Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 20 – 1910

1910 Oct 20 – Chapter of Accidents

Wm. Cruise has Ribs Broken
Wm. Ashmore Leg Broken
Gun Accident
Wm. Ashmore of Sifton, met with a serious accident Saturday. While felling a beef, the animal made an unexpected plunge and fell on one of Mr. Ashmore’s legs, breaking two bones below the knee. He was brought to the hospital, where he is doing as well as can be expected.

1910 Oct 20 – Had Ribs Broken

Robt. Cruise, who recently invested in a power gang plough and why is busy ploughing his farm south of the town, has among the crew operating the plough his son William, aged 17 years. On Saturday night, William attempted to jump from the engine to the plough and was thrown under the wheel and the weight of the plough passing over him, breaking four ribs and slightly injuring him internally. We are glad to report that the young man is now on a fair way recovery.

1910 Oct 20 – Arm Amputated

John Kolodichook of Pine River, was accidentally shot Sunday morning in the left forearm, which resulted in amputation of same just below the elbow. Mr. K was out shooting and had climbed a tree to see if there were any ducks on a nearby pond. Before climbing he laid his gun against the trunk of the tree. When part of the way up the tree he slipped and fell, discharging the gun with the above result. The unfortunate man had no attention for three hours after the accident, and bled from eleven o’clock in the morning until the arrival of Dr. Lineham that evening at seven. He was brought to Dauphin on a special Sunday evening, and taken to the hospital.

1910 Oct 20 – Fork River

Mrs. Lipsky and Mr. Shaffer, from St. Louis, are staying at Mrs. Clawson’s in this village.
Mr. Dallas having disposed of his farm intends to have a sale on November 2nd. Mrs. C. Bailey gave birth to a son last week.
A large congregation attended the English Church last Sunday night for Harvest Festival, when a very appropriate sermon was preached by the Rev. H.H. Scrase. The church was very prettily decorated by Mrs. Rowe, Mrs. Scrase, Miss Collins, Miss Gracie Little and Mr. King, Churchwarden.
Mr. Hugh Armstrong, M.P.P for Portage la Prairie and Provincial Secretary, paid us a visit last week and was accompanied by Mr. J. Grenon and Mr. D.F. Wilson looking over land in this district.
Mrs. C. Bailey gave birth to a son last week.
Mrs. Crouch and children who have been visiting Mrs. Kennedy, left for Winnipeg last week.
Mrs. Morris, who has been staying here for some time left for Winnipegosis last week.
Mrs. Johnson, from Winnipegosis, is staying with her daughter, Mrs. D. Kennedy.

1910 Oct 20 – Sifton

Rev. Dr. Carmichael of Winnipeg and Dr. McLaren, of Toronto, stopped off at Sifton on Saturday on their way east.
Mark Cardiff, Dauphin, paid us a business visit last week.
Hugh Armstrong, M.P.P., passed through here a week ago on his way home from Winnipegosis.
J.G. Harvey, M.P.P., Robt. Hunt, and A.J. Rawson, Dauphin, were among the visitors to Sifton on Sunday.
Messrs. Kennedy & Barrie started up their flour mill on Monday for another season’s operations.
Wm. Ashmore met with a rather serious accident on Saturday last while felling a beef. The animal made an unexpected plunge forward, falling on Mr. Ashmore’s legs, breaking both bones below the knee in one leg. He was taken to the Dauphin General Hospital for treatment.
Everybody took advantage of the prevailing fine weather and drove in to the Ruthenian Church Services held by His Reverence Archbishop Sczeptycki, of the Greek Orthodox Church, on behalf of the adherents of that rite. The gathering was the largest in Sifton for years.
Mrs. Wm. Ashmore and John Kennedy were visitors to Dauphin on Sunday.
H.H. Scrase, Fork River, held services at the mission on Sunday, also Rev. Father Perhach at he Greek Orthodox Church.
Rev. Archbishop Scztepski and staff, left Monday evening for Prince Albert.

