Today in the Dauphin Herald – September 11, 1919

G.W.V.A. Notes

Members of the above association are requested to note that a general meeting is called for Sept. 11th at 8 p.m. All members are asked to make an effort to be present as business of importance will be placed before the comrades.
Arrangements have been made with Wallace Graham for a series of concerts to be put on at the town hall, under the auspices of this association.
The dates are as follows:
The Castle Square Entertainers, Sept. 19th.
The Victorian Serenaders, Oct. 14th.
The Canadian Juveniles, Nov. 3rd.
The Varsity Sixtette, Dec 5th.
The Dixie Jubilee Singers, Dec. 15th.
The Rob Wilson Co., Jan 1st.
All of the above are first ate shows and have been to Dauphin on several occasions and are well known to the majority of the residents here. A start is made on Sept. 19th with the Castle Square Entertainers; it is proposed to have a short dance after the show for which the Castle Square orchestra has been retained. The idea of having these entertainments is to further the possibility of having quarters owned by this association and the support of the public is looked for and counted on in the usual manner that it has always been given.
The dance held on the 8th inst., by the Ladies’ Auxiliary as a success and the ladies are to be congratulated on their venture, which, like the above concert, is to help along the main plan of this association.

Roie Waters Drowned

A sad event occurred last week when Roie Waters, a returned man, was drowned through the upsetting of his canoe on Sarah lake, 10 miles south of Durban. The young man left his home on Friday morning Aug. 28th, and noting was seen of him until his body was recovered by his brother and Constable Tacuik, of Dauphin, last Saturday. From all appearances it would seem that the canoe was overturned on the discharge of his gun and being hampered with heavy clothing he was unable to extricate himself from the dangerous condition.
Deceased was well and favorably known in the Swan River Valley, and also leaves many friends in the Dauphin and Ste. Rose districts to mourn him untimely end.

Fork River

Pte. W. Pruden, lately from overseas, is visiting his brother, O. Pruden.
The station here had a little fixing done last week in the way of a signal and a lamp. It looks as if we were to have an operator. None to soon to suit the public.
G. Scriven, lay reader, who has been in charge of the Anglican mission this summer, will preach his farewell sermon in All Saints church at three in the afternoon, Sunday, Sept. 14th.
The Returned Soldiers’ Committee will meet in W. King’s office at 8 o’clock Saturday evening, Sept. 13th. All members are requested to attend as there is business of importance to transact.
Two elevators are now in running order.
The rain at the end of the week held up threshing for a few days.
Fred King caught a large rat in a trap on his farm. This is the first rat seen in this part of the country.
Some small minded persons, for the want of better employment, on Saturday night last decorated one of the church doors with rotten eggs. Such happenings are a disgrace to a community and the culprit should be apprehended and dealt with. This is not the first occasion such rowdyism has happened.

Zalana

Mossey River Municipality, Sept. 6.
Harvesting grain is practically over around here. Possibly a few have not quite finished stacking yet. Some have already threshed, mostly from the stook; the stacks can wait until later if necessary. This has been a nice week for threshing. Pokotylo’s machine seems to be the only one working just around here. John is quite an enterprising fellow and is deservedly popular. The prevailing price for threshing here seems to be 8 cents a bushel for oats and 12 cents a bushel for wheat. Although the farmers around here had more land under cultivation this year than last the average yield is not so good. The rust did considerable damage, especially to the wheat. There seems to be a pretty good yield of vegetables this year, though in some instances not quite so good as last year.
The Fork River Agricultural fair, which was advertised for Aug. 15th, but postponed on account of heavy rain that day, is now advertised to come off on Friday, Sept. 26th, in conjunction with the Boys’ and Girls’ club fair. An interesting feature of the fair will be a baby show. Two prizes are offered—1st prized $10; 2nd prize $5. There ought to be a lot of entries here, I wonder if Frank and the wife will show the big boy who arrived last week. It is to be hoped the weather man will be in good humor and favor us this time.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – September 4, 1919

Barn Burned

Early Sunday morning last the barn on Chas. N. McDonald’s farm at Gartmere was discovered on fire. When the alarm was given the fire had made too great headway to be got under control and the structure was soon reduced to ashes. Fortunately there was no live stock in the barn at the time of the fire, but harness and other articles that were in the building were burned.

The barn was erected last summer at a cost of about $6,000 and there is $2,5000 insurance on the building and $1,000 on the contents.

The origin of the fire is a mystery.

House Burned

Norman Beyette’s dwelling at Listowel was burned early Monday last during a gale. The contents were also destroyed. Mrs. Beyette and little daughter had a narrow escape, being in bed at the time and made their escape through the flames.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – August 28, 1919

G.W.V.A. Notes

(Contributed by J.M. Chalmers, secretary.)
Members of the above association are asked to note that the regular meeting called for 28th inst. Has been cancelled. This is owing to the fact that threshing operations make it pretty nearly impossible for the majority of the comrades to attend. In fact, at this time of the year it is hard for any to attend. The next meeting will be held on the 11th of September and all the members are asked to make an effort to be present as business of importance will be placed before the comrades.
The rooms are proving their use these days. During the month of July some 250 comrades slept in them and this number will be exceeded during the present month. We have within the past two weeks had a large number of comrades from the east looking for work in the harvest fields and on threshing gangs and the fact that these men are able to put up in these rooms until they have been placed has been a boon to mauy, and the manner in which they have expressed their appreciation speaks well for Dauphin.
We are informed that Comrade G.F. King has been notified that he is to be presented with the Military Medal, earned whilst he was in France by the Prince of Wales during his visit to Winnipeg. This will mean another parade for George, but he will doubtless endure same in consideration of the fact that by doing so he is giving a boost to the Vets of Dauphin, to say nothing of the town in general.

Verdict in Favor of Mr. Grenon

In the suit of the Armstrong Trading Co. Ltd., against T.P. Grenon for possession of the property known as the Commercial hotel, Winnipegosis, has resulted in favor of defendant. Mr. Grenon’s counter-claim for rent was allowed. Bowman, McFadden & Caldwell represented Mr. Grenon and a Winnipeg firm the A.T. Co.

Winnipegosis

The ladies of the Woman’s institute entertained the children of the town at a picnic at the beach on Wednesday Aug. 20th. Races and games were the order of the day, for which prizes were given and a beautiful lunch and parcel of candy to each child. After having a good time they were taken home in cars by the Misses Grenon, Dr. Medd and Mr. Bradley.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – August 21, 1919

Movement to Dam Mossey River

A movement is on foot to have the Dominion Government build a dam on the Mossey River on Lake Dauphin. This year the water in the lake is at its lowest point, and navigation for even small boats is almost impossible. The hay lands are to be reclaimed the depth of water in the lake has to be greatly increased. By building a dam the water could be raised several feet which would permit of navigation and increase the productiveness of the hay lands by hundreds of thousands of tons.

Nat Little Writes About France After War

Mr. and Mrs. Nat Little, of Fork River, are touring France. Mr. Little, in the following letter, describes, in an interesting manner, has visit to the battlefields:
To fulfill my promise to you I write these few lines on my trip to date. After seeing Ireland, Scotland, England and Wales, these countries having been described so often there is no use repeating. We crossed from Folkestone to Bolonge and on to Paris, said to be the most beautiful city in the world. We made Paris our headquarters, going out to some one of the battlefields each day and returning at night on account of there being no accommodation in the country. We have been over every battlefield except Ypres. Tourists will be allowed into Belgium some time in August. All battlefields look alike—nothing but ruin and destruction. Artois and Arras, were first visited on account of the valiant part taken by our Canadian soldiers. We crossed from Arras to Lens by motor and on foot, following Vimy Ridge, and passing through Souchez, Givenchy, Carency and Mount St. Eloi, or the remains of these places. On the ridge a large monument has been erected to the fallen Canadians.

Little Black Crosses

Soldiers’ graves are everywhere, many of the little black crosses bearing no inscription and having only the hero’s helmet placed on top to show his nationality. German prisoners under French guards are busy collecting these scattered bodies and placing them in cemeteries where the shell holes and trenches have been filled it. Everywhere are piles of barbed wire and dumps of empty shell cases round the gun positions. There are camps here and there, pacing sentries, heavy motor lorries carrying rusty guns and Nissen huts. On top of the slope are lying several belts of German machine gun ammunition and a vast stack of cartridges, undoubtedly a well chosen nest for some Hun sniper.

“Booby Traps” Numerous

Dugouts are intact, but the tourist is advised not to touch anything, for not all the “booby-traps” have been discovered, and there are still “duds” and grenades lying about. The whole area is dotted with shell holes and trenches, and the very ridges seem to have been blown away. But where are the places themselves? If you did not read the tragic epitaphs written on some of them you would pass without notice the grave of what was only a few years ago a happy cluster of houses and blooming gardens nesting around a church.
Some cities had 30,000 inhabitants and more; nothing now remains of them. Is there any possible future for these towns and their fellow-sufferers? They say it would cost $1,250,000 to clear out the ruins of each town. Let it be added that there are in these ruins 100,000 unexploded shells, and that according to recent statistics one out of ten is sure to burst in the hands of the workers! A thousand accidents have already occurred in the past few months. After the terrible loss of human life in France is it wise to risk new ones for such a doubtful result? Would it not be better to build a new city close by and leave the ruins as a terrible avenging witness of the war German willed and waged.
German prisoners—fat, sturdy and rosy-face are standing in line and hand to each other quietly and methodically bricks from the rubbish heaps. A Frenchman in our party, his hat at the back of his head, suddenly raised his clenched fist and said, “Ah, ces bandits de Boches!” The Germans answered this outburst with an expressionless animal stare, but I perceived just an ironical twinkle in the eye of a feldwebel (sergeant).

