Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 22 – 1921

Dog Race for Dauphin

The First Annual Dog Race will be held on Monday, January 2nd, in the afternoon, for boys and girls. The prizes will be given according to the support received from the public. It is the Committee’s object to have several races this winter and the first will be run on the above date, so the competitors will have time to train their dogs by then. Any subscriptions may be handed to Rev. Hamilton, Pat Muligan, Duncan Pearson or to F.C. Turland, who is acting Secretary-Treasurer, and who will also be pleased to give full particulars upon request. Help to boost the race Supress of the event will mean fun for the kiddies this winter.

Had Hands and Feet Frozen

Jerry Ravensburg, a homesteader in the Crane River district, was found by the provincial police last week, wandering around the lake in an aimless m[?] with his hands and feet badly frozen. Ravensburg had become insane and left his home. He was given medical attention and later taken to the asylum in Brandon.

Needy People in Town

Dauphin has more families in need this winter than in any year in its history. While in some cases it may be attributed to [falis?] of parents, a great deal of the distress can be accounted for by lack of employment. The Town Council, the churches and other organizations have the matter of providing for families well in hand, and their efforts are being supplemented by the endeavor of citizens. The officers of the Salvation Army, have applications for clothing and people who have cast off garments can make good use of same by notifying Capt. Johnson, who will distribute same to the right quarters.

Fork River Festivities

The season opened with a Hallowe’en party to be held in the school. The earliest arrivals, however, found all in darkness and thought that they were Tuck in when a glance down the street showed them the affair had taken a slight Tilt and landed across the way. The organization was well planned for a progressive game of whist fit into the Timewell and introduced the strangers. The sons of Williams, Richards and Will were present and gave a steadiness to the affair. Someone suggested that it would be as well to Lock (the) Wood as the unsteadier element might get Cooper in trouble over the dishes. However Prudens prevailed and the affair passed off quietly with a Little dance. Our worthy seedsman Briggs by name has been heard saying Harlow quite frequently but the young lady herself calls it Halo. His brother’s face is seen to Blanche with fear as he Hunts for a partner for a dance.

The following week a Thanksgiving supper was given and turkey figured largely on the bill of fare. Some hunters in the vicinity who were, commissioned to replenish the larder, report the choicer varieties of game to be very scarce but grouse to be fairly abundant. However a very sumptuous repast was served. The Irish of course could not get along without their Tait(ers). Parker(house) rolls, salads, etc., were served in a lavish manner and the tables fairly groaned under the weight of the good things provided. A Little dash of Curry added brightness as well as spice and flavor to the affair. The Winnipegosis orchestra played during the meal which added greatly to its enjoyment. After the supper they put on a very enjoyable program. The world renowned baritone Prof. Shears rendered a very classic selection in the truly pompus style of such celebrities. Unfortunately he could not Reid his music very well, in fact he read it upside down, i.e., the music; but otherwise it was artistically rendered and heartily encored. Another popular item was given by Mr. Roberts. Mr. Roberts has acquired a truly oriental style both in methods of procedure and delivery for he read it backwards and in a reverse position. A noted trio also figured largely on the program. A famous elocutionist was present and gave a very fine selection, but upon being encored she was so upset by some experience with a young man from Aldershot that she was unable to respond. Her troubled Browse won the sympathy of the audience. We hope that she will soon recover from her unhappy experience and be able to favor the public again in her usual capable manner.

The next event was a farewell to our esteemed friends, the Lockwoods. They will be greatly missed in our midst as they took a very active part in the social life. The evening’s performance opened with a game of whist. This created considerable excitement as the winners were nearing the goal. There was scarcely time to take a Brethour two and no time to Parker round the corners as the winning team was just two lengths ahead and making straight for the goal. The prizes presented were of a useful character. Some of our friends from the north were present for the first time this season and have a very Ven(er)able appearance as well as added distinction to the party. Our new station agent felt very Proud as he danced with the leading belles of the town. A very dainty lunch was served and four leafed clovers were seen among the viands. Later some recitations were given. Mrs. Lockwood gave some really good advice to girls which we hope will receive serious attention.