1910 Oct 20 – To the Herald:

SIR – In your issue of Oct. 6th, I noticed something about a missing post-office at Fishing River and a P.M. Re the missing P.O. That said P.O. was called Sobeiski and a man named Demko Kasczuk was duly appointed but owing to his moving to Sifton he would not accept that appointment therefore the post office was never opened so I fail to see where it was missing. Re the elevator. We heard a great deal about it in June but since then it has been hors de combat. Re the mail bag. I was always under the impression that the P.M. at the distributing office had the locking up of all mail bags leaving his office so as to prevent such things as tacks etc., getting mixed up with the mail and if that is so the mail carrier would be ignorant of what the mail bag contained.

A Subscriber

1910 Oct 20 – To the Herald:

SIR – In reply to, and for the information of, “A Fork River Correspondent” whose concoction of misrepresentations appeared in your issue of Oct. 6th, I beg to be allowed to state the following facts regarding the establishing of a post office at Fishing River. That on Sept. 25th, 1905, the post office that the farmers of Fishing River petitioned for on N.W. ¼ 33-28-19 west P. mer. was established under the name of “Sobieski,” and that Demko Kasczuk who was mentioned in the petition as a fit and proper person, was appointed as Postmaster. That the necessary papers, etc., for opening the office were taken to Kasczuk’s place of business at Fishing River, and it was found that Kasczuk had departed for Sifton and had barred the doors and windows, and that he did not intend to return to Fishing River to do business because the R.R. Company would not stop their trains at that point. That as there was no other person asking to take the office over, the matter was allowed to drop for a time; so it will appear that it was the postmaster that was lost, and not the post office as stated. I would also state that a postmaster has been found since in the person of one of Mr. Glen Campbell’s workers at last Dominion election, and that the Fishing River P.O. is in operation. Also on the same date (Sept. 25th, 1905) “Lacey” P.O. was established (since named Oak Brae) 5½ miles east of “Sobieski” and Fred Lacey was appointed Postmaster and still survive, much to the annoyance, it seems, of the Fork Riverite whose letter appeared on Oct. 6th. As to tacks and sugar being put into Oak Brae mail at Fork River, I may say that I am not responsible for what is put into the mail bag at Fork River. I would advise him to complain to Fork River postmaster or to the postmaster general at Ottawa, and state what damage has been done and I am confident he will get satisfaction, also if this correspondent will find out and inform me as to time of making up mail for Winnipegosis at Fork River I will try and get in on time and thus please him has he is the only one who seems to worry about the matter, we have yet to receive the first complaint on this score from any one who has mailed a letter from this office to Winnipegosis. If “A Fork River Correspondent” will call at Oak Brae I will produce documentary evidence to support the statement re establishment of post office which I am certain will convince this reckless individual.

Not many years ago we had in the British House of Commons a set of politicians known as “Little Englanders.” They were opposed to the progress and expansion of the empire and it seems to me that one or two of that party must have got their quietus in the old land and turned up at Fork River, for whenever anything is said or done having for its object the improvement and development of this part of Manitoba, this “Little Fork Riverite” and his kindred spirits oppose it, and set to work to frustrate any movement for the betterment of this country. We remember when a siding was asked for by the farmers of Fishing River district the “Little Fork Riverite clique saw ruination for Fork River in it, and suggested that something ought to be done to prevent that siding being constructed. The farmers of Fishing River and Fork River were encouraged to sign a petition just previous to the election last June, asking the Government to erect an elevator and were told again and again that an elevator would be erected this fall at Fork River is the Roblin Government was returned to power, have we got one? Not on your life and I charge that the action of the “Fork Riverite” clique has discouraged any of the Elevator companies from erecting an elevator at Fork River. I do not bow the knee to the Roblin Government but I signed the petitions for the erection of a Government Elevator and advised others to do the same and intended if it was built, to patronize it because it would be built with the people’s money and it is good policy the patronize any institution that our money is invested in and endeavour to get the best we can out of the investment, there are thousands of bushels of grain in our district this season and we have no local market, I repeat that the Government Elevator is lost to Fork River district and the famers have been fooled once again and I ask the disappointed farmers to become “knockers” along with me and we will get the elevator along with a lot of other good things such as post offices etc., etc.

Fred Lacey,
Post Master, Oak Brae.