Threshing Commenced

Threshing operations have commenced in all parts of the district. This is the earliest on record for threshing. The grain is in good shape for the separator. The returns in some parts are larger than were expected, although it is too early yet to form anything like a correct estimate a to what the yield will be. The grade is not expected to be very high on account of the unevenness of growth.

Fork River

Mr. Gilmore, of the Canadian Northern Townsite Co., spent two days here with the intention of putting ore of the townsite property on the market. Fred Tilt has been appointed townsite agent.
Miss Ina Briggs has returned from her holidays and started duty as teacher of the Fork River school on the 18th inst.
Wheat threshing has started.
The Agricultural Society’s exhibition was postponed on account of the heavy rain on the selected day, Friday, the 15th. The show will now be held on the same date as the Boys’ and Girls’ Club fair, which date will be announced next week.
Rev. Harry P. Barrett, rector of St. Paul’s church, Dauphin, will hold holy communion and baptismal services in All Saints’ church at three in the afternoon of Sunday, August 24th. All are invited to attend the services.
Mrs. Terrin and children, of Dauphin, spent the week-end with Mr. and Mrs. C.E. Bailey, on the Mossey.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – August 14, 1919

Fair Notes

Some of the ladies were quite disappointed that there was no baby show this year. The baby show was very popular in past years and it was undoubtedly an oversight that it was not held this year. Mr. John Gorby, who was had charge of this department in past years, is the champion of the ladies and the babies and it will not be his fault if the show is not held next year. The babies are out greatest national asset and their welfare is contributed to by information supplied by physicians and professional nurses at these exhibitions.
The directors worked hard for several weeks to complete the details of the fair and have the satisfaction of knowing their efforts were appreciated and the exhibition a success in every way.
Chas. Murray, the patient and tireless secretary, had a busy three days of it.
The stock parade, headed by the band of the 79th Cameron Highlanders, was a striking feature on Friday.
Over 5000 people passed through the turnstiles on Friday.
The War Saving and Theft Stamp advertising display was very much in evidence on the grounds. The entrance to the grounds, the main building, grand stand, ticket office and other places throughout the grounds were nicely decorated with different lines of posters. It was evident that Mr. Blackadar intended that the large crowds that gathered each day on the grounds should be thoroughly informed regarding this movement.

Successful Exhibition

The 28th annual fair of the Dauphin Agricultural society, held on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday of last week, was the most successful in its history. And this, too, in the face of the fact that the farmers were in the midst of the harvest. While it is true there was a falling off in most of the departments it is a noteworthy fact the exhibits generally were of a superior class. The livestock was the best ever shown here. Two notable herds were J.D. McGregor’s Aberdeens and John Graham’s shorthorns. In the Clydesdale, Percherons, Agricultural and light horses many fine animals were shown and nearly all the leading breeders of the district were represented.
The poultry section was by long odds the best in the history of the society. The exhibit was not only large but of the highest quality. Much credit is due the Poultry Association and its energetic secretary. Wm. Murray, for the success achieved.
The attractions were exceptionally good. The band of the 79th Cameron Highlanders from Winnipeg furnished the music on Friday and the splendid program was enjoyed by all.
Credit is due Mr. Wm. Rintoul for the manner in which the numerous young ladies executed the intricate dances. The little girls also did exceptionally well.
The Scotch dancing by the two little Simpson girls, to the music of the bagpipes played by their father, caught the fancy of the big crowd.
At 1.30 several hundred war veterans assembled in front of the grand stand and on behalf of the citizens Mayor Bowman extended them a hearty welcome. In his address he referred to the historic places in France where the Canadians made history and achieved undying fame. Robt. Cruise, M.P., also spoke, Major Williams, in the absence of Brig. Gen. Ketchen, replied on behalf of the men. Major Skinner added a few words in regard to a suitable memorial for those who had made the supreme sacrifice.

Fork River

E. Harris, formerly of Bracebridge, Ont., is visiting at the home of Fred Cooper.
Don’t forget to come to Fork River’s annual agricultural show, Friday, August 15th.
Rev. Harry P. Barrett, rector of St. Paul’s, Dauphin, will preach in All Saints’ Anglican church, Sunday afternoon, Aug. 24 h, at 3.
Mrs. J. Rice, teacher of North Lake school, has returned home from visiting at Cypress River and Neepawa and is feeling better after her trip.
The White Star Co.’s new elevator is nearly completed. Thus the commercial importance of this centre grows.
Owen Pruder is busy overhauling the Northern elevator so as to have it ready for the fall delivery of grain.

Sifton

The marriage of Miss Anna Farion, daughter of Fred Farion, merchant, of this place, to Mr. W. Belashta of Canora, was celebrated at St. Paul’s parish church, on Wednesday, the 6th inst., at 9 p.m. Bishop Budka, with the assisting priests, officiated. Some two or three hundred invited guests were present. The church had been very tastefully decorated with flowers, which blended very pleasingly with the handsome costumes of the bride and attendants. To the lively strains of a bridal chorus, sung in Little Russian, the bride and groom, showered with confetti, and guests repaired to the large Ruthenian hall, where en exceptionally well appointed supper was served. Covers for at least two hundred and fifty were laid and the tables were used for several relays of guests. The hall was very tastefully festooned and draped, with roses and asters as floral decorations. An orchestra, composed of Ruthenians, four brothers, from Winnipeg, played very pleasingly and tastefully. Bishop Budka, on behalf of the guess, toasted the bride and bridegroom, the latter responded very neatly both in Little Russian and English. Dancing was kept up until daylight. A. Kozak, one of the old national Cossack dances, given most artistically by Miss Belashka, of Winnipeg, and Mr. Dyk, of Dauphin, was much admired; also the tasteful fox-trotting of Mr. Assifat. A number of visitors from Winnipeg were present, amongst others, Mrs. Stefanyk, Mr. and Mrs. Badnac, Dr. Pasdrey, and Lieut. Kreman editor of the Canadian Ruthenian. Mr and Mrs. Belashta have left for Canora, their future home, where Mr. Belashta is in the legal profession.
During the evening Mr. —– spoke at some length about the conflict between the Poles and so-called Ukrainians, the West Galicians, stating that Premier Lloyd George had alone amongst the Allied powers at the peace conference, expressed himself in favor of an independent Ukraina, separate from the claims of the Polish aristocracy. He was followed by Mr. F. Taciuk, of Dauphin. A collection, totaling one hundred and twenty dollars, was taken up to be forwarded to Europe for use against the Poles.

Winnipegosis

Geo. G. Spence, who was formerly manager for the Hudson’s Bay Company here, has bought T.H. Whale’s general store.
There is an average crop in this district in spite of the dry season. The grain is nearly all cut and threshing will soon commence.
All the fishermen in town are bustling getting in supplies and preparing for the fall fishing. Two of the companies large boats leave here within the next few days for points at the north end of the lake.
A party of forty business men came up from Dauphin Sunday and took a trip fifty miles up the lake, upon the steamer “Armenon.” The trip was an enjoyable one and everyone was delighted with it. A net was set on the voyage out and was taken in on the return voyage. Nineteen fish were caught and Mr. Dan Hamilton auctioneered them off and got as much as $2.00 for a “sucker.” A Dominion and a Provincial M.P. were among the party.
The English Church is holding a regular Sunday service at Winnipegosis.
The town council is planning for a new municipal hall and extensive sidewalks.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – July 31, 1919

Charged with Rape

Robt. Lambert, aged 17, of Minitonas, appeared before P.M. Hawkins on the 25th inst., charged with rape. The girl is 16 years of age. He was remanded for trial.

Notes of the Fair

It is now only a week until the Dauphin fair will be in full swing. A large number of entries have already been made in vegetable and other hall exhibits. The early harvest is not interfering to any great extent with the entries in other classes so much as was at one time feared. They are assured of some good entries in cattle and horses as entries have already been received from J.D. McGregor, Brandon; John Graham, Carberry; C. Moffatt and J.I. Turner, Carroll. J.C. Crowe, Gilbert Plains, and W.H. Devine are expected with exhibits of Pereherons.
The unfortunate accident to Lieut. Kerr’s aeroplane at Portage la Prairie will prevent his appearance, but Lieut. Casewell, of Brandon, will fly in his stead. The public are thus assured of a threat in aeronautice.
The 4rd Cameron Highlanders band, of Winnipeg, will be in attendance.
It is understood that Thursday and Friday afternoons will be declared civic holidays in town.
See the Farmerette girls. They are the latest sensation.
It is almost certain Col. Barker, V.C., will be among the visitors.
Cheap rates are offered on the railway. A fare and one-third for return tickets.
All the leading baseball teams of the district are entered in the tournament. $450 are offered in prizes.
The entries for the horses races are large, and the speeding contest will be the [missing] in Dauphin.
Lieut. Casewell and Lieut. Bennett will make flights in their airplane and do the latest stunts.
Prospects for the Poultry Department are very bright. Entries are coming in from many outside points.
All entries for the Poultry section, including eggs, must be in by Aug. 2nd, and other sections by Aug 5th.
Racing Program
Thursday, Aug. 7th
2.30 pace, 2.25 trot, purse $500
Half-mile running race, purse $200
Friday, Aug. 8th
2.12 pace, 2.07 trot, purse $700
5-8ths mile running race, purse $200
2.20 trot, purse $700

In Memoriam

Meston—In loving memory of Pte. Walter Russell Meston, 1st Depot Batt., who died at Winnipeg, July 22nd, 1918, aged 23 years.
We miss thee from thy place, dear;
We miss thee from our home;
But thou art called to better things,
The whyfor should we mourn.
Inserted by his parents, sisters and brothers.

