Today in the Dauphin Herald – October 2, 1919

G.W.V.A. Notes

The regular meeting of the above association was held on Sept. 25th. Only a small turnout was registered, this without a doubt being due to the fact that the majority were busy threshing, still, all the same, there could and should have been more and the comrades are earnestly asked to remember the meeting on October 9th. A full attendance is desired and, in fact, must be had, and all are asked to make a special effort to attend. Matters of great importance to the association will be dealt with and it is the desire of the executive that a representative meeting give its ruling on these matters.
On the 14th inst. the second entertainment arranged by the Veterans will be placed on at the town hall, viz., The Victorian Serenaders. There will be a dance after the same as the previous show an the co operation of all to secure a good house is asked. Little need be said as to the merits of the company as same is well known to the majority, but it will fully maintain the reputation established by the Castle Squares and good value for money is assured.
We would draw the attention of the reader to the special appeal from the G.W.V.A. in this edition of the paper and ask that they give the proposition their support. This will be the first time that a general appeal has been made in this district by the returned men and we are confident that we shall not ask in vain, but that the public will respond in the same spirit as the men did in the past four years.
Comrades, keep the 9th October in your “bean” and attend the meeting that night.

Presented With Meerschaum Pipe

The employees of the town met at the hall on Wendesday afternoon and presented ex-Chief Bridle with an address and valuable meerschaum pipe. Mr. Bridle and family left on the early morning train for British Columbia.

Women Killed by Tree

A sad fatality occurred last Friday during the heavy windstorm. Mrs. Wm. Lesiuk, of Venlaw, was out in the garden digging potatoes for the mid-day meal when she was struck on the head by a falling tree. A limb of the tree pierced the unfortunate woman’s skull and penetrated the brain. She leaves a family of several small children – Gilbert Plains Maple Leaf.

Fork River

The postponed Fork River fair was held on the 26th. Owing to rain the night before some of the farmers in the outlying districts did not exhibit as had been their intention. The exhibits in all classes were exceptionally good; the garden truck, I am told by those who were at both fairs, was even better than Dauphin. Taken all around Fork River did will and with the experience gained next year should be a top notcher.
The Boys’ and Girls’ Club held their fair the same day and the showing made by them was a credit to the children and their teachers.
A great deal of trouble is caused by the young people on the district in tricks played with the property of residents of the town. Unless this is stopped some of the younger generation may find themselves up before the local J.P. Boys will be boys, but the destruction of property is carrying fun too far. Placing a hayrack on the road, and piling barrels and boxes in the way of the automobiles is a pastime that may prove costly for the offenders.
Victory Loan Campaign starts Oct. 27th. This will give those who are applying for their naturalization papers a chance to show just how patriotic they are, and we are waiting to see how much they will put into victory bonds. Everybody should subscribe for some and help reconstruction.
I read with interest “Well Wisher’s” letter in last week’s Herald and think it well worthy of the thought and action of those having the welfare of the boys and girls of the district at heart.
Mrs. Jerry Frost and family have returned to Southern Manitoba, after having spent a month with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
The dance in the hall on fair night proved a success. Let us dance while we are young, as the time will come when we can’t.
Prof. Williamson and family have arrived from Southern Manitoba to take up their residence. The professor will teach music.
The Jewish New Year service was held on Thursday and Friday. Quite a number attended from Winnipegosis, Sifton and other points.
Mrs. McQuay and children were visitors at the home of Mrs. Fred. Cooper during the fair.
Mrs. Vining and G. Stuart, of Winnipeg, are visiting Mrs. Rice, who is on the sick list.

