Today in the Dauphin Herald – August 21, 1919

Movement to Dam Mossey River

A movement is on foot to have the Dominion Government build a dam on the Mossey River on Lake Dauphin. This year the water in the lake is at its lowest point, and navigation for even small boats is almost impossible. The hay lands are to be reclaimed the depth of water in the lake has to be greatly increased. By building a dam the water could be raised several feet which would permit of navigation and increase the productiveness of the hay lands by hundreds of thousands of tons.

Nat Little Writes About France After War

Mr. and Mrs. Nat Little, of Fork River, are touring France. Mr. Little, in the following letter, describes, in an interesting manner, has visit to the battlefields:
To fulfill my promise to you I write these few lines on my trip to date. After seeing Ireland, Scotland, England and Wales, these countries having been described so often there is no use repeating. We crossed from Folkestone to Bolonge and on to Paris, said to be the most beautiful city in the world. We made Paris our headquarters, going out to some one of the battlefields each day and returning at night on account of there being no accommodation in the country. We have been over every battlefield except Ypres. Tourists will be allowed into Belgium some time in August. All battlefields look alike—nothing but ruin and destruction. Artois and Arras, were first visited on account of the valiant part taken by our Canadian soldiers. We crossed from Arras to Lens by motor and on foot, following Vimy Ridge, and passing through Souchez, Givenchy, Carency and Mount St. Eloi, or the remains of these places. On the ridge a large monument has been erected to the fallen Canadians.

Little Black Crosses

Soldiers’ graves are everywhere, many of the little black crosses bearing no inscription and having only the hero’s helmet placed on top to show his nationality. German prisoners under French guards are busy collecting these scattered bodies and placing them in cemeteries where the shell holes and trenches have been filled it. Everywhere are piles of barbed wire and dumps of empty shell cases round the gun positions. There are camps here and there, pacing sentries, heavy motor lorries carrying rusty guns and Nissen huts. On top of the slope are lying several belts of German machine gun ammunition and a vast stack of cartridges, undoubtedly a well chosen nest for some Hun sniper.

“Booby Traps” Numerous

Dugouts are intact, but the tourist is advised not to touch anything, for not all the “booby-traps” have been discovered, and there are still “duds” and grenades lying about. The whole area is dotted with shell holes and trenches, and the very ridges seem to have been blown away. But where are the places themselves? If you did not read the tragic epitaphs written on some of them you would pass without notice the grave of what was only a few years ago a happy cluster of houses and blooming gardens nesting around a church.
Some cities had 30,000 inhabitants and more; nothing now remains of them. Is there any possible future for these towns and their fellow-sufferers? They say it would cost $1,250,000 to clear out the ruins of each town. Let it be added that there are in these ruins 100,000 unexploded shells, and that according to recent statistics one out of ten is sure to burst in the hands of the workers! A thousand accidents have already occurred in the past few months. After the terrible loss of human life in France is it wise to risk new ones for such a doubtful result? Would it not be better to build a new city close by and leave the ruins as a terrible avenging witness of the war German willed and waged.
German prisoners—fat, sturdy and rosy-face are standing in line and hand to each other quietly and methodically bricks from the rubbish heaps. A Frenchman in our party, his hat at the back of his head, suddenly raised his clenched fist and said, “Ah, ces bandits de Boches!” The Germans answered this outburst with an expressionless animal stare, but I perceived just an ironical twinkle in the eye of a feldwebel (sergeant).

Threshing Commenced

Threshing operations have commenced in all parts of the district. This is the earliest on record for threshing. The grain is in good shape for the separator. The returns in some parts are larger than were expected, although it is too early yet to form anything like a correct estimate a to what the yield will be. The grade is not expected to be very high on account of the unevenness of growth.