Sent Up for Trial for Incest

Henry Bracher, a farmer from the Minitonas district, was before the police magistrate on the charge of incest. The evidence warranted his being remanded for trial.

Fork River

Wm. Northam has moved out of town on to his farm a mile south where he has had a considerable amount of land broken this summer.
Fred Cooper, A. Hunt and Sam Reed, who have had a two weeks’ vacation in the west, returned home this week satisfied that there are worse places to farm than Fork River.
George Shannon has purchased a Happy Farmer tractor.
The annual meeting of the Mossey River School district was held on the 22nd. W. King, sen., was elected trustee for the coming term, Mrs. A. Rowe retiring.
Geo. Tilt has sold his farm to Mr. Steffesen.
Fork River residents are always well represented at the Dauphin fair and the attendance will be increased this year. When you have a good car and good roads the trip is only a jaunt.
Flying machine stunts will attract us all. Looping the loop and all the rest is new to the people of the north.

Winnipegosis

The municipality of Mossey River has a powerful new grader, which is at work building the road from Fork River to Winnipegosis.
Geo. Klyne, the teacher engaged by the School District of Don, who died suddenly last week, was buried on the 26th inst. F.B. Lacey the government representative, attended the funeral. The deceased came from North Dakota.
The ladies’ baseball team from Dauphin played the Winnipegosis team on Friday last. The Dauphin team won out.
The J.J. Crowe Lumber Co., Ltd., has bought out A.C. Bradley and is erecting a large lumber yard here.
Mr. Shaunnessey, general manager of the Booth fisheries, was a visitor last week and inspected the company’s property here.
Quite a number of our citizens, will leave on Thursday next to attend the Dauphin fair.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – July 24, 1919

G.W.V.A. Notes

The regular meeting of the above Association was held last Thursday, July 17th, Comrade F. Scrase, president, in chair.
Application for membership was received from eleven returned men, all of which were accepted. This now brings the total membership of the Dauphin Branch to 271. It is hoped that same will reach the 500 before the end of the year. Any returned men in the town that have not become members up to the present are asked to do so at an early ate, for like all other things, many can help one, and the greater the membership then so much more will be able to be done for the returned man by the association.
The auditors’ report for the past six months was submitted, and on motion of Comrades Armstrong and Miles it was accepted.
During the past year considerable progress has been made by the local branch in the town. The present new quarters were opened in March and between three and four hundred men have slept in these rooms during that period. When it is considered that no charge is made for the use of these and the fact that it is sometimes next to impossible to secure a room in the town on shot notice, the use and benefit of the rooms to the retuned men that are here looking for land and getting information and particulars re the Soldier Settlement, can be readily seen. The rooms are also used to a very great extent by the returned men of the town in the evenings, and also by the boys who are living on the farms when they are in town during the day, and were it not for them it would be hard to find a place for them to spend the time, especially the men that are here to make entry on land and are compelled, owing to waiting for trains, etc., to stay in the town over night or in some cases two or three days.
Application was received from the Ladies’ Auxiliary for the use of the large hall on Aug. 6, 7 and 8 for the purpose of serving dinner, and same was granted by the comrades.
The next meeting of the association will be July 31st, and members are requested to make note of the date.

Peace Day Celebration

In spite of the counter attractions elsewhere the citizens turned out in large numbers to celebrate Peace Day in Dauphin. At 10 a.m. about 250 people gathered for a Union Thanksgiving Service, which was conducted by Captain Kitson and Rev. Harry P. Barrett, while the address was given by Rev. J.A. Haw.
At 1.30 the children gathered at the two schools and a procession of about 40 automobiles, crowded with happy youngsters, headed by the town band, went along Main street to Fourth avenue and Second street to the park. In the park races were run for all children and in many events there were so many competitors it was necessary to have two and sometimes three beats.
The grown-ups of the town brought baskets and quite a number of family parties were to be seen enjoying picnic tea on the grass. Hot water was supplied and a booth managed by the members of the Children’s Aid Society, under the conductorship of Mrs. Vance, dispensed ice cream, sandwiches, lemonade, etc. in aid of the Home.
The whole day’s programme was arranged at two hurriedly called meetings at which Mr. George King was chairman. It would be impossible to mention all who contributed to the success of the day, but we must make note of the energy and interest of the Committee, Rev. Harry P. Barrett, Messrs. Ramsay Skinner, R.J. Malcolm, Rintoul, D. Sutherland, Wright, Barker and Ferguson.

Fork River

Harvest is expected to begin at once. There is some good crop in the district this season, and the quality, too, is expected to be high.
Wm. Coultas is building a dwelling on his farm.
S.B. Reid and family are visiting at Rathwell, Man.
Fred. Cooper and Mr. Hunt and family are on a vacation to Saskatchewan points.
The wild raspberry crop is a prolific one this season and canned raspberries will be found settlers’ tables this winter.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – July 17, 1919

Fined $200 for Operating Still

Nikola Presiloski, of Valley River, appeared before the police magistrate this week on the charge of “operating a still illegally.” He pleaded guilty and was fined $200 and $7 costs. The brand of whiskey manufactured by Presiloski is said, by those who sampled it, to be the best they ever imbibed.
Constable Coleridge, laid information against Joe Woiak, for failing to register under “Alien Enemy Act.” He was fined $10 and $5 costs.

G.W.V.A. Barn Dance

A barn dance was held on July 10th under the auspices of the Great War Veterans’ association in the barn of Mr. Arthur Fisher, Burrows. Some 150 people made the trip, and as the roads were good and the weather all that could be desired, a good time was spent. The McMurray orchestra was in attendance and, as usual, this was an assurance that the music was of the highest order. After all expenses had been paid a good sum was turned over to the association which will help their work and bring nearer the fond hope of the members that at some time, and it is hoped soon, they will be able to see their way to having quarters owned by the association as a permanent home for the veterans of the district. The thanks of the association are due to Mr. Fisher, who has placed his barn at the disposal of the association on two occasions this summer, and also to the various ladies and gentlemen who assisted in the arrangements.

G.W.V.A. Notes

Members of the above Association are asked to note that the meeting will be on Thursday night at 9 o’clock in place of 8 as usual. This change is to prevent a clash with the baseball game to be played the same evening. Members are requested to put in an appearance as matters of importance will be discussed. The executive of the association is informed that an Order-in-Council has been passed extending the War Service Gratuity to men that have seen service in England, but did not proceed to France. Particulars have been requested as to the manner in which application should be made for same and comrades will be notified on receipt of same.
This association wishes to thank those ladies who kindly sent cakes for the dance recently held at Mr. Fisher’s barn, also to Mr. Fisher for the use of his place.

Peace Day Observance

Dauphin citizens will observe Peace Day by a short service in the town hall at 10 a.m. In the afternoon a basket picnic will be held in the park with a program of sports for the children.

Sentenced to Five Years

The town of Dauphin laid a charge of “vagrancy” against Wm. Boyko. He appeared for trial before P.M. Hawkins on Monday. He entered a plea of not guilty but was convicted and sentenced to five years imprisonment in the Industrial Training School at Portage la Prairie on Tuesday. Boyko’s previous record is bad.

Winnipegosis

Geo. Spence, who has been overseas for over two years, returned home last week.
A party of surveyors are surveying the new railway line from Toutes Aides to Winnipegosis.
Miss A. St. Godard, of the Pas, is visiting her sister before going to Winnipeg to reside.
Misses Myrtle and Edna Grenon were passengers to the city on Saturday to meet their father. They will leave for Minneapolis to send their holidays.
Mrs. St. Amour and Misses A. and H. St. Godard left on Saturday for a visit to Winnipeg.
A fire occurred in the Armstrong Trading Company’s oil sheds this week, but was put out before serious damage was done.
F.G. Shears, J.P. Grenon and A.H. Steele have left for Winnipeg in connection with the suit started by the Armstrong Trading Co. against J.P. Grenon as to the ownership of the Winnipegosis hotel.
This has been a dry season here but lots of rain has fallen this week which has put the crops in good condition.
The lake steamers have been overhauled and have made several successful trips up to the north end of the lake, establishing new fishing posts.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – July 10, 1919

Police Court Cases

P.M. Hawkins, Presiding
On information laid by Constable Coleridge, John Goik appeared before the police magistrate on the charge of “non-registration under Alien Enemy Act.” He was found guilty and fined $10 and $5 costs. Urko Chorny also appeared on the charge of “removing without permit under Alien Enemy Act.” He was found guilty and fined $10 and $9 costs or 30 days hard labor. Urko elected to take the 30 days.
On information laid by Chief Bridle several boys were assessed $2 and costs each, for bicycle riding on sidewalks.
Wm. Bell faced the magistrate on Monday on two charges. First, that of “driving a motor while intoxicated,” second, for “having liquor I place other than private dwelling.” On the first charge he was fined $25 and $5 costs, and on the second count he was assessed $200 and $5 costs.

Saturday July 19th, Peace Day

Saturday, July 19th, has been proclaimed Peace Day, and a statutory holiday.