Zelana

Fork River, Sept. 23rd.
My last letter spoke of some nice weather for threshing. Perhaps I spoke too soon for there seems to have been very little nice weather since for threshing. But according to the old saying “It is an ill wind that blows nobody good,” so if people could not thresh then at least some of them can plow. A few around here have quite a bit turned over ready for next spring. If the fields could be sown now, there would surely be enough moisture to promote growth. In fact grain is sprouting in the stooks and in some of the stacks.
After threshing for Peter Drainiak on Saturday, Gaseyna’s machine was moved to their own place just before another rain. We understood that John Pokotylo’s machine held up at Mr. Chraighill’s by the bad weather. The threshing outfit owned by Messrs. Bugutsky, Miskae and Lyluk had not been out at all this season.
Last Friday Mrs. Paul Lyluk had the misfortune to run a pitchfork into her foot. Our teacher, who has taken a course in “First Aid”, dressed the wound.
Jim Phillips lost a valuable cow recently from blackleg it is supposed. A number of animals have died around here from the same cause.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – September 18, 1919

G.W.V.A. Notes

The regular meeting of the above association was held on Thursday, 11th inst., some 70 of the comrades being in attendance. Applications were received from 28 retuned men for membership, all of whom were accepted. This brings the local branch membership up to 331.
The main business of the evening was the question as to the possibility and advisability of having quarters owned and operated by the association. After considerable discussion the following resolution was arrived at: That this branch of the association go before the public of Dauphin and the municipality and collect the necessary funds for the erection of a building to be run and owned by this branch of the association. Same to take the form of a club room and home for returned soldiers and that provision shall be made to have bed rooms for the use of the members and that it shall be so constructed and planned that it shall be self-supporting, i.e., that the ground floor shall be suitable for rental for offices, etc. The resolution was carried without further comment. A committee was then appointed to submit to the association the best way to raise the money necessary and the manner that we shall go after same; also to draft plans as to the nature of the building that the association has in mind.
The committee that as appoint by the meeting was carefully selected and men naturally adapted to work of this nature were asked to act. One o the main ideas of the building is to have one on much the same lines as the Y.M.C.A. buildings in Winnipeg, which would be an asset to the town and a token of its appreciation to the men that had served. While the idea that we have in view is of erecting a building of a distinctive type so that it shall be recognized as a soldiers’ building it is not by any means proposed to make this a memorial building, but to be built, owned and operated as a building devoted to the veterans use, which will be self-supporting so that in the future years we may not have to go before the public for its support. That the scheme will receive the response from the public that will be necessary, if we are to have such a building, is looked upon with confidence, for judging by the generosity that has been given to the men of this town in the past is excellent encouragement that the same will be given in the present case. The public will be further notified in the near future as to the plans of the veterans and the manner in which they propose raising the funds that will be required.
The comrades are pleased to welcome home Comrade Mackie and his bride. They have the best wishes of the branch for their future happiness.
Please remember the Castle Square Entertainers on the 19th. This is a first-class show and will please the most particular. After the show the orchestra will play for a dance. Come and give that building a little lift.
Forms have been received by the secretary from the Provincial Command re the re-establishment question. These are to be filled out by every returned solider and returned to the secretary. They will be posted at the first opportunity and should be returned with as little delay as possible. A supply is also on hand in the G.W.V.A. building and call be filled in there. By calling you will assist the secretary and help yourselves in getting the best terms possible. These forms are required to give the Association the facts necessary to place the case of the returned men before the commission which has been appointed to look into their requests.

Made Haul of Scotch Whiskey

A bootlegger met with lard luck at Ste. Rose village last week. He arrived in town with two valises well filled bottles containing Scotch whiskey and secured a room at the hotel. On leaving the hotel to go down street to work up a connection he locked the door of the room. On returning, after being away less than half an hour, he found the room had been broken into and the liquor removed from the valises. He then interviewed the magistrate who informed him that the quicker he made tracks out of town the better for his welfare.

To be Appointed Chief of Police

Mr. F.W. Little, turnkey at the jail, will be appointed to the position of chief of police made vacant by the resignation of Chief Bridle. Mr. Little has been a member of the London, Eng. Police force and a few years ago served on the local force with satisfaction to the council.