Sime nature study students from Snell’s Grove brought some specimens for identification. Among them was the lace wing, a very dainty insect with large Lacey wings, and which feeds upon the aphids. Another was the Dobson which is the aquatic larva of the order of insects known as neuropteran. In the larva stage of development it is used largely by fishermen for bait. It is well known along the banks of the Mossy. Eels are also reported to be found along this stream. The Meadows and Lees are full of such insects as the damsel and dragon flies.

The evening’s performance closed with a little dance and as the lights were low it finished up with a dance in the White, moonlight which was streaming in through the windows. Then there was a Russel for to get the wraps. The darkness acted as a Shield to some amusing episodes which were transpiring in the corridors.

The next important event was the recital given by the pupils of Prof. Williamson. The pupils reflected great credit on their teacher by the way the songs and instrumentals were given. Among them was the Flight of the Butterflies and The Thunderstorm. A little lassie of eight played a Scotch selection on the violin and was heartily encored. Representatives were presented from the various countries. The Irish were there from the Shannon while the McLean tartan represented the Highlands. Prof. Williamson represents the Toronto College of Music and his pupils were presented with diplomas from that college during the evening performance. Misses Reid, Bailey, Robertson, Hafenbrak, Munro and Hunt were the fortunate winners and nearly all passed with honors.

After these there was an adjournment and those who did not stay in their Ward at home set out on five year’s cruise on the Meighen and were shipwrecked.

–J.B.

Fork River

The Orangemen will hold their annual New Year’s Ball on January 6th. This is an annual affair and always has been one of the events of the season. Come out and enjoy yourself. The proceeds are to go to a member who lost his all by fire some days ago.

The U.F.M. has elected new officers for the year and will start out with a pie social on January 13th. Do not forget the date.

E.V. Lockwood and family have left for Englefeldt, where Mr. Lockwood will take charge of the C.N. station.

J. Schuchett is moving his old warehouse to the street and all old customers will find him open for business.

The “kiddies” are looking forward to the Christmas holidays with a grin.

Rats are becoming the pest of the village. We would like to see the council put a bounty on them. It might help rid the district of what will be the source of considerable loss of not checked.

See Fred Tilt for fire and life insurance. No one should go without insurance. The cost is small and the security is great.

Winnipegosis

The catch of fish at this point, so far, is below normal. The late mild weather made it very hard to handle the catch at all.

Enearson Bros. have taken a bunch of teams up to the northern part of the make and expect to return with fish about Dec. 20.

The Booth fisheries and the Independent Fisheries have finished storing ice for next season’s operations.

Hay and wood are coming in steadily, at $2.50 to $3 per load for hay and $3.50 to $4 per cord for seasoned poplar.

The trustees are advertising for a new principal of the school. Teachers seem to be ever on the move and keep the trustees guessing all the time. Some day the profession, like other professions, will become more permanent. Of course, in this statement I do not wish to include the gentler sex, whose chief aim (and a worthy one) is to get married.

The United Sunday school Christmas tree and entertainment on the 22nd promises to be a great success. A large number of our young people are taking part in the program. The work of training the children was no small job, and to those who gave their time the thanks of the community are due.

Inspector Martin, of the provincial police, Dauphin, arrived on Tuesday, to participate in a wolf hunt. He was joined here by Constable Black. Timber wolves are reported killing tock in the country north of the town and settlers want these dangerous animals exterminated. An Indian hunter will accompany the two constables on their expedition.

Our community, in sympathy with other places in the West has experienced a poor year. But, many of us in times gone by have seen worse days, so let us cheer up and plan for better things in the coming year.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 15 – 1921

Brakeman Tuck Killed

George F. Tuck, brakeman, was killed at noon Monday in the Canadian National Railway yards at Swan River. He jumped from the Prince Albert through freight train as it was pulling into the station. He slipped, fell backward under the moving cars, and was killed instantly. Tuck was 23 years old and a native of England. He was a returned soldier and had been a resident of Dauphin for little over a year.

The funeral took place from Farrell’s Undertaking Parlors on Wednesday afternoon to Riverside cemetery. The service was conducted by the Rev. Philip Duncan.

Fined for Assault

Fred Beyko appeared before P.M. Hawkins on Monday, December 12th, charged with assaulting Harry Derkacz. Beyko was found guilty and fined $20 and costs, amount in all to $46.75. Both parties belong to the Valley River district.

