Today in the Dauphin Herald – September 25, 1919

Dauphin Industry Checked

(From The Winnipeg Free Press.)
Some districts are dogged by misfortune. Here we have a proposal in the House of Commons to abolish hanging just as Dauphin was coming to the fore as a good place to grow help.

Farms Sold for Big Prizes

Frick brothers, from Illinois, purchased the Hambleton and Puchalski farms this week. Both are half sections and close to town. The price paid for the former was $30,500 and the latter $35,000.

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Sept. 23.
Duncan Crerar has returned home from Winnipeg after interviewing Hon. Dr. Thornton in regard to our school affair.
The Coffey and Grenon farm here was sold the other day to two American farmers for the sum of $7000.
Mrs. Sharp is leaving soon for England. Her absence will be regretted sincerely by her numerous friends.
The second lawsuit between Cooper and Russell will be heard before J.P. Tilt, of Fork River, on the 24th inst.
The Grain Growers’ of this district will hold a meeting at the house of Jas. Laidlaw on Friday, Oct. 2nd. Members are requested to be present.
Thos. Toye has purchased from Jas. Costello, of Alberta, the famous Clydesdale stallion “Gay Lad.”
Pte. John Heywad, of Virden, has taken up land in this district and has brought in his stock. He is busy securing a supply of hay for the winter.
Vacant land in this district is nearly all being taken up by returned soldiers.
Capt. Wm. Slater, of the Salvation Army, has gone to Brandon. He has been holding meetings here at different points.
The weather of the past week has been unfavorable for haying and harvesting operations.
The municipal grader working between Winnipegosis and Fork River does not seem to be making as good progress as we would like, but, before offering criticism, we will bide our time.

Winnipegosis

The regular monthly meeting of the Women’s Institute was held in the Union church Friday evening, Sept. 10th. A goodly number of the members were present and the programme proved a very interesting one. Misses Ruth McCauley and Lottie Black gave a very pleasing duet. Miss Kathleen Dempsey delighted the audience with a recitation, Mrs. Houchin gave a splendid and well prepared paper on the subject, “Why Women Should be on the School Board.” Miss M. McMartin gave a talk, and illustrated the difficult subject, “Chilling of Childhood.” She explained in her usual intelligent manner what helps to make a beautiful life. Ten cent tea in aid of the library fund was served at the close by Misses Falconer and MacDougall, when the meeting closed with “God Save the King.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 8 – 1910

1915 Dec 8 – Shot for a Deer

What might have proved a fatal accident to a hunter occurred in the Riding Mountain south of Gilbert Plains on Friday last. William, the 18-year-old son of Jas. D. Sutherland was hunting in the mountain and was attired in white. He was coming through the scrub when the white of his legs was noticed by another hunter, by the name of Dimmick from Roblin, who at a distance of 2200 yards fired at him for a deer and hit him in the right leg, the ball breaking it. Sutherland immediately ell and yelled loudly which prevented Dimmick from again firing as he had the rifle to his shoulder a second time when he heard the yells. As the two men were a long distance away from any habitation, Dimmick had to carry the wounded man three miles to a farmer’s house when medical aid was procured and young Sutherland brought to the Dauphin Hospital, where he is doing as well as can be expected.

1915 Dec 8 – Fork River

Miss Lane, from Dauphin is spending a few days up here before proceeding to her home in Winnipeg.
Mrs. Rice, teacher of Mowat School was taken seriously ill last week and returned to Dauphin to be under the doctor’s hands. We all hope she will soon be herself again.
F. Storrar paid a visit Dauphin lately.
A Christmas tree and entertainment will be held in the Orange Hall under the auspices of the English Church, on Friday evening, December 23rd, at eight o’clock. A good time is expected for the children. Admission all children free, but a charge for admission will be made to adults.
Mr. Letwin has been appointed as assistant to Mr. D. Kennedy in the Armstrong Store here.