Fork River

Miss Ina and Stella Briggs left for their homes in Southern Manitoba to spend the holidays.
Pte. Miller has returned from overseas and is visiting at the home of his father, Charles Miller.
Pte. Merko and his war bride have arrived from overseas and are visiting with friends here.
Max Gashina has returned from overseas and is visiting at his home before going north to homestead.
The members of the Purple Star L.O.L. will hold their 17th annual basket picnic on July 12th at Fork River. Sports of all kinds.
The late heavy rains have proved of immense benefit to the district. The crops now promise well.
The auditor’s report is now in the hands of the clerk and will be perused with much interest. The ratepayers are entitled to know how the business of the municipality is conducted, and the council should let its light shine so that all may see its good work.
The question of the hour: “Are we to have the new school?” It is up to the ratepayers to say yea or nay.

Mossey River School Exams.

Results of exams: Examinations at Mossey River School No. 999:
Grade VII—Blanche Hunt 77.
Grade VI—Louise Rowe 63.
Grade V, Sr—Viola Rowe 76, Willie Thompson 73, Lorne Shannon, Gordon Atkins.
Grade V, Jr—Beatrice Rowe 79, Pearl Reid 67, Irene Bailey 65, Mary Briggs 64, Verna Reid 62, May Shaw 56.
Grade III—Lulu Thompson 87, Bernard Hunt 84, Percy Shannon 75.
Grade II—Ivy Hunt 92, Danny Wilson 69, Ivor Humphries 63, Alvin Bailey 59.
Grade I—Horace Thompson, Courtney Humphries, Albert Shannon.
Grade I, Jr—Charlie Rowe, Clara Pearson, Walter Pearson, Reggie Wilson.
K.E. Briggs, teacher.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – July 3, 1919

Case Transferred to Winnipeg

The case of the Armstrong Trading Co. vs. J.P. Grenon and J. McInnes, which was among the list of King’s Bench cases here, has been transferred to Winnipeg. This has been done for the benefit of the counsel who are all Winnipeg residents. The case starts today (Thursday).

Great War Veterans Hold Big Celebration

Fortune smiled on the Great War Veterans on Tuesday. Their first celebration was a splendid success viewed from all standpoints. The weather was ideal, and the crowds the largest that ever visited the town. Between four and five thousand people were on the Exhibition grounds in the afternoon. There was not a hitch to mark the day’s program.
The parade in the morning attracted much attention and favorable comment was heard on all sides on the many and varied representations in the line of march. There were cars decorated with flags without number, and it appeared as if every boy and girl in the town carried the colors.

Verdict for Mrs. Haley

Mrs. Jos. Haley has secured a verdict for $10,000 in the count at Saskatoon against the Canadian National Railway for the death of her husband. Joseph Haley was killed at Hawke’s spur, a mile west of Hudson’s Bay Junction in the fall of 1918 by being caught between a loading platform and a freight car. Action was instituted in the province of Saskatchewan owing to the accident having occurred there. The case came to trial at Saskatoon on June 25th, when judgment was given for $10,000. Bowman, McFadden & Caldwell represented the plaintiff.

Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River on Tuesday, June 10th, Coun. Yakavanka absent. The minutes of last meeting were read and adopted.
Communication were read from the solicitor re Bowlen judgment; Fred Wenger, account against ward 2; the teacher of South Bay S.D.; W.H. Paulson re taxes; three applications for the position of road commissioner; Bank of Nova Scotia re line of credit; Dept. of Public Works re road across 3-31-18; Geo. Lvon re wood on road; the estimates of Mossey River S.D., and a largely signed petition from ratepayers in south-east corner of the municipality and Lawrence municipality praying for a road on boundary line.
Hunt-Namaka – That a grant of $250 be made to the Fork River agricultural society.
Marcroft-Paddock – That after hearing the circumstances the taxes on the se 2-31-19 be allowed to stand over till the coming December, and that the penalty on them be cancelled.
Hunt-Reid – That a grant of $150 be made to the Returned Soldiers’ committee for the purpose of giving a banquet to returned soldiers.
Marcroft-Reid – That the secretary obtain designs of monuments from the different marble works with a view to erecting a monument to the memory of all Mossey River soldiers who were killed in the war.
Marcroft-Namaka – That Coun. Hunt and Reid be a committee to select, stake out and authorize the use of a nuisance ground for Fork River.
Hunt-Reid – That a grant of $10 be made to the South Bay Boys and Girls’ club.
Hunt-Namaka – That a special meeting of the council be held at Fork River on Saturday, June 14th.
Reid-Namaka – That Mrs. Domeric be refunded the taxes of 1918, with the exception of the special school tax.
Reid-Namaka – That the reeve and sec.-treasurer be a committee to deal with matters regarding the council chamber at Winnipegosis.
Marcroft-Namaka – That the account of Coun. Reid ($22) for letting and inspecting work be printed.
Marcroft-Paddock – That the auditor’s report be printed.
Reid-Namaka – That the accounts of the meeting of Jan. 7th, March 5th, and those of today, as recommended by the finance committee, be passed.
Bylaws were employing the collector at $5 per day when instructed to go out by the reeve and sec.-treasurer, appointing James Bickle road commissioner, and repealing the bylaw making the councilors road commissioners. Also authorizing a vote of the ratepayers of Mossey River School District, No. 999, on a $12,000 debenture bylaw.
The council then adjourned.

Fork River

A gang of men are engaged building a new elevator. This will make the second elevator at this point.
Gus. Andrus, Jim Parker and G. Lacey have invested in tractors and are busy turning over the soil.
The heavy rain of Saturday gave the hand a good soaking and the crops are greatly befitted by it.

Mossey River School Report

The following is a list of pupils who were successful in the recent mid-summer exams:
Grade VII—Honors; Bob Williams. Pass; Ben Shuchett.
Grade VI—Nathan Shuchett, David Nowasod.
Grade V—Honors; Arthur Jamieson.
Grade IV—Mildred Carlson, Amos Carlson, Bill Williams, Sofie Beyko.
Grade III—Goldie Shuchett, Edna Hafenbrak, Earnest Hafenbrak, Donald McEachern, Tony Beyko.
Grade II—Birdie Stonehouse, Roy Dewbury, Allie Dewbury, Steve Nowasod, Jack Puchaylo.
Grade I sr—Kate Williams, Milo Carlson, Peter Zerba.
Class A—Clarice Carlson, Mary Stefishon, Tommy Hafenbrak, Cornie Chipley.
Gertrude M. Cooper, teacher.

Winnipegosis Public Schools

Grade IV to Grade V—Honors; Theary Frederickson, Benjamin Ketcheson, Lawrence Marchenaki. Pass; Gladys Cartwright, Jos. Mikit, Clara Hubble, Alexina Dumas, Charlie Adam, Mary Langlois, Harry Whale, Muriel Snelgrove, Rae Spence.
Primary to Grade II—Pass; Olive Shears, Vera Wills, Christine Schaldemose, Glen Dunby, Marie Loire, Hugh Johnson, Elizabeth Bradbury, Brynhildur Bjornsson, Grace Campbell, Bert Hubble, Chas. Spence, Harriet McLeod, Paul Lemchuk.
T. Tozer, Teacher.

Grade IV jr. to Grade IV sr.—Honors: John Marchenski, Rose McAuley. Pass: Agnes Burrell, Mary Chermak, Margaret Sanderson, M. Mapes, Albert Dumas, Sarah Klyne, Mary Richard, Donald McAuley, Violet Groff, Wm. Mapes, Olivina Langlois, Blennie St. Matt, Jessie Paddock, Jas. Richard, Hilliard Denby, Beverley Scchaldemose.
Grade III to Grade IV—Pass: Jos. Ponliot, Daisy Walmsley, Frank Wallace, Myrtle Snelgrove, Lawrence McDonell, Martha Sanderson, Wall. Pouliot, Ralph McAuley.
Following is a list, in order of merit, of successful pupils in the recent yearly examinations in Winnipegosis public schools:
Grade VII to Grade VIII—Pass: Tina Marchenski, Margaret Robinson, Ernest Needham.
Grade VI to Grade VII—Honors: Margaret Magnusson, James Brown, Kathleen Dempsey, Margaret McAuley, Charlotte Bradley. Pass: Paul Rudiak, Grace Whale, Cecil Paddock, Frank Needham.
Conditional—Alice Mapes, Harvey McAuley.
Grade V to VI—Honors: Mary Marcuenski, Evelyn Groff, Svava Frederickson, Charlotte Adam, Addie Ketcheson, Gordon Rognvaldson, Edith Hubble. Pass: Muriel Burrell, Annie Denby, Archie McLellan, Amelia Adam, Hjalmtyr Thorarinsson, Jos. Schaldemose.
Grade V Jr. to Grade V Sr—Honors: Leo Magnusson. Pass: Harvey Grenon, Verna Denby, Esther Hechter, Evolda Whale, Felix Magnusson, Gifford Campbell, George Campbell.
M. McMartin, Teacher.
Leith McMartin, Teacher.

Grade II to Grade III—Honors; Fred Magnusson, Jennie Ogryzlo, Margaret McLellan, Annie Dubinak, Stearnie Fredrickson, Stephen Zawrich, Alvina St. Godard, Sarah Alex, Mary Lyons, Myrtle Clarkson, Roderick St. Matt, Jos. Hechter, Mark Brown, Annie Zuk, Alex Klyne, Uric Lavergna. Pass; Wm. Wallock, D’Elroy Pouliot, Medos Langlois, Wm. Flamand.
Conditional: Ernest Seiffert, Bruce McAuley, Florence Paddock.
Grade I to Grade II—Honors: Viva Burrill, Lilian Bilenduke, Mary Kruchek, Donald Morris, Iva Whale, Vera Rognvaldson, Dolly Morris, Annie Marchenski, Armand Langlois, Nora Demery, Keitcha Snelgrove. Pass; Chas. Kachoe, Roderick Klyne, Dan McKay, Stephen Ogryzlo, John Semchuk, Fred St. Matt, Jos. Vermette, Helen Fiddler.
L. Levites, Teacher.

