Today in the Dauphin Herald – April 29, 1920

G.W.V.A.

We regret to learn that Comrade Roy Armstrong has resigned the secretaryship of the association. His work with the soldier settlement board as supervisor takes him away from town so much he could not attend to the duties.
Comrade Bates was in the city last attending a meeting of the executive of the provincial command when a lot of routine work was put through.
A number of returned boys are looking for homestead and soldier grant lands these days and the country south of Dauphin Lake will be well taken up this spring and a large amount of breaking will be done if we only get the right weather from now on. The rooms are proving of great service to these men.
We are sorry to learn that a great number of the soldier settlers lost a large amount of stock on account of the hard winter and the shortage of feed.
At a meeting of the executive Comrade E.C. Batty was asked to act as secretary-treasurer for the local branch of the association to fill in the term of Comrade R. Armstrong, who has resigned. Comrade Batty has agreed to fill the breach.
The Ladies’ Auxiliary held a very successful dance on Friday last. The ladies are doing good work and same is appreciated by the association.
Returned men should note that school lands are now open for soldier settlement, and any returned man may apply for an examination and estimation on any particular parcel.
Capt. Scrase has gone to Banff to take treatment and it is hoped by all the comrades that he will greatly benefit and will return to Dauphin fully restored to good heath.
Comrades Lys and Armstrong are waiting on the roads to dry up till they try out their Henry Fords. Watch for smoke when Hugh gets at the wheel.

Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River on the 12th inst., all members being present. He minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted.
Communications were read from the Bank of Nova Scotia, re line of credit; The C.N. Town Properties, re roadway; the Dept. of Education; the H.B. Co.’s, re road divergence, 3-3-16, and the Provincial Board of Health, re district nurse.
Yakavanka-Panageika — That the clerk write the municipalities of Ethelbert and Winnipegosis and ask if they will cooperate with this municipality in the matter of a district nurse.
Marcroft-Thorsteinson — That the discount and penalty, amounting to $9.14 against the s.w. 13-41-19, be cancelled.
Hunt-Yakavanka — That the account of Peter Drainian for delivering [pilng] at Fork River, $11.40, be paid.
Marcroft-Hunt — That the action of the committee on seed grain in securing wheat, barley and flax be endorsed, and that the two samples of oats now sown are satisfactory.
Hunt-Marcroft — That the gravel which will be required for the foundation of the soldiers’ monument be procured at once and that the matter be placed in the hands of the reeve.
Marcroft-Hunt — That the secretary write the returned soldiers’ committee thanking the organization for its kind appreciation of the council’s action regarding the mater of a monument in memory of the fallen soldiers.
Hunt-Marcoft — That the services of an engineer be procured to lay out certain roads throughput the municipality and giving an estimate of the cost. This with a view to borrowing money by the issue of debentures for the building of such roads.
Marcroft-Yakavanka — That the clerk ask for tenders for the peeling of the timber now in the municipal yard. Tenders to be received up to April 30th, and that the reeve and clerk be a committee to deal with the matter.
Hunt-Marcroft – That Robert Allen be employed to run the road engine for the season of 1920, and that his remuneration be $1 an hour.
Marcroft-Hunt — That the clerk ask for applications for man to run grader for the season of 1920.
Yakavanka-Namaka — That the declaration of the reeve $23.60, and Coun. Marcroft, $12.70, for letting and inspecting work be passed.
Hunt-Yakavanka — That Coun. Marcroft be authorized to call for tenders for the building of a bridge, 20 feet, on road allowance east of 34-31-19.
Panageika-Yakavanka — That a grant of $25 be made to the Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ club for the year 1919.
The accounts as recommended by the finance committee were ordered paid.
Marcorft-Thorsteinson — hat the reeve, clerk and Coun. Hunt be a committee to look for suitable sites for the soldiers’ memorial.
By-laws were passed authorizing the purchase of seed grain and cancelling soldiers’ taxes.

Ethelbert

The meetings took place on Thursday evening of Mr. William S. K[illegible], of Dauphin and Miss Florence J. [illegible], of Ethelbert.
[illegible] Adams, of Winnipegosis, has been appointed registration clerk for the east half of the Ethelbert constituency, and [illegible] Skaife, of Ethelbert, has been appointed registration clerk for the west half.

Winnipegosis

The Dramatic society have two performances of “The Private Secretary” last week. Mr. Shears in the title part was very good indeed. We did not know he could be so funny. Mr. Lamont as the Uncle from India was excellent; his acting was perfectly smooth and full of life. A new addition to the society was r. D.C. Brown, of the Bank of Nova Scotia here. He had an easy stage presence on the whole and a good voice. Our old friend Mr. Wilis is getting into a habit of trotting about too much. He is an old favorite and we don’t want to see him acquiring bad habits. The ladies all did well. Mrs. Shears’ voice was all it should have been in calling upon the spirits for a sign. Miss McMartin, as the daughter of the house and Miss Leith McMartin, as the widowed landlady, were both good. Miss Woodiow, who possess a striking beauty, was a most charming little girl on the stage n her flame colored dress. The make-ups were all good, some of them exceptionally so. Mr. Ketcheson, as the tailor, was very good indeed also Mr. Roberts.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – April 22, 1920

G.W.V.A. Notes

We wish all comrades to note that before they can make entry on Dominion Lands, both homestead and soldiers grant, they must have attestation certificates. If they will look after this matter before time of making entry, it will save them a lot of trouble and delay.
We note that Comrade Roy Armstrong is now with the Soldier Settlement Board as supervisor and takes in the district of Winnipegosis, Ochre River and Makinak.
At the last meeting of the Association we had a very fair attendance to hear Comrade Batty give his report of Montreal convention. He gave a general outline of the work done at the convention. We hope to see an increased interest in the meetings. Come out to them. The matter of the War Veterans’ home was up before the meeting and some discussion took place. We are still waiting on the results of the work of the Memorial Committee before making any public campaign for funds for our building. In the meantime we are getting all the money we can gather toward our building fund.
Comrade Herman, of Ashville, who has been in the hospital, is convalescent.
Comrade Garth Johnston has gone to Prairie River to start operations on his farm.
Hugh Lys and E.R. Bewell, supervisors for the S.S.B., are out on soldier settlement work.
We have had a number of men make use of the rooms this month while passing through and who appreciate same very much.

Bicton Health

Winnipegosis, April 20.
The rain Tuesday was welcome. Warmer weather is now assured. Don’t let us be impatient; you know we are promised seedtime and harvest as long as the world lasts.
The United Famers of the district held a meeting on the 17th at the home of Mr. Dumas. Important business was transacted. A resolution was passed requesting the Grain Growers to build an elevator at Winnipegosis the coming summer. The question of taking political action was brought up and discussed. A vote showed the meeting to be in favor of such a move.
The corduroy road leading to the school is nearly complete.
James Laidlaw is drawing his house and stable over to the homestead.
Frank Sharp has purchased a fine team of horses from Mr. Pruder.
A meeting will be held in the Orange Hall, Fork River, on the 27th inst. and it is expected that delegates from every local in the Ethelbert constituency will be present and it will then be decided whether a farmers’ candidate will be placed in the field.