Fork River

Mr. Gilmore, of the Canadian Northern Townsite Co., spent two days here with the intention of putting ore of the townsite property on the market. Fred Tilt has been appointed townsite agent.
Miss Ina Briggs has returned from her holidays and started duty as teacher of the Fork River school on the 18th inst.
Wheat threshing has started.
The Agricultural Society’s exhibition was postponed on account of the heavy rain on the selected day, Friday, the 15th. The show will now be held on the same date as the Boys’ and Girls’ Club fair, which date will be announced next week.
Rev. Harry P. Barrett, rector of St. Paul’s church, Dauphin, will hold holy communion and baptismal services in All Saints’ church at three in the afternoon of Sunday, August 24th. All are invited to attend the services.
Mrs. Terrin and children, of Dauphin, spent the week-end with Mr. and Mrs. C.E. Bailey, on the Mossey.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – August 14, 1919

Fair Notes

Some of the ladies were quite disappointed that there was no baby show this year. The baby show was very popular in past years and it was undoubtedly an oversight that it was not held this year. Mr. John Gorby, who was had charge of this department in past years, is the champion of the ladies and the babies and it will not be his fault if the show is not held next year. The babies are out greatest national asset and their welfare is contributed to by information supplied by physicians and professional nurses at these exhibitions.
The directors worked hard for several weeks to complete the details of the fair and have the satisfaction of knowing their efforts were appreciated and the exhibition a success in every way.
Chas. Murray, the patient and tireless secretary, had a busy three days of it.
The stock parade, headed by the band of the 79th Cameron Highlanders, was a striking feature on Friday.
Over 5000 people passed through the turnstiles on Friday.
The War Saving and Theft Stamp advertising display was very much in evidence on the grounds. The entrance to the grounds, the main building, grand stand, ticket office and other places throughout the grounds were nicely decorated with different lines of posters. It was evident that Mr. Blackadar intended that the large crowds that gathered each day on the grounds should be thoroughly informed regarding this movement.

Successful Exhibition

The 28th annual fair of the Dauphin Agricultural society, held on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday of last week, was the most successful in its history. And this, too, in the face of the fact that the farmers were in the midst of the harvest. While it is true there was a falling off in most of the departments it is a noteworthy fact the exhibits generally were of a superior class. The livestock was the best ever shown here. Two notable herds were J.D. McGregor’s Aberdeens and John Graham’s shorthorns. In the Clydesdale, Percherons, Agricultural and light horses many fine animals were shown and nearly all the leading breeders of the district were represented.
The poultry section was by long odds the best in the history of the society. The exhibit was not only large but of the highest quality. Much credit is due the Poultry Association and its energetic secretary. Wm. Murray, for the success achieved.
The attractions were exceptionally good. The band of the 79th Cameron Highlanders from Winnipeg furnished the music on Friday and the splendid program was enjoyed by all.
Credit is due Mr. Wm. Rintoul for the manner in which the numerous young ladies executed the intricate dances. The little girls also did exceptionally well.
The Scotch dancing by the two little Simpson girls, to the music of the bagpipes played by their father, caught the fancy of the big crowd.
At 1.30 several hundred war veterans assembled in front of the grand stand and on behalf of the citizens Mayor Bowman extended them a hearty welcome. In his address he referred to the historic places in France where the Canadians made history and achieved undying fame. Robt. Cruise, M.P., also spoke, Major Williams, in the absence of Brig. Gen. Ketchen, replied on behalf of the men. Major Skinner added a few words in regard to a suitable memorial for those who had made the supreme sacrifice.

Fork River

E. Harris, formerly of Bracebridge, Ont., is visiting at the home of Fred Cooper.
Don’t forget to come to Fork River’s annual agricultural show, Friday, August 15th.
Rev. Harry P. Barrett, rector of St. Paul’s, Dauphin, will preach in All Saints’ Anglican church, Sunday afternoon, Aug. 24 h, at 3.
Mrs. J. Rice, teacher of North Lake school, has returned home from visiting at Cypress River and Neepawa and is feeling better after her trip.
The White Star Co.’s new elevator is nearly completed. Thus the commercial importance of this centre grows.
Owen Pruder is busy overhauling the Northern elevator so as to have it ready for the fall delivery of grain.