1910 Oct 20 – Winnipegosis

On Monday last the “Manitou” left the landing stage at Winnipegosis, heavily laden with fishermen and their equipment. Part of this equipment, and one would think a very important part, consisted of the wives and children of some of the fishermen. Although so many have left the town, the toll of departure is not yet complete but it is expected that this week all the people occupied during the winter in fishing, will have left the town. We wish them luck.
On Sunday next the Rev. James Malley will conduct the service in the Fork River Methodist Church at 11 o’clock in the morning instead of 3 p.m.
On Sunday next the Methodist pulpit at Winnipegosis will be occupied by the Rev. Jas. Malley. The subject will be “Buried alive by Devils.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 14 – 1915

1915 Oct 14 – Arrested

Two young Ruthenians were arrested in the Ethelbert district this week charged with setting fire to two stacks of wheat on Michael Buyar’s farm. The case against them appears to be a strong one. Detective John Parn worked up the case and made the arrests.

1915 Oct 14 – Ethelbert

Harry Cope Nash, of Cowan, was a visitor in town Monday.
We have failed to announce for the last week or two that Mr. Wm. Barrie was appointed as justice of peace for and in the province and Mr. Geo. C. Smith as a provincial constable.
Threshing is just beginning ere and if we only get a few nice days there would be quite a portion of it done.
The average is very good, but the wheat grades somewhat low.
Brachman’s have enloaded this week a carload of flour. It looks as if they alone are going to stock flour this fall.
We had a temperance meeting here this last Sunday. There was a big crowd gathered in the town hall and Mr. Farley, from Winnipeg put up a strong speech and made an impression on the Ruthenians, which were in the majority at the meeting and it looks as if they might join the temperance forces.
Mr. White, from Grandview, is doing a big cattle business in this locality. He has shipped four cars in two weeks.
Mr. Kenneth McLean has built an addition to his house on the farm and has fixed up the house first class. Kenneth, I’ll be you expect company!
Mrs. A. Clarke, of Munson, Alta., returned home on Monday.
Ethelbert will be the chief centre of the wood business again this winter.

1915 Oct 14 – Fork River

Private A.J. Storrar, of the 45th Batt., has returned to Sewell camp after spending a few days with friends. [1 line missing].
Miss Robinson, of Dauphin, is a visitor at the home of Mrs. Dewsbury.
Mr. Sam McLean, of Dauphin, was here on a business trip lately. He had his little gun with him. Some say he was up for chickens, others think it was for larger game.
Mr. Hosey, horse dentist, spent a few days here fixing up the company farm horses.
T.N. Briggs’ outfit is threshing the company’s crop. The yield is such a surprise to Archie that it keeps him busy; in fact, he has not time to sleep as they thresh night and day.
Fred. Coop and Billy Williams are hard at the threshing also and the elevator is busy these days.
John Watson, bailiff of Dauphin, was a visitor here for a short time last week getting the lay of the land.
Capt. Alex. Russell is home from Kelwood and is spending the Thanksgiving holidays with his family.
Mr. and Mrs. Somerfield, from Ontario, are visiting at the homes of their nephews, F.F. and Vivian Hafenbrak, on the Fork River.
Prairie chickens are not near so numerous as in past years in this vicinity.

1915 Oct 14 – Sifton

Football match – 1st Sifton Patrol Boy Scouts vs. Revd. Father Sabourin’s school. Thanksgiving day was celebrated here by a football match between the above trams. The scouts made the challenge, which was kindly accepted and by the permission of Father Sabourin, the scholars marched to the Wycliffe School grounds in charge of the teacher. The Scouts played with dash and vim and although much less in stature and outweighed, steadily kept the ball in the enemy’s quarters and finally succeed in placing the leather. A large number of spectators enjoyed the dun. Score: Scouts, 1 goal; Father Sabourin’s school, nil. Scout team: Leslie Kennedy, (captain), John Gillis, Max Marantz, G. Marantz, Joe Reid, John Terchennik, Roy Kennedy, Louie Kennedy, Roddy Gillis, Mike Setchiabin, Stanley Gillis.