Fork River

Willard McPhedren, from Ethelbert, has arrived to take charge of our 2×4 station. It is about time the railway company built a new station with a platform large enough to accommodate the growing business of our district.
Thanksgiving harvest festival was held on Sabbath last. Wet weather interfered with the attendance.
Geo. B. Scriven, Anglican lay reader, left on Monday for Faribault, Minn., where he will attend college.
Sunday school will continue as usual at 2 p.m.
F.B. Lacey and son have invested in a tractor. The faithful plodding horse is no longer speedy enough for our progressive farmers.
E. Munro is wearing a pleasant smile. The arrival of a little dairy maid is the reason for so much joy in the household.
J. Reid, of Sifton, one of the oldtimers, was a visitor in town on Sunday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – July 10, 1919

Police Court Cases

P.M. Hawkins, Presiding
On information laid by Constable Coleridge, John Goik appeared before the police magistrate on the charge of “non-registration under Alien Enemy Act.” He was found guilty and fined $10 and $5 costs. Urko Chorny also appeared on the charge of “removing without permit under Alien Enemy Act.” He was found guilty and fined $10 and $9 costs or 30 days hard labor. Urko elected to take the 30 days.
On information laid by Chief Bridle several boys were assessed $2 and costs each, for bicycle riding on sidewalks.
Wm. Bell faced the magistrate on Monday on two charges. First, that of “driving a motor while intoxicated,” second, for “having liquor I place other than private dwelling.” On the first charge he was fined $25 and $5 costs, and on the second count he was assessed $200 and $5 costs.

Saturday July 19th, Peace Day

Saturday, July 19th, has been proclaimed Peace Day, and a statutory holiday.

Fork River

Miss Ina and Stella Briggs left for their homes in Southern Manitoba to spend the holidays.
Pte. Miller has returned from overseas and is visiting at the home of his father, Charles Miller.
Pte. Merko and his war bride have arrived from overseas and are visiting with friends here.
Max Gashina has returned from overseas and is visiting at his home before going north to homestead.
The members of the Purple Star L.O.L. will hold their 17th annual basket picnic on July 12th at Fork River. Sports of all kinds.
The late heavy rains have proved of immense benefit to the district. The crops now promise well.
The auditor’s report is now in the hands of the clerk and will be perused with much interest. The ratepayers are entitled to know how the business of the municipality is conducted, and the council should let its light shine so that all may see its good work.
The question of the hour: “Are we to have the new school?” It is up to the ratepayers to say yea or nay.

Mossey River School Exams.

Results of exams: Examinations at Mossey River School No. 999:
Grade VII—Blanche Hunt 77.
Grade VI—Louise Rowe 63.
Grade V, Sr—Viola Rowe 76, Willie Thompson 73, Lorne Shannon, Gordon Atkins.
Grade V, Jr—Beatrice Rowe 79, Pearl Reid 67, Irene Bailey 65, Mary Briggs 64, Verna Reid 62, May Shaw 56.
Grade III—Lulu Thompson 87, Bernard Hunt 84, Percy Shannon 75.
Grade II—Ivy Hunt 92, Danny Wilson 69, Ivor Humphries 63, Alvin Bailey 59.
Grade I—Horace Thompson, Courtney Humphries, Albert Shannon.
Grade I, Jr—Charlie Rowe, Clara Pearson, Walter Pearson, Reggie Wilson.
K.E. Briggs, teacher.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – June 12, 1919

Aged Man Commits Suicide

Peter Kozsowski, who resided 16 miles southwest of town in the Ruthenian settlement in the Riding Mountain, committed suicide on Tuesday. He retired to the stable, laid down and placed the muzzle of a shotgun under his chin, and then touched off the trigger. The charge nearly blew the top of his head off.
Deceased had been in poor health for some time and also had trouble with some of his neighbors which no doubt preyed on his mind. He was 57 years of age, leaves a wife and four children. One son is at the front.
Coroner Rogers visited the scene of the tragedy on Wednesday, and after enquiring into the particulars, decided an inquest was unnecessary.

Fair Notes

The new horse barn being erected at the fair grounds by F. Neely, is nearing completion. It provides accommodation for seventy-five head of horses.
It is the intention of the directors to proceed immediately with the construction of additions to the grand stand, cow barn and poultry house.
The race track and the baseball diamond have been put in good shape and will be available for the sports of July 1st.