Sifton

The marriage of Miss Anna Farion, daughter of Fred Farion, merchant, of this place, to Mr. W. Belashta of Canora, was celebrated at St. Paul’s parish church, on Wednesday, the 6th inst., at 9 p.m. Bishop Budka, with the assisting priests, officiated. Some two or three hundred invited guests were present. The church had been very tastefully decorated with flowers, which blended very pleasingly with the handsome costumes of the bride and attendants. To the lively strains of a bridal chorus, sung in Little Russian, the bride and groom, showered with confetti, and guests repaired to the large Ruthenian hall, where en exceptionally well appointed supper was served. Covers for at least two hundred and fifty were laid and the tables were used for several relays of guests. The hall was very tastefully festooned and draped, with roses and asters as floral decorations. An orchestra, composed of Ruthenians, four brothers, from Winnipeg, played very pleasingly and tastefully. Bishop Budka, on behalf of the guess, toasted the bride and bridegroom, the latter responded very neatly both in Little Russian and English. Dancing was kept up until daylight. A. Kozak, one of the old national Cossack dances, given most artistically by Miss Belashka, of Winnipeg, and Mr. Dyk, of Dauphin, was much admired; also the tasteful fox-trotting of Mr. Assifat. A number of visitors from Winnipeg were present, amongst others, Mrs. Stefanyk, Mr. and Mrs. Badnac, Dr. Pasdrey, and Lieut. Kreman editor of the Canadian Ruthenian. Mr and Mrs. Belashta have left for Canora, their future home, where Mr. Belashta is in the legal profession.
During the evening Mr. —– spoke at some length about the conflict between the Poles and so-called Ukrainians, the West Galicians, stating that Premier Lloyd George had alone amongst the Allied powers at the peace conference, expressed himself in favor of an independent Ukraina, separate from the claims of the Polish aristocracy. He was followed by Mr. F. Taciuk, of Dauphin. A collection, totaling one hundred and twenty dollars, was taken up to be forwarded to Europe for use against the Poles.

Winnipegosis

Geo. G. Spence, who was formerly manager for the Hudson’s Bay Company here, has bought T.H. Whale’s general store.
There is an average crop in this district in spite of the dry season. The grain is nearly all cut and threshing will soon commence.
All the fishermen in town are bustling getting in supplies and preparing for the fall fishing. Two of the companies large boats leave here within the next few days for points at the north end of the lake.
A party of forty business men came up from Dauphin Sunday and took a trip fifty miles up the lake, upon the steamer “Armenon.” The trip was an enjoyable one and everyone was delighted with it. A net was set on the voyage out and was taken in on the return voyage. Nineteen fish were caught and Mr. Dan Hamilton auctioneered them off and got as much as $2.00 for a “sucker.” A Dominion and a Provincial M.P. were among the party.
The English Church is holding a regular Sunday service at Winnipegosis.
The town council is planning for a new municipal hall and extensive sidewalks.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – July 24, 1919

G.W.V.A. Notes

The regular meeting of the above Association was held last Thursday, July 17th, Comrade F. Scrase, president, in chair.
Application for membership was received from eleven returned men, all of which were accepted. This now brings the total membership of the Dauphin Branch to 271. It is hoped that same will reach the 500 before the end of the year. Any returned men in the town that have not become members up to the present are asked to do so at an early ate, for like all other things, many can help one, and the greater the membership then so much more will be able to be done for the returned man by the association.
The auditors’ report for the past six months was submitted, and on motion of Comrades Armstrong and Miles it was accepted.
During the past year considerable progress has been made by the local branch in the town. The present new quarters were opened in March and between three and four hundred men have slept in these rooms during that period. When it is considered that no charge is made for the use of these and the fact that it is sometimes next to impossible to secure a room in the town on shot notice, the use and benefit of the rooms to the retuned men that are here looking for land and getting information and particulars re the Soldier Settlement, can be readily seen. The rooms are also used to a very great extent by the returned men of the town in the evenings, and also by the boys who are living on the farms when they are in town during the day, and were it not for them it would be hard to find a place for them to spend the time, especially the men that are here to make entry on land and are compelled, owing to waiting for trains, etc., to stay in the town over night or in some cases two or three days.
Application was received from the Ladies’ Auxiliary for the use of the large hall on Aug. 6, 7 and 8 for the purpose of serving dinner, and same was granted by the comrades.
The next meeting of the association will be July 31st, and members are requested to make note of the date.

Peace Day Celebration

In spite of the counter attractions elsewhere the citizens turned out in large numbers to celebrate Peace Day in Dauphin. At 10 a.m. about 250 people gathered for a Union Thanksgiving Service, which was conducted by Captain Kitson and Rev. Harry P. Barrett, while the address was given by Rev. J.A. Haw.
At 1.30 the children gathered at the two schools and a procession of about 40 automobiles, crowded with happy youngsters, headed by the town band, went along Main street to Fourth avenue and Second street to the park. In the park races were run for all children and in many events there were so many competitors it was necessary to have two and sometimes three beats.
The grown-ups of the town brought baskets and quite a number of family parties were to be seen enjoying picnic tea on the grass. Hot water was supplied and a booth managed by the members of the Children’s Aid Society, under the conductorship of Mrs. Vance, dispensed ice cream, sandwiches, lemonade, etc. in aid of the Home.
The whole day’s programme was arranged at two hurriedly called meetings at which Mr. George King was chairman. It would be impossible to mention all who contributed to the success of the day, but we must make note of the energy and interest of the Committee, Rev. Harry P. Barrett, Messrs. Ramsay Skinner, R.J. Malcolm, Rintoul, D. Sutherland, Wright, Barker and Ferguson.