1915 Oct 14 – Winnipegosis

Last week was a busy week in town, every night being filled by a concert, dance or moving picture show and we all feel the better for it.
There was a most enjoyable dance in honour of our soldier boys on he occasion of their leaving for their regiment. Everybody was there and seemed to have a great time.
On Wednesday evening Mr. and Mrs. Sid. Coffey gave a dance in the Rex Hall, which was well attended and a most enjoyable evening was spent.
The concert in aid of the Red Cross Fund was held in the Rex Hall on Friday, the 8th, inst., and the hall was crowded; the program was a good and varied one and was much appreciated. The proceeds amounted to $57.10.
The ten-cent tea at the home of Mrs. White last Wednesday netted the handsome sum of $11.75.
Don’t forget the masquerade ball in the Rex Hall on Friday, the 22nd Oct. or you will sure miss a good time. Tickets on sale from Dunc Kennedy.
Three cars of settlers’ effects arrived on Saturday from the east. This northern country is rapidly filling up. We are glad to welcome all comers.
Miss Dolly Geekie and Miss Eva Fredrickson left on Saturday’s train for Winnipeg to spend a few days with friends.
[1 line missing] few days with Miss McMartin, left on Monday’s train for Neepawa.
Mr. Wiseman, of Roblin, has opened up a jewellery store and repair shop in the Rex Hall block.
Mr. Goodman, of Winnipeg, has opened up a second hand clothing emporium in the old Hunking house across the track.
The council met as a court of revision on Wednesday the 6th inst., and adjourned to meet again on the 14th October at 9.30 a.m.
Mayor J.P. Grenon returned Friday from a business trip to Winnipeg.
Frank Hechter left on Saturday for Dauphin on business.
The Field Day at the schoolhouse on Wednesday last, the 6th Oct., was a great success but the cold weather prevented quite a number from attending. Much credit is due Principal Davis and Miss McMartin and Miss Whitemore for the good time the children had. The singing of “O Canada” deserves special mention.
All the fishermen are busy these days getting their outfits ready for leaving for the north this week.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 29 – 1910

1910 Sep 29 – Buried in Well

Kamsack, Sask., Sept. 25 – A funeral service, attended by circumstances that are unique in the history of Canada, took place Saturday on the farm of John Bowes, sixteen miles south of here. At the top of a 73 foot shaft that had been sunk for a well and at the bottom of which lay the remains of Elwer Olson, aged 35, of Yorkton. Rev. J. Morrison conducted a service for the dead. The shaft has been closed up and the body will remain for ever in the deep and improvised grave. Hansen was overcome by gas in the well and attempts to recover the body were fruitless.

1910 Sep 29 – Died from Burns

Miss Mabel Gunn of Makinak, aged 28 years, died Tuesday from burns received last week through an accident in handling coal oil. The young lady was trying to squelch a blaze on the floor with a rug, when her clothing caught on fire, and before it was put out she received terrible burns.
The unfortunate lady lingered nearly a week and everything possible was done to relive her suffering.
The funeral to the Makinak cemetery took place Wednesday.
Miss Gunn was favourably known throughout the Dauphin district, being one of Makinak’s earliest residents and having, with her sister, run a boarding house there for years. Her demise is keenly felt by the citizens of that community.

1910 Sep 29 – Fork River

Mrs. Comber left here for her home in Selkirk last week.
Mr. Frame from Treherne has been visiting friends here.
On Sunday Sept. 18th, Mrs. E. Morris gave birth to a little girl.
Quite a large congregation attended the Harvest Festival Service at Winnipegosis last Sunday night when a special sermon was preached by the Rev. H.H. Scrase.
Car loads of wheat are being shipped from this point.
Tom Toye’s youngest child died last week and was buried at Winnipegosis. The burial service was taken by the Rev. H.H. Scrase.
Cattle buyers are busy in this district. Quite a number of cattle have been sold lately and shipped to Winnipeg.
Fleming Wilson from Dauphin paid us a visit last week.
Harvest Festival Service will be held at the English Church on Sunday evening, October 9th, at 7.30.