Update to Mossey River Honour Roll

I’ve made a few updates the Mossey River Honour Roll with an addition of a few names under:

  • Fork River,
  • Sifton, and
  • Winnipegosis.

The stats are as follows:

WWI Honour Roll
Community Old Number New Number
Fork River 30 31
Sifton 28 29
Winnipegosis 101 109

That’s ten new names, mostly from Winnipegosis. I was also able to determine one of the men under unknown area was from Sifton and another actually belongs to the WWII list.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – June 26, 1919

The Great Strike Over

The greatest strike in the history of the country is virtually over. The sympathetic strike has been declared off and hundreds of the strikers have returned to work and others are returning as fast as places can be found for them.
The staff of the Dauphin Telephone Exchange all returned to work on Wednesday, and the local trains are scheduled to run again. Most of the men, if not all, are expected to be back at their places in the shops by the end of the week.

Winnipegosis

The Great War Veterans’ Association held a successful picnic at the baseball grounds here on June 20th. The program of sports was attractive and drew a large crowd of visitors. There were foot races for men, women and children. Fast and slow horse races were also held. There was other variety with the hop.-step and jump race, the running jump and the tug of war. Fork River won the football game and Winnipegosis won the baseball game. Each team got a prize of $25, and both games were spirited and hotly contested.
Mrs. E.A. Morrison, after spending a few months holiday with her daughter, Mrs. E. Cartwright, has departed for her home in Kerrobert, Sask.
Hugh Armstrong was a business visitor in town last week.
Mrs. Geo. Spence has left for Winnipeg to meet her husband who is returning from overseas after over two years military service.
Miss M. Olsen, who has been nursing C. Burrell, left on Tuesday for her home in Winnipeg.
R. Montgomery, auditor for the Armstrong Trading Co., is in town for a few days on business.
The season is very dry here and rain is badly needed.
The strike in Winnipeg is making conditions awkward and the town is having trouble in getting mail and freight.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – June 19, 1919

Bootleggers Busy

Bootleggers are enjoying a thriving trade with the construction gangs at work on the railway. A Ste. Rose correspondent writes that much of the liquor being sold is said to be of home manufacture.

Cross Duck Mountain by Auto

A Minitonas automobile party accomplished a feat on Tuesday which will stand as a record. They crossed the Duck Mountain in cars. One car contained Reeve Roy Johnston, Clerk J.H. Cannon, Thos. Tedford and H Bigham, and the other Geo. Hayes, W. Shiels, Mose Leslie and Wm. Sifton. The cars left Minitonas at 7 in the morning and arrived at Pine River on the opposite side of the mountain at 10 p.m. The distance is round about a hundred miles. The road followed was the old Sifton colonization trail. The cars met with no great obstacles on the trip beyond fording a stream or two. The members of the party are enthusiastic in describing the scenery in the mountain.

Fork River

Mrs. L. Rawson and family have arrived from the States. Mr. Rawson intends moving on to his farm which he recently purchased from H. Little. The farm adjoins the townsite.
Councilor Hunt has purchased a car. No doubt he will find the lumps on the road when he speeds up.
Ben Cannon is spending his vacation in Winnipeg.
W. Williams is putting his sawmill in shape to cut the logs brought in last winter.
A good heavy rain fell on Saturday. It was needed and has revived the crops.
Service will be held in All Saints’ Church at 3 p.m. Sunday school meets at 2 o’clock.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – June 12, 1919

Aged Man Commits Suicide

Peter Kozsowski, who resided 16 miles southwest of town in the Ruthenian settlement in the Riding Mountain, committed suicide on Tuesday. He retired to the stable, laid down and placed the muzzle of a shotgun under his chin, and then touched off the trigger. The charge nearly blew the top of his head off.
Deceased had been in poor health for some time and also had trouble with some of his neighbors which no doubt preyed on his mind. He was 57 years of age, leaves a wife and four children. One son is at the front.
Coroner Rogers visited the scene of the tragedy on Wednesday, and after enquiring into the particulars, decided an inquest was unnecessary.

Fair Notes

The new horse barn being erected at the fair grounds by F. Neely, is nearing completion. It provides accommodation for seventy-five head of horses.
It is the intention of the directors to proceed immediately with the construction of additions to the grand stand, cow barn and poultry house.
The race track and the baseball diamond have been put in good shape and will be available for the sports of July 1st.

Police Court Cases

Justyn Baran appeared before Police Magistrate Hawkins on the charge of theft of harrows, valued at $15. He pleaded guilty and was released on suspended sentence and ordered to pay the costs of court, amounting to $22.50.
Chief Bridle laid information against Frank Crowder for allowing cattle to run at large on the streets. He pleaded not guilty but was convicted and fined $5 and costs of court amounting to $7.
O.Kaczar was convicted on the charge of common assault. He was assessed the costs of court, amounting $20.50.
Edward Rsesnowski was fined $2 for riding a bicycle on the sidewalk.
Herbert Brown was fined $2 and costs for allowing his children on the streets after 10 p.m.

The Strike Situation

The strike situation remains practically unchanged. In some quarters the belief prevails that the chances for a settlement are improving.

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, June 10th.
The crops are looking well.
Pte. D.C. Sanderson has returned home from overseas.
A cow belonging to W. Cooper gave birth to a calf with five legs.
A Grain Growers’ meeting was held on Friday, the 6th. Several important matters were brought up. The Famers platform was heartily endorsed by all.
Word has been received that the Bicton Heath School will be returned to the control of the ratepayers at an early date. We will then select our own trustees.
Sunday school is held every Sunday at 3 o’clock at the old Sieffert farm. Service is held at 7 o’clock every Sunday evening at the house of Thos. Toye.

Fork River

Mr. Geo. H. Scriven arrived last week to take charge of the Anglican services during the summer at Fork River, Winnipegosis, Sifton and Mowat. Service will be held in All Saints’, Fork River, on the 15th, at 3 o’clock.
Mr. and Mrs. M. Wick and Mrs. Farrell, of Dauphin, were visitors on Sunday at farm of Mr. W. King.
Rec. H.P. Barrett, of Dauphin, took the services on Sabbath. There was a large congregation. Several children were baptized.
Jack Schuchett has gone to Winnipeg to end the strike.
Willie Tuck has returned home after an extended trip to Ontario to recuperate.
W. Northam has a tractor at work breaking up his quarter section south of the town.
J. Richardson, F. Hafenbrak and W. King interviewed the council in behalf of the Agricultural Society for a grant. The council acted generously and voted $250.

Winnipegosis

On Sunday last a large congregation attended the Methodist Church to welcome the Rev. H.P. Barrett, the rector of Dauphin, and Mr. G.B. Scriven, the new Anglican student in charge of this mission. By the courtesy of the Methodist body here, Mr. Scriven will hold divine service in the Methodist Church next Sunday evening, June 15th, at 7:30 p.m. It is to be hoped that as large a congregation will gather as at last Sunday’s service and give Mr. Scriven all the encouragement possible in the work to which he is called here.
Much local interest is in evidence as to the outcome of the King’s Bench court case, Armstrong Trading Co. vs. Grenon and McInnes, which comes up before Judge Curran at Dauphin next week. Commanding legal talent has been engaged by both parties.

Robert Colin Wood (1898-1918)

I am going to write about my maternal 2nd cousin 3x removed, Robert Colin Wood (1898-1918).

Robert Colin Wood was born 8 Dec 1898 in a place called Jackfish, Ontario, some 244km east of Thunder Bay. The place is now a ghost town but was once a port of commercial fishing and to receive coal for steam trains travelling on the CPR.

SHTC002349922

Canadian Pacific Railway Station Building at JackFish
7 Sep 1900

His parents were William Samuel Wood (1868–1901) and Martha Ritchie (1871–1906) and he was an only child.

Robert’s parents were married 18 Nov 1891 in Ross, Renfrew North, Ontario in the place where his mother lived and grew up.

In the 1901 census, the Wood family lived in the CPR community of Schreiber, Ontario, which was about 40km west of where Robert was born.

1901 Census

1901 Census

The census data was collected on May 28th, however, only five months later, William would be dead.

At the age of 33, William, who worked on the railroad as an engineer, was killed in an accident on 6 Oct 1901 in Port Arthur, Ontario. It appeared he survived the accident itself but succumbed to exhaustion following train injury, fracture spine, chest, and head.

I have yet to find any mention of an accident around this date.

The next time I find Robert he is living with his paternal aunt and uncle, Martha Wood (1874-) and Richard Groggin (1871-) in the 1911 census in York. The pair had married in 1894, a few years after William and Martha, in Port Arthur. In this record, Richard is documented as working as a conductor and his wife, a housekeeper.

1911censusgroggins

1911 Census

Martha and Richard can also be found living in Schreiber, Ontario in the 1901 census. They had staying in their home at the time, Martha’s mother Melissa (1845-1924), and her two sisters, Christina (1880-) and Clara (1887-) who were working as domestics.

1901censusgroggins.png

1911 Census

The reason why Robert was now living with his aunt and uncle in 1911 was for the fact that his mother, Martha, had died of heart failure on 31 Jan 1906. His mother’s death came only three months after she’d remarried Alex McFarlone in Port Arthur.