Fork River

Father and Son Banquet—Boys’ work has come right into the limelight in Fork River with the introduction of the Canadian standard efficiency training under a local advisory council composed of Messrs. W. King, J. Williamson, A.J. Little, Fred. Cooper, C.E. Bailey and Milton Cooper.
A Trail Rangers’ camp has been formed with E.V. Lockwood as mentor, Robt. Williams chief ranger; Arthur Jameson, sub ranger Nathan Schucett, tally, and Ben Schucett, cache.
So interested are the boys that the ladies of the district, to encourage them, supplied a splendid banquet on Friday night last at which some 43 fathers and sons sat down and enjoyed the substantial repast. When the eating was finished the chief ranger bade them toast “The King,” which was done with musical honors.
The following toasts were enthusiastically honored: “Canada,” proposed by Arthur Jameson; “Tuxis Boys,” by N. Schuchett; “Our Dads,” by B. Schuchett; “Our Sons,” by W. King. A very nice little speech by D. Robertson on the “Kind of Dad I Like,” was responded to with excellent advice to boys on the “Kind of Son I Like,” by D.F. Wilson. “Our Homes” was given by Mr. Lockwood, and this was followed by three sort addresses by Prof. Williamson on the advantages of an education; Tuxis boys at large by Rev. H.P. Barrett and the boy and the church by Rev. E. Roberts. Votes of thanks to boys, ladies, speakers and officers were proposed by W. King, D. Lockwood, E.V. Lockwood and Rev. H.P. Barrett. The national anthem brought to a close an evening long to be remembered in the annuals of Fork River.

CORRESPONDENT CRITICIZED.
To the Editor of the Dauphin Herald:

SIR:—
O’wad some power the giftie gie us
To see ourselves as others see us.
So wrote the poet long years ago and we hope the writer of the article in your last issue entitled, “Fork River,” will be given that blessed gift, it may reach him sometime that it is very bad form to wash his dirty linen in public and still worse to do it in such a way as to convey the impression that it is editorial news.
Have very good first hand information as to all that happened at the returned soldiers “get together” in Fork River on a recent Saturday night and I suggest that the moralist who penned the account in the paper would be better employed in taking an active and religious interest in the welfare of the young folk of the district than in writing scurrilous articles under the cover of anonymity.
I am dear sir, yours faithfully,
HARRY P. BARRETT,
Priest in charge of Fork River.

Winnipegosis

The regular monthly meeting of the Women’s Institute was held on Friday evening, April 16th, in the Union Church. A large number of the members were present. After the business was finished. Dr. Medd gave an interesting and most instructive address on “Child Welfare,” which was greatly appreciated by all present. The social part of the evening consisted in songs and a recitation, which were much enjoyed. Tea was served by the refreshment committee. The proceeds of the evening were placed to the credit of the Library fund.
The Fisherman’s ball, held last Thursday at the Rex Hall, was a great success.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – October 23, 1919

G.W.V.A. Notes

Regular meeting of the above association was held on the 9th inst. about 40 comrades being in attendance. Application for membership was received from 9 returned men, all of whom were accepted.
The committee appointed to consider the question of building a home for the returned men reported that they had approved a design for a veterans’ home as presented to them by Mr. H. Payton, the architect, this sketch being placed before the comrades for approval. Instructions have been given to Mr. Payton to finish the design and it is hoped to have these drawings shortly to place before the public so that when an appeal is made for help in the construction there will be no doubt in the mind of anyone as to where the money is going. It is also felt that the plans under consideration will not only meet the needs of the veterans but will meet with the approval of the community and be a credit to the town of Dauphin and district, and will give those interested in the welfare of the returned men the opportunity of expressing their appreciation.
The members of the above mentioned committee are as follows: Comrades J.D. Neeley, H. Oliphant, F. Neeley, F. Bumstead, D. Kitney, J.W. Skinner, W.F. Terrell, W. Wright, C. Lane, H.H. Olson, E.C. Batty (chairman) and J.M. Chalmers (secretary). Any of the afore-mentioned committee will be only too pleased to go into the matter of the building and give all the information that is desired.
We are informed that the Ladies’ Auxiliary intend putting on a dance on Hallowe’en Eve (Oct 31st). Some very fine prizes have been donated, and all are asked to bear the date in mind and come and have a good time.
I have been asked to state that Comrade R.H. Elliott has lost his service button. The number of which is 163371. Anyone finding same will please return it to the G.W.V.A. rooms or to the above mentioned. These buttons cannot be replaced and also that it is a criminal offence to be in possession of one unless the certificate belonging to same is also in the possession of the bearer.
On Thursday, 14th, the Victorian Serenaders performed at the town hall under the auspices of this Association. The show was as usual good, and the music after for the dance was generally conceded to be first rate. The house was not as good as might have been hoped, but this was in a large measure due to the weather and the fact that there have been several other attractions during the month. However it was a well-paying proposition and the proceeds will be used in the furtherance of the building proposition.
On Nov. 3rd the third of the series of the concerts to be run under the auspices of this association will be placed on at the town hall. This time it is the Canadian Juveniles and it will not be necessary to say a great deal about these as they are well known to the residents here. The Gray Girls, who are travelling with this company, have already established a reputation for themselves in Winnipeg second to none; the same also applying to Charlie Wright. We would strongly recommend this entertainment to all and would ask that we be given the usual support of the public and so enable us to bring that home for the veterans a little nearer to a possibility.
Members are asked to note that the regular meeting will be on the 23rd inst., and a full attendance is requested. Now that the bulk of the farm work for the season is through, there is no reason why the members should not attend, and it is only by so doing that we can accomplish anything for the bettermen in general of the returned men.

Sir Henry Drayton to Speak

The Victory Loan Committee have their organization completed and the canvases for both town and rural will commence Monday, Oct. 27th. A public meeting will be held at Dauphin on Oct., 29th, at which Sir Henry Drayton, Minister of Finance, is expected to speak.