1915 Dec 8 – Sifton

Bert Kennedy, of Canora, Sask., who was a patient in the Dauphin Hospital with typhoid, was a visitor to his brother John Kennedy for a few days before returning to his house at Canora.
Miss Scott, Neepawa, was a visitor at the Presbyterian mission house for a couple of days. Miss Scott is always welcomed at the mission house.
Rev. Johnston, of Gilbert Plains, held services here on Wednesday evening last. The sermon was well put and much appreciated.
H.H. Scrase, Fork River, held service on Thursday evening. Quite a large crowd congregated.
The moose shooting season is on again. Rudolph Spruhs is one of the number to leave for the haunts of the antlered monarch.
The Manitoba Government Telephones have a construction gang camped in the village doing construction work east of town.
On Tuesday Messrs. Buckwold & Levin shipped out three cars of cattle to Winnipeg.
The elevator of the British America Elevator Co. had to close down on Saturday for lack of cars to ship out. This is said to be the first experience of this kind since the elevator was erected. The opportune arrival of empty cars has now, however relieved the situation.
Rev. J.A. Sabourin is having a furnace and hot water heating system installed by M. Cardiff, of Dauphin, in his new building which is being rapidly completed. A new R.C. Church is expected to be erected next summer.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Melynik a few days ago a pair of twin girls. All three doing well.
With the late fall of snow the farmers are quickly taking advantage of the good sleighing and hustling their grain to market.

1915 Dec 8 – Winnipegosis

The Rev. James Malley will occupy the pulpit of the Methodist Church, Winnipegosis, on Sunday next. Subject: The Call to Advance.
Teamsters here have been busy freighting fish from the various fishing grounds up the lake. They are impartment men and must needs be well catered for. Recognizing this fact the Misses Geekie and Black have opened a new restaurant at which good, solid, substantial meals are served at all hours. This is just what was needed in our busy little town. The fact that hot meals can be obtained at all hours, would see to be a guarantee of success. We wish them luck.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 19 – 1914

1914 Nov 19 – Fatal Shooting Accident

A fatal shooting accident occurred five miles west of Sifton on the 18th, when Joseph Thomashewski, aged 30 years, lost his life. He was out hunting rabbits at the time. He wounded one and as the little animal started to run away he raised the gun and struck at struck at it. The gun was discharged by the act and the contents lodged in his stomach. The unfortunate man died on the spot.

1914 Nov 19 – Fire at Mossey River

Thos. Glendenning, whose farm is at the mouth of the Mossey River at Lake Dauphin, had his stables destroyed by fire on Friday last, the 13th isn’t. All the contents of the stables were burned. There was no insurance.

1914 Nov 19 – Had Hand Taken Off

Leslie Nash, a boy 14 years of age, was brought from Roblin on Tuesday and placed in the hospital here. He was out hunting rabbits at Roblin, when his gun was accidentally discharged, the contents lodging in his left arm. The wound was a bad one and was found necessary to amputate the hand. The boy is doing as well as could be expected.

1914 Nov 19 – Little Girl Smothered

A sad fatality happened at Gilbert Plains on Wednesday, when Thos. Poole’s two-year-old daughter was smothered. The little girl, 2 years old and her brother, 4 years, were left in the home, while Mrs. Poole was absent for a short time. In the meantime fire started with the result that the little girl was smothered. The boy will recover.

1914 Nov 19 – Ethelbert

The sleighing is fine. Farmers are bringing in wood now.
The Ethelbert mill is running all right now. This is what is wanted, a good mill.
Henry Brachman was a passenger to Dauphin on Monday.

1914 Nov 19 – Fork River

Mr. Geo. Lyons, of Winnipegosis, municipal tax collector, spent a short time here on business lately.
Mr. Fleming, of the Northern Elevator has returned from a few days visit to his old home in Veregin, Sask.
Mr. D. Kennedy, manager of the A.T. Co., returned from a short vacation south and reports having enjoyed his outing.
Mrs. C. Clark’s friends will be pleased to hear she has arrived safely at her home in Paswegan, Sask.
The threshermen’s annual ball came off on Friday night and proved an enjoyable affair. Everyone enjoyed the outing. “It’s a Long Way to Tipperary” and we trust all arrived safe.
The Rev. A.S. Wiley, rural dean of Dauphin, took the service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon.
Mr. Sid Gower, who has been spending the summer at Winnipeg, is renewing acquaintances here.
Mr. Green has returned from Dauphin, having taken Mr. Wiley’s place at St. Paul’s on Sunday.

