Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 5 – 1914

1914 Nov 5 – Had Face and Arms Badly Burned

Mrs. Bradley and her young daughter, Charlotte, of Winnipegosis, were badly burned on Hallowe’en night by the explosion of a spirit lamp. With a number of others they were seated in a locked room around the lamp telling ghost stories. The lamp had been filled to overflowing and when ignited exploded, burning Mrs. Bradley severely about the face and hands. In the excitement the key to unlock the door could not be found and the door had to be broken open before medical aid could be sent for.

1914 Nov 5 – Ethelbert

Arthur Whish is wearing a broad smile these days. It’s a bouncing girl.
John Dolinsky’s two boys are being tried at Portage la Prairie this week for shopbreaking.
K.F. Slipetz is a busy man these days making out marriage licenses and taking in taxes.
Wm. Murray, truant officer, paid our school a visit last week and rounded up a few delinquents. One man was brought before F.M. Skaife for refusing to send his two girls to school and was fined $50 and costs, sentence being suspended. The two girls are now attending school.
Financially, Ethelbert district is as well of as any part of the country. The wood industry is one of our chief resources. The farmers are getting in better shape all the time. It is true we have gone a little slower than some other parts, but we are not feeling the “stringency” quite so bad either.
“How are collections?” Henry Brackman, our merchant prince, says they are good.

1914 Nov 5 – Fork River

Mrs. Sam Reid and daughters, have returned from a two weeks’ visit to Winnipeg.
Willis Miller, of Mowat, is nursing a broken arm caused by coming in contact with a separator belt in motion. Hard luck Willis.
D.F. Wilson has returned from a few days’ visit to Dauphin. He is still a member of the cane brigade.
Coun. Lacey had a tussle the other day with a fire set out by some careless person. The department has promised to appoint a fire guardian here next season, as one or two of these fire fiends around in this neighbourhood want making an example of.
Mrs. F. Cooper and daughter have returned from a week’s visit with friends in Dauphin.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, is a frequent visitor here of late.
Some one the other day was asking for a remedy to keep ponies from destroying flour and other articles left on the station platform. We would suggest either a herd law or dynamite.
Aubrey King, who was laid up a week from a kick from a horse, is able to follow the plough again.
The tax sale here was a tame affair.
Quite a consignment of firearms and ammunition arrived here lately and the Fork River brigade are practicing hard, some with tin and others with glass targets don’t you know.
The Winnipegosis orator and Coun. Toye attended the council meeting in this burgh on Thursday. Nothing serious happened other than a sort of weary feeling after such a display of talent.
Nurse Tilt is home on the farm for [1 line missing].
Hallowe’en has passed and the mischief-makers surely did the grand. They had a surprise in store for the warden of All Saints’ Church on Sunday. He found the church had been broken open and a large roll of page wire fencing standing up inside the alter rails and before the bell could be used for service he had to climb into the belfry and left an iron gate off and unwind a few yards of sacking. The Methodist Church received a similar visit. Are we living in a Christian land? The minister’s gigger at Winnipegosis was pulled to pieces and carried away so a team had to be hired so the services at other points could be held. Can anyone show us where the fun is in tampering with our churches? Is nothing sacred?

1914 Nov 5 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. McInnes and son went to Dauphin in Monday.
J.P. Grenon left on Monday for Port Arthur.
Mrs. Bradley was quite badly burnt by a gasoline explosion at her home a few days since.
Our bustling little town by the unsalted sea is generally noted for something. I think we hold the record for the number of police magistrates hat have been appointed during the past few years. A good second is the number of police constables. The latest is the appointment of Donald Hattie, our genial blacksmith, to the position of constable. Whose arm, I would like to ask, is stronger and grasp firmer than the brave Donald’s. Offenders beware, arouse not the sleeping lion as you will find a strong combination in the law and Donald when they go together.
Dan Hamilton, auctioneer, was here on Wednesday and sol the effects of the estate of the late Richard Harrison. Truly the voluble Dan is some auctioneer, and can get the last dollar out of an article. It is as good as a side show to hear the running comments of Dan. I heard the running comments of Dan. I heard one fellow remark he should have been a preacher.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 23 – 1914

1914 Jul 23 – Successful Ethelbert Students

The following students from Ethelbert School were successful in passing:
Entrance – Honours – Ben Brackman and Nessie McNullan
Grade IX – Maggie Hagar and William Mastiuck
Grade X – Waldmar Mastiuck