Fork River

Will Northam, has purchased a house and lot in town from J. MacDonald and will take up his residence with us.
E. Lockwood and family have arrived from Regina. Mr. L is the new station agent.
Bert Little and family have arrived from Chicago to take up their residence.
Ben Cameron has charge of the White Star elevator and is handling considerable grain.
A pleasant time was spent at the Orange Hall on Friday evening, when a dance and presentation was given to our returned boys. Proceedings started at nine sharp and a good crowd turned out for the occasion. Dancing occupied those present until eleven o’clock when an address was read by the se.-treasurer of the Returned Soldiers’ Committee. Presentation of watches was next on the program. Corp. Briggs, Pte. Briggs, Pte. Gasena, Pte. Reader and Drive S. Craighill each receiving a watch as a small token for the service they have rendered their country. Pte. A. King who was “over there” for four years returned while the dance was on but for some reason did not get his watch with the rest. I wonder why? The banquet for the boys is to be given on Friday evening, Oct. 31. Let us hope everyone will turn out and have a good time.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 13 – 1919

1919 Nov 13 – Soldiers Tendered Banquet

A year ago Tuesday the bells of the town were ringing and the whistles blowing. It was a day long to be remembered. The Germans had started the war with the object of conquering the world and had, after the great struggle, hoisted the white flag and asked for the cessation of hostilities. It was a different scene that greeted the eye as one entered the town hall on Tuesday night, November 11th, 1919. Here were tables stretched the full length of the hall, artistically arranged and simply groaning under the load of good things that weighed them down.
The occasion was a banquet tendered the returned boys, their wives and lady friends by the Ladies’ Auxiliary of the G.W.V.A. and it was worthy of them. The members of the Auxiliary have been tireless workers for the welfare of the men and this banquet crowned their efforts.
There were between three and four hundred present.
During the dinner hour Major Skinner extended a welcome to all on behalf of the Auxiliary.
A vote of thanks was tendered the ladies on motion of Comrades Bates and Batty.
After the tables were cleared there was a short program followed by a dance. Those taking part were Mrs. Grobb, violin selection; Mrs. R. Hawkins, solo; Rev. H.P. Barrett, song; Miss H. Clarke, recitation. The McMurray orchestra furnished the music for the dance.

1919 Nov 13 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Nov. 10th.
Mr. Shield and bride arrived last week and have rented John Hayward’s residence on the Mossey River.
John Judge and Mr. Gourlay from Virden, have arrived. They have rented Briggs brothers’ buildings.
A basket social will be held in the school on the evening of Nov. 21st. The proceeds will be devoted to a fund for the purchase of an organ for the school.
The work on the road that leads to the school is still undone. Children from this district east of the muskeg have not been able to attend school of late on this account. The Dept. of Public-Works has provided a special grant from this road. In view of this it seems strange that an effort has not been made to have the work performed.

1919 Nov 13 – Fork River

A meeting of the directors of the Agricultural Society was held on the 5th inst. It was decided to pay the prize money at once. As this was the first show held by the society the directors are to be congratulated on its success.
Mrs. Rice, for a number of years was teacher at North Lake School has sold her property and has left the community. Mrs. Rice has lived a number of years in the district and has done good work as a teacher. Her departure from our midst is a matter of regret.
Mr. and Mrs. Caswell, of Hartney, Man., are visiting at the home of Mr. T.N. Briggs. The young people attended the banquet to the returned soldiers.
Mrs. Gordon Weaver, of Magnet, is visiting her aunt, Mrs. Briggs.
All Saints’ S.S. staff held a public meeting on the night of the 6th. About 50 were present. Rev. H.P. Barrett presided. Arrangements were made for the annual Christmas tree, and also to hold a social evening every Wednesday at which there will be a varied program.
A public meeting is called for Friday, 14th inst., for the purpose of organizing a branch of the Grain Growers’ Association.

1919 Nov 13 – Fork River

Mrs. Emma Rice wishes to thank all who were kind and considerate to her during her recent illness. She is now comfortably provided for in Dauphin and hops to be able to return to our midst within a short time.

LETTER OF APPRECIATIONS.
On behalf the returned boys of the Fork River district we wish to express our appreciation of the banquet tendered us, the gifts of watches and purses and the uniform kindness shown us upon all occasions. We further wish to acknowledge the efforts of the ladies in preparing the excellent supper provided us. The banquet was a most enjoyable event, the pleasure being shared by a number of friends from outside.
THE COMMITTEE.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 28 – 1911, 1914, 1916

1911 Sep 28 – Fork River

Miss Bertha Johnston of Dauphin, is on a visit to her sister, Mrs. Duncan Kennedy.
Glen Campbell’s committee rooms were set fire to at the wind-up of Cruise’s meeting by some political sore head. Not much damage was done.
Mr. Y.G. Littler was a visitor to Winnipeg on business.
Our Liberal friends had to import help from Saskatchewan and outside points, with boodle and slandering stories. It was quite unnecessary as they have proven to be past masters at the game themselves. However i was of no avail as we gave a majority of 20 for Campbell in sip of their unscrupulous tricks.
James Duff, of New Lowell, Ont. is visiting at the home of Mr. Noah Johnston of Mowat. He thinks we have a good district here.
The scribe in looking over the Press notices that our old friend Jackdaw, has been to Hell on a tour of instruction. He should now know something of what is in store for him and the cabinet ministers of the late Laurier Government and govern himself accordingly as the ways of the transgressors are hard.
The Liberal-Conservatives will hold a ball in the Orange Hall on Sept. 29th. Everybody welcome irrespective of political learning.
Hurrah for R.L. Borden, a tiger for Glen Campbell, although defeated will not be forgotten in the future.
Nicola Dinsercsim is under a quarantine for scarlet fever, having lost two of his family during the last week. He has our sympathy in his time of trouble.
Threshing is going on apace this week. No doubt the change of atmosphere is due to the reciprocity funeral on the 21st.
Mossey River Council meets at Winnipegosis on Tuesday, Oct. 3rd.
There are some people who prefer to keep dogs instead of fences and consequently their neighbours cattle suffer. One farmer who has had his cattle badly cut by dogs has found an ointment made of lard and strychnine a splendid thing for cattle’s sore heels. Put in plenty of strychnine and it has a most soothing effect on the cattle.

1911 Sep 28North Lake

Owing to an outbreak of scarlet fever, North Lake School has been closed. Mr. J. Spearing the teacher, was soon on the trail and located 10 cases. Dr. Medd of Winnipegosis, health officer for this municipality, quickly responded to the call for assistance. After a strict investigation he put five houses under quarantine much to the annoyance of the inhabitants, but joy to the surrounding district. He said something about the roads here but we’d rather not put it in less the Reeve and Councillor for this district gets hold of the paper.
The Doctor’s young; but he can certainly put the fear of the old gentleman into the Galicians in a case of this kind. We’re afraid he will have to be called again for an outbreak of nervous disorder.
Threshing has started in places around here. Mostly barley has been grown this year owning to the big prices it will bring?
Mrs. Jos. Spearing is visiting in the Oak Brae district this week.

1911 Sep 28 – Winnipegosis

D. McAuley made a shipment of cattle to Winnipeg on Tuesday.
Duck shooting this season has not been as good as in the past years. Sportsmen returning from the north end of the lake have fairly good bags, but not the large ones they use to be able to report.
Rev. Thorirason of Oak Point, near Brandon, held confirmation services on Sunday.
The Mossey River Council meets here on Oct. 3rd.
The fishing schooners are already leaving for the north end of the lake, to prepare for the winter season which opens on November 20th.
Something sure did happen here on the 21st. How the oracle was worked no one yet has been able to clearly state, but one thing is certain that there will be an election protect and from the revelations then, “just how it happened” will be explained and hot to the satisfaction of either the Liberals or Mr. Cruise.
Frank Hechter was a visitor to Dauphin on Saturday.
Miss Johnson of the Dauphin Hospital staff, who has been recuperating at her home here, leaves Saturday to again take up her duties a the hospital.

