Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 5 – 1912, 1918

1912 Dec 5 – Fork River

Miss M.B. Nixon left for Winnipeg, for a weeks visit among friends.
Miss Muriel Alterton, of Mossey River, and Miss Grant, of Pine View Schools attended the convention at Dauphin.
Mrs. Geo. Shannon and Mrs. Kennedy returned from a visit to Winnipegosis.
Wm. King expressed to E. Walker, of Dauphin, a trio of Mammoth Bronze turkeys for breeding purposes.
Fred Cooper, W. Williams and T. Shannon’s threshing outfits are busy these days.
D.F. Wilson, F.B. Lacey and J. Seiffert, members of the council, returned from a week’s trip to the Municipal Convention at Winnipeg.
Miss Lizze Clark returned to Dauphin after spending a few days at her home.
Mr. Monington, of Neepawa, is staying with J. Robinson for the hunting season.
Duncan Kennedy has received two shipments of pure bred Plymouth Rocks from Portage la Prairie last week and is now in the market with pure bred roosters.
Joe Lockhart was elected trustee for Mossey River School for the coming term in place of Wm. King, who retires this term.
Looking over the Herald we notice the annual statement of receipts and expenditures for ten months of the municipality of Mossey River. Just the same old two by four statement. Why not publish in book form in detail like Dauphin. Our council seems to be behind the times in this respect. Year after year we are asking for this to see where our money is expended and this year we cannot see where any of it has been expended on the roads.

1912 Dec 5 – Winnipegosis

The annual school meeting was held in the school house on Monday, a large number of ratepayers being present. Messrs. Grenon, Whale and Thomas were elected as trustees for the coming year and Mr. Shear continues as sec.-treasurer. Mr. Hulme’s engagement is for the year. The master of a new school to be erected was discussed. The lots have already been secured, as we hope it will not be long till they are build on.
Rev. H.H. Scrase remained in town from Sunday’s service till Tuesday.
Harry Grenon is preparing to open a business in the late Hudson’s Bay post.
The Misses Paddock had a party last night to entertain Miss Hazel Coffey who has been visiting the Misses Whale while Mr. and Mrs. Whale made a trip to Dauphin.
We are pleased to see certain patients are able to be out again.
The young people’s enjoyment on the lake will be curtailed since the snow has come.
A few of the men from the fishing camps took advantage of the recent glistening ice to make a trip back to town, an enviable one “on their steely feet so bright.”
Mrs. Bradley has enjoyed a most delightful visit from her sister, Mrs. Armstrong. Miss Charlotte accompanies her aunt back to Portage.
Mr. and Mrs. Hippesley, of South Bay, have returned from a trip to Dauphin. Regret is felt at the probability of their moving West to B.C.
A visit to Mrs. Johnston’s home would assure anyone of the benefit on illness to be gained by sojourning there.
Miss Hayes reports an interesting convention held in Dauphin.
Hunters are arriving in town in pursuit of the fleet footed game of the woods.

1918 Dec 5 – Blew Out His Brains

Telesphore Gagnon, who resided with his two sons at Valpoy, 15 miles northeast of Ste. Rose, committed suicide last week by blowing out his brains with a shotgun. Gagnon lost his wife a year ago, and also suffered lose to his property by fire. These matters preyed on him until his mind became unbalanced and led him to commit the rash act. He was 60 years of age.

1918 Dec 5 – Had Arm Amputated

Thos. Switzer, who resides in the Sandringham district, had the misfortune to accidentally discharge his rife, the bullet entering his left arm. He was brought to the hospital, where it was found necessary to amputate the arm below the elbow.

1918 Dec 5 – Major Barker Critically Ill

A cablegram from France to Mr. G. Barker at the end of the week states that the condition of his son William is critical.

1918 Dec 5 – Military Funeral

Pte. Wilbur Olsob, of the 226th Batt., who died of influenza, was accorded a military funeral, he arrangements being in the hands of the G.W.V.A. The funeral cortege assembled at 2.30 p.m. at Farrell’s undertaking parlours on Friday afternoon, where a service was conducted by Rev. J.A. Haw, who also officiated at the graveside. About 50 members of the association, under command of Capt. Scrase, attended. Lieut. Clark and Sergt. Chambers were in charge of he firing party.