Police Court Cases

Justyn Baran appeared before Police Magistrate Hawkins on the charge of theft of harrows, valued at $15. He pleaded guilty and was released on suspended sentence and ordered to pay the costs of court, amounting to $22.50.
Chief Bridle laid information against Frank Crowder for allowing cattle to run at large on the streets. He pleaded not guilty but was convicted and fined $5 and costs of court amounting to $7.
O.Kaczar was convicted on the charge of common assault. He was assessed the costs of court, amounting $20.50.
Edward Rsesnowski was fined $2 for riding a bicycle on the sidewalk.
Herbert Brown was fined $2 and costs for allowing his children on the streets after 10 p.m.

The Strike Situation

The strike situation remains practically unchanged. In some quarters the belief prevails that the chances for a settlement are improving.

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, June 10th.
The crops are looking well.
Pte. D.C. Sanderson has returned home from overseas.
A cow belonging to W. Cooper gave birth to a calf with five legs.
A Grain Growers’ meeting was held on Friday, the 6th. Several important matters were brought up. The Famers platform was heartily endorsed by all.
Word has been received that the Bicton Heath School will be returned to the control of the ratepayers at an early date. We will then select our own trustees.
Sunday school is held every Sunday at 3 o’clock at the old Sieffert farm. Service is held at 7 o’clock every Sunday evening at the house of Thos. Toye.

Fork River

Mr. Geo. H. Scriven arrived last week to take charge of the Anglican services during the summer at Fork River, Winnipegosis, Sifton and Mowat. Service will be held in All Saints’, Fork River, on the 15th, at 3 o’clock.
Mr. and Mrs. M. Wick and Mrs. Farrell, of Dauphin, were visitors on Sunday at farm of Mr. W. King.
Rec. H.P. Barrett, of Dauphin, took the services on Sabbath. There was a large congregation. Several children were baptized.
Jack Schuchett has gone to Winnipeg to end the strike.
Willie Tuck has returned home after an extended trip to Ontario to recuperate.
W. Northam has a tractor at work breaking up his quarter section south of the town.
J. Richardson, F. Hafenbrak and W. King interviewed the council in behalf of the Agricultural Society for a grant. The council acted generously and voted $250.

Winnipegosis

On Sunday last a large congregation attended the Methodist Church to welcome the Rev. H.P. Barrett, the rector of Dauphin, and Mr. G.B. Scriven, the new Anglican student in charge of this mission. By the courtesy of the Methodist body here, Mr. Scriven will hold divine service in the Methodist Church next Sunday evening, June 15th, at 7:30 p.m. It is to be hoped that as large a congregation will gather as at last Sunday’s service and give Mr. Scriven all the encouragement possible in the work to which he is called here.
Much local interest is in evidence as to the outcome of the King’s Bench court case, Armstrong Trading Co. vs. Grenon and McInnes, which comes up before Judge Curran at Dauphin next week. Commanding legal talent has been engaged by both parties.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – April 24, 1919

Boys Plead Guilty to Robbery

On Sunday night, April 6th, the Clothes Shop, Mr. Benedickson’s store, was entered and a quantity of goods stolen. The matter was placed in Chief Bridle’s hands and he at once got busy with the result that two boys, about 17 years of age, were arrested at Wadena, Sask. The boys’ names are Fred Beach and Norman Clubb, and hail from Winnipeg. They were brought from Wadena on Tuesday and appeared before P.M. Hawkins on Wednesday, and pleaded guilty to the charge. They were remanded till Friday for sentence. The boys are known to the city police and their previous history is to be investigated. The most of the stolen goods were recovered.