1914 Nov 19 – Winnipegosis

Miss Bernice Walker, of Dauphin, who has been visiting her cousin, Miss Ross, returned home by Monday’s train.
Hon. Hugh and Mrs. Armstrong are visiting at the home of Mrs. Bradley.
Mr. and Mrs. Bert Steele arrived in town on Saturday’s train from Warroad, en route to Mafeking. They are visiting at the home of Mrs. J.P. Grenon.
A number of young folks took this season’s first sleigh ride to Fork River to the Threshermen’s ball. All report having a good time.
The curling and skating rinks are fast getting into shape. E.R. Black has the contract for making the ice.
The bachelor apartments were the scene of an enjoyable evening last week. A whist drive and any oyster supper finished a very pleasant evening.
Ed. Cartwright and family left on Monday’s train for Mafeking, where Mr. Cartwright looks after the interests of the Canadian Lakes Fishing Co.
Ben Hechter has been laid up trough sickness for the past few days.
When are we going to have the formal opening of the new school?
Jos. Grenon, manager of the Winnipegosis hatchery, left on Monday’s train for Fort Qu’Appelle, with sixteen million whitefish eggs, for the new government hatchery there.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 9 – 1915

1915 Sep 9 – Winnipegosis Council

Meeting of the Council of the Village of Winnipegosis held in the Council chambers at 7 p.m. on the 6th inst. Mayor J.P. Grenon in the chair and Councillors Walmsley, Levons, Morris and Hjalmarson present.
Walmsley – Morris – That the minutes of previous meetings be adopted as read. Carried.
Morris – Walmsley – That Dunc Kennedy be appointed sec-treasurer at a salary of $30 per month from Sept. 1st till end of the fiscal year. Carried.
Lyons – Hjalmarson – That Walter Clarkson be appointed constable for the Village of Winnipegosis at a salary of $40 per month. Carried.
Lyons – Morris – That the Mayor and Councillors walmsley and Lyons be a committee to secure a yard and feed for pound for Village of Winnipegosis. Carried.
Lyons – Hjalmarson – That the Mayor, Coun. Walmsley and the Sec.-Tresurer meet the committee appointed by the municipality to go over the matter of the appointment between the village and the municipality. Carried.
Morris – Walmsley – That the Council may for the transportation of Mr. [2 lines missing] such time as the Council are in a position to buy it our it is sold. Carried.
Morris – Walmsley – That the Council adjourn to meet at the call of the Mayor. Carried.