1914 Sep 28 – Nine Miles of Dead in Trenches

LONDON, Sept. 23 – The Daily Mail’s correspondent reports that the German right has been turned between Peronne and St. Quentin. He says wounded have been arriving at the unnamed place. They report that there are nine miles of dead in trenches between those town towns.

1914 Sep 28 – Ethelbert

Considerable wood is being shipped out.
Messrs. Geo. Marantz and H. Brachman, were at Dauphin in the early part of the week attending the Jewish New Year services.
Threshing will be pretty well wound up in this district by the end of the week.
Efforts will be put forth by most of the farmers to have as large an area of land as possible unfair crop next year in view of the high prices promised for grain.
K.F. Slipetz was a Dauphin visitor on Monday.

1914 Sep 28 – Fork River

Mrs. D. Kennedy returned on Monday from a visit to Dauphin.
Wm. Howitson has returned and is open for business again at the A.T. Co. store. He is of the opinion that Fork River is the right place.
In the gloaming Mr. Archie McDonald left for a few days trip and will take in Winnipeg. Archie needs a rest after such a strenuous summer’s work on the farm.
Jack Angus, of Winnipegosis, is taking a vacation for a week at Fork River. He says there are times that Toye’s dredges or schooners are out of the question.
Miss Grace Little has returned from a months visit with friends at Winnipeg and Brandon.
Mr. Thomas and family have arrived with a carload of furniture from Saskatchewan. He has charge of the Northern elevator and intends making this his home for some time.
F.C. Green, from England, has arrived to take charge of this mission for a time. He will hold service in All Saints’ Anglican Church, Sunday afternoon, Sept. 27th, at 2 o’clock.
In this time of war would it not look very much more loyal of Mossey River School district to have the good old flag flying say at least once a month irrespective of the reading of the School Act.

1916 Sep 28 – The Week’s Casualty List

The Dauphin boys are now in the midst of the active fighting along the Somme and the causality list grows daily.
Fred. I Pike, died from wounds.
Lorne Shand, arm shattered and eye injured.
Chas. Batty, wounded in chest and shoulder.
Fred. Grant, wounded.
Geo. Gray, gunshot wound

1916 Sep 28 – Dauphin Nurses Wanted For War Front

Miss Jackson and Miss Wilson, recent graduates of the Dauphin Hospital nursing staff, and miss Myers, have received notification that their services were accepted for overseas duty. Miss Myers will be connected with Military District No. 10 and leave Oct. 3rd. Miss Jakeman and Miss Wilson will be with the Queen Alexander Technical nursing staff and leave Oct. 7.

1916 Sep 28 – Fork River

All will regret to learn that Lieut. T.A. Worsey was killed in action on Sept. 7th. He was lay reader and in charge of Fork River mission in the summer of 1914. On his return to St. John’s College in the fall to take up his studies he enlisted in the Grenadiers as a Private and worked his way up till he got his commission of Lieutenant. He was highly esteemed by everyone for his sterling qualities.
Jas. Playford, of Dauphin, was a visitor here for a few days renewing acquaintances.
John Watson, of Dauphin, was among the recent visitors here.
S.B. Levins has sold his bunch of horses to Ben. Hechter, of Winnipegosis.
F.F. Hafenbrak was unfortunate in loosing the best team he had with pink eye. Horses are horses at this time of the year.
Wm. King has received a pair of registered Berks for breeding. Once our farmers commence to specialize in stock there will be a surer basis of the farming industry. Grain growing exclusively is too doubtful a source of income.
Steve Brazdon got his hand caught in a thrashing machine and had it badly crushed. Dr. Medd, of Winnipegosis, dressed the wound.

1916 Sep 28 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Hall Burrell’s boat was blown ashore near Hunter’s Island during the big blow on Friday last. He took to the small boat and pulled in for help. He got her safely off the rocks without much damage and brought her into port on Monday.
The Armstrong Trading Co. here are doing a lot of business these days. Fishing is good and trade is correspondingly good. Everybody is the store is busy.
Capt. W.B. Sifton was here last week. He made a trip up the lake and on his return took a party to Salt Point for shooting.
Dr. Medd made a trip to Dauphin on Saturday afternoon in his auto, returning on Sunday.
We hear that Sunday school is to commence at 2 o’clock during the [1 line missing] are again ??? ??? Methodist Church. Sunday, the 24th was the first day of the change.
Duck Hunter says there is very little sport this season. They sigh for the palmy days when the railroad first touched the lake at this point. Then it was usual thing to bring home from fifteen to twenty five ducks, now the man who gets seven is happy.
The Red Cross Society here have announced that they will meet on the first Monday of every month for the purpose of transacting business. This is outside of committee meetings, etc.
The Home Economics Society are planning heir program for the winter. Addresses are being arranged suitable to the season for each monthly meeting.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 16 – 1914

1914 Jul 16 – Both Drew Gun

There was a lively time at Ashville on Monday and it looked like a shooting bee at one stage. John Burnison, a section man, has been acting strange of late and among other things was threatening to shoot residents. He drive his wife and family from the house and shot a cow belonging to Fred Kemp, the storekeeper. He services of Constable Levins, of the town force, were called into requisition and in company with John Campbell, son of Glen, he went to the house. Burnison told the men to get out and to enforce his order moved emphatically reached for his gun. As he raised the weapon Levins flashed out his revolver and Burnison wilted, dropped the gun. He was then placed under arrest and brought to Dauphin by automobile.

JOHNNY SPRINTED.

When Burnison raised the gun, Johnny Campbell, who was in the room, waited for no further display of hostility, but bolted out the door, dashed through the potato patch and over the back fence. As far as known at Ashville he holds all records for this kind of a sprint up to the present.

1914 Jul 16 – Cadets at Sewell Camp

For the first time in cadets history of this province a camp has been conducted and found to be a success, the boys coming from all parts of the province. The days were given over to drills and training in the various branches of cadet work. Reveille call for rising at 6:30, breakfast at 7:00, cleaning up lines to 8:30, when Divine service was conducted, making it impressive with the boys taking part in the singing and responsive reading; 9 to 11 inspection in drills, musketry signalling, first aid, physical training. 12:00, noon dinner; 1:00 to 2:15, rest; 2:30 to 4:00, drilling and general training work; from 4:00 to 5:00, rest, shower bath, etc.; 6:00 p.m., tea; 7 to 9 games and sports; lights out at 9.45. The above makes up the daily routine of camp life, and for the men in charge there were not many idle moments.

SPORTS CURTAILED

It was planned to have Saturday given over entirely to games and sports, but owning to the great storm that passed over the camp this programme was greatly curtailed, only eleven events being run off. Dauphin won five firsts and one second in these events. Our boys, however, kicked because they could not make it an even six firsts. This was a very creditable showing, however, hen you consider tat there were over 20 contingents of cadets in camp, most of who entered teams for the sports.