The last census record that Robert is documented in is the 1916 census of the prairies where he’s living with his aunt and uncle in Rocanville, Saskatchewan. In addition to his adoptive parents, also living in this household is Martha (1903-) his adopted sister and well as his grandmother Melissa. It seems Richard changed occupations and was now a farmer.

1916censusgroggins.png

1916 Census

On 20 Mar 1917, Robert ventured to Regina where he signed his attestation papers and joined the Canadian Over-Seas Expeditionary Force. His regimental number was: 1069577. Robert was a private of the 249th Battalion who was transferred to the 15th Canadian Res. Battalion on 4 Mar 1918 in Bramshott and then to the 28th Battalion (Saskatchewan Regiment) on 10 May 1918.

Robert entered the battlefield on 22 May 1918 in France. About a month and a half later, on 12 Aug 1918, Robert received a gunshot wound to the head which he later died of on the same day.

Robert is one of 332 Canadian WWI soldiers buried in the St Sever Cemetery Extension. His grave is number 5379, inscribed on the stone it reads, “Gone but not forgotten.”

Below is a transcription from the 28th Canadian Infantry Battalion war dairies. It is my assumption that Robert was one of the 20 killed in the trenches in front of Caix.

CAIX. Aug 12th 1918.

The Battalion moved into Reserve Position on the Blue Line (AMIENS Defence Line) with Brigade Headquarters at CAIX. Battalion now in trench system in front of CAIX. Estimated that Battalion captured 80 Machine Guns in the attack.

Total Casualties…..
3 Officers Killed.
3 Officers Wounded.
20 O.R. Killed.
3 O.R. Missing.
100 O.R. Wounded.

Battalion resting up from operation, reorganizing and refitting. Weather very hot. Situation quiet. Officer Commanding proceeded to O’s C. Conference at Brigade Headquarters in the afternoon.

Reinforcements 3 O.R.
To Hospital 4 O.R.
From Hospital 2 O.R.
Leave Captain A.F. Simpson and 4 O.R.
On Command 4 O.R.
5 O.R. previously reported Wounded now reported Killed 9.8.18.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – June 5, 1919

Dominion Day Celebration

The Great War Veterans’ association intend holding a big celebration on Tuesday, July 1st (Dominion Day). The programme provides for an elaborate Calithumpain and automobile parade in the forenoon, and splendid sports—baseball, football, track and children’s races in the afternoon. Suitable prizes given in all events. A grand ball will be given in the evening in the town hall.

The Strike Situation

The strike situation remains unchanged but late news from Winnipeg is hopeful of a settlement being reached. Locally the number of strikers has increased. The freight handlers, car checkers and call boys are the latest to join the strikes.
Supt. R.C. Brown was up from Portage on Tuesday and met the telephone operators, but the conference has not altered the situation and the exchange remains closed.
The best of order, however prevails throughout the town.

Winnipegosis Elections

Winnipegosis village, which has a charter of its own, held their elections on the 30th ult. There were three candidates for the Major’s chair. The vote stood: J.C. Adam 57, J.P. Grenon 19 and S. Sieffert 10. The following councilors were elected: Geo. Lyons Ward 1, Ed. Cartwright Ward 2, Jos. Burrell Ward 3, Sid Dennett Ward 4.

A Returned Soldier’s Lament

We are the boys who have done our bit,
But when we came back we were very hard hit.
The girls of Dauphin say we are tough!
I guess we are, all right enough.

We don’t mind the slams we get from either man or girl.
We just laugh at them, till their minds are in a whirl.
They call us boys instead of men,
But we took our stand with the best of them.

We fought in Belgium and in France,
And we made the wily and brutal Hun dance,
To the tune of the cannon, machine gun and bomb
We boys helped the Hun on the way to his home.

When we went o’er the top we had the best of luck.
Every blessed soldier boy filled with vim and pluck.
Thinking of the girls at home land of the brave and free!
Fight, even unto death, for the dame of Liberty.

Now, comrades, you all will agree with me
That some of these girls are as tough as we
So let us all strive to forgive and forget.
That we may learn to become men yet.

Winnipegosis

Pte. A. Clyne has returned to town from overseas after seeing two years active service.
While Mr. F.G. Shears and a few friends were motoring back from Dauphin they met with an accident. Mr. Archie McDonell was slightly injured.
The Ladies Aid of the Union Church held a very successful picnic on the school grounds. Refreshments and ice cream were served and an interesting baseball game was played between Winnipeg and Fork River, the latter winning by one side score. A crowd was in attendance from Dauphin and Fork River.
A.H. Steele has returned from Mafeking, where he has been fighting bush fires for three days.
C.H. Dixon was in Camperville for three days on business.
J.P. Grenon has taken about 20 fishermen to the Pas to fish in the lakes near Sturgeon, being mile 239 on the Hudson Bay Railway.
Mrs. G.W. Mullhearn and children came on Tuesday’s train to visit Mrs. A.H. Steele for the summer.
Miss A. Wilson has returned from an extended visit to the coast, and has resumed her work at the post office.
Long Shaw house has been burned out through bush fires.
The body of Helger Johnson, who was drowned in the lake six months ago, has just been recovered and was brought to town by Dorie Stevenson, on the boat Odinak.
The municipal election for mayor has just closed. It was a 3cornered contest and was hotly contested. Courad Adam was elected. The vote stood Adam 57, Grenon 19, Sieffert 10.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 29, 1919

C.N.R. Shopmen Drop Tools

The big strike is assuming greater proportions every day, and the universal question is, “Where is it going to end?” The railway mail clerks went on strike on Wednesday and there is practically no mail for outside points moving.
The men in the C.N.R. shops here struck at 10 o’clock this (Thursday) morning. This move will do much to cripple the operations of the company. The best of order, however, prevails.

G.W.V.A. Notes

Meeting of the above association, held Thursday, May 22nd, Comrades F. Scrase and G.F. Johnston both being away, Comrade Roy Armstrong took chair for the meeting.
Seven applications were received for membership. All were accepted.
Comrade Roy Armstrong reported on his trip to Winnipeg in connection with the question of memorial. He reports that Winnipeg is anxious to get a provincial memorial erected in Winnipeg, funds to be raised throughout the province. This does not meet with the approval of outside points, which desire memorials at local points. The question was referred to a committee, and another meeting will be held. He also stated that the general feeling favored a community hall.
The thanks of the association were tendered to Comrade Neeley for erecting doors for club room.
The Ladies’ Aid have turned over a balance of $100 to the association, and our thanks are due them.
The Sports Day committee met Friday, May 23rd. Citizens of the tow have generously supported the committee, and one of the best Sports day should result.
The Veterans’ baseball team played the C.N.R. on the 26th, and went under. More practice is needed to ensure better success.

“Ivens, the Terrible”

Recv. “Bill” Ivens is one of the leading figures on the labor side in the big strike. He was on the Ochre River circuit for several years and while there kept things going. During a recent visit the returned soldiers refused to permit him to speak. The Winnipeg Free Press refers to him as “Ivens, the Terrible.”

Married

READER-STORRAR – At the Parsonage, Dauphin, on May 27th, by the Rev. J.A. Haw. Alex. Reader to Eva May Storrar, both of Fork River.

Record Hot Weather

He hot weather for the past ten days is unprecedented for the month of May. The records in existence show nothing to equal it. The registering of the government thermometer since May 22nd is as follows:
May 22 …. 95 deg.
May 23 …. 92 deg.
May 24 …. 95 deg.
May 25 …. 95 deg.
May 26 …. 93 deg.
May 27 …. 95 deg.

Fork River

Pte. Alex. Reader has returned from overseas and, what do you think, came all the way to Fork River to pick out a wife. He was married at Dauphin on Tuesday to Eva May Storrar.
We are supposed to have a herd law at Fork River, but not withstanding many animals roam at will about the street at night.
John H. Richarson and Frank Hafenbrak made the trip to Dauphin on Tuesday by car. They report the roads good.
Fred Tilt has been appointed a justice of the peace. He will balance the scales evenly.
Adolf Rudinski has purchased a Clydesdale stallion from E.E. McKinstry, of Dauphin. The introduction of a better clam of stock in our district is what is needed.
Strike or no strike the Herald came to hand as usual last week. The large circulation of the paper at this point is evidence of the appreciation of the people.
When Mr. W.J. Osborne, municipal auditor, was here he assured a number of ratepayers hat he would have the auditor’s report printed this year. So far as can be learned the report has not yet made its appearance.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 22, 1919

G.W.V.A.

Regular meeting of the above mentioned association held Thursday, May 15th, some 30 of the Comrades being in attendance.
Application for membership received from 16 returned soldiers. All of these were accepted.
Moved by Comrade R. Armstrong, seconded by Comrade T. Boyce, that this branch endorse the resolution prepared by the Winnipeg branch of the G.W.V.A. and remain neutral with regard to the strike that is on at Winnipeg, and it was also resoled that should such occasion arise the G.W.V.A. in this town place their services at the disposal of the authorities to maintain order.
Moved by Comrade Price, seconded by Comrade Cocking, that a separate fund in connection with the work of this branch of assisting sick comrades and their dependents. And that in the future all grants under this heading shall be paid from that account and that moneys donated to this association shall be placed at their credit of same and shall not be used for any other purpose.
Moved by Comrade Percy, seconded by Comrade C. Lane, that this branch appoint a delegate in the Dominion convention to be held at Vancouver on June 8th. Vote taken and Comrade G.F. Johnston was appointed delegate.
General committee in charge of the G.W.V.A. sports day met Friday, 16th, to make further arrangements on this project. These committees are now completed and they were instructed to commence operations at once in the preparation of a program.
The association begs to acknowledge receipt of the sum of $64.20, raised at a box social held in Dauphin last Saturday evening, under the management of F. Tacuik.
Owing to the strike in Winnipeg the Better ‘Ole has been postponed. The new dates are Monday and Tuesday, June 2nd and 3rd.