1915 Sep 9 – Winnipegosis

Miss Evelyn Barrell and Mr. Sidney Coffey were married in Winnipeg on the 30th August, and arrived in town on Saturday’s train. Their many friends wish them a long and happy wedded life.
G.O. Bellsmy, an old-timer, spent Sunday in town.
Geo. C. Nigh spent the week-end wit his wife and reports the crops in good shape at Grandview. He left on Monday’s train for Grandview.
Dr. Buttomley, accompanied by Tom Needham, arrived from Dauphin by auto Saturday, and left for Meadow Portage with Ern. Bickel to inspect the smallpox epidemic over there.
J.A. Ball, customs officer, spent Saturday in town.
T.F. Ganther arrived on Saturday’s train and is helping J.C. Adams with the completion of his residence.
Sergeant Jack Angus came up from Brandon on Saturday’s train and is looking well and reports the boys from here all well and happy and getting along splendidly. He left Joe Johnston in charge of his squad.
Jas. McInnes has purchased a gasoline launch and made a trip to Waterhen on Saturday with a survey party.
Hull Burrell took Mr. Loire and party to their ranch on Saturday, returning Saturday night.
The S.S. “Maniton” arrived from the north Sunday with a load of fish and report fishing quiet.
Donald Hattie returned from Snake Island and report fishing quiet.
W.H. Hunking left on Wednesday from Johnston, North Dakota, where he intends making his home. His family preceded him some time ago.
Harry and Walter Grenon returned on Saturday from an extended trip to Quebec and Eastern points and report a splendid vacation and a real good time.
Miss St. Vrain and Geo. Adams were married at the home of the latter’s parents last week and are receiving the congratulations of their many friends.
Mrs. Jne. Cain left on Wednesday’s train for her home in Rainy River, Ont.
The Mossey River Council met in the council chamber, Winnipegosis, on the 31st August. The reeve and all councillors present.
E.R. Black and Scotty Howatson had an exciting trip going to Grave’s Point in a gasoline boat. They were lost and were eleven days making their destination. Why they made the point they had only a few matches left.
Sam McLean made a flying visit to town on Friday by automobile. We don’t see much of Sam nowadays.
Mrs. W. Morton and children returned on Wednesday from a two months’ visit to her parents at Wadena, Sask.
Capt. Russell received a nice bull terrier from Kelwood recently. Experts Dunc Kennedy and Billie Walmsley will tell you all about it. These two can sure spot a good dog with half an eye open.
Mr. and Mrs. Woiff and family motored up from Ochre River on Sunday to visit Mrs. Kennedy.
Joe Alex left for Winnipeg on business on Saturday.
Wm. Flett, Hudson’s Bay agent, returned from the far north and has been spending a week in town. He left for Winnipeg Saturday.
C.L. White left for Waterhen River Friday, taking a canoe in tow on account of the low water in the rivers.
The new principal for our school arrived in town Wednesday last.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 4 – 1912

1912 Jul 4 – Fork River

Mrs. Richardson, of Ontario, is visiting at the home of her sister, Mrs. Sam Bailey, on the Mossey River.
Miss Pearl Cooper returned home from a visit to her numerous friends in Dauphin.
Mr. and Mrs. Wood are visitors with Mr. and Mrs. Bert Cooper on the Fork River for a few days.
Mrs. C. Clark returned ohm from Dauphin, where she has been attending her daughter. We are pleased to hear that Miss Olive is improving and will soon return home.
S.W. Swannerton was a visitor with Mr. Kennedy, manager of the Armstrong Trading Co., in connection with business for the Rapid City Flour Milling Co.
Miss A. Snelgrove is a visitor to Dauphin this week.
Mrs. Kennedy and Mrs. Williams are taking a trip to the Lake Town.
Mrs. Paul Wood and family, who have been visiting at Mrs. D.F. Wilson’s, having returned to Sifton.
Fred B. Lacey of Oak Brae, and D.F. Wilson, are visitors to Winnipegosis, the summer resort, on business.
Take care Bay Centre as we respect the one mentioned and he can kick both ends and unless you know the ropes you might get hurt. No offence meant.
The Government Agricultural special train was here on the 27th. There was a large turnout. The ladies
car was full and great interest was taken in the lectures on home culture given by the ladies in charge. A great number of famers turned out and listened to the able addresses delivered on cattle, horses and grain and weeds. As the train was late arriving the time was short to deal with so many subjects properly. We hope o see them back again at an early date and that our council will go in for roads instead of rabbit paths after hearing the road lecture given on good roads. The professors took two epecimros spector, which were returned safely and as soon as classified will be reported on and that’s the long and the short of it.
Frank Bailey, of Winnipeg, expect for the Sawyer & Massey Co., is spending a few days with is parents, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Bailey. We are alway pleased to meet Frank.
Several took in the Oddfellow’s excursion to Winnipegosis and and brought back a good dose of mosquitoes as souvenirs.
Nurse Johnston, of Dauphin Hospital, and Mrs Johnston are visitors at Mr. and Mrs. Duncan Kennedy.
Whew, but its not. Just a sheet of paper between here and the place we hear on Sunday. Looking for a cool place is the order of the day. The river is well patronized.
W. King shipped two Berkshire sows to Robert McGregor, from this herd. There is a bargain for some on in “McNair,” the head of this herd, who is for sale.
A meeting of the Mossey River council will be held at Fork River on Tuesday, July 9.