1918 Dec 5 – Rural Nominations

MOSSEY RIVER
Reeve – T.B. Venables, F.B. Lacey, J.D. Robertson
Ward 1 – J. Yakavanka
Ward 3 – E.A. Marcroft
Ward 5 – J. Namaka

1918 Dec 5 – Victoria Cross for Barker

Major Wm. G. Barker has been awarded the highest honour possible for distinguished service at the front, the Victoria Cross.
Other Dauphin boys who have been decorated, include:
Military Cross – Lawrence Shand
Military Medals – Stuart R. Widmeyer (deceased), G.A. Jackson, Geo. F. King, N. Chard, A. Douglas and J. Fletcher

1918 Dec 5 – Fork River

Mrs. M. Angus has returned to Winnipeg after spending two weeks with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Craighill.
Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Brewer are patients in the hospital at Dauphin.
W. King, I.H.C. agent, has just finished a warehouse in which to store implements.
Mr. and Mrs. W. Northam have taken up their residence in the parsonage for the winter.
H. Swartwood, of Dauphin, was a recent visitor in our midst.
Sid Frost has left for Rathwell. Before leaving Wm. King, on behalf of Sid’s many friends here, presented him with a valuable violin and case in recognition of his services in a musical way.
Wm. Williams was a Dauphin visitor on Tuesday.
F.B. Lacey, T.B. Venables and J.D. Robertson are the nominees for the reeveship.
The Fork River, Mossey River and Pine View Schools are still closed.
Several of the hunters have returned. Which one shot the steer?

Pte. N. MacCauley, of Winnipegosis, was among the returned soldiers from overseas this week.

1918 Dec 5 – Winnipegosis

A special peace thanksgiving service was held in the Union Church on Dec. 1st. The church was well decorated with flags of the Allies, and was packed to overflowing. The hymns were of a joyful, patriotic and military character, and were heartily sung. The Rev. A.E. Hook conducted the service and took on his subject, “Trusting in God.” He gave a vivid description of the terrible struggle which had lasted over four years, and spoke of the murmurings which had sometimes arising during the war. People had doubted if there was a God and if there was he was not a righteous God. The termination of the war, however, had vindicated God as a righteous God. He said that we had many things to be thankful for because of the war. He mentioned principally that drink and practically been abolished and that nations had been awakened into prayer in a manner they had never done before.
The ban, which had closed down all public gatherings during he epidemic of influenza, was lifted last week and there are no cases in town, though there are a few in the rural districts.
The first load of fish from the lake arrived in town on Tuesday. The fishing has been delayed somewhat on account of the mild weather, but the prospects of a large catch are good.
D. Roy Grenon skated into town today from Waterhen, a distance of over 25 miles.
Winnipegosis reports over two crowns to its credit in the Victory Loan Drive.
Two carloads of wheat were shipped out of town this week.
The fishermen have started to put up ice for summer use.
The collectors report that subscriptions to the Mercantile Sailors’ Fund are coming in well.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 2 – 1911

1911 Nov 2 – Fork River

A. Cameron of Mowat Centre is a visitor to Dauphin on business.
Mrs. Ivor Humphreys, of Dauphin, is visiting at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
Mat Little has finished his implement warehouse on Main Street and has his machinery under cover.
Miss Alterton, teacher of Mossey River School; Miss M. Nixon, of Pine View; H. Benner, of Tobeski School; J Spearing, of North Lake School and John Nowside are attending the teachers’ convention at Dauphin and no doubt education will advance by leaps and bounds on their return.
D. Kennedy, manager of the Armstrong Trading Co., is busy preparing for winter with an up-to-date stock of all kinds. Miss Pearl Wilson has charge of the dry goods department, and Carpenter Stonehouse is erecting a wood house and tin house and other improvements, while Prof. Gordon is busy wielding the paintbrush trying to beat Jack Frost.
Our Grit friends seem to be having a high old time hunting mission ballot boxes. When Fork River disfranchised the deputy returning officer was missing. They seem to have a way of losing something every election and now Sir Wilfy missed the premiership and since then Joe has been missing and the other little fellow was floundering around in the Press a week ago and he’ll soon be missing too if this weather continues.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 2 – 1913