Fork River

The mighty hunters have returned from their annual trek. Some bring spoils others a long face.

The annual meeting of the U.F.M. will be held in the school house on Friday evening, December 16. This is the business meeting of the year and everyone is requested to turn out. A directors meeting will be held right after the annual meeting and the evening will finish with a dance and supper. Everyone turn out and have a good time.

The teachers are working hard on the Christmas entertainment to be held on the 22nd. The “kiddies” are rounding into shape and there is a promise of a fine evening ahead. Do not forget the date.

Municipal nomination day passed over very quickly. Reeve Robertson was returned by acclamation. In Ward 2 we have Sam Hrushovey and Joe Fedorovitch. Ward 6 Metro Fediuk, Nicola Panagopka and Arthur Shannon, while Ward 4 has Mr. Hart and Frank Thorsteinson.

T.B. Venables has completed part of his new home and has moved in for the winter. Mr. Venables will complete building operation in the spring.

James Tate lost his home by fire some days ago. The family was away at the time and as far as can be learned there was little if any fire in the stove at the time.

Stanley King was a visitor during the hunting season. Stanley is an old-timer and is always a welcome visitor.

E.V. Lockwood and family have returned from a trip to Chicago, where they were visiting Mrs. Lockwood’s folks.

Cordwood is coming into town and the price is a bit lower than for some time.

In fixing up for the winter do not forget to see Tilt for insurance. No matter what it is he has insurance to cover it.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 8 – 1921

Fine $200

Stanley Sawicki, of Sifton, appeared before magistrate Hawkins at the end of the week charged with having liquor in his possession, when arrested by chief of police Everett. He was found guilty and fined $200 and costs. The liquor was home brew and possessed a good kick Sawicki was but recently released from jail.

Fork River

The election is over, but we doubt if all are satisfied with the result. It was ever thus.

The annual meeting of the Fork River Agricultural Society will be held in the Secretary’s office, on Saturday, December 17th, at 2 p.m.

On Tuesday evening the pupils of Prof. Williamson gave a musical recital in the Orange Hall. There was a large attendance and the appreciation shown by the audience throughout the evening testified to the excellent merit of the performers. Amongst those who made their appearance for the first time were Hetty Richardson, piano solo; Mary Jane Little, piano solo; Bernice McLean, piano solo and Maisie Dobson, a little maid of 8 years whose well rendered violin solo earned for her two recalls. The style and technique displayed in the rending of the piano solos “La Papillion” by Kate Robertson, “Dance Gaciense” by Irene Bailey, “Artutus” by Blanche Hunt and “Silver Nymph” by Myrtle Munro, also the “Sonatma” by Edna Hafenbrak was above the average and gave evidence of the high standard of training those young students receive in the Fork River studio. The vocal solos by [?] Bailey and Edna Hafenbrak were well received, as were the piano duets by the misses Shannon, Richardson and Munro and pearl and Verna Reid. Congratulations and thanks were tendered Prof. Williamson for the great interest he takes in the progress of his pupils.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 1 – 1921

Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River, Nov. 15. All the members were present. Minutes of the last meeting read and adopted.

Communications were read from Lakeview Municipality, including copies of several resolutions. Municipal Commission, re date for Mossey River and Winnipegosis to meet in the question of the Mossey River Bridge; Dauphin Land Office, re cancellation of homestead entries; the Hudson Bay Co., as to water trouble on 12-29-20; H. Arrowsmith, re tax account; the controller of town planning, re addition to Fork River; two applications for cancellation of taxes under “The Soldiers’ Taxation Relief Act,” and the Municipal commissioner, re hail insurance.

Hunt-McLean — That the taxes on the T.A. Burrows lumber yard be cancelled to a basis of assessment of $5,000.

Marcroft-Hunt — That taxes to the amount of $20.34 standing against the S. of 2-31-18 be cancelled.

Hunt-Marcroft — That taxes against the following lands be cancelled to the amount over and above an assessment of $800. The nw, sw, and ne of 9-29-18; the nw 23-30-18; and the ne 14-31-19, and also the nw 11-29-19, to an assessment basis of $900.