1914 Jul 23 – Fork River

The Orangemen of Fork River held their 12th annual basket picnic on July 13. The weather was fine for the occasion and there was a large turnout many coming from Winnipegosis, Mowat, Sifton and Melton. There was a parade after dinner. Speeches were made by the Rev. E. Williams and Rev. Brother Clixby, and the chairman Brother William King country master. The sports commenced with a football match between Fork River and Mowat which resulted in two goals to nothing in favour of Fork River. Foot racing and other sports were also indulged in till supper. After supper a football match was played off between Winnipegosis and Fork River teams which ended in favour of Fork River, one goal to nothing. The Winnipegosis automobile was busy all night carrying passengers. There was a good dance at night. Thanks due our Winnipegosis friends for furnishing the music, which was much appreciated.
S, Nowosad and family are away for a short time visiting at Vonda, Sask., where John, the son resides.
Edwin King has returned to Saskatchewan after a week’s visit at his home here.
Milton Cooper has returned from a trip to the Winnipeg exhibition.
Mrs. Theo. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, spent last week with Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Mr. Brewer, of Ashville, spent a few days here and took a carload of stock south. The man who is raising stock is the one who is making money these days.
Road building is the order of the day.
W. Lockhart, from Ontario, is spending a few days here on business.
Coun. Robertson, of Ward 6, has resigned as he is leaving for the north for a year. Here will be an election to select his successor.
Mr. Kennedy and Mr. Venables both lost valuable clots last week.
There was considerable discussion at the last council meeting by the ratepayers regarding stock running at large and it was decided to enforce the by-law passed. Owners of stock must take care of them during the night or get into trouble.
On Sunday parties driving along Main Street to church had to pass between young men paying baseball, which is dangerous to horse and driver. We would kindly draw the players attention to the last part of clause 3 in by-law No. 5.

1914 Jul 23 – Mr. King replies.

To Editor of the Herald.
Sir – On Friday my attention was drawn to an article in the Press reporting Dr. Shortreed’s meeting at Fork River, said to be written by F.B. Lacey, who presided at that meeting. Personally I have nothing but pity for a man who will write such an untruthful report and makes such uncharitable statements. The meeting was held out on Main Street in front of Mr. Nat Little’s store. Dr. Shortreed was given a good hearing. The doctor quoted some figures he could not prove and Mr. Grenon politely took off his hat to the doctor and asked that a Conservative be allowed to speak. The request was flatly refused. Mr. Little shouted, “Go back to Winnipegosis. What in h-ll did you come here for?” This is the language our friend used in front of his own doorstep to persons who were quietly listening to Dr. Shortreed. When later the doctor repeatedly stated that the Roblin government was kept in power by the rattle his statement was objected to. There was no one there under the influence of liquor unless our Liberal friends. To judge from their pugilistic attitude at times it would lead people to believe they were under the influence of something. Perhaps it was fright, as the 10th was close at hand. At the close of the meeting, the Conservatives offered to pay for the hall and invited Dr. Shortreed and his friends to go there and discuss the matter as long as they liked. The offer was declined. If there was any rowdyism it was not the Conservatives who indulged in it. There were several other misstatements in the article worthy of the man who wrote them. But they are not worthy noticing. We have the greatest respect for a great number of our Liberal friends in Fork River and their opinions are always treated with the consideration they merit and we are sure they do not endorse such tactics.

W. King, President of Conservative Association of Fork River.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 3 – 1913

1913 Apr 3 – Nellie McClung Recitals

Mrs. Nellie L. McClung, the popular Manitoba novelist, favoured Dauphin with her first visit this week. She came under the auspices of the Presbyterian Ladies’ Aid, and gave two recitals in the town hall on Monday and Tuesday evenings, respectively. Mrs. McClung gave all her numbers from her own books, “Sowing Seeds in Danny,” The Second Chance,” “The Black Creek Stopping House.” The selections contained variety of wholesome humour and pathos. The splendid character of the author is reflected in her works. Each reading had many lessons to teach. One might go as far as to say some of them were sugar coated sermons. The entertainer was assisted by some of our best local talent including Miss Harvely, the ladies’ quartette, Misses Johnston, Gunne, Coutts, and Cadman; the male quartette, Messrs. Park, Argue, Johnston and Stelck; Mrs. Jewsbury, Miss Astley and Mr. Main. On Tuesday evening the McMurray orchestra was in attendance.

1913 Apr 3 – Ethelbert

Mr. Finch, of Minitonas, took the services at the Methodist Church on Easter Sunday, to full congregation. He gave two very instructive sermons, and was very much appreciated.
We had a novel and spirited debate at the church on Friday night, when six debaters dealt with the subject of “Should women be allowed to vote?” Mr. McPhedran, Mrs. Munro and H. Brackman took the affirmative and Mr. Brown, teacher, Cyril Skaife and N. Booth took the negative.
Two men were arrested on Friday night for a savage attack upon one of the councillors named Mandryk. A preliminary trial was held and upon taking the evidence a fresh summon was taken out and the case will be dealt with Thursday, the 3rd inst.
The council intend putting two cells into the lock up of a substantial and safe character like those at Dauphin. We need a good man as constable.