1913 Jan 2 – Fred Nex Killed

Fred. Nex, formerly publisher of the Dauphin News, and who afterwards kept a store at Sifton, was killed near Whitemouth, Man., not long since. He and two other parties were riding on the C.P.R. on a gasoline motor, when it collided with a train. All three were killed. Deceased of recent years held the position of secretary-treasurer for the Municipality of Whitemouth. He leaves a widow and several small children.

1913 Jan 2 – Fork River

John Chipla and family returned from Canora, Sask., for the holidays.
Bert Williams left for Moose Jaw to see his brother, who resides there.
Miss Olive and Alice Clark are visiting friends at Laird, Sask., during the holidays.
Miss Muriel Alterton, who taught the Mossey River School the last three years, has left for Winnipeg.
Miss Grant, teacher of Pine View School, has gone home for the holidays.
A. Hunt has gone to Ottawa to spend the holidays with his parents.
There was quite a family re-union at the homestead of D.F. Wilson last week. Paul Wood and family, of Sifton; Fleming Wilson and family of Dauphin and others. It was cheering to see so many familiar faces at Christmas Tide.
Miss Bertha Johnston, of Dauphin, Mrs. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, were the guests of D. Kennedy during the holiday.
Peter Ellis, of Kamsack, is home on a two weeks’ vacation.
Abe Shinks returned from his homestead in Sask., and intends to remain the rest of the winter at Fork River.
The Christmas tree and concert in the hall on Christmas Eve, under the auspices of All Saints’ W.A. and S.S. was a success. It being a nice evening there was a large turnout. Wm. King, warden, was chairman. A good programme of songs, recitations, and drills by the children, after which Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus arrived and distributed the gifts among the children. We congratulate Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus on the able manner they filled the position. We take this opportunity of thanking all those who took part in the concert and tree. It is encouraging to see everyone turn out on Christmas Eve to give the little folks a good time.
We wish all a Happy New Year.
Rev. H.H. Scrase held service on Christmas morning at Winnipegosis, and at All Saints, Fork River, in the evening.
In the Press we notice our Mowat friend twitting Mr. Borden and his followers for opposing the Transcontinental Railway when they were in opposition. Do you remember Laurier’s election cry in 1904? A national Transcontinental Railway for thirteen million dollars. What do we now find? The National Transcontinental Railway is going to cost us, including interest and charges, payable by the people, nearly eighty million and a cash outlay of close on three hundred million by the time we are through with it. Is it any wonder it was opposed at the time considering the unbusinesslike method adopted by the Laurier government. Our M.C. objects to Borden’s scheme of giving thirty-five millions to England for Dreadnaughts to be manned by Englishmen instead of Canadians. We consider Borden’s scheme the only possible one under the circumstances and far superior to the one Laurier has being playing with for years. What did his amount to? He, Laurier, wanted a strictly Canadian fleet, part on the Atlantic coast, the other half on the Pacific coast. That’s just what he handed down to Borden when he went out of power. The Niobe in the east and the Rainbow in the west. The boats are so powerful you have to take a magnifying glass to see them on a fine day. As for manning our warships with Canadians our friend is talking through his hat. The Marine Department at Ottawa could not find recruits enough in Canada to run those two little steamboats, the Niobe and the Rainbow. They had to be tied up for want of men. Finally they had to import them. Take a rest friend, you must be tired of jumping the fence so often.