Hunt-Toye — That the several resolutions submitted by the municipality of Lakeview be endorsed and that the delegates to the Municipal Convention are instructed to support them vigorously.

Marcroft-Thorsteinson — That the account of Coun. Panagobka for letting and inspecting work be passed.

Panagobka-McLean — That the following amounts of taxes be cancelled: D.A. Briggs $35.28; T.N. Briggs, jr, $75.

McLean-Toye — That the polling place for Tp. 30, Rge. 19, be Bicton Health School and for Tp. 29, Rge. 19, Wieden School.

Toye-Panagobka — That the reeve and Coun. Marcroft be a Committee to investigate the water trouble on sec. 12-29-20.

McLean-Panagobka — That the accounts as recommended by the Finance Committee be passed.

McLean-Panagobka — That the Council adjourn to meet again at the call of the reeve.

Winnipegosis

Several loads of fish have arrived from Duck Bay. As the season advances fish deliveries will be a daily occurrence.

Candidate W.J. Ward was in town Tuesday. He is billed to address several meetings in the district this week.

Rev. E Roberts returned from Dauphin on Tuesday. He had an interview with the dentist while at the big down.

The ladies in town are very busy preparing for the United Church bazaar, to be held in Friday, December 9th, in the Rex Hall, commencing at 3 p.m. A good assortment of dainty useful presents will be on sale, most suitable for Christmas presents; and tea will be served from 5 to 7 o’clock. At 8 p.m. there will be an entertainment in the hall. Admission: Adults 35 cents; children 15 cents.

Although December brings us to the half year in church work, as yet, owing to the distressing financial situation we have been able to raise only 26 per cent of the amount necessary to carry through our year’s work. It is therefore sincerely hoped that this effort to add to church funds will receive the utmost possible support of…[lost page atm]

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 24 – 1921

Fire at Fork River

Early on Friday morning last fire destroyed the store and stock of James Schuchett at Fork River. The family lived over the story and were awakened at 3 o’clock by smoke and flames. The fire had made such headway that the inmates had only time to make their escape. Very little was saved from the building. Mr. Schuchett was in Winnipeg at the time of the fire. He carried $6,000 insurance.

I.O.D.E. War Memorial

The Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire war memorial, instituted about a year and a half ago, is rapidly completing its organization, the most important object of which is to benefit the sons and daughters of decreased or disable soldiers, sailors or airmen, in connection with the clause re bursaries in Canadian universities, already ten boys and eight girls are studying in the universities and in nearly every case the universities are remitting a large portion of the tuition fees. The successful candidates for the Canadian bursaries this year, value $250 per year for four years, are as follows: Province of Manitoba James Kellett, of Winnipeg; Saskatchewan, E.W. White, Arcola; British Columbia, Kathleen Dodds, Vernon; Ontario, Gordon R. Maybee, Napanee; Quebec, E.W. Staecie, Montreal; Nova Scotia, Florence L. Tupper, Kentville. Owing to the fact the Prince Edward Island and New Brunswick did not send in any applications, the bursaries allotted to these provinces were given to Manitoba and Saskatchewan. J. Sumner, of Winnipeg, was given one of these bursaries and Wm. Blackburn, of Weyburn, the other. The clause re overseas scholarships, value $1,400 for one year—is not as yet fully completed. Four scholars were sent to British universities this year and five will be sent next year. When this clause of the memorial is complete the overseas scholarship will be given in each province each year.

Sunday Night Fire

What might have been a serious fire with disastrous consequences broke out on Sunday night at midnight. Mr. Spence, of the Royal Bank, was passing by Bowman and McFadden’s office and noticing flames, quickly raised the alarm. In a very few moments our efficient fire brigade was on the spot. The fire had started in one corner of the office between two brick walls and thus saved more series results. Mr. and Mrs. Ramsden and babe were awakened and quickly made their escape. Beyond the damage of smoke and water no serious harm was done.

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Nov. 22

We are looking forward to the coming municipal election. Rumor has it that four men are going to lock horns for Ward two.

Settlers are still coming in around here; this is going to be a good farming district yet.

We are pleased to learn that Mr. Wenger and family are coming back in our midst.

The attendance at our school is now on the upward trend since the roads from up.