G.W.V.A. Notes

A meeting of the above association was held on Thursday, April 17th, some 40 members being in attendance.
The question of a memorial for the fallen comrades was discussed by the comrades, and it was suggested that the memorial should take the shape of a home for the returned men, and that a committee be formed to confer with the memorial committee organized by the town.
It was moved by Comrade Armstrong, seconded by Comrade H. Harvey, “that this branch of the G.W.V.A. endorse the Imperial Veterans’ resolution, and request that the government take up the matter of insurance by the state for returned men who, owing to injuries received whilst in action, are at the present time unable to get insurance, or who have to pay excessive rates for such.
Moved by Comrade H. Harvey, seconded by Comrade Oliphant, that this branch endorse the resolution of the G.W.V.A. Winnipeg, and protest against the sect known as ‘Hutterites’ from being allowed to settle in this country.
A delegation was received from the Ladies’ Auxiliary, and arrangements made as to taking care of soldiers’ widows, who come to this town in connection with land, etc. It was decided that the auxiliary should provide rooms, as it was not considered that the G.W.V.A. rooms were suitable accommodation for ladies, and that they would be more comfortable in a separate house.

Mossey River Council

The council met at Winnipegosis on April 7th, all the members being present. The minutes of the previous meeting wee read and adopted.
Communications were read from the Children’s Hospital, Winnipeg; the solicitor, re passing of social legislation; R. Flett, re reduction of taxes; The Red Triangle Fund, R. Cruise, M.P., re Hudson’s Bay Railway; copies of letters from the weed commission, C.B. Martin, re seed grain, and Sawinski Bros., re car of plank.
Hunt-Reid – That in consideration of the large amount of money that has been expended in the buildings of the Hudson’s Bay railroad, and, further, very large amounts in construction of harbor accommodation on the bay, and, whereas, a comparatively small amount will be required to finish the railway and thus render the large expenditure useful; this council is therefore, of the opinion and most empathically recommends that the Hudson’s Bay railroad be completed as soon as possible, thus giving to Western Canada the benefits to be derived from it and for which it has waited so long. That a copy of this resolution be forwarded to Sir Thomas White.
Yakavanka-Namaka – That the council of the rural municipality of Mossey River hereby makes formal application to the Good Roads Board of the Province of Manitoba that the following roads within the municipality be brought under the provisions of “The Good Roads Act, 1914,” and amendments thereto;
Road from south boundary of the municipality, making connection with the Dauphin good road system; due north to the village of Fork River, and from that point north and easterly to the village of Winnipegosis.
Road from the village of Fork River due west to the western boundary of the municipality road from corner on Fork River-Winnipegosis road to west side of range 19, along township line between tps. 29 and 30. Also from corner on same road westerly two miles between tps. 30 and 31.
Road from n.w. corner 12-29-19, easterly six miles, thence south to Lake Dauphin and then following lake shore to south boundary of the municipality.
Road from Winnipegosis north-westerly through tp. 31, rge. 18, and continuing into tp. 31, rge. 19.
Road from Winnipegosis south-easterly through tp. 3, rge. 18, and continuing easterly across tp. rge. 17.
Hunt-Reid – That Coun. Paddock and Marcroft be a committee to inspect road northwest of Winnipegosis, and report what can be done in the matter of making it passable at net meeting.
Yakavanka-Namaka – That the municipal bank account be moved from the Bank of Ottawa, Dauphin, to the Winnipegosis branch of the same bank.
Yakavanka-Namaka – That the clerk write the rural municipality of Dauphin and ask its council of it is prepared to pass a bylaw similar to those passed for the last two years covering work on the boundary road between the two municipalities.
By laws authorizing a line of credit of $15,000, amending the collector’s bylaw by reducing the salary to $125 pre month, and a bylaw authorizing a vote of the ratepayers of the Mossey River School district to issue expenditures for the borrowing of $12,000 to purchase grounds and build and equip a school. The vote to be taken June 14th.
The council adjourned to meet at Fork River at the call of the reeve.