1912 Jul 4 – Winnipegosis

E.R. Black was a passenger to Dauphin on Monday.
The first excursion of the season, was by the Oddfellows of Grandview on Friday. The train brought a large crowd and all spent a pleasant day in boating and other amusements. A notable piece of enterprise on this occasion was the business acumen shown by a number of the ladies of the town by the erecting of booths, and selling of ice cream and refreshments. We are glad to say the young ladies did a good business and realized a nice profit.
Boating is the popular pastime with our citizens just now. At anytime on the river and law the small craft may be seen dodging and darting about.
Mrs. Coffey and her son Ted, returned to Dauphin Saturday, after a short visit with her daughter, Mrs. J.N. McAuley.
Capt. Coffey is here this week making repairs to his boat.
It is rumoured about that the Masonic and Oddfellows lodges of Dauphin will shortly hold an excursion to this place. We hope the report is true and promise the visitors an enjoyable outing.
Nurse Johnston of the Dauphin Hospital staff spent a few days visiting at the home of her mother last week. She returned to Dauphin on Saturday’s train.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 11 – 1914

1914 Jun 11 – Bad Fire at Ochre River

A disastrous fire occurred at Ochre River on Sunday morning last about 2 o’clock, when the store of the Ochre River Trading Co., together with most of the stock, was destroyed. The fire, when discovered had made considerable headway and the building being a frame one, was soon consumed. Willing hands did what they could to save the contents of the store and keep the fire from spreading.
The building was valued at $4000 and was insured for $2000.
The stock was insured for $12000 and its value placed at a sum in the neighbourhood of $15000 or $16000.
The origin of the fire is a mystery. It is probably that an investigation will be made.

1914 Jun 11 – House Burned

For the second time Mr. Gillies’ house at Sifton, was burned on Saturday night. The structure was a two-story frame building and nearly finished. Some time ago Mr. Gillies’ partly constructed dwelling was burned also. Incendiarism is suspected and the cause of the fire will be investigated.

1914 Jun 11 – Three Killed in Collision

One of the worst accidents that has happened for some time past on the C.N.R. took place just east of Cote, a small station six miles from Kamsack, on Friday night last. It was a head-on collision between No. 2 eastbound and No. 201, speed freight. There is a curve at this point in the road and the two trains were running at a good rate of speed and were right together before the engineers had time to reverse. No. 2 was in charge of Engineer J.H. Arnold and No. 201 Engineer R.T. Perkins, Jas. Clyde was firing for No. 2. and F.J. Smith for No. 201. All four were from this point. Perkins, Clyde and Smith all managed to jump and not one of them received any serious injury. Arnold stuck to his post and was so badly scalded and otherwise inured that he dead a few hours afterwards at the Kamsack Hospital.
F.J. Faiji, mail clerk, and Ross Donaldson, express messenger, were instantly killed. Both ran out of Winnipeg.
Geo. Gougeon, brakeman, of Dauphin was slightly injured.
W.H. Messier and J.A. McVicar were the conductors of the respective trains, the passage and freight. Both escaped unhurt.
None of the passengers on the train were injured, but nearly all received a bad shaking up.