SUNDAY ROUTINE

Sunday was given over to drying clothes and blankets after the washing of Saturday’ storm, we were able, however, to have our church parade on Sunday afternoon, when the boys made a fine showing in the march past Col. S.B. Steele, Camp Commandant.

GIMLI NEXT YEAR

The camp this year has been largely in the nature of an experiment, and both officers and men profited by the experience gained, which will be conductive to better results in next year’s camp, which we are informed, on good authority, will be held at Gimli, making a more interesting camp for the boys.

PRESENTATION OF PRIZES

Presentation of prizes won by the Dauphin Cadets will take place as soon as the prizes active from Winnipeg, when both Messers. Manby and Batty will express their appreciation of the boys in camp.

PRIZES WON

The following were won by the Dauphin cadets:
Seniors – 220 yard race – P. Lowes, 1st. 440 yard race – P. Lowes, 1st.
Juniors – Standing broad jump – C. Bossons, 1st.
Horse and rider – C. Bossons and E. Struthers, 1st.
Relay Race – Struthers, Bossons, Dunstan and C, Dickerson, 2nd.

1914 Jul 16 – Notes From the Firing Line

Our boys were seldom late for the Knife and Fork Parade.
Some boys were sick, but after one visit to the hospital tent and a taste of the medicine, were able to appear again at the dining tent.
It was a surprise to the officers in charge what a lot of food the boys could consume.
Sammy Dunstan only had seven eggs, three cups of coffee and five slices of bread and butter for breakfast on Friday morning.
It took a special dish to hold the porridge for the Tierney Bros.
2nd Lieut. Lowes’ tent was the quietest one in the whole came at 6.30 a.m.
After dinner on Wednesday G. White could hardly see and had o be taken to the hospital.
Who stole the pies from the cook’s tent on Friday, July 10th?
Instructors Manby and Batty were on duty from 6 a.m. to 11.45 p.m.; everybody here sleeps with one eye open.
The Dauphin Mouth Organ Band and Quartette, consisting of Messrs. Lowes, C. Batty, Gougeon, C. Fickerson, Dunstan and Murphy, made night horrible after hours.
Sammy Dunstan, with his long blue shirt, was the star of the baseball diamond.
Our four boys, who attended the ambulance class, passed with such high honours, that they have decided to stand practice here. The charge will be moderate.
With the aid of our expect signallers, Dauphin Cadets won the sham fight on Friday night.
We wonder by whose order the mixture was put into the tea on Friday night.
Instructors Manby and Batty had their beds made every day by the cadets. We don’t think.
Gougeon and Kuryk are open to give lessons in wrestling. Charges very moderate.
Our boys were always the first in the grub tent and the last out.
Mr. Campbell, of Souris (late of Dauphin), took some interesting group photos of our boys.
The mud fight a 8.30 p.m. Saturday night was a sight never to be forgotten.
The thanks of the boys are due to Mr. Moor and Mrs. Smithers, of the Winnipeg Y.M.C.A., for the assistance rendered us in various ways.

1914 Jul 16 – Fork River

Mr. Sinstiski, who has been here the last two weeks, took great interest of the Liberal party. He is said to be a cattle buyer but no stock has been shipped up to date. All the bests are off. Nuff said.
Hurrah for Sam Hughes! This northern county knows a good man when we have him, and what we have we will hold, as Scotty says.
Edwin King, of Kinistimo, Sask., is spending his holidays at his home here.
The members of L.O.L., No. 1765, attended the Methodist Church on Sunday, the 12th. Rev. Bro. Clixby, of Winnipegosis, preached the sermon. There was a fair turn out considering the hot weather.
Miss Chase, of Dauphin, is spending her holidays with her grandmother. Mrs. W.R. Snelgrove, on the Mossey.
Walter Clark, of Paswegan, Sask., has returned home after spending a few days among friends here.
Mr. Runny, of Saskatchewan, liberal representative, has returned home with an enlarge cranium, as an election souvenir in remembrance of Fork River.
The Misses Briggs, of Brandon, are visiting at their aunt’s Mrs. T.N. Briggs.
Dr. Shortreed, at his meeting here, stated that the Roblin government was supported by the rabble. As the people here did not agree with these sentiments they did their best on the 10 h to leave him at home to think over the errors of speech, trusting that in future he will have respect for the opinion of others.
Mrs. R. McEachern and son returned from a week’s visit with friends at Million.
Mr. Sam Lowery returned to Winnipeg after a week’s visit here in connection with his farm.

1914 Jul 16 – Winnipegosis

Progress is being made with the new four rooms brick school. The building promises to be adequate to our needs for the present.
Contractor Neely returned on Monday from Dauphin.
Several new residences are going up in town. Among those building are Donald Hattie, Capt. Mapes and Steven Bros.
Coun. Hechter and J.P. Grenon are taking in the exhibition at Winnipeg this week.
The steamer Manitou will commence making trips to the north end of the lake this week.
Capt. Coffey and Jos. Grenon, Sr., are building a boat with a 65 foot keel. The boat will be operated by steam power.
The elections are over and a feeling of goodwill towards all pervades us. The stress of battle is often trying and during the heat of it we are prone to lose our tempers. But this we are glad to say is only a temporary lapse. Misrepresentation should never be resorted to even in the heat of battle. In the report sent the Press of the meting at Fork River, Mr. Lacey went far out of his way to misrepresent sent Mr. Grenon and others. There was no disturbance at the meeting as Dr. Shortreed will readily admit if appealed to. The truth should be the first consideration in sending out newspaper reports.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 9 – 1914

1914 Jul 9 – Boy Scouts at Sewell

The Dauphin contingent of Boy Scouts, numbering 50, left on Wednesday for Sewell, where they go into camp for a week. The boys are in charge of Lieut. E. Manby and Mr. E. Batty.
The officers of the corps are:
Patrol leaders – Stanley Nicholson, Clarence Bossons, Percy Lowes and Tom Walker.
Corporals – W. Gardiner, Henry Terrell, Ed. Gougeon and Cliff. Baird.
New uniforms, including belts and hats, were supplied to the boys before they left and they looked spic and span.
They left on No. 2 as the train pulled out they lustily joined in singing.
“Where the boys are dog-gone glad to lay in Sewell;
“Sew” – I don’t know how to spell it.
But I am going to my home in Sewell camp.”

1914 Jul 9 – Fork River

The Reeve has proclaimed Monday, July 13, a civic holiday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 2 – 1914

1914 Jul 2 – Damage by Hail Storm

A heavy ran storm accompanied by hail visited the Mountview district on Tuesday afternoon. The strip touched by the hail was a narrow one and only two farms were struck.
W.G. Lock last 45 acres of wheat and 15 of oats. Crop insured.
Jas. Scarff last 40 acres wheat and 20 oats. Not insured.
Mr. Lock had only insured his crop a few days before the storm and only received his policy from Winnipeg on Wednesday.