1910 Sep 29 – Sifton

Mr. F.E. Nex of Whitemouth, is visiting his father-in-law, Mr. Ludwig Zarowoney. Fred bicycled from Winnipeg to McCreary, where he boarded the train.
Rev. Sabourin was in Winnipeg last week on business.
School Inspector Walker of Dauphin, inspected the village school on Tuesday last.
Miss A. Griffith of Fishguard, Eng., is visiting her brother-in-law, Mr. W Carr.
Mr. and Mrs. W. Barrie have just returned home, after a couple months visit to his parents in “ye auld Scottish hielands” near Aberdeen. Bill reports a vey pleasant trip.
Theo. Stefanik of Winnipeg, addressed a large open air gathering here on Wednesday of last week in the interest of the community. Mr. Rawson of Dauphin was noticed in the gathering.
Charl Holinski is about completing the building of his new home. A fireside gathering is expected to initiate the new house when finished, so no doubt Mr. Jordan of Dauphin will be likely called upon to send up the necessary for the occasion, which is usually quite in evidence at such times.
Mr. and Mrs. T.A. Kitt and son of Valley River, visited Sifton on Sunday.
Miss Bessie Wilson of Fork River, is visiting her sister, Mrs. Paul Wood.
Mr. W. Carr went to Winnipegosis on Saturday on business.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 13 – 1911

1911 Jul 13 – Four Fingers Taken Off

At the farm of D.E. Collison, Ochre River, on Monday, a young Galician lad had four fingers of his right hand taken off by a crushing machine. He was brought to town for medical treatment.

1911 Jul 13 – Fork River

Mrs. George Shannon was a visitor to Dauphin this week on business.
The annual meeting of the ratepayers of Mossey River School, 999, was held Tuesday the 4th, to elect a trustee, Mr. D.F. Wilson, retiring, Mr. A. Hunt was elected to fill the vacancy. The motion for moving the school house to Fork River was lost by the chairman giving the resting vote in favour of the present site; t is a pity as most of the scholars have 1 1/2 miles to walk to school.
Several famers here and Winnipegosis took a trip to Dauphin to hear R.L. Borden the great Conservative Leader speak. The Borden express passed through here on Friday morning with the ambulance car on behind in charge of Dr. Medd and a live Whale.
A large number of people from here took in the English Church Excursion from Gilbert Plains to Winnipegosis, among them the members of the Board of Trade who chartered a Winnipegosis liner for a sail and report the time of their lives.
In looking over the items published of the minutes of Mossey River Council it states they have taken over the Fork River Cemetery; and engaged Dr. Medd as health officer. As these two items are coupled together your correspondent would suggest our health officer get our cemetery committee together and confine them to their last resting place as the pigs and cattle are running over everything and half the summer gone and no fence to fit to keep stock out.
A heavy rain and hail storm passed through here on Friday evening, doing considerable damage.
Miss Finch and miss Hill ex-school teachers of the Mossey River School are spending their holidays at the home of Mr. and Mrs. C.E. Bailey.
Miss Pearl Wilson returned from a visit to Mr. Humphreys of Dauphin.
Mr. A. Hodgson stayed over to help the boys out with the Orange Picnic on the 11th.
Miss Alice and Ethel Finch of Carman are visiting friends at Fork River.

1911 Jul 13 – Sifton

Mrs. Wm. Riler and family left on Tuesday week for Netherhill, Sask., where they are intending to reside.
Miss Scott, who was a visitor at the mission for a few days, returned to Neepawa on Thursday. Miss Scott intents leaving for eastern Ontario shortly where she will spend the balance of the summer visiting with friends.
An electric storm passed over the village on Friday. Mr. Felix Marantz lost three valuable horses having been struck by lightening and the fourth one received a severe shock.
The wild strawberry season has about closed for this year. The strawberries seem to have been in much demand, much more than could be procured to supply.
Mr. Wm. Barrie is leaving on a business trip to Victoria B.C. and other coast points.
Mr. D.R. Barlow, contract of building the R.C. Mission Church here.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 25 – 1912

1912 Apr 25 – Postmaster Resigned

Mr. Collison, postmaster at Winnipegosis, has tendered his resignation and will cease his labors on May 1st. It is understood that Walter Ketcheson will receive this appointment.
Mr. Collison has also resigned as Fishery Inspector In connection with this appointment the name of A. Parker is prominently mentioned.