1914 Jun 11 – Mossey River Council

Meeting of the council held at Winnipegosis on May 30th.
The minutes of the previous meeting were adopted as read.
Hunt-Bickle – That the council now sit as a court of revision.
The clerk reported that no protests had been filled since the court of revision had adjourned.
Hechter-Toye – That the court of revision new adjourn.
Hunt-Bickle – That the council now take up the usual municipal matters.
Communications were then read from Prof. Black, the Deputy Minister of Public Works; the Land Commissioner of the Hudson’s Bay Co,; Judge Ryan; J. Irwin; the solicitors for the C.N.R.; the Municipal Solicitor; H. Rustad and a petition from certain ratepayers asking for a bridge.
Hechter-Bickle – That the plan of subdivision of block G and part of block F, village of Winnipegosis, plan being numbered 251, submitted by Munson & Allan, be approved.
Hunt-Bickle – That the secretary write the superintendent of the C.N.R. Dauphin, regarding the putting in of a culvert through the railway at pole No. 22, north of mile board No. 12.
Toye-Hunt – That W. Vincent be paid $13 for his service in securing the title to the roadway through the Champion farm.
Toye-Hechter – That plank be supplied to cover a bridge 20 feet long over Icelandic Creek, on the township line, between 29 and 30, the settlers agreeing to do the work.
Hunt-Bickle – in amendment – That Coun. Robertson and Toye deal with the matter of a bridge across Icelandic Creek and that the coasts be borne by ward 5 and 6. Amendment carried.
Messrs. Macneill and Reid, the delegates from Dauphin, were head regarding the building of a road from Winnipegosis to Dauphin.
Hechter-Hunt – That a vote of thanks be tendered the delegates from Dauphin.
Hechter-Toye – That the council now decide to come under the provisions of The Good Roads Act, a road from Fork River south to the boundary of the municipality and connecting with the proposed road to be built by the Dauphin municipality, between section 35 and 36 in township 28, range 19.
Bickle-Richardson – That the reeve and Coun. Hechter and Hunt be a committee to select the main roads and prepare the preliminary steps required t come under the provisions of The Good Roads Act.
Hechter-Richardson – That a grant of ten bags of flour be made to Seifat Michtka and that the flour by bought from whoever will supply it at the lowest price.
Hunt-Bickle – That in the matter of a petition of certain ratepayers of ward 6 regarding statute labour, the reeve by authorized to ??? in the absence of Coun. Robertson.
Robinson-Hechter – That the reeve be authorized to go to Winnipeg and see the Minister of Public Works with a view to getting a grant for the biding of public roads in the municipality.
Hechter-Hunt – That the public works committee be authorized to begin work and if the weather permits complete the Fork River and Winnipegosis road; the work to be done in accordance with the profile of the Government engineer.
Richardson-Hechter – That on complaint to the clerk and the production of the necessary proof by the complainant, the clerk is hereby instructed to prosecute the owners of animals running at large contrary to the provision of the by laws.
Richardson-Hechter – That the clerk notify parties who have had interments made in the municipal cemeteries to apply at the office of the municipality for their cemetery deeds.
Toye-Richardson – That the accounts as recommended by the Finance committee be passed.
Toye-Bickle – That Coun. Hechter be authorized to rent two tents to be used by the men on road constructions.
A by-law was passed making an appropriation to the wards on a basis of six mills in the assessment.
Bickle-Toye – That the council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the reeve.

1914 Jun 11 – Fork River

Mrs. Chas. Denby, of Winnipegosis, returned home, having spent a week among friends.
Mrs. Kennedy and family have returned from Winnipegosis having spent the weekend there.
W. Williams’ planning mill is running full blast these days and “Billy” is busy shipping lumber.
W. Howiston spent a few days at Winnipegosis and while away we are informed, invested in a schooner. That’s all right “Scotty.”
Mr. Secord, homestead inspector, is spending a few days inspecting work performed by homesteaders.
Peter Ellis, of Kamsack, is visiting here.
Jack Robson and Harry Hunter have returned from a two months trapping and hunting trip and they report a good catch.
E. Williams, lay reader, has returned from attending the Synod at Winnipeg last week. He reports a very busy time.
The mail these days contains many copies of the speech on free wheat by our friend “Bob” Cruise, member for Dauphin. The wheat question does not cut any ice here at present. Its roads and bridges we went. We would be delighted to hear our friend “Bob” converting the Senate and his friends to vote for Borden’s good roads policy which was thrown out last session.
The seeding is over and the crop has been put in good shape, it being one of the finest seasons we have seen for years.
The captain of our fire brigade has prophesized a dry season and is seriously thinking of going into growing watermelons in case of fire. The only thing we can do is to keep smiling as the crops are looking good.
Feming Wilson, of Dauphin, was a visitor here between trains the latter end of the week.
“Joe” Lockhart is filling a car with settlers’ effects and is off for the banana belt. Ta, ta, “Joe” we wish you good luck.
There will be a court of revision at Ethelbert on June 17th. It’s the last chance for getting on the list for the electoral division of Gilbert Plains.
W. King has returned after a two weeks’ trip north. He had a good time, tanks to his two Liberal friends who stuck to him closer than a brother, and “Billy” always appreciates a good thing.
Mrs. Curtis and Mrs. Morrisain, of Texas, U.S., are visiting their friend, Mrs. Nat Little, for a few weeks.
Miss F. Sanderson left for Winnipegosis to take charge of a large diary business started by G. Sanderson, of that burgh.
W. Hunkins and “Jimmy” Bickle passed through here recently at a 2-40 gait.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 25 – 1915