1913 Apr 3 – Fork River

C. Bradley and family, were visitors from the Lake tow at Mr. Kennedy’s.
Mrs. McQuigge and family, of Dauphin, returned home from visiting with Mr. and Mrs. Fred Cooper on the Fork.
Miss Alice Godkin and Katie Williams have returned from a short visit to Dauphin.
A car load of young stock were shipped from here by a farmer for his ranch at Lloydminster, Sask.
The elevator has closed down for the season and John Clemens and family left for Dauphin, where they will reside.
Dave Shinks, general manager for the Williams Lumber Co., east of Lake Dauphin, is renewing acquaintances around town this week.
Mrs. Scrase and Mrs. Kennedy and family spent the weekend at Winnipegosis with friends.
Harcourt Benner returned to his duties at Dauphin and his many friends are pleased to hear his vacation here has been beneficial to him. Come again Harcourt.
Mrs. R. McEacheron and son, Donny, returned from a two months visit to friends in Nova Scotia.
The Woman’s Auxiliary of All Saints’ Church held their annual meeting in the church on Wednesday, March 26th. Quite a number were present. The secretary’s and treasurer’s report were received, showing a good year’s work with a cash balance on hand. The officers elected for the coming year are president, Mrs. W. King; vice. Mrs. Lacey, Mowat; secretary, Mrs. H. Scrase; treasurer, Wm. King.
F.B. Lacey, of Oak Brae, who has been under the weather for some time, is getting around again.
Mr. Gordon and family, of Mowat, have left for North Dakota for a change of climate.
Dunk Kennedy paid the lake town a visit on Sunday.
“Say, Mike, some one’s wife got sick, I am told, and they phoned for a doctor and by the time he arrived the baby had grown bald headed and was crying with the toothache.”
“Well, Pat, that shows we are not paying $600 a year for speed. If we are it got miscarried that time.”
“Now, Mike, don’t put your foot into it again. You know that unless you can yell like “Hell-o” they don’t catch on. It’s the fellow at the other end. Wow.”
“Say, Mike, did yees catch on to the way the members of parliament from the different provinces voted on the proposal of the government to build three Dreadnoughts, to be added to the British fleet, pending the formation of Canada’s permanent naval policy? It’s instructive.”
Our readers should note whence came the opposition. The vote against the government’s proposal as the division recorded in Hansard, was made up thus:

Against
Quebec (with 65 members) 44
Prince Edward Island (with 4 members) 2
Nova Scotia (with 18 members) 9
New Brunswick (with 13 members) 5
Saskatchewan (with 10 members) 6
Alberta (with 7 members) 6
Manitoba (with 10 members) 2
British Columbia (with 7 members) 0
Ontario (with 66 members) 11
Total opposition 85

It is not significant that 75 out of 85 members from the province of the United Empire Loyalist (Ontario) supported the measure, while 44 out of 65 from Quebec opposed it? Besides the 44 members from Quebec, at least 9 members from other provinces who voted against the proposal represented French ridings, making a total of 53, so that at the very outside figure only 32 coming from English speaking ridings, out of a total 221 members, tried to force the government to the country. If time were taken to go further into details it could be shown that one-half of these 32 members represented ridings in which there was a considerable sprinkling of French-Canadian and foreigners. So there is every reason for the assertion that the British people of Canada are well content with Borden’s naval.

1913 Apr 3 – Winnipegosis

The Armstrong Trading Co. has purchased and received a car load of horses from Winnipeg which they have deposited on their farm. A chance is open for any one wishing to purchase a good team. The company is preparing to build an addition to their store, also a house on the farm.
Mr. McArthur and daughters are again residents of their home here. We hope Mr. McArthur will soon join hem, fully recovered.
Mr. Scrase and Master Archer visited in town last week, and were the guests of Mrs. Bradley.
Mrs. D. Kennedy and children, of Fork River, are visiting her mother for the week past. Mr. Kennedy joined her on Sunday to avail themselves of a trip to Snake Island with Inspector and Mrs. White.
Mrs. Langlois and sons have gone on a trip to Le Pas to visit friends there.
The Anglican Church entertainment had to be postponed owing to the interest taken in the moving pictures exhibited here the past week and contined this one, which will make it difficult to satisfactorily produce the playette, “When Greek meets Greek” on the 4th as intended. An interesting competition is being held to raise extra church funds. The cigarette quilt won by Mr. Bradley at a raffle recently being the reward.
Messrs. Coffey, Whale, Ketcheson, White and others are attending a meeting of the masonic order this week in Dauphin.
The spring, though tardy, is likely to prove a delightful one at the Lake.