Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 12 – 1911, 1916

1911 Oct 12 – Badly Injured

Nat Douse, a young man in the employ of the Burrows Mill at Grandview, met with a bad accident last Thursday. While at work in the mill he slipped and fell against the slash saws and sustained injuries to his right shoulder, the muscle and flesh being torn very badly. After he had his wounds dressed at Grandview he was brought to the hospital here. A few days later it was found necessary to amputate his arm at the shoulder. Douse is now making as good progress as can be expected towards recovery.

1911 Oct 12 – Planing Mill Burned

The planning mill belonging to T.A. Burrows at Birch River was destroyed by fire on Monday afternoon. Besides the mill a half dozen cars of lumber were also burned. The loss is covered by insurance.

1911 Oct 12 – Fork River

The heavy rains have tied up the threshing machines and stopped the ploughing. With the present fine weather work will commence again.
Constable G. Weaver has returned from a business trip to Dauphin and reports everything quiet.
W. King, Sam Bailey and D. Wilson paid a visit to Winnipegosis on Tuesday. The fishermen are busy preparing to go up to the lake for the winter’s fishing. It is remarkable how many Conservatives one meets there since the Borden Government was elected.
Mr. Littler is attending the Rural Deanery meeting in Dauphin.
Mr. Stevenson, government engineer, was up inspecting the government dredge working in the Mossey River.
In the Press, Sept. 28, page 1, is composed of items of Cruise’s big Majority and the Markets is said to be correct. Take the price of barley, No. 3, 60 to 62, No. 4, 60 to 64, first time we ever knew No. 4 to bring more than 3. On another page under the heading of Charvari it is stated barely looks like thirty cents and that the Press will be doing business at the same old stand. Would advise them to take a rest and not contradict themselves so often. On another page is a large rigmarole about T.A. Burrows the gentleman who it has been claimed used his office to feather his nest and was never heard on the floor of the house only to try and protect himself regarding the timber steal. Of course he should have a senatorship. Rats! As yet they have the audacity to talk about Jimmy Harvey and Glen Campbell.
Mr. F.B. Lacey, postmaster general of Oak Brae, is attending Council meeting at Winnipegosis.

1916 Oct 12 – The Week’s Casualty List

Sergt. Frank Burt, killed on Sept. 24th. Burt enlisted at Dauphin with the first contingent two years ago. (Frank Burt, 1876, 46965)
Pte. Anderson Reed Walker, killed. (Anderson Reid Walker, 1895, 2056)
Sergt. Fred. Clark-Hughfield, wounded. (???)
Pte. Hugh Dunston, wounded on shoulder. (Hugh Leo Dunstan, 1896, 150887)
Pte. Jas. A. Justice, wounded. (James Amos Justice, 1896, 424028)
Lieut. Percy Willson, died from wounds. (Major Percy Willson, 1883)

1916 Oct 12 – Winnipegosis

Miss Edna Grenon was among the arrivals on Saturday’s train to spend Sunday and Thanksgiving Day at home.
Mrs. P. McArthur has returned from a short visit to Minneapolis.
The “Manitou” has two more trips to make taking fishermen’s supplies up. We trust the present good weather holds so that she may get in safely before freeze-up.
There has been a good deal of liquor in town of late. There is something taking in the liquor law when these boozers can have it shipped up here to them from Ontario and deal it out to other boozers more benighted than themselves. Now that men are scare it would prove a very potent method of wheeling a man over far more effective than money.
Mrs. J.E. McArthur was a passenger on Tuesday’s train going to Winnipeg.
It is reported that Jimmie Taylor, who went to the front with the 79th, has been wounded.
The Red Cross evening at Victoria Hall on Thursday night under the management of Mrs. Hall Burrell and Miss Jarvett, was a great success socially and financially. Over $10 was taken at the door.
Mr. Lacey, of Fork River, was here on Saturday in connection with the business of building the Meadow Land and Don schools.
Miss Leith McMartin spent the week-end at Dauphin.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 27 – 1914

1914 Aug 27 – Latest From Line of Battle

LONDON, Aug. 27 – Late reports to War office state that desultory fighting is occurring along French frontier.

ON EVE GREAT BATTLE

Germans are ready to strike great blow. The troops are fast advancing and one of the biggest battles of the war is in sight.

RUSSIANS ADVANCING

The Russians are advancing in German territory and clearing everything before them.

1914 Aug 27 – Volunteers Get Right-Royal Send-Off

It was truly a great night in Dauphin, the night before the volunteers went away. It was Friday night last, the boys leaving on Saturday morning. The people of the town were out in full force and their right royal patriotism was most marked. The reality of war is brought home to us when “Our Own” are called out for service and hence a subdued depth of pent up emotion which is not found on other occasions. The Band did their part well, and what could be done without the band at such a time as this.

Great Cheering

A crowd of enthusiastic men, joined by a host of boys, well supplied with Union Jacks, some Belgian and French flags, formed in procession headed by band and red-coats. Everywhere, from doors and windows, hotels and street corners, the volunteers were lustily cheered.

Meeting Held in Open

The procession reached the town hall about 9 o’clock. The ball had been packed for nearly an hour and the enthusiasm inside was no less than on the street. Patriotic music was indulged in led by Prof. Minnaert. Only a small portion of the crowd being able to hold the public meeting and send-off for the boys in the op. When all gathered in front and around the corner, as large a crowd as was ever seen in Dauphin, surrounded the group of thirty-two men, whom we have the honour of sending to the front. Again the Band did its part well and between the addresses gave without stint, sweet patriotic strains.