1915 Feb 25 – Interesting Letter from England

Private Kenneth Cates, formerly of the Bank of Commerce staff here, but who recently enlisted with the Scots Guards, writes interestingly of soldier life in England:
“L” Company, Scots Guard, Hut 11, Caterham, Surrey, England.

I have been thinking that possibly you might like to know that the famous “Dauphin Life Guards” are represented in Kitchener’s army in the person of your humble servant. I shook off the dust of the C.B. of C. some two months ago and returned to my native land, much to the surprise of my mother and sister who supposed me safely in Canada, until I walked in on them.
I enlisted in Liverpool when I landed and only had two days at home after being absent seven years! I asked to join the Devonshire Regiment but they were not recruiting for them in Liverpool and as I was tall enough the recruiting officer said I could join the Scot Guards if I like, which I accordingly did and am now in receipt of the princely sum of 1s. 1d. a day, just about what I used to spend on Bordeaux at the “Kandy King’s.”

This is the depot for all the Guards regiments, viz., Grenadiers, Coldstreams, Irish and Scots Guards. The barracks are full up of course so we are quartered in corrugated iron huts (or shacks) which hold about 34 men each, each hut being in charge o a trained soldier, mostly from the reserve. Our beds consist of three planks raised six inches from the floor, straw mattress, pillow and 3 blankets. We get four drills a day of an hour each. It does not sound very much, but believe me, it’s all you want. They are pretty strenuous hours while they last. Reveille is at 6 a.m., breakfast 7 a.m., dinner at noon, tea at 4.15, lights out 10 p.m. We are allowed out of barracks each evening for 6.30 to 915 p.m. and on Saturday and Sunday we get out at 2 p.m. We can also get weekend leave for 12 noon Saturday till 1 a.m. Monday morning.

The training here lasts from 10 to 12 weeks. My squad has passed in foot drill and were issued rifles today. I hope to get to the front some time about April. We get a finishing touch at Wellington Barracks, London, after leaving here which lasts from a few days to perhaps four weeks, it all depends how often drafts are being sent to the front. Both the 1st and 2nd Battalions of the Scot Guards are at the front and they are kept up to strength from the 3rd Battalion to which we belong. There are only six men left out of the original 1st Battalion which went out in August, so you can imagine how they have been cut up.

It is raining here everyday and the mud is something awful, pretty nearly knee deep, but apart from the weather there is nothing whatever to complain of in the barracks and huts here. There are about 8000 men here altogether and practically every one of them is suffering from a bad cold. You cannot get rid of them, what with getting wet, always wearing wet boots, etc. my squad was inoculated for typhoid yesterday. It is rather painful for a short while, but the effect as a rule passes off in two days. We are allowed forty-eight hours off from all drill and fatigue duty to recover in. We are to be vaccinated tomorrow.

We get a bath once a week (boiling hot), but one lot of water has to do for three men!

I got a complete outfit of shirt, socks, underwear, boots razor, brushes, towels, etc., overcoat and cap, on joining, but the supplies of khaki trousers and jackets are hopelessly in arrears, so you have to wear your own suit of clothes; needless to say we are a somewhat ragged and nondescript looking crowd in consequence and the weather ruins a suit in a week.