Fork River

Harvest is expected to begin at once. There is some good crop in the district this season, and the quality, too, is expected to be high.
Wm. Coultas is building a dwelling on his farm.
S.B. Reid and family are visiting at Rathwell, Man.
Fred. Cooper and Mr. Hunt and family are on a vacation to Saskatchewan points.
The wild raspberry crop is a prolific one this season and canned raspberries will be found settlers’ tables this winter.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – June 12, 1919

Aged Man Commits Suicide

Peter Kozsowski, who resided 16 miles southwest of town in the Ruthenian settlement in the Riding Mountain, committed suicide on Tuesday. He retired to the stable, laid down and placed the muzzle of a shotgun under his chin, and then touched off the trigger. The charge nearly blew the top of his head off.
Deceased had been in poor health for some time and also had trouble with some of his neighbors which no doubt preyed on his mind. He was 57 years of age, leaves a wife and four children. One son is at the front.
Coroner Rogers visited the scene of the tragedy on Wednesday, and after enquiring into the particulars, decided an inquest was unnecessary.

Fair Notes

The new horse barn being erected at the fair grounds by F. Neely, is nearing completion. It provides accommodation for seventy-five head of horses.
It is the intention of the directors to proceed immediately with the construction of additions to the grand stand, cow barn and poultry house.
The race track and the baseball diamond have been put in good shape and will be available for the sports of July 1st.

Police Court Cases

Justyn Baran appeared before Police Magistrate Hawkins on the charge of theft of harrows, valued at $15. He pleaded guilty and was released on suspended sentence and ordered to pay the costs of court, amounting to $22.50.
Chief Bridle laid information against Frank Crowder for allowing cattle to run at large on the streets. He pleaded not guilty but was convicted and fined $5 and costs of court amounting to $7.
O.Kaczar was convicted on the charge of common assault. He was assessed the costs of court, amounting $20.50.
Edward Rsesnowski was fined $2 for riding a bicycle on the sidewalk.
Herbert Brown was fined $2 and costs for allowing his children on the streets after 10 p.m.

The Strike Situation

The strike situation remains practically unchanged. In some quarters the belief prevails that the chances for a settlement are improving.

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, June 10th.
The crops are looking well.
Pte. D.C. Sanderson has returned home from overseas.
A cow belonging to W. Cooper gave birth to a calf with five legs.
A Grain Growers’ meeting was held on Friday, the 6th. Several important matters were brought up. The Famers platform was heartily endorsed by all.
Word has been received that the Bicton Heath School will be returned to the control of the ratepayers at an early date. We will then select our own trustees.
Sunday school is held every Sunday at 3 o’clock at the old Sieffert farm. Service is held at 7 o’clock every Sunday evening at the house of Thos. Toye.

Fork River

Mr. Geo. H. Scriven arrived last week to take charge of the Anglican services during the summer at Fork River, Winnipegosis, Sifton and Mowat. Service will be held in All Saints’, Fork River, on the 15th, at 3 o’clock.
Mr. and Mrs. M. Wick and Mrs. Farrell, of Dauphin, were visitors on Sunday at farm of Mr. W. King.
Rec. H.P. Barrett, of Dauphin, took the services on Sabbath. There was a large congregation. Several children were baptized.
Jack Schuchett has gone to Winnipeg to end the strike.
Willie Tuck has returned home after an extended trip to Ontario to recuperate.
W. Northam has a tractor at work breaking up his quarter section south of the town.
J. Richardson, F. Hafenbrak and W. King interviewed the council in behalf of the Agricultural Society for a grant. The council acted generously and voted $250.

