the west side, also that the clerk be instructed to settle all legal expenses so far incurred by Mr. Champion.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the clerk make inquiring regarding the acquiring of a roadway across the corner of the S.E. 30-30-18 adjoining the roadway.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the accounts presented by weed inspector Robinson, amounting to $40, for cutting thistles, be paid.
Lacey-Toye – That road commissioner Nicholson’s account for letting and inspecting work, $13, be paid.
Lacey-Toye – That Dr. Medd’s salary for services rendered the municipality, $200, be paid.
Lacey-Paddock – That the clerk advertise for sale all patented lands in arrears of taxes.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the tender of the Canadian Ingot Iron Culvert Company for twenty-two 12 inch culverts 18 feet long for the sum of $362.60 be accepted.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the Reeve and Councillors be paid their fees and mileage to date.
Lacey-Toye – That Campbell & Simpson’s account of $12.60 be passed.
A by-law authorizing a loan of $2,000 was passed.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the Council adjourn to meet at Fork River on Thursday, Sept. 29.

1910 Sep 10 – Ethelbert

Ethelbert is all right. Such is the verdict of Bob Wilson and Ike Hewitson. Some three months ago Bob and Ike, thinking that a fortune was to be made at Kindersley, Sask., pulled out of Ethelbert with a car of stock and farm utensils. After getting there they were soon convinced that they had made a big mistake, and pulling out of Kindersley re-shipped to Edmonton. After wandering about for some time looking up the country, and travelling about the one thousand miles, living in a tent the meanwhile, they again headed for the old home at Ethelbert. The trip lasted three months and they never slept in a house all that time. They arrived at Ethelbert last Thursday, having payed fully $500 to be convinced at last that Ethelbert might be bad, but a jolly sight better than many places they had seen in their search for a nice soft spot to make their fortunes in.
What we want at Ethelbert is good progressive farming, to make it one of the best and most productive district in the province. Then with an intelligent and progressive council, able and willing to make needed improvements all over the municipality, all the vacant land would soon be taken up and an era of prosperity would set in, making the district an ideal one for the poor man to make a comfortable home for himself.
“All change here!” is the cry of the conductor at the big terminals. That is what is taking place here.
Rumour has it that the Queen’s Hotel is about to change hands, also one of the stores.
M. Wollochachuck has been appointed buyer for the Crystal Farmers’ Elevator Co., N.D.
O. Myska has sold his store to Peter Kuzzyk, who expects to act as agent for the Massey-Harris Co.

1910 Sep 10 – Sifton

Threshing is again in full swing although it has been delayed somewhat by rain.
The British American elevator is open again for the coming grain season with Paul Wood in charge as buyer.
H.L. Troyie from Ontario is visiting friends in the village.
Miss E. Sprague, mission nurse at Wakan, Sask., is spending a few days at the mission house the guest of nurses Reid, Maker, and Goforth.
H.J. Gillis is home from Grandview for a visit to his family.
Milton Ross of Irma, Alta., brother of the station agent made a short visit to the village last week.
Rudolph Spruhs had the misfortune to run a nail through his foot although lamed he is able to be around.
The Rev. Sabourin is away attending the Eucharist Congress in Montreal.
W. Carr has sold his stock and we understand intends moving to Winnipeg. He has had the misfortune to loose his wife and we all extend our heartfelt sympathies in his bereavement.
A couple of our local sports drove out to the lake in their automobile on Saturday in search of the feathery game. On their return however, walking seemed too good to resist any such temptation so the auto was abandoned by the roadside in order that the more healthy exercise might be indulged in.
The whooping cough epidemic is about subsided much to the relief of the little ones.
By the goodness of all the mosquitos and toads that remain our “man behind the gun” has a new red auto. One of the more common type such as is propelled by ox power.
The railway is rapidly completing the fencing of their right of way through the community which no doubt will be a considerable relief to adjoining settlers, protecting them from loss of cattle by straying on the track as was formerly the case.