I sailed from St. John and our passage was quite uneventful. The boat, however, was painted gray all over and all the portholes were pasted over with brown paper so as to show no lights. We were challenged by a cruiser when off the Irish coast and several trawlers, taken over by the Admiralty, came up close to look us over and coming up the Mersey serachlights were playing on us all the time. I got into London at 8 o’clock in the evening and found it in darkness, hardly any street lights all. The theatres were all running, however, but getting very poor houses at night. Everyone goes to matinees now instead.

Everything seems to be the same as usual; no excitement. You would hardly think the war was on, except that the place seems to be swarming with fellows in uniforms. It struck me that there were not so many young men to be seen in the city and in Liverpool. Nearly everybody you meet has several friends in the army somewhere. I have two cousins at the front; one is in the Flying Corps attached to General Paget’s Division and the other came over from India recently with a native regiment and my brother-in-law has quite a good job in the Army service corps and is travelling all over the place buying forage, etc., and all the eligible young men in my native village in Devonshire seem to have joined.

Although I had been away seven years, I have only managed to get two days at home so far. I hope to get a weekend shortly and seven days later on.

1915 Feb 25 – War is Hell

German prisoners recently taken tell a horrible story, and confirm Gen. Sherman’s statement that “War is Hell.” They declared that men in trenches both officers and privates had gone violently insane from exposure, the strain of constant fighting and horrible sights which continually greet their eyes.

1915 Feb 25 – Fork River

Miss Rose Canber has returned to her home after spending a short time with her parents.
Mr. E. Black and Mr. Wm. Hankings, bailiff of Winnipegosis, were here on business last week.
Several of our farmers are putting up ice for the summer on the Mossey River. It is quite a contract as the ice is over four feet thick. It is of good quality.
Mr. John Seiffert, P.M., seems to have his hands full these days smoothing out things here and at Winnipegosis. Johnny keeps smiling and gets there all the same.
T.N. Briggs is making his pile this winter cutting and shipping cordwood. With tamarac selling at $2 a cord and seasoned poplar at $1 there is not the least doubt but what there will be a number of retired farmers around this burgh by the time another year rolls round.
Aubury King represented this patriotic corner of the globe at the Red Cross ball at Winnipegosis last week. He reports a swell time.
Mr. Sid Coffey and Jack Angus, of Winnipegosis, were visitors at this burgh last week on important business. Jack was just taking the lay of the land after being absent at Mafeking all winter. He expects to be a frequent visitor in the near future. That’s all right, Scotty does not object. There’s lots of room here for everybody as Sid’s moving picture show is coming on Wednesday night.
It is rumoured that there has been quite a number of deaths among the Ruthenians east of here during the last two months from diphtheria. Some of those who had the disease have been allowed to run at large and thus it spread. We trust this disregard for health and law will be dealt with by the proper authorities. The majority of these people have lived here long enough to know the law in this respect and should be made to suffer for their carelessness, which is little short of criminal
Wm. King is attending the session of the orange Grand Lodge at Winnipegosis this week.
It is too bad the way timber is being cut through these parts without permits. Much of the timber cut is ruined. We understand an inspector is shortly to visit these parts and there will be something doing then.
Alex Cameron was a Dauphin visitor on Monday, returning on Wednesday.

1915 Feb 25 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. N. McAulay and Mrs. J. Denby arrived home from Dauphin on Friday’s train.
Frank Hechter left for Winnipeg on Monday.
Mrs. J. Seiffert is visiting her parents at Fork River.
Mr. and Mrs. Hallie Burrell arrived home from Dauphin on Monday and brought with them their new arrival. “Watch Winnipegosis grow.”
The government tug, “Mossey River” is off the cars, and will lay on the ice till the river opens, when she will be taken out on her trial trip.
Jim McInnes and Archie McDonald returned on Monday from Winnipeg, where they had been “seeing the elephant.” Just what this means has not been fully explained but Archie keeps on smiling.
Mrs. J.P. Grenon returned from Dauphin on Monday’s train.