Winnipegosis

On Sunday last a large congregation attended the Methodist Church to welcome the Rev. H.P. Barrett, the rector of Dauphin, and Mr. G.B. Scriven, the new Anglican student in charge of this mission. By the courtesy of the Methodist body here, Mr. Scriven will hold divine service in the Methodist Church next Sunday evening, June 15th, at 7:30 p.m. It is to be hoped that as large a congregation will gather as at last Sunday’s service and give Mr. Scriven all the encouragement possible in the work to which he is called here.
Much local interest is in evidence as to the outcome of the King’s Bench court case, Armstrong Trading Co. vs. Grenon and McInnes, which comes up before Judge Curran at Dauphin next week. Commanding legal talent has been engaged by both parties.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 22, 1919

G.W.V.A.

Regular meeting of the above mentioned association held Thursday, May 15th, some 30 of the Comrades being in attendance.
Application for membership received from 16 returned soldiers. All of these were accepted.
Moved by Comrade R. Armstrong, seconded by Comrade T. Boyce, that this branch endorse the resolution prepared by the Winnipeg branch of the G.W.V.A. and remain neutral with regard to the strike that is on at Winnipeg, and it was also resoled that should such occasion arise the G.W.V.A. in this town place their services at the disposal of the authorities to maintain order.
Moved by Comrade Price, seconded by Comrade Cocking, that a separate fund in connection with the work of this branch of assisting sick comrades and their dependents. And that in the future all grants under this heading shall be paid from that account and that moneys donated to this association shall be placed at their credit of same and shall not be used for any other purpose.
Moved by Comrade Percy, seconded by Comrade C. Lane, that this branch appoint a delegate in the Dominion convention to be held at Vancouver on June 8th. Vote taken and Comrade G.F. Johnston was appointed delegate.
General committee in charge of the G.W.V.A. sports day met Friday, 16th, to make further arrangements on this project. These committees are now completed and they were instructed to commence operations at once in the preparation of a program.
The association begs to acknowledge receipt of the sum of $64.20, raised at a box social held in Dauphin last Saturday evening, under the management of F. Tacuik.
Owing to the strike in Winnipeg the Better ‘Ole has been postponed. The new dates are Monday and Tuesday, June 2nd and 3rd.

The Strike Situation

The greatest strike in the history of Canada was declared in Winnipeg last Thursday. It is outcome of differences between employers and employees which include several matters besides the question of wages. Shorter hours and the recognition of the principle of bargaining are among these. It will be realized that it is not an easy matter to settle matters of this nature offhand. It is somewhat of a revolution; but there are days of revolutions and the issues must be squarely faced. In the meantime the public are not only suffering in convenience, but loss.
There have been no daily papers for the past week from Winnipeg and the absence of the papers is keenly felt. The last copies of the papers to be received was Friday and the newsy on the train sold these at from 10 to 25 cents each. It proved a bonanza for the agent.
There has been no mail going to Winnipeg for a week and during the past two or three days none south of the boundary.
The express service south and west have been discontinued for a week.
The managers of the moving picture theatre are obliged to go to Winnipeg to or three times a week to get the films. But this is better than having to close up.
The price of eggs has declined as there is no means of sending the hen fruit to outside markets.
Senator Robertson, Minister of Labor, was billed to arrive in Winnipeg on Wednesday. The outcome of his visit will be waited with much interest.

Fork River

Pte. A.E. Eales has purchased the n.w. ¼ 6-30-18, and intends improving the property.
The Returned Soldiers’ Committee will meet on the 24th to arrange for a banquet and transact other business. The ladies are invited to attend.
Rev. H.P. Barrett, rector of St. Paul’s Dauphin, will hold service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday, June 8th, at 3 o’clock.
Max King has started breaking on the home farm with a 10-20 Titan and a 20 inch breaker. He is doing good work.
All Saints’ Sunday School has been reorganized and started on Sunday with W. King as superintendent, and Mrs. A. Russell, Mrs. McEachern, Miss I. Briggs and Miss S. Briggs as teachers.
Service was held in the Methodist Church by Rev. Mr. Hook on Sunday afternoon. There was a good attendance.
The dance given by the Returned Soldiers’ recently was well patronized and all who attended had a good time.
Edwin King, weed inspector for the municipality, has started on his rounds. Winn is some hustler, but he will have to go some if he keeps ahead of the fast growing weeds these days.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 13 – 1919