James Toye informs us, that the young folks are going to hold a boating party next spring. Gondolas stone boats and punts will be the order of the day. The route to be traversed is from Jas. Laidlaw’s corner to Arthur Campbell’s, and thence across country to Tom Toye’s.

Someone said Tom Toye’s wrist was swollen. “Too much hand shaking, Tom”!

An old musical ditty says: “Mary had a little lamb, etc.” Last Sunday Mr. Ogmundson met a wolf with a little lamb and he got it, and took it back it its owner.

We would like to see the Herald in a few more homes around here.

Mr. Ogmundson has about completed his new barn. He is waiting for plaster.

Say, Joe, have you spotted out the Christmas tree yet? The young and old, are looking forward for another good time.

Rev. E Roberts will commence his series of lantern lectures on the evening of November 30th at 8 p.m. everybody turn out as it will be worth seeing.

Arthur Campbell, of Sec. 14, is going to contest the reeveship this year. He has already promised Bob Toye 4 drain pipes, and a deep ditch. “Go to it Arthur.”

Fork River

The week-end excitement was the Schuchett fire Friday morning. The residents did some hustling to save the adjoining building of Fred Tilt and the pool room, run by Geo. Lloyd. Schuchett’s loss has been considerable, but he has $6,000 in insurance. The store was the best building in town and is a loss to the community.

There is a report that both Mr. Tilt and Mr. Ben Canner lost considerable sums of money during the excitement of the fire. Ben says in future he will not leave his money in his overalls.

Coun. Ab. Hunt is a juryman at the Dauphin assizes this week.

The people hereabouts are looking forward to hear some of the political spell binders hold forth before election day. So for we have had no meetings. Guess the candidates think we know how to vote anyway.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 17 – 1921

$300 from Poppy Day Sale

In commemoration of the many Canadian Soldiers who are buried on the battlefields of France and Flanders, and to mark the signing of the armistice, thousands of Red Poppies, replicas of the scarlet flowers which grow in such profusion in the devastated areas, were placed on sale last Friday, all through Manitoba.

In Dauphin the sale ladies were on the street at an early hour, and every pedestrian was politely asked the question, “Will you buy a poppy?” Scarcely a person refused and nearly every man, woman and child, wore a red flower.

Headquarters for the poppy Day campaign were established in the G.W.V.A. Hall. Proceeds of the sale amounted to about $300, half of which goes to the G.W.V.A. Building Fund, and half to the I.O.D.E. War Memorial.

La Verandrye Chapter thanks the Great War Veterans Association for the use of the rooms, the citizens in town and country for their generous response toward the campaign, and lastly the different committees of ladies, who worked so untiringly in their efforts that the sale might be a success.

Dauphin’s Population 3862

The census returns for Manitoba are now to hand. The population for he town is 3862. With the sub-divisions of Westmoore and River Heights it is 4,200. The sub-divisions are really part of the town although in the rural municipality of Dauphin. The increase since the census of 1911 is 37.19 per cent.

The population of the Electoral Division of Dauphin is 35,219. The increase since 1911 is 50.78 per cent.

The population of the province is 613,008, an increase since 1911 of 32.92 per cent.

Grandview town has a population of 846, an increase of 32.81.

Winnipegosis

Mr. Harry W. Grenon returned on Tuesday from a trip to Chicago. He states that the fish market outlook is not very bright. Prices are likely to continue low.

The open winter fishing season started on the 15th. The number of licenses issued is about 150, which is considerably less than last season. No fish, of course, will be brought down from the north until the ice is strong enough to carry the teams.

The wholesale companies operating this season are: The Booth Fisheries, The Armstrong Independent Fisheries and H.W. Grenon.

The prevailing prices for fish are 6 cents a pound for whites and 5c. for yellows.

The meeting in the interest of Mr. Cruise last week was well attended. The speakers were Messrs. Cruise and Bowman.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 10 – 1921

1921 Nov 10 – I.O.D.E.

To-morrow, Armistice Day, as a tribute to Canada’s dead heroes, members of La Verandrye Chapter will flood the streets with their hand-made poppies. Corps of workers have been enlisted for the task, and every citizen will be asked to buy a poppy in memory of a soldier “lying in Flanders fields.”