1914 Jul 2 – Latest From Sewell Camp

Sewell Camp, June 30.
The Sergeant-Trumpeter mounted a new steed on Tuesday and we were treated to a great display of fireworks from the horse’s heels, the sergeant’s tongue and also eventually from the part of his pants which struck the ground after a while. For a minute or so he was hear saying, “Going up! Going up!” When he struck the ground, Sergeant-Major Fletcher was heard to say, “Coming down, I fiddler.” Highfield after four days’ rest has still a stiff neck.
The boys look very smart in their new Indian service helmets, which were presented to us alone (the 32nd) as a distinction for our work last year. The boys are proud of them as they should be.
Someone caused an uproar on Sunday. He said the camp was being attacked by Suffragettes. On closer examination they proved to be Cameron Highlanders.
Our shoeing smith thought he would ride the Sergeant-Trooper’s broncho, but changed his mind at the same time as the broncho.
It takes Dave Cox to ride the bronchos and round-up the runaways.
We will leave here on Friday morning arriving at Dauphin in the evening.
Our regiment was inspected on Saturday by the honourary colonel, Dr. Roche.
We turned out on Saturday morning at 4.30 a.m. for shooting on the range. Major Walker very conveniently was absent having a blister on his heel, so stayed in bed.
The Ashville boys are a first-class bunch of rifle shots.
The Dauphin squadron has been nicknamed “The Devil’s Own,” and they are worthy of it.
Red noses are the fashion. It is the fault of the occasional sunshine, not the grog.
On galloping off the field two regiments collided, resulting in a bad smash, one man getting his collarbone broken and two others disabled.
Our boy troopers, Gordon Walker, Gordon Batty and Roy Wade, are constantly being court-martialled by Squad Sergeant-Major, for unsoldierly conduct; not being on parade at 5.30 a.m., catching gophers before cleaning up their tent, etc.
Our cook put up some fine apple pies, things which are comparatively unknown here. We have an idea that Frank Beyette can have his job every year if he likes.
We have had a number of lady visitors up to now, among whom was Mrs. Walker and little daughters.
We wonder what it is that makes the boys sit down so slowly and gently. Having had some ourselves they have our sympathy.
H.H. Allan, the photographer, came down here this year and he is doing roaring business.

1914 Jul 2 – Fork River

A. Cameron and F.B. Lacey, of Mowat, have returned from a trip to Dauphin.
Vote for Sam Hughes, the farmer, and you won’t make a mistake.
Miss Gertrude Cooper has returned from Dauphin and is with her parents on the Fork.
Mrs. Attwood, of Towell, Indiana, and her mother, are spending the summer months with Mrs. W. Davis on the farm.
Mrs. Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, is a visitor at the home of D.F. Wilson on the Mossey.
Messrs. J. Robinson and H. Hunter have put a three-horse power gasoline engine in their new boat. The water should fly now.
Several of the electors from her attended the Conservative meeting at Winnipegosis on Wednesday night. The speakers were Mr. Shears, and Mr. Grenon. The meeting was well attended. We hope to go again in the near future.
The Orangemen of Fork River have arranged for a grand celebration here on Monday, July 13th, when they will be a good programme of sports. The hall will be free to the public in the evening for a dance. All are cordially invited to come and have a good time. There will be a church parade at 3 o’clock on Sunday afternoon, the 12th.
On Saturday afternoon a Conservative meeting was held in the Orange Hall. W. King, president, presided, Mr. Sam Hughes have an account of his four years stewardship as member for Gilbert Plains, which was very satisfactory and well received. Hon. Hugh Armstrong, Provincial Treasurer, followed and gave a very satisfactory account of the financial standing of the province, which showed that the business was in good hands under the Roblin government.
Mr. Clopeck, of Winnipeg, addressed the Ruthenians for a short time and was well received. The hall was crowded and he gallery was taken possession of by a large number of ladies. Everything passed off quietly. It was a most successful meeting of the kind ever held in Fork River.
Mr. Green, late Liberal member for North Winnipeg, was here a short time Monday and later left for Winnipegosis accompanied by N. Little.
H. Woods, of Dublin Bay, was a visitor here on Saturday night attending the committee which is arranging for the Orange picnic.

1914 Jul 2 – Winnipegosis

Coun. Frank Hechter went to Winnipeg on Monday in connection with the good roads movement. He was joined by some of the delegates from the other municipalities at Dauphin.
Mrs. Kenneth McAulay, and children, and her sister, Miss Smith, left for Kamsack on Monday.
The big political guns, Hugh Armstrong and Sam Hughes left for Dauphin on Sunday.
Capt. Coffey returned on Sunday to Dauphin with his automobile, taking with him several of the politicians.
R. Morrison has finished the foundation for the new school.
Mrs. T. Johnston returned on Monday from a visit to Dauphin.
Mrs. W. Johnson and Mrs. McIntosh, of Fort William, are visiting with Mrs. Johnston.
The big political meeting on Saturday night was held in the new Rex Theatre. This building seats over 300 and a great many were obliged to stand during the speaking.
The weather has been rather on the cool side for boating and the usual umber of crafts are not seen on the lake. With the warm weather of July many will seek cool breezes of the water.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 4 – 1915

1915 Feb 4 – Remains Found

Some time last fall Paulo Jura, a one-armed young Ruthenian, disappeared at Ethelbert. An investigation was held but no trace of the young man could be found. He went out shooting with another young man named Timothy Nakonectiny, and at the time and considerable money on his person. Recently his remains were found in the Duck Mountain, but the flesh had just about all disappeared from the bones. His clothes, however, were identified. No trace of the money could be found.
Detectives are now again investigating the case.
Nakonectiny, Jura’s companion, has disappeared from the district.

1915 Feb 4 – Third Contingent Complete

The 110 men allotted to the Dauphin district to be raised for the Third Contingent has just about been enrolled, the number now reaching 106. Taken altogether the men are a fine lot and compare favourably with the first that enlisted here. The following is a summary of the nationality of the men:

Canadian 37
English 43
Scotch 20
Welsh 1
American 3
South Africa 1
Danish 1

CANADIAN.
J.D. Munson, single. (Jack Devereux Munson, 1895, 424039)
G. Prieur, single. (Gabriel Prieur, 1896, 425219)
A.A. Day, single. (Arthur Archibald Day, 1896, 424013)
J.E. Welch, single. (John Edward Welch, 1891-1916, 74199)
C.W. Shaw, single. (Charles Wallace Shaw, 1875-1916, 424037 or A/24015)
W.C. Mitchell, single. (William Charles Mitchell, 1885, 74202)
I. Zufelt, single. (Isaac Zufelt, 1891, 425518)
H.W. Gardiner, single. (Hugh William Gardiner, 1894-1916, 424020)
J. Gallant, single. (Joseph Gallant, 1892-1916, 424019 or A/24019)
B.A. Whitmore, single. (Burton Alfred Whitmore, 1890, A/24250)
H.L. Pearson, single. (Harry Lindley Pearson, 1896, 425194)
J. Payne, single. (John Payne, 1892, 424066)
F.W. Clark, single. (Francis William Clark, 1890, 424671)
C.J. Ivens, single. (Charles John, xxx-1917, 424952)
G. Wildfong, single. (Gordon Wildfong, 1892, 424079)
S. Day, single.
J. Hicks, single. (John Hicks, 1895, 154745)
A.E. Arnold, single. (Albert Edward Arnold, 1895-1916, 424002 or A/24002)
P.E. Chard, single. (Percy Edwin Chard, 1896, 424657)
J.A. Justice, single. (James Amos Justice, 1896, 424028)
H.W. Minish, single. (Herbert Whitfield Minish, 1893, 424061)
G. Stewart, single. (Garfield Stewart, 1895-1916, 425364)
H. Bidak, single.
C.C. Stacey, single. (Clarence Crozier Stacey, 1896-1916, 425349)
J.E. Wells, single. (Joseph Edward Wells, 1889, 424076)
J.E. May, married.
J.J. Troyer, single. (Joseph James Troyer, 1887, 425428)
J.A. McLean, single.
J.S. Willis, single.
Jas. E. Cain, single. (James Edward Cain, 1894, 154744)
John Ball, single. (John Ball, 1895, 424539)
Edward Gordon, single. (Edward Gordon, 1893, 425870)
J.M. Crossland, single. (John Marshall Crossland, 1887, 154737)
Victor Lavalle, single.
John R. Levins, married. (John Richard Levins, 1880, 424033)
L.A. Campbell, single. (Lorne Alexander Campbell, 1879-1916, 460743 or A/60743)
Henry C. Batty, single. (Henry Charles Batty, xxx-1916, 424320)

ENGLISH.
A. Grove, single.
W.F. Percy, single. (William Freeman Percy, 1886, 425202)
P.E. Millard, single. (Percy Edward Millard, 18781916, 74190)
A.H.G. Whittaker, married. (Albert Henry Guilym Whittaker, 1891-1916, 424077 or 424245)
A.G. Sanderson, married.
Wm. Coleman, single. (William Coleman, 1876, 424688)
R. Smith, single. (Richard Smith, 1889, 74196)
F. Clark, married. (Frank Clark, 1883, 424009)
J.S. Blundell, single. (James Stuart Blundell, 1893-1916, 74201)
A.J. Middleditch, married. (Albert John Middleditch, 1892, 425078)
J.W. Thompson, single. (John Walter Thompson, 1891, 424072)
Ivo Osman, single. (Ivo Isman, 1892, 74204)
T.L. Radway, single.
H. Marchant, single. (Harry Marchant, 1891, 424194)
G.J. Dickason, single. (George James Dickason, 1887, 424035)
P. Cowley, married. (Paul Cowley, 1886, 74186)
G. Burkett, married. (George Burkett, 1870, 154735)
J.A. Hurst, married. (J Arnold Hurst, xxx, 424339)
T.W. Swannell, single. (Frank Walton Swannell, 1893-1918, 425389)
C. Recknell, single. (Cuthbert Bradshaw Recknell, 1890, 425232)
F. Pexton, single. (Fred Pexton, 1887, 424067)
A. Wood, single. (Arthur Wood, 1897, 424375)
A.E. Weeks, single. (Arthur Edward Weeks, 1880-1917, 425472)
C.P. Webb, single. (Charles Peter Webb, 1895, 424374)
W. Weeds, single. (Walter Weeds, 1894, 424371)
A. Baldwin, single. (Andrew Baldwin, 1889, 74184)
W.E. Ridley, single. (William Ernest Ridley, 1891, 74205)
R.E. Richards, single. (Robert Edmond Richards, xxx, 74207)
R.W. Watson, single. (Robert William Watson, 1891-1917, 424075 or 24229)
F. Pickup, single. (Frederick Pickup, 1893, 424068 or A/24068)
T. Pedley, married. (Thomas Pedley, 1878-1918, 425197)
A. Spence, married.
J. Gomme, single. (John Gomme, 1890, 424021)
C. Heather, single. (Charles Robert Heather, 1887, 424896)
B. Cheesmore, single. (Benjamin Cheesmore, 1887-1916, 424327)
W.J. Hill, single. (William James Hill, 1880, 74189)
P. Boam, single. (Percy Boam, 1883-1916, 74185)
T. Brown, single.
Herbert Townson, single. (Herbert Townson, 1896, 425426)
R.C. Crowe, single. (Roland Charles Crowe, 1897, 424012 or A/24066)
H.F.B. Percival, single.
Wm. J. Hickman, married. (William James, 1881, 424910)
F.L. Pearce, single.
Benj Dilworth, married. (Benjamin Dilworth, 1884-1916, 74187)

SCOTCH.
T.M. Ray, single. (T.M. Ray, xxx, 74206)
W.J. Wallace, single. (William John Wallace, 1895, 74200)
W. McDonald, single. (John Elliott McDonald, 1882, 424064)
Wm. Donaldson, married. (William Donaldson, 1885, 74188)
J. Nicol, married. (James Nicol, 1884, 74194)
J. Armstrong, married.
T. Latta, single. (Thomas Latta, xxx, 424031 or A/24136)
J.A. Craig, married.
A. Wilson, single. (Allan Wilson, 1895, 74198)
I. MacGlashan, single. (Isaac MacGlashan, 1885, 74193)
Wm. Miller, single. (William Miller, 1883-1916, 74191)
J. Alexander, single. (John Alexander, 1890, 425896)
R. Morrice, single. (Robert Morrice, 1892, 424343)
J.A. Whyte, single. (Joseph Alexander Whyte, 1893, 424078)
Wm. Lyon, single. (William Lyon, 1883, 424034)
R.L. Adams, single. (Robert Lawson Adams, 1896, 424001)
Wm. Munro, single. (William Munro, xxx, 74192)
Thos. Martin, single. (Thomas Martin, 1892, 424046)
N. McLeod, single.
T. Woodhouse, single. (Thomas Woodhouse, xxx, 425906)

WELSH.
E. Burnett, single. (Edwin Burnett, 1896, 424323)

U.S.A.
E. Engebretson, single. (Elmer Rudolph Engebretson, 1890-1918, 424015)
Wm. Madden, single. (William Madden, 1878, 424341)
C.B. Shales, single. (Chester Berdell Shales, 1896, 622436)

TRANSVAAL S. A.
H.E. Lys, married. (Hugh Ernest Lys, 1875-1876, Capt.)

DENMARK.
A. Peterson, single.