1919 Nov 13 – Soldiers Tendered Banquet

A year ago Tuesday the bells of the town were ringing and the whistles blowing. It was a day long to be remembered. The Germans had started the war with the object of conquering the world and had, after the great struggle, hoisted the white flag and asked for the cessation of hostilities. It was a different scene that greeted the eye as one entered the town hall on Tuesday night, November 11th, 1919. Here were tables stretched the full length of the hall, artistically arranged and simply groaning under the load of good things that weighed them down.
The occasion was a banquet tendered the returned boys, their wives and lady friends by the Ladies’ Auxiliary of the G.W.V.A. and it was worthy of them. The members of the Auxiliary have been tireless workers for the welfare of the men and this banquet crowned their efforts.
There were between three and four hundred present.
During the dinner hour Major Skinner extended a welcome to all on behalf of the Auxiliary.
A vote of thanks was tendered the ladies on motion of Comrades Bates and Batty.
After the tables were cleared there was a short program followed by a dance. Those taking part were Mrs. Grobb, violin selection; Mrs. R. Hawkins, solo; Rev. H.P. Barrett, song; Miss H. Clarke, recitation. The McMurray orchestra furnished the music for the dance.

1919 Nov 13 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Nov. 10th.
Mr. Shield and bride arrived last week and have rented John Hayward’s residence on the Mossey River.
John Judge and Mr. Gourlay from Virden, have arrived. They have rented Briggs brothers’ buildings.
A basket social will be held in the school on the evening of Nov. 21st. The proceeds will be devoted to a fund for the purchase of an organ for the school.
The work on the road that leads to the school is still undone. Children from this district east of the muskeg have not been able to attend school of late on this account. The Dept. of Public-Works has provided a special grant from this road. In view of this it seems strange that an effort has not been made to have the work performed.

1919 Nov 13 – Fork River

A meeting of the directors of the Agricultural Society was held on the 5th inst. It was decided to pay the prize money at once. As this was the first show held by the society the directors are to be congratulated on its success.
Mrs. Rice, for a number of years was teacher at North Lake School has sold her property and has left the community. Mrs. Rice has lived a number of years in the district and has done good work as a teacher. Her departure from our midst is a matter of regret.
Mr. and Mrs. Caswell, of Hartney, Man., are visiting at the home of Mr. T.N. Briggs. The young people attended the banquet to the returned soldiers.
Mrs. Gordon Weaver, of Magnet, is visiting her aunt, Mrs. Briggs.
All Saints’ S.S. staff held a public meeting on the night of the 6th. About 50 were present. Rev. H.P. Barrett presided. Arrangements were made for the annual Christmas tree, and also to hold a social evening every Wednesday at which there will be a varied program.
A public meeting is called for Friday, 14th inst., for the purpose of organizing a branch of the Grain Growers’ Association.

1919 Nov 13 – Fork River

Mrs. Emma Rice wishes to thank all who were kind and considerate to her during her recent illness. She is now comfortably provided for in Dauphin and hops to be able to return to our midst within a short time.

LETTER OF APPRECIATIONS.
On behalf the returned boys of the Fork River district we wish to express our appreciation of the banquet tendered us, the gifts of watches and purses and the uniform kindness shown us upon all occasions. We further wish to acknowledge the efforts of the ladies in preparing the excellent supper provided us. The banquet was a most enjoyable event, the pleasure being shared by a number of friends from outside.
THE COMMITTEE.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 6 – 1913, 1919