The Strike Situation

The greatest strike in the history of Canada was declared in Winnipeg last Thursday. It is outcome of differences between employers and employees which include several matters besides the question of wages. Shorter hours and the recognition of the principle of bargaining are among these. It will be realized that it is not an easy matter to settle matters of this nature offhand. It is somewhat of a revolution; but there are days of revolutions and the issues must be squarely faced. In the meantime the public are not only suffering in convenience, but loss.
There have been no daily papers for the past week from Winnipeg and the absence of the papers is keenly felt. The last copies of the papers to be received was Friday and the newsy on the train sold these at from 10 to 25 cents each. It proved a bonanza for the agent.
There has been no mail going to Winnipeg for a week and during the past two or three days none south of the boundary.
The express service south and west have been discontinued for a week.
The managers of the moving picture theatre are obliged to go to Winnipeg to or three times a week to get the films. But this is better than having to close up.
The price of eggs has declined as there is no means of sending the hen fruit to outside markets.
Senator Robertson, Minister of Labor, was billed to arrive in Winnipeg on Wednesday. The outcome of his visit will be waited with much interest.

Fork River

Pte. A.E. Eales has purchased the n.w. ¼ 6-30-18, and intends improving the property.
The Returned Soldiers’ Committee will meet on the 24th to arrange for a banquet and transact other business. The ladies are invited to attend.
Rev. H.P. Barrett, rector of St. Paul’s Dauphin, will hold service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday, June 8th, at 3 o’clock.
Max King has started breaking on the home farm with a 10-20 Titan and a 20 inch breaker. He is doing good work.
All Saints’ Sunday School has been reorganized and started on Sunday with W. King as superintendent, and Mrs. A. Russell, Mrs. McEachern, Miss I. Briggs and Miss S. Briggs as teachers.
Service was held in the Methodist Church by Rev. Mr. Hook on Sunday afternoon. There was a good attendance.
The dance given by the Returned Soldiers’ recently was well patronized and all who attended had a good time.
Edwin King, weed inspector for the municipality, has started on his rounds. Winn is some hustler, but he will have to go some if he keeps ahead of the fast growing weeds these days.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 15, 1919

Four Men Badly Injured

Mr. Arthur Fisher, who resides in the Burrow district, is erecting a large barn. Last Friday four men, John Neely, Frank Potter, John James and Geo. Smith were engaged erecting the rafters when a whirlwind came up suddenly collapsing the timbers. Neely, Potter and Smith were badly injured by the failing timbers. James, who was working on the top, jumped when the rafters commenced to fall, but was unable to clear himself and was struck and injured. Mr. Neely was so badly injured that his condition will not yet permit of his removal to town.

G.W.V.A.

The regular meeting of the above association was held on Thursday, May 8th, between 30 and 40 of the comrades being present. Owing to the unavoidable absence of the president, Capt. F. Scrase, Comrade G.F. Johnston, vice president, took the chair.
Applications were received from 13 returned soldiers for membership, all of which were accepted. This makes the membership of the local branch 195 and a considerable increase on this is expected in the near future.
The secretary has since this meeting been informed that a special meeting has been called by Premier Norrie to consider the memorial question for this province, on May 16th. It has, therefore, been decided to send a delegate to this meeting to represent this branch.
During the past week a donation of $112.65 was received from the citizens of the Ethelbert district, per Rev. G. Tymchuk. The thanks of the association are due to all the subscribers of the above mentioned donation.
A grant of $25 to this association has been received from the Dauphin Automobile club. This has been acknowledged and thanks are due to the members of the club for same.
On May 23rd and 24th the “Better ‘Ole” is being put on at the Star theatre. This is to be under the auspices of the G.W.V.A. Ask any returned man what he thinks of it and he will soon convince you, to say the least of it, that it will be well worth seeing, and at the same time give the association a lift.
A meeting was held on Friday, the 9th in connection with the G.W.V.A. Sports Day, to be held on 1st July, and arrangements made for appointing the various committees to make same a success. Posters are to be got out advertising same. The committee are requested to note that the next meeting will be held on Friday, may 16th, at 8 p.m. sharp. A full attendance is essential.
Members are asked to note that the Manitoba Provincial Command have issued a weekly paper devoted to the returned solider. It is known as the Manitoba Veteran, and will be issued weekly. The rate is 5c per copy or $2 per year. Sample copies have been received and if the paper continues like the sample a bright future is assured. Subscriptions are taken by the local secretary of the G.W.V.A.

Fork River

Billy Tuck has gone to Dryden, Ont., for a short trip.
W.R. Snelgrove is around again after his illness. He has moved on to the Chase farm, having exchanged his Dauphin residence for the property.
Steve Warrawrork, of Volga, has purchased the Slobodizan farm from W.R. Snelgrove.
Corp. Duncan Briggs and Private Tom Briggs and H. Craighill have arrived from overseas. They are looking hale and hearty.
Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Cameron and children, from Neepawa, are visiting at Mr. Nat Little’s house.
Robt. Rowe intends Fording it to town for the future, having purchased a Ford car from Nat Little.
Wm. Northam is busy fencing the farm be purchased south of town.
All Saints S.S. will meet as usual at 2 o’clock, Sunday, 18th inst.
Rain is falling as I write and it is welcome. All the wheat is about in. The season for work has been very favorable.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 8, 1919

Cow Gave Birth to Five Calves

A cow belonging to C. Hall, a farmer of Benito, Man., gave birth to five fully developed calves on Sunday, May 4th, in the pasture field. The calves died from cold before discovery. The weight of the calves was over 200 pounds.

Ethelbert

An enthusiastic meeting was held in the municipal hall on May 1st to consider how to promote the sale of thrift and war saving stamps in this municipality. After an interesting and instructive talk by Mr. Blackader, of Dauphin, the provisional director for Northern Manitoba, it was decided to form a district committee the following being appointed: District chairman, Bert Skaife, assistant postmaster: secretary, M. Mihaychuk, principal town school. Committee – J.A. Watson, manager Bank of Montreal; Dr. F.O. Gilvart, R. Skaife, N.A. Hryhorczuk, reeve; Geo. Hryhorczul, A.W. Magis, J.M. Shewchook, Peter Meinuchuk, Dan Vetzal, Geo. Vetzal, Wm. Herman, J. Popliusky, Frank Pelechatv, George Kalinchuk, Peter Kuzyk, Peter Melnyk, J. Masciuk, M. Sytnyk, J. Syrnyk, W. Monita, H. Hawryluk, Wm. Proshak, I. Sherval, Peter Pundy.

Winnipegosis

A meeting was held in the Rex theatre last Monday for the purpose of organizing a board of trade. The meeting was a successful one and a board was organized for Winnipegosis district. Dr. Medd was elected president and C.H. Dixon, secretary.
Building is brisk in town and quite a few houses are going up as well as stores being enlarged.
The ladies of the town are busy making roses for Mothers’ Day. They aim to make 300 within the next week. The proceeds of the sale of the roses will be applied on the church debt.
The ice is rapidly breaking up on the lake and the same will soon be open for navigation.
A dramatic society has been organized in town with the small membership fee of 50 cents. Exceptionally good talent exists as noticed in former plays. The society should prove a success.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 1, 1919

Clubb Sentenced to One Year

Norman Clubb and Fred Beach, the two boys who pleaded guilty to breaking into Benedickson’s store, came up for sentence before P.M. Hawkins on Wednesday. Clubb, who has a bad record was sentenced to one year in jail. Beach was let off on suspended sentence.

G.W.V.A.

All members of the above association and other returned soldiers wishing to exercise their soldier rights with regard to the land scheme are requested to attend a meeting to be held on Thursday, May 1st, at 8.30 p.m. Important information will be imparted.
(Signed)
J.M. Chalmers,
Sec. G.W.V.A.

Fork River

Sowing and ploughing is the order of the day. The land is in good shape and there will be a large acreage sown if the fine weather continues.
Mr. Andy Rowe received an Easter gift. It’s a wee daughter.
Miss Stella and Ina Briggs, teachers of Pine View and Mossey River Schools, returned from their Easter holidays to Winnipeg and Rathwell.
The stork left a little girl at the home of Robert Rowe the other evening.
Mr. J.H. Lowes has returned from Makinak.
This is to be clean up week around the village by the order of the health officer. All should join heartily in the good work.
On Friday evening last, April 25th, the home of Mr. and Mrs. T.B. Lacey, at Oak Brae, on the Mossey, was besieged and taken possession of for the evening by about eighty old-time friends of Private L.H. Lacey, late of 226th Battalion and who enlisted in Dauphin in April 1916. He went overseas with the battalion and later joined the 44th Battalion and was sent to France. He was at Vimy Ridge and after at Lens where he was taken prisoner on the 23rd of August, 1917. He remained a prisoner to the close of the war. On April 5th last he had the pleasure of stepping off the local at Fork River to be greeted by 84 old-time friends. Previous to this a committee had been formed and about one year ago they appointed canvassers to collect fund for the purpose of providing a suitable present to every boy that had enlisted from Fork River and the southern portion of the municipality. It was arranged that the sum of $50, or its equivalent, should be presented to each of the boys after their return in recognition of their services overseas. A public reception has taken place as a rule and the presentation has been made, but owing to the frail condition of Lorne’s mother and out of deference to her, the presentation of a valuable gold watch was made to him at his home. Mr. Wm. King, (whose three sons were “over there” and did their bit gallantly), is the sec.-treasurer of the fund, and who with other members of the committee, drove in from Fork River and at about 10 p.m. Mr. King called for Lorne and presented him with an inspiring address and a gold watch as a token from the people. Young and old had a good time that night over one of the returned, but we thought that night of the many anxious mothers that are still waiting for those they love, and many that wait until the resurrection for their loved ones.
Mrs. and Mr. F.B. Lacey desire to thank Mr. King and the committee for their kindness and consideration in acceding to their wishes and making the presentation at their home.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – April 24, 1919

Boys Plead Guilty to Robbery

On Sunday night, April 6th, the Clothes Shop, Mr. Benedickson’s store, was entered and a quantity of goods stolen. The matter was placed in Chief Bridle’s hands and he at once got busy with the result that two boys, about 17 years of age, were arrested at Wadena, Sask. The boys’ names are Fred Beach and Norman Clubb, and hail from Winnipeg. They were brought from Wadena on Tuesday and appeared before P.M. Hawkins on Wednesday, and pleaded guilty to the charge. They were remanded till Friday for sentence. The boys are known to the city police and their previous history is to be investigated. The most of the stolen goods were recovered.