Winnipegosis

The regular monthly meeting of the Home Economic Society was held on Friday evening, April 18th, at 8 p.m., in the Union Church. It being Good Friday the musical part of the programme consisted of Easter hymns. Mrs. J.E. McArthur gave an excellent paper on “Ventilation and Well-Lighted Rooms,” and Mr. Hook spoke in his usual pleasing manner on the subject, “Associates for the Young,” bringing foremost in his speech the necessity of child training. Ten cent tea was served, proceeds in aid of the library fund, when the meeting was brought to a close by singing he National anthem.
The Home Economics Society library is open every Saturday from 3 o 5 p.m., in Mrs. Honchin’s ice cream parlor.
Mr. D.G. McAulay and family have moved from the farm into town and taken up residence in the house formerly owned by J. Alexander.
The executive of the Order of the Needle wish to thank all those who helped to make the bazaar on the evening of Monday, the 21st, so successful. Mr. J.R. Burrell and her assistants, Mrs. K. McAuley and Mrs. Thomas, are especially to be lauded for the efficient way in which they handled the tea room, which was very popular. Mr. Hamilton very kindly gave his time in arranging the booths, which were very prettily decorated by Mrs. Steele, Mrs. St. Amour, Mrs. J.E. McArthur and Mrs. J.A. Campbell. A number of ladies and gentlemen assisted on the programme of music for dancing after the booth closed. Mr. Ketchison acted as floor manager and as usual made things go. The receipts for the evening were $119.10. Paid out for working material $3.75, for decorations $1.40, cartage 75 cents, rent of hall $6; total $11.90. To be divided between Red Cross and Belgian Fund, $107.20.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 7 – 1914

1914 May 7 – Escaped in Male Attire

Woman at station on Tuesday Night Dressed in a Man’s Suit – Who was the Woman?
When court was called on Wednesday morning there was a surprise when Chief Bridle gave out that Mrs. Murphy had left town and would not appear to answer the charge of attempting to commit suicide.
How the woman managed to get away is now what is puzzling the police as she was supposed to be in bed at home sick and the trains were being closely watched.
But there is a possible explanation of how the escape was effected. On Tuesday night a woman dressed in a man’s suit was observed on the station platform by several who were there. So sure was the conductor of the train that the supposed man was a woman that he offered to be the cigars with an acquaintance that such was the case. The disguise was very good but the woman, whoever she was, evidently forgot one essential in her make-up, which was a source of much amusement to the bystanders.

MRS. MURPHY HEARD FROM.

This (Thursdays) morning the Herald received a little from Mrs. Murphy, the postmark being Winnipeg, May 6th. In this letter she says that “she has to thank the liars of Dauphin for the trouble they have caused her.” She further remarks that after it is too late she has had her eyes opened and warms other women to beware and not believe liars as she did until it is too late to mend the damage done.

1914 May 7 – Met Instant Death

Maurice Frobisher and his brother arrived a short time ago from St. Norbert, Man., and took up homesteads at Asham Point, in the Ste. Rose district. On Saturday last the two brothers were going by ox team to Ste. Rose. Maurice was sitting in the back end of the wagon holding a rifle, when it accidently discharged, the bullet entering his arm, passing to his jaw and came out at the back of his head. Death was instantaneous.
Dr. Harrington was telephoned for and went to Ste. Rose. After learning the circumstances be decided that an inquest was not necessary.
Deceased was 40 years of age and unmarried.

1914 May 7 – Prairie Fire Does Damage

Prairie fires were running southwest of the town in the Mayflower and Spruce Bluff districts on Friday and Saturday. A dwelling on the farm of Arthur Bule, near the Mayflower School, was burned. A. Maynard lost a quantity of hay and other settlers suffered minor losses.

1914 May 7 – Ethelbert

Seeding has been going ahead actively and much of the wheat has been ???. The recent rain held things up for sure.
Very little wood is now being shipped out, still there are always a few cars moving.
Business is a little on the quiet side of late. Our burgh is becoming quite an egg expecting centre, many cases being shipped out weekly.
Wm. Morray, truancy officer, is visiting schools in our municipality. He is very busy going from one farmer to another making them send their children to school. On account of his visit the school trustees of Ethelbert S.D. have to provide more accommodation for the children that are of school age and who must attend. The people are satisfied with the action of the government in this move and will assist the officer in every way in enforcing the law.