Farewell Speeches

The chairman, Mayor Bottomley, took his place on the front steps of the town hall and everyone, except the volunteers, stood up for over an hour’s programme of music and speeches.
The speakers were Messrs. D.S. Woods, Munson, Wiley, Flemming, Bethell, Major Walker and Captain Newcombe.
The words spoken by all were in accord with Britain’s position and in a deep serious vein set forth the new grave situation in which Canada and the Empire stand today.
The Boys were recipients of a box of cigars each, some wholesome advice, heartiest congratulations, with affectionate hopes for a safe return.
It was an evening never-to-be-forgotten in Dauphin and the warmth of the farewell, the deep subdued feeling, was only surpassed on Saturday morning, when the train actually pulled out, all hats and handkerchiefs waving, all eyes wet, and the Band paying “God be With You Till We Meet Again.”

1914 Aug 27 – Praise For Dauphin Boys

W.J. Rawson, of Brandon, who was in town on Wednesday, told a Herald representative, that the Dauphin contingent had the best appearance of any of the troops assembled at that point for transpiration to Valcartier.

DAUPHIN.
Lieut. A.E.L. Shand (Albert Edward Lawrence Shand, 1891)
Sergt. G. Fraser
Sergt. W. Code
Sergt. T.D. Massey
Corp. D. Wetmore (David Lee Wetmore, 1884, 346)
Corp. N.C. Chard (Norman Cyril Chard, 1894, 240 SGT)
Corp. C.S. Wiltshire
Pte. H.A. Bray (Harold Arthur Bray, 1891, LT)
Pte. H.H. Moore
Pte. A.J. Pudifin (Arthur James Pudifin, 1885, 322)
Pte. Garth Johnston (Garth Fraser Johnston, 1890, 718076)
Pte. Neville Munson (Neville Munson, 1892, 313)
Pte. W.S. Gilbert (William S. Gilbert, 1874, 265)
Pte. C. Curtis
Pte. H. Izon (Hubert Izon, 1885, 280)
Pte. S. Laker (Stephen Laker, 1895, 13)
Pte. J.E. Greenaway (Joseph Edward Greenaway, 1885, 269)
Pte. A.J. Johnson
Pte. D. Powell
Pte. E. Sonnenberg (Edward Sonnenberg, 1892, 335)
Pte. E. Classen
Pte. E. Herrick (Eliot Charles Herrick, 1887, 275)
Pte. E. McNab
Pte. J.E. Lewis (John Edmund Lewis, 1893, 27501)
Pte. C.S. Van Tuyll
Pte. D. McVey (Devon McVey, 1892, 302)
Pte. A.E. Pickering (Albert Edward Pickering, 1892, 320)
Pte. A. Redgate (Albert Redgate, 1889, 324)
Pte. F.A. Mathews
Pte. H. Pollard
Pte. T.A. Collins (Thomas Arthur Collins, 1887, 245)
Pte. Frank Norquay (Frank Norquay, 1891, 318)
Pte. F. Jauncey (Fredrick Jauncey, 1890, 282)

WITH 99TH BRANDON.
Pte. C. Lane
Pte. P. Mickleburg (Ernest Michleburgh, 295)
Pte. Jackson
Pte. W. Bubb (William Charles Bubb, 1884, 2140)

WINNIPEGOSIS.
Pte. E. Morris
Pte. A. Martin
Pte. A. McKerchar

SWAN RIVER.
Pte. D. Stringer (Dixon Stringer, 1890, 24178)

ROBLIN.
Corp. J.B. Shearer (John Buchanan Shearer, 1892, LT)
Pte. J. Hallam (Jonathan Hallam, 1878, 46973)
Pte. W. Day
Pte. W. Armstrong
Pte. R.J. Ritchie
Pte. F. Burt
Pte. A. Hay
Pte. E. Simpson

1914 Aug 27 – Fork River

Mr. Vivian Hafenbrak and bride have returned from a month’s visit to Ontario. Mr. H. is of the opinion the crops in the Dauphin district are ahead of anything along the route he travelled.
It is said, “War is Hell.” So is the price of binder twine, when there is a difference of 1 to 4 cents on the same quality. How the war should affect twine now that was made in 1912 we give it up and leave it to other fellows to explain. Even the motorcar dare is doubted.
The fall fishing has started, so we are told, and while wages are lower our bonnie fishermen are head singing. “Rule Britannia” and “Britons never shall be Slaves.”
Some of our ratepayers are enquiring who is running the Mossey River School affairs at present.
Jack Chipla left for Winnipeg to work on the C.P.R.
D.F. Wilson returned from a trip west on business and reports crops light out there.
A. Snelgrove and Pat Powers have left for Yorkton for the threshing season.
Mrs. Johnston, of Port Arthur, is a visitor at the home of Mrs. Kennedy.
Mr. Clarkson, Winnipegosis, passed through en route for Yorkton.
The Winnipegosis contingent passed through here for the seat of war as happy as clams on their way to Dauphin.
Mr. Ramsay, of Sifton, paid the burgh a visit with a cattle buyer and is rustling a car of stock.

1914 Aug 27 – Winnipegosis

The fishing fleet has left for Spruce Island, a point about 40 miles north. There are between 15 and 20 boats engaged in the work. The catches so far are reported good.
Capt. Coffey arrived from Dauphin on Wednesday.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong was a late visitor.
To be or not to be, that is the great question. At the time of this writing the funds required to complete the school are not yet in sight. It is believed they are forthcoming but until they are the citizens are in a sate of doubt. The new school is needed that is one thing sure.
Architect Bossons, of Dauphin, was here on Saturday.