1913 Nov 6 – Fork River

Mrs. D.F. Wilson and daughter, Miss Pearl, returned from a month’s visit to Ontario. They report a very pleasant time.
F.B. Lacey from Mowat Centre, returned from a visit to Dauphin on business and to attend the teachers’ convention.
We are informed that Capt. Cain, of Mowat, left for Dauphin to take out a license of some sort. Time will tell whether it is for fish, flesh or fowl.
Mrs. Frost and daughter, of Rathwell, are visiting her daughter, Mrs. Reid, on the Mossey River.
Mrs. C.E. Bailey, is spending the week in Dauphin, with friends.
Archie McDonald, who has been busy with a gang ditching on the company’s farm here, has returned to Winnipegosis, the ground having frozen too hard to do any more work this season.
Miss J. Weatherhead, teacher of the Mossey River School, spent the weekend with friends at Dauphin.
Mr. Roe, of Neepawa, has left for the west with his second consignment of cattle from this point.
John Seiffert, and Steve Letwyn, of Winnipegosis, are busy among the farmers, buying cattle for the company’s at South Bay.
Wm. Coultas has invested in stock and intends stall feeding them for Xmas beef. We believe Billy is on the road to become a millionaire in the near future. Farmers take notice and follow suit.
Frank Clawson, of Dauphin, is here renewing old acquaintances.
Mrs. N. Little, and daughter, Miss Grace, took a trip south on business for a few days.
Mr. O’Callagan, of Portage la prairie, auditor for the Armstrong Trading Co., is visiting the Co.’s store on his semi-annual tour of inspection, and is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Messrs. Sturdy, White and Shears, of Winnipegosis, are busy at the Co.’s store this week taking stock.
Mrs. Stonehouse and daughter, Miss Sylvia paid the lake town a visit this week.
Hallowe’en passed off with the usual result. Some are minus their gates, others are looking for strayed buggies. The bell of All Saints’ received its annual visit and was fixed up as usual to keep it from running away, while the other building is left in peace as usual. This is where unity comes in, we suppose; yes, with a vengeance.
Our Winnipegosis friends seem to be grieved at the way they are used by the Mossey River municipal board and would like to know if anybody knows that Mossey River is on the map. Better ask somebody else, I guess. But one thing we do know at tax paying time we are not allowed to forget our residence. Not very likely Mike.

1913 Nov 6 – Winnipegosis

Capt. Coffey was a passenger to Dauphin on Monday’s train.
The ice on the lake is firm enough to permit travel between the mainland and Snake Island. If the weather becomes warm again which it threatens now, navigation will be resumed.
Frank Hechter left for Dauphin and Winnipeg on Saturday. Frank is up and down pretty often and helps keep the C.N.R. running.
J.P. Grenon is off to Quebec, where he will study mink farming. The mink farm at Macaza has proved a decided success and he is anxious to learn something of the methods employed in rearing this little animal which produces such a fine grade of fur. The fox branch of Mr. G’s ranch is making progress, and there is every prospect of it becoming a profitable industry. Fish and fur producing animals abound in this part of the West and if the industries flourish as we hope they will there is no reason why the people here should not become prosperous, if not wealthy. The fishing industry is a great asset and the timber resources are large and are being profitable exploited. With good land for farming and cattle raising at the back of all, no part of he West offers better inducements for settlers than this town and district.
The telephone line is now completed and it is sure to prove a great convenience. Postmaster Ketcheson is in charge of the service. The connections are small at present but they are sure to grow. Those connected up with the service are Canadian Lakes Fishing Co., The Armstrong Trading Co. and Frank Hechter. Dauphin is the Central checking office.
Cattle buyers have been in the district of late but have not secured many animals as that canna Scot, Capt. Dugald McAuley, usually covers the district like a blanket.

1919 Nov 6 – Soldiers Banqueted at Fork River

One of the largest banquets held in Northern Manitoba took place at Fork River on Friday night, the 31st ult. The banquet was gotten up by the people of the Mossey River municipality and tendered to the returned soldiers. The supper was held in the Orange Hall, and it is estimated that fully two hundred and fifty people sat down to the splendid spread prepared by the ladies of the district.
Mossey River municipality was well represented by her sturdy sons in France and Flanders, and, like all Canadians, they did their part well. Some of the boys were destined not to return and today rest under the sod across the ocean. Others survived their wounds. The occasion was one for rejoicing.
Each soldier was remembered in a tangible form and presented with either a gold watch and guard or a well-filled purse. It was a recognition of the men well worthy of any community.

TOAST LIST.
Following the supper there was a short toast list. Mr. Geo. King, of Dauphin, was toastmaster. The list included “The King.”
“The British Empire,” proposed by Geo. Spence, of Winnipegosis, and responded to by Principal Jonasson, of Winnipegosis, and the Rev. Mr. Roberts.
“The Municipality of Mossey River,” proposed by ex-Reeve F.B. Lacey, and responded to by Coun. Hunt and Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
“Our Hosts and Hostesses,” was proposed by the Rev. H.P. Barrett, of Dauphin.
The address to the soldiers was read by Mr. Wm. King, and the presentations made by Sergt. Frank Hechter, of Winnipegosis.
The men made suitable replies, in which they each returned their heartfelt thanks.
At the conclusion of the speech making the hall was cleared and the young people indulged in a dance.
There were a number of guests present from Dauphin, Winnipegosis and other points.