1915 Feb 4 – Fork River

Mr. Nat Little and daughter, Miss Grace, have returned from a two weeks’ trip to Rochester, Minn.
Mr. W. Walmsley was in town last week.
Archdeacon Green spent a few days in Dauphin on church business last week.
W. King county Orange master, is away on his annual tour among the various lodges and expects to return to Dauphin in time for the annual county meeting to arrange business for the coming term.
Wm. Northam, one of the standby subscribers of the Herald at Fork River, sends in the following verse when remitting his subscription. We take it that Mr. Northam intends the lines as a warning to delinquents:
He who doth the printer pay
Will go to Heaven sure some day;
But he who meanly cheats the printer
Will go where there is never winter.

1915 Feb 4 – Winnipegosis

Five men are working on the dredge fitting her out for the summer.
A large number of the fishermen are back in town again, and things are moving a little faster than usual.
J.W. McAulay was a visitor to Dauphin on Wednesday to attend the trainmen’s ball.
Dancing is one of the chief pastimes in this town. Lately, hardly a week goes by without one or two dances being held. A surprise dance was given at the home of Hos. Grenon on Friday last and another dance on Tuesday night in the Rex Hall.
Will Morton, station agent, whose life was despaired of, is getting better.
Mr. and Mrs. Ravelli, left on Wednesday for Portage la Prairie, where they will enter the employ of Hugh Armstrong.
Mrs. Theo. Johnson was a visitor to Dauphin on Wednesday.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Litwyn on the 28th ult., a son.
Mrs. (Dr.) Medd returned on Monday from a visit to Winnipeg.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 30 – 1913

1913 Jan 30 – Constable Rooke Shot
CONDITION CRITICAL

Thursday Jan. 30th, 11:30 a.m. – Constable Rooke’s condition critical, but he is holding his own well considering the wound is of such a dangerous character.

Constable Chas. Rooke was seriously shot Sunday by John Baran. A Galician, whom he was attempting to arrest, and is now in the general hospital. Mr. Rooke left early Sunday morning, taking a livery team and driver to arrest John Baran, who lives some twenty miles southwest of town, in the municipality of Gilbert Plains.
Baran has been giving considerable trouble of late and had deserted his wife, who has been a public charge for several years and was living with another woman at his farm in the Riding Mountain.
In driving out Sunday morning Rooke left his team at a neighbour’s a mile from Baran’s, and proceeded on foot accompanied by J. Tomaski, his driver, expecting that he would be able to approach and capture his man without giving him the alarm and perhaps escaping in the woods. After carefully approaching the house he rapped on the door but was told by the woman, who came to a window, that Baran was not at home. Rooke then proceeded to affect a forcible entrance, when three shots were fired in rapid succession through the door, the weapon used being a rifle.
The first shot struck the officer in the left breast over the heart.
His driver attempted to assist him to walk back to where the team was left, but after proceeding a short distance was compelled to leave him and hasten on for his team. Returning, with the assistance of the neighbour, he conveyed the wounded man to this neighbour’s house, but had to leave him there as he could not stand the jolting of the cutter. The driver drove down the mountain about nine miles to the home of H. McCorvie, who has a telephone, and summoned medical aid from town.
Upon receiving advice Dr. W.J. Harrington at once drove out, using all possible haste and getting a fresh team at McCorvie’s. A sleigh was fitted out in which to ring the injured man to the hospital and followed the doctor out.

WAS NOTORIOUS CHARACTER

Baran is a notorious character. He had been sent to jail two years ago for assaulting his wife. Baran deserted her and was living with another woman and his wife has to be supported as a charge on the town. It was only two years ago that Constable Rooke drove thirty-three miles in the coldest day of January, through a storm, in order to rescue Baran’s two little children, who were reported to be destitute and starving to death. These children were committed to the Winnipeg Children’s Aid Society by Magistrate Munson. Baran was summoned to appear before the magistrate for the non-support of his wife and children, and having disobeyed the summon, the magistrate issued a warrant and it was this warrant that Constable Rooke was endeavoring to arrest Baran on when he was shot.

THE INQUEST

The inquest on the death of the Baran baby, who was shot Monday by the police posse which went to the Galician settlement, was held, on Tuesday in the town hall. Evidence was taken from Dr. Ross, Chief of Police Bridle, F. May, W. Evans, W. Knight, E. Turland and Fred Little, members of the posse who did the shooting. The evidence produced showed that the child was killed almost instantly, the bullet passing through the body, causing a shock and hemorrhage.
The following jurymen were empanelled: Geo. King, foreman; Thos. Shaw, N. Taylor, E. Batty, H.F. Caldwell, D. Sutherland, T. Jordan, J.F. Neeley, R.G. Ferguson, F. Copeland, F.J. McDonald, H.R. Morrison.
After viewing the remains of the child and hearing the evidence, they returned the following verdict: –

VERDICT OF JURY

“We, the jury empanelled to take evidence as to the death of the baby Baran, on Jan. 27th, find that the baby came to his death by being shot with a rifle in the hands of one of the posse under Chief Bridle, organized for the purpose of arresting John Baran, suspected of having shot Constable Rooke, and the death of the baby, while regrettable, was purely accidental under the circumstances and we attach no blame to any member of the posse.”

1913 Jan 30 – Woman Placed Under Arrest

Annie Chisyk, who is a patient in the hospital suffering from a bullet wound, was formally placed under arrest on Wednesday, charged with shooting Constable Rooke. Her trial was set for Feb. 4th.

1913 Jan 30 – Fork River

Mr. W. Murray, Municipal Auditor, has been here auditing the books of Mossey River Municipality and it has been a busy week for Clerk Wilson.
Wm. Northam, who has been spending a few months at Weyburn, Sask., returned home last week.
Fred Storrar and William Johnston returned from the north end of the lake and report the fishing not to good lately as some of the men are off work.
Dunk Kennedy and John Richardson attended the Masonic banquet at Dauphin and report a good time.
Fred Cooper has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Wm. King returned from a two weeks’ trip west on business.
The cordwood has been coming in lively of late and the place looks like a wood camp; wood bring piled on all the streets.
At the inter-diocesan examinations of the Church of England Sunday School, Mrs. H.H. Scrase teacher of All Saints’ S.S. was sixth place in first class work, securing a diploma and book. Mrs. C. Bradley, of Winnipegosis, passed with first class diplomas as teacher of Winnipegosis Anglican S.S. We congratulate these ladies.
Wm. Parker was at the Armstrong store on business Thursday and Friday.
Mr. Cockerill of the Peabody Company, was a visitor at Dunk Kennedy’s on Saturday.
Howard Armstrong’s nephew has arrived on a visit from Ontario.
J.W. Johnston has moved up with his family to the hatchery on Lake Winnipegosis and Miss Eva Storrar accompanied them for a visit.
Sandy Munro was a weekend visitor at home on Saturday and Sunday.
Billie Coultas is sporting around with a new cutter these days and seems right in line with the Educational Department in the speeding line and guarantees to take the curves safely.
We must ask our readers to excuse the want of news last week as our correspondent was off for a week’s trip and our motto is while we are alive we will crow.
Service will be held in All Saints’ Anglican Church Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock, February.