The Red Poppy was chosen by Canadian women as the fitting bower with which to honor Canada’s army on Armistice Day. It is hoped that the citizens will co-operate with us in making Canadian Poppy Day a huge success. Proceeds of the sale are solely for patriate purposes.

1921 Nov 10 – L.A. to G.W.V.A. Notes

The regular meeting will be held in the new hall on Tuesday, Nov. 15th. A full attendance is request.

The bazaar was a success. This is a feather in the ladies’ hats.

The dance will be held on Saturday as a usual in the Veterans’ new hall. Admission 50c.

1921 Nov 10 – Fork River

Your correspondent missed last week through having the hook worm or some other equally no-good excuse.

The Fork River Women’s institute met on the 5th November to receive the report of the retiring president, Mrs. E. Lockwood. The women are to be commended for the deep interest they are taking in fitting up the school kitchen.

The regular social evening of the Fork River U.F.M. will be held on Friday evening, Nov. 11. Every one turn out and have a good time. Cards and dancing will be the order of the evening.

E.V. Lockwood is disposing of his property north of the town.

Our old resident, “Bill” Tuck, says he is going west and grow up with the country. Hop-to-it, Bill, you have our best wishes.

Mike and Carl Lundy have recently purchased the livery stable of Harry Little. They intend to carry on a general dray and livery business.

The school trustees have just received their winter supply of coal. The kiddies are assured of a comfy building for winter.

The Mossey River Rural Credits Society held a meeting on the first to talk matters over with the members. Each and every member is requested to call and see the secretary on or before the next meeting, which will be held on December 3, 1921.

Mr. and Mrs. J. Peterson have left for Winnipeg, where they expect to spend the winter. Their house is for rent or sale. For terms apply to F.J. Tilt.

Mr. and Mrs. Shuchett have a friend who has just arrived from Russia, having been ten months making the trip. What a difference this lady must find between Russia and her present home.

Tax notices are out and the usual cry is heard up and down the land. Our school rate is high but we believe it could be reduced by bringing the two schools together.

Big game permits will shortly b on sale at the office of Fred J. Tilt.

N. Panagobka is putting on a sale on the 19th inst. here is a chance for those who have some spare cash.

A. Cameron, of Cypress River, was a visitor this week. Sandy is hale and hearty and is always a welcome visitor in our midst.

Our crops are not what we expected this fall but we are in far better shape than some districts in southern Manitoba. Fork River has never known an absolute crop failure and we don’t expect to. Readjustment must come after a war such as we have gone through and we feel that ere long we will be back on a pre-war basis. Good bless (? old kaiser bill.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 3 – 1921

1921 Nov 3 – Fire at Winnipegosis

Fire early Wednesday morning destroyed the stores of Isaac Bradbery and Nate Kessler. The loss will be considerable. Some insurance was carried by the firms.

1921 Nov 3 – G.W.V.A. Notes

The next regular meeting will b held on November 9th –will the members keep this date in mind and attend the meeting.

Anyone who has a supply of magazines that they are done with and have no further use for will oblige by leaving them in the reading room of the home. The reading matter will be much appreciated. The magazines will also be sent to the homesteads where reading matter is always acceptable.

Only a year now left in which to take up the soldiers’ insurance. Have you taken up any of this insurance? Over five thousand returned men have taken up the insurance; there are many more who are entitled to take advantage of it and become insured. It is a good thing to take up while it is going.

Don’t forget to support the “Poppy Ladies” on Armistice Day. Every veteran should have a poppy on that day.

Don’t fail to attend the bazaar of the Ladies’ Auxiliary to the G.W.V.A. on Thursday, November 3rd, as well as the ball at night.

Will every member see to it that he is in good stand if with the local branch. We are trying to get the new home fitted up and need all the help that we can get it.

1921 Nov 3 – H.E. Hunt Loses His Leg

H.E. Hunt, who now resides at Stettler, Alta., met with a bad gun accident on Tuesday, 1st inst. he received the charge of the gun in his leg below the knee and later had to have the leg amputated. Mrs. Hunt left for Stettler this (Thursday) morning.

1921 Nov 3 – Jury Verdict Accidental Death

The coroner’s jury empanelled at Winnipegosis on the 27th ult., to enquire into the death of Duncan Crerar, who was thrown from a wagon when his horses ran away, brought in a verdict that his death resulted from the accident.