1912 Apr 25 – Fork River

Mrs. W. Williams is spending a few days in Dauphin visiting friends.
Will the Winnipegosis fellow who borrowed the crank off the jigger kindly settle up as it so used to a crank that it will not very will run without a crank.
Lance Tilt who has been laid up with inflammatory rheumatism, returned home from Montana, after an absence of four years. We trust the change will be beneficial.
Miss Eva Storrar is visiting in Dauphin this week.
Mrs. G. Shannon has been very sick. Her numerous friends will be pleased to learn she is recovering.
F.B. Lacey, postmaster general of Oak Brae, returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Mrs. G. Tilt, who has been spending a few days on the farm, returned to Dauphin on Saturday. We are always pleased with a visit from Nurse Tilt.
Just as we were thinking of taking another week off, our Mowat friend in the Press puts in his oar, and we know he will take offence at the scribe if he was overlooked. It is very good of him to admit the scribe only gets made sometimes. we have nothing but pity for our friend as we are aware his complaint is chronic and he cannot help it. He goes on to state the scribe can’t get the job of removing the nuisance at Oak Brae. We are not anxious to remove him. We were just making a deal for the purchase of a certain kind of spreader when our attention was called to his ravings. If the deal goes through we may come up some time and attend to the nuisance as it is said: The man that maketh two blades of grass grow where only one grew before, He is a greater benefactor to the world at large. So cheer up my Mowat friend you will then be of more use to the future generation than you have been in the past. And you say in the meantime the (nuisance) will be put on ice to await our arrival. Foolish man, try saltpetre. I am afraid you are too far gone for either saltpetre or ice to ??? you now that the hot weather is coming on. Take the scribe’s advice and plant your onion patch, or we might get made and then there will be wig on the green for sure. As we sympathize with the Press, after congratulating themselves on getting rid of one Jackass to put up with another “Oak Braying” around them.
We are sorry to hear of Mrs. Condon’s death at Mowat. She had been sick for sometime and the family have the sympathy of the people of this district.
Sydney Howlett who has been living here the last four years, moved out east to his homestead and in taking the last load his team of horses broke through the ice and were drowned. Hard luck. Duncan Kennedy has started a subscription list to help towards paying for another team.

1912 Apr 25 – Sifton

Seeding has commenced and will be rushed if the weather keeps fine.
Paul Wood, one of our old-timers, has sold his property in town and three-quarter sections to two monks of the Greek Orthodox Church. The price, it is understood, was about $10 000.
Wm. Barrie was a visitor to Dauphin on Monday.
The foreigners are fast buying up all the property and business enterprises of the English speaking people. another deal is likely to take place shortly.
A little work, or if you like, a little more work on the roads in this vicinity would be to our great benefit.
Thos. Ramsey lost a nice team of ponies this week by the animals straying away. We hope he finds them.
The Herald is gaining in popularity in this district. It is a bright paper.

1912 Apr 25 – Winnipegosis

Dr. Medd went to Dauphin on Tuesday.
Fred E. McDonald is taking in Dauphin this week.
Jackfish and pickerel are numerous in the small streams.
It is reported that Mart Collison has resigned both his government jobs and is leaving this burg for Edmonton. He is one of the old-timers and is widely known.
Who will be the new postmaster? Will Walter Ketch the job?
Another meeting of the citizens was held on Monday to further discuss the organization of a Board of Trade and place before the people the advantages of our progressive little town. Satisfactory progress is being made with the work. Winnipegosis will go forward once our town is better known.
Building promises to be lively in our little burg this season. Among the large buildings contemplated is a $12 000 store for the Armstrong Trading Co., to be located on property alongside the Winnipegosis hotel.
Mrs. Johnson took young Johnny Dilworth to Dauphin Hospital on Saturday night. The little fellow was successfully operated on for appendicitis and is recovering.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 4 – 1912