1914 May 7 – Fork River

R. Corbett and his assistant returned to Winnipeg after taking the levels for draining a township and a half and laying out the road to Winnipegosis.
The English Church concert held in the Orange Hall, May 1st, was a very successful one. Our critic here admits it the best. A large number came from Sifton and put on a dialogue, which, to say the least was a laugh maker from start to finish. It pleased everyone. Our Winnipegosis friends were out in force and helped materially and that with the help of Fork River contingent a good evening’s entertainment was enjoyed. An excellent super was provided by the ladies. After supper several hired the hall for a dance and splendid music was supplied by Mr. Russell and sons.
Contractor Briggs is busy these days trying to make Main Street passable. Next thing we know Councilor Richardson will be putting down the balance of the sidewalk and all will be rosy.
John Clemens and family have left for McCreary, where they will reside in the future.
W. King has been appointed registration clerk for the northern portion of Gilbert Plains constituency. He starts in on the 12th of May at Winnipegosis.
Richard Harrison and E. Bickle, of South Bay, were visitors here at the council meeting during court of revision.
The dwelling house of J. McDonald caught fire last week. Captain Wilson and the fire brigade were soon on the ground. There was very little damage done.
Mr. McMillian, of Cyprus River, is a visitor at the home of A. Cameron of Mowat.
Our Mowat friend states they have put a bell and tower on the Mowat School house and yet they forgot to put a foundation under it. Of course, our friend usually does things different from others, which accounts for his being in a kicking frame of mind. He goes on to state the folks he sends to take his mail out, take all the way from one day to a week and the sometimes longer before he gets his mail back. What a shame. We trust he got the paper which contained the write up of how his pet government let the contractors mulet the people out of forty million dollars in building the Transcontinental Railway. Say, F.B. don’t get sore over our convention at Gilbert Plains. Have you forgotten the fuss you made with your friends here and up north because they wanted a share of the swag when you carried the chequebook and had to take a holiday for a few weeks in Winnipeg. You were not missed a bit. Have the common decency to keep in your own backyard, as we believe the glass in our house is of better material than yours and as in the past you can’t afford to indulge in stone throwing.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 30 – 1914

1914 Apr 30 – Attempted Suicide

Early Saturday evening Dr. Rogers was hastily summoned to Mr. F.O. Murphy’s farm, two miles south of town. When he reached the house it was found that Mrs. Murphy, in a fit of passion, had taken a dose of poison. The Dr. immediately put a stomach pump to work and most of the drug extracted, or sufficient to save the woman’s life.
Earlier is he evening Mrs. Murphy, who is of a jealous disposition, assaulted another woman, a Mrs. Clark, who she found in company with her husband. It was this which led up to the woman taking the poison. She had a narrow escape from death. She is recovering slowly but it will be some days yet before she is able to be around again.

TO SETRIEDON CHARGE OF ATTEMPTED SUICIDE.

Chief Bridle has laid a charge against Mrs. Murphy for attempted suicide. The case was to have been tried by P.M. Munson on Wednesday, but owning to her weak condition the trial was postponed until the 4th prox. The penalty for this offence is two years, if she is found guilty.
ASSAULT CHARGE ALSO.
Mrs. Clark has laid a charge against Mrs. Murphy for assault. The case is likely only to go to trial in the event Mrs. Murphy being freed on the first charge.

1914 Apr 30 – Fork River

Miss G. Shannon, of Dauphin, is spending a few days on the homestead with her parents.
F. Cooper was a visitor to the Lake Town on business and reports everything very quiet.
John Robinson and Mr. Hunter left for the north for a couple of months to inspect some of the lakes with a view for next winter’s business.
John Clemens is busy loading cars at the Northern elevator.
Our friend Scotty is out on the warpath looking for ducks and geese. We expect to get a fowl supper soon.
Fishing for Jackfish and suckers is the order of the day. All the young fry are busy these days landing the fish with spears and forks.
A. McDonald, of Winnipegosis, has located on the company farm for he summer.
The W.A. of All Saints’ Church is having a concert in Orange hall on May 1st. Everybody welcome.