1921 Nov 3 – October Police Records

The police records for October show that these were 13 convictions for October as follows: Two were fined for speeding, four drunks, one for breach of license by-law, two for disorderly conduct, two for running autos with cut outs on, two for breach of traffic by-law. The town’s share of the fines amounted to $110.

1921 Nov 3 – Poppies! “Lest we Forget.”

With the world-wide call to prayer for the disarmament of the Nations, there comes through “The Imperial Order Daughters of Empire” a national call to service. The fingers that were used so long to plying the busy knitting needles are not content to remain idle. There is work yet to be done—great and noble work, and every loyal Canadian must feel it a privilege to share the responsibility which the Daughters of Empire have assumed. The Poppies bloom in Flanders Field over the graves of many an unknown hero, who, when he gave his life for his country, have his all; and somewhere under the British flag his children may be struggling through life without the advantages that would make of them men and women worthy to fill the gaps left by the war. Many an inventive genius, many a brilliant mind may be lost to the wold because of the lack of resources to finance an advanced education.

And herein lies the work of The Daughters of Empire for many future years—to maintain the fund established, by them for enabling the worthy sons and daughters of fallen British soldiers, sailors and aviators, to obtain the best educational advantages the country can afford, thus making of them an asset of which the nation may be proud.

Has any monument so grad yet been erected to the memory of our Canadian heroes?

To keep alive the spirit of patriotism, and inspire the sentiment in the minds of the young, the women of our National Chapter, and all its auxiliaries, have, during the past weeks been engaged in marking “Poppies”, which they expect will be purchased and worn on “Armistice Day” by every loyal British subject. Though it is “Only a scrap of paper” it will be the duty of every parent and teacher in the land to wear one and tell the children the “Old Old Story” of that for which the Poppy stands the story of—

“The day when our hearts were wrung

And our Country’s Banner a half-mast hung

For the loss of our lads in brown

‘Twas a Nation’s grief, but an Empire’s gain

For they fell, that Empire to maintain

And that peace and liberty still might reign

In every man’s home town.

How best can we honor our noble dead—

Can storied marble a halo shed

To glorify Khaki Brown?

No! Let us open the doors of learning wide

To the sons and daughters of those who died

At Ypres and Vimy and Somme’s red tide,

For the sake of their own home town.

And in future years when the mists roll by,

And a world shall ask the reason why

These sleep in Khaki Brown,

Old Time will flutter his hoary wing,

And say in a voice with a gladsome ring,

“They died that a nobler race might spring

From the boys of our own home town.”

1921 Nov 3 – Thieves Enter Tailor’s Shop

Solomon’s tailor shop was entered Sunday night and two pair of pants and a grey jacket taken. Entrance was gained through a window in the rear of the shop. The window was being repaired and had been left unsecured.

1921 Nov 3 – Wife Beater Given Two Months

Edward Radford, a homesteader of the Shergrove district, appeared before magistrate Rheaume at Ste. Rose du Lac, on Saturday, October 29th, charged with beating his wife. He was found guilty and sentenced to two months in the Dauphin jail at hard labor.

1921 Nov 3 – Winnipegosis

The hatchery boat is now bringing in the roughfish which were caught while taking spawn.

Messrs. Toye, McDonald, Joe Bickel, Shears, Ketcheson, Sieffert, Denby, Brown, and Giggins attended the Union government convention at Dauphin, when Robert Cruise was again nominated as a government supporter.

A community club is being formed at this point, under the direction of Mr. Shears. Singing will be taken up as one of the first features of the winter’s programme.

Coroner’s juries do some funny things. In his evidence at the inquest of Duncan Crerar, Dr. Bottomley gave it as his opinion that deceased came to his death as a result of apoplexy. Yet in the face of this evidence the jury brought in a verdict that death was due to his being thrown out of a wagon, due to deceased’s horses running away.

Mrs. Theo. Johnson returned to town on Tuesday, from Dauphin. She shortly leaves for Fort William, where she will spend the winter.

The politicians are beginning to get busy. Handshaking has started, but the campaign cigar has not yet made its appearance.