1912 Apr 4 – Fork River

Duncan Kennedy has been appointed a commissioner for taking affidavits for use in the courts of the province.
Mr. Jangerman, who has been homesteading east of the Mossey, left for Dauphin with his family for a few months.
Mr. and Mrs. J. McAuley of South Bay, were visitors at D. Kennedy’s.
Mr. Combers of Selkirk, a relative of Capt. D. McLean, arrived here with a car of settlers’ effects and intends farming in this vicinity.
Mr. and Mrs. J McMillian and family who have been spending the winter here, have left for the west.
J. Seiffert of Winnipegosis, was here attending Court of Revision and Council meeting.
The bridge gang of the Canadian Northern Railway are busy fixing bridges in this vicinity.
Purple Star, L.O.L., 1765, held their general meeting on Thursday night last. A. McKerchar, J. Bickle and Martin, Winnipegosis, and W. Weir of Dauphin, visited the lodge and an interesting evening was spent.
The heaviest fall of snow of the season occurred on Friday, and puts an early spring out of the question. The horses and cattle are looking fairly well considering the long winter.
Our Mowat friend of the Press evidently declines our advice. We wish to tell him that we had a short conversation with the Dr. as he wished. The Dr. did not seem to be ??? all over the scribe’s health ?? not be a benefit to the public ??? health officer would take a trip ??? to the vicinity of Oak Brae and investigate the nuisance there, and have it removed as soon as possible before the hot weather sets in.
What has been become of the Fork River correspondent to the Press? Did he get snowed under as he has not been heard of lately. He must have gone across the herring pond for those letters that never arrived. Quite a fake.
Our friend Jimmy Johnston stole a march on the boys. We congratulate him and his bride and wish them a long life and a happy one. So say all.
A. Cameron is a visitor to Dauphin this week.
The council meeting held last week went off quiet well.
A nice little children’s party was held at the home of Mrs. Scrase, when Mr. McCartney gave a magic lantern entertainment. The pictures shown consisted of St. Paul’s Cathedral, Japan and Jessica’s first Prayer. When this was over the children had candies, cakes &c. and played all kind of games. At 10 o’clock they all went home after having enjoyed themselves.
Mr. McCartney returned from visiting friends at Grandview.

1912 Apr 4 – Sifton

The roads are very poor where Galicians live. They are not doing their share to advance these country places. There is a marked difference in the roads where English speaking people live. One hears that Canadians and English settlers give their time and their horses gratis for so many days each year to “grade” the roads. The Galicians are unwilling to help in any way unless they get from $1.50 to $2 daily. They, however, use the roads that others make. This is unfair! We need extra laws and to have them enforced. If a man does not help the country that helps him and he at “loggerheads” with the community in which he dwells he ought to leave the country. We have too many such in Canada now. They take all they get and hinder all progress to wit, the effort to get money for bridges in the municipality, etc.
The school at Sifton is making great progress under Capt. A. Russell. Sifton is fortunate in getting such an able man. He has an average of 59, a far from easy task daily instructing them. He must be congratulated in one feature especially the teaching of patriotism and love for the country. The exercising of his thoroughbred stallion keeps his health up. “Bunkus” is the pride of the place.
Nurses Goforth and Reid do excellent work at Sifton. They are always busy, and work on so untiringly in caring for Galicians. Not all the heroes work along the plaudits of the crowd. Many heroes work on unknown by the many. We wonder if Galicians are grateful enough for the services given them in these hospitals.
The mill formerly owned by Messrs. Kennedy & Barrie is now being run by Galicians.

1912 Apr 4 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Munro, who has been working for the Presbyterian Church in Winnipegosis, South Bay, Fairville and Sifton, for the Winter, closed his ministry last Sunday, March 31. He had large attendances at his closing services at each place, including people of all denominations. Attendances were favourable right through the winter. He never before experienced such a beautiful winter. He leaves soon for Saskatchewan Presbytery, where he takes up work for the Summer months.
The Presbyterian Church at Winnipegosis voted in favour of union unanimous all but two. Some did not vote. Those who voted against union and those who did not vote have the greatest standing in the church. At the closing service, which was a united one, Mr. Munro urged union for Winnipegosis even if organic union failed to be realized.