G.W.V.A. Notes

A meeting of the above association was held on Thursday, April 17th, some 40 members being in attendance.
The question of a memorial for the fallen comrades was discussed by the comrades, and it was suggested that the memorial should take the shape of a home for the returned men, and that a committee be formed to confer with the memorial committee organized by the town.
It was moved by Comrade Armstrong, seconded by Comrade H. Harvey, “that this branch of the G.W.V.A. endorse the Imperial Veterans’ resolution, and request that the government take up the matter of insurance by the state for returned men who, owing to injuries received whilst in action, are at the present time unable to get insurance, or who have to pay excessive rates for such.
Moved by Comrade H. Harvey, seconded by Comrade Oliphant, that this branch endorse the resolution of the G.W.V.A. Winnipeg, and protest against the sect known as ‘Hutterites’ from being allowed to settle in this country.
A delegation was received from the Ladies’ Auxiliary, and arrangements made as to taking care of soldiers’ widows, who come to this town in connection with land, etc. It was decided that the auxiliary should provide rooms, as it was not considered that the G.W.V.A. rooms were suitable accommodation for ladies, and that they would be more comfortable in a separate house.

Mossey River Council

The council met at Winnipegosis on April 7th, all the members being present. The minutes of the previous meeting wee read and adopted.
Communications were read from the Children’s Hospital, Winnipeg; the solicitor, re passing of social legislation; R. Flett, re reduction of taxes; The Red Triangle Fund, R. Cruise, M.P., re Hudson’s Bay Railway; copies of letters from the weed commission, C.B. Martin, re seed grain, and Sawinski Bros., re car of plank.
Hunt-Reid – That in consideration of the large amount of money that has been expended in the buildings of the Hudson’s Bay railroad, and, further, very large amounts in construction of harbor accommodation on the bay, and, whereas, a comparatively small amount will be required to finish the railway and thus render the large expenditure useful; this council is therefore, of the opinion and most empathically recommends that the Hudson’s Bay railroad be completed as soon as possible, thus giving to Western Canada the benefits to be derived from it and for which it has waited so long. That a copy of this resolution be forwarded to Sir Thomas White.
Yakavanka-Namaka – That the council of the rural municipality of Mossey River hereby makes formal application to the Good Roads Board of the Province of Manitoba that the following roads within the municipality be brought under the provisions of “The Good Roads Act, 1914,” and amendments thereto;
Road from south boundary of the municipality, making connection with the Dauphin good road system; due north to the village of Fork River, and from that point north and easterly to the village of Winnipegosis.
Road from the village of Fork River due west to the western boundary of the municipality road from corner on Fork River-Winnipegosis road to west side of range 19, along township line between tps. 29 and 30. Also from corner on same road westerly two miles between tps. 30 and 31.
Road from n.w. corner 12-29-19, easterly six miles, thence south to Lake Dauphin and then following lake shore to south boundary of the municipality.
Road from Winnipegosis north-westerly through tp. 31, rge. 18, and continuing into tp. 31, rge. 19.
Road from Winnipegosis south-easterly through tp. 3, rge. 18, and continuing easterly across tp. rge. 17.
Hunt-Reid – That Coun. Paddock and Marcroft be a committee to inspect road northwest of Winnipegosis, and report what can be done in the matter of making it passable at net meeting.
Yakavanka-Namaka – That the municipal bank account be moved from the Bank of Ottawa, Dauphin, to the Winnipegosis branch of the same bank.
Yakavanka-Namaka – That the clerk write the rural municipality of Dauphin and ask its council of it is prepared to pass a bylaw similar to those passed for the last two years covering work on the boundary road between the two municipalities.
By laws authorizing a line of credit of $15,000, amending the collector’s bylaw by reducing the salary to $125 pre month, and a bylaw authorizing a vote of the ratepayers of the Mossey River School district to issue expenditures for the borrowing of $12,000 to purchase grounds and build and equip a school. The vote to be taken June 14th.
The council adjourned to meet at Fork River at the call of the reeve.

Winnipegosis

The regular monthly meeting of the Home Economic Society was held on Friday evening, April 18th, at 8 p.m., in the Union Church. It being Good Friday the musical part of the programme consisted of Easter hymns. Mrs. J.E. McArthur gave an excellent paper on “Ventilation and Well-Lighted Rooms,” and Mr. Hook spoke in his usual pleasing manner on the subject, “Associates for the Young,” bringing foremost in his speech the necessity of child training. Ten cent tea was served, proceeds in aid of the library fund, when the meeting was brought to a close by singing he National anthem.
The Home Economics Society library is open every Saturday from 3 o 5 p.m., in Mrs. Honchin’s ice cream parlor.
Mr. D.G. McAulay and family have moved from the farm into town and taken up residence in the house formerly owned by J. Alexander.
The executive of the Order of the Needle wish to thank all those who helped to make the bazaar on the evening of Monday, the 21st, so successful. Mr. J.R. Burrell and her assistants, Mrs. K. McAuley and Mrs. Thomas, are especially to be lauded for the efficient way in which they handled the tea room, which was very popular. Mr. Hamilton very kindly gave his time in arranging the booths, which were very prettily decorated by Mrs. Steele, Mrs. St. Amour, Mrs. J.E. McArthur and Mrs. J.A. Campbell. A number of ladies and gentlemen assisted on the programme of music for dancing after the booth closed. Mr. Ketchison acted as floor manager and as usual made things go. The receipts for the evening were $119.10. Paid out for working material $3.75, for decorations $1.40, cartage 75 cents, rent of hall $6; total $11.90. To be divided between Red Cross and Belgian Fund, $107.20.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – April 17, 1919

The Coming Dauphin Fair

The directors of the Agricultural society take this opportunity of making an announcement regarding the fair to be held on August 6th, 7th and 8th. The directors hope in time to develop a fair which will be representative of Northern Manitoba and second only to Brandon. In an endeavor to carry out this project they hope to get the support of the citizens of Dauphin and the surrounding district.
Representatives from the board attended the Brandon Winter Fair and interviewed some of the big breeders in the south, several of whom, including J.D. McGregor, Brandon; John Graham, Carberry; J. Hume, Souris; J. Turner, Carroll. The Shorthorn Breeders association and others intimated their intention of bringing up exhibits.
Fully $3000 will be set aside for attractions, including a full programme of horse races, a baseball tournament and a platform of attractions. The grounds and buildings will be lighted and evening performances given. The directors fell that thy will be in a position to put on a fair which will be a credit to the district and they solicit the cordial support of rural and town citizens.

Mounted Police for Dauphin

Information from Ottawa is to the effect that six mounted policeman are to be located at Dauphin. These will comprise a sergeant and five men and they will cover the territory within the hounds of the Dauphin Judicial District, which extend from McCreary to the Pas on the north and to the Saskatchewan boundary on the west.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – April 10, 1919

Kicked in Face by Horse

Hancy Ward, a young farmer in the Burrows district received a kick in the face by a horse on Friday last. Both jaws were broken and most of his teeth were knocked out. He remained insensible for a considerable time after receiving the kick. When he recovered consciousness he managed to reach his brother Chris hose and was conveyed from there to the hospital, where is now receiving treatment.

Fork River

Ed. Morris and Pte. W Munroe, of Winnipegosis, were recent visitors to our burg.
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Northam have returned from a two months’ visit to Vancouver, Seattle and other points and are well satisfied now with Fork River. In their travels they state that they saw no part equal to Fork River district.
Pte. Lorne H. Lacey, who was a prisoner in Germany for a considerable time, has returned home and his looking hale and hearty. There was a big crowd at the station to extend a welcome to him.
Edwin King has returned home from Winnipeg, where he took a three months’ course at the Returned Soldiers’ School.
Many birds are here and we may now count that warm weather will set the water in the streams running and everybody will want to go fishing.
A meeting of the Returned Soldiers’ Committee was held in the office of W. King, sec.-treasurer on Saturday evening last. The members of the Baseball committee were present and a satisfactory donation was accepted from the proceeds of the box social for the Returned Soldiers’ Fund. This was the first meeting of the Returned Soldiers’ Committee since the baseballers organized and on that account the donation could not have been handed over before. The committee are of the opinion that “Contributor’s” letter to the Herald was a little previous and uncalled for. The committee of each association is trying o work in harmony and retain the confidence the public has placed in them.