1913 Jan 2 – Winnipegosis

The W.A. entertainment last Friday evening was a success and though the proceeds, were small, more was not anticipated. The orchestra selections render by the Messrs. McArthur, Mrs. A. McArthur, and Mr. Shears were most appropriate, and the representation of Mr. and Mrs. Candle was amusing, while the comedy “Box the Cox” demonstrated the fact that theatrical talent is not lacking amongst us.
If a young “Lochinvar” appears in our midst let no one say they were fully warned.
Mr. Malley, lately from college, addressed the Christian Endeavor League last week.
Harry Parker had the misfortune to sprain his ankle while coming down the lake freighting fish. Hope he will soon be about again.
J.P. Grenon’s youngest son, also sustained an injury from an accident, the nature of which has not been learned.
Mrs. Johnston, of Minitonas, is visiting her friends, the Stuarts. A little one made the festive season.
We are pleased to hear Mrs. Graff has recovered from her illness under Mrs. Johnstone’s efficient nursing.
A.C. Bardley’s late indisposition was the result of cold.
The card circle last Wednesday evening was a pleasing character. Mrs. Burrell now possesses a good time-keeper and we trust Mrs. Crannage may find her work basket useful considering her aptitude with the meddle which was effectively displayed in the doll dressed for the W.A. competition, and won by Miss Hansford. See “Whilimina”.
Mr. Seaforth made a business trip to Dauphin on Saturday.
Miss Browne also made a trip to meet a friend from Winnipeg.
The Presbyterian S.S. entertainment on the 27th (the most anticipated event of the season), was very successful owing to Santa Claus’ generosity, whom the children admirably presented in a Cantata. It was regretted that Mr. Malley was unable to perform the duties of chairman, but Mr. Noble very kindly filled the place.
The Anglican Christmas service was harmonious. Rev. H.H. Scrase delivered a fine sermon.
This weather might inspire a spring song, considering the gulls are circling up the lake, but undoubtedly the storm that follows such illusive calm is liable to occur any time.
We wonder what the presence of pure white partridges may prognosticate. It is easy to obtain them, and they should look very pretty mounted.
The Armstrong Trading Co. lost a valuable team in the lake last week, and a horse dropped dead the week before. Fortunately they are not likely to feel the loss.
Mr. Ruthledge, formerly of Winnipegosis, spent Christmas in town.
The Misses Bradley spent Christmas here with their parents, and Mr. and Mrs. Saunders enjoyed the company of their sons with a friend from Winnipeg. A dance was given by the latter in Victoria Hall on Thursday evening.
Mr. and Mrs. Johnston, of the Lake View hotel, returned from Winnipeg on Christmas Eve, where they spent a week on business and visiting.
Mrs. Bradley spent a delightful week-end in Dauphin, and attended the Anglican S.S. entertainment, of which he “Washing Day Cantata” was a particularly enjoyable feature. The trip from their home was suggestive of wedding bells resulting in poetic effusion.
Miss Johnston returned home for the Christmas holidays.

1913 Jan 2 – A REVERIE.

Ye children of the heavenly king,
Imagine that the angels sing,
Send peace on earth for men and driven
To doubt that women have earned a heaven.

As everyone of us should hold,
The truth that’s better far tan gold’
Let dissension meet a final doom,
And perversity by refused a room.

Then trust the Savour’s power to do
All that he said, which well he knew
Would be doubted by impatient men,
Though women believe faithfully till – when!

The world shall be forced to cry, “well done”!
In Him we live, the kingdom’s won!
To exercise faith within the soul
Makes humanity’s love perfectly whole.

1913 Jan 2 – Winnipegosis

James McNicholl passed quietly away on Friday afternoon last Dec. 27th, after a lingering illness, having been tended faithfully by his wife for whom he showed much affection. The funeral rites were performed by Father Derome on Monday morning. Deceased’s wife, two sons and two daughters were among the mourners.
Miss Clara Bradley is away on a visit to her aunt in Portage la Prairie. Miss Dolly having returned with her.
Miss Shannon has returned from Fork River where she spent the Christmas holidays visiting her parents.
Mr. Scott is leaving on Thursday for Mafeking on business for the Standard Lumber Co.
Mr. and Mrs. Shears are wished joy of their young daughter, born to them on the 28th inst., at the home of Mrs. Johnstone.

1913 Jan 2 – Gulls at Lake Winnipegosis

Numerous sea gulls have, of late, made their appearance at Lake Winnipegosis. It is not known that those birds have ever appeared here at so late a date in any year in the past.