Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 6 – 1913

1913 Mar 6 – 100 Years Old

An old resident of Ethelbert, named Hogg, died this week. He was believed to be 100 years old.

1913 Mar 6 – Baran Pleads Not Guilty

The assizes opened on Tuesday at Portage la Prairie. The Baran case is the most important one on the docket. Contrary to expectations Baran has put in a plea of “not guilty.” The witnesses from here are Mary Peleck, the woman who was in the house at the time the shot was fired, E.A. Munson, S.A. McLean, J. Tomoski, A. Rzesnoski and Dr. Harrington.

1913 Mar 6 – Fork River

A. Hunt returned from Ottawa having spent two months visiting with his parents and friends. While in Ottawa he located our friend, “Bob” Cruise in his seat in the house. Ab. will know where his seat is when he goes to Ottawa again.
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Ramsay, of Sifton, were visitors at the home of Dunc Kennedy this week.
Duncan Briggs returned from Mafeking having spent the winter fishing up north with Theo. Johnston.
Messrs. Johnston, Nowside and King were visitors to the Lake town on business recently.
Sid Howlet, of Million, paid us a visit last week and is returning with a road of supplies to his homestead.
Miss Pearl Wilson has returned from Dauphin after a month’s visit among friends at that point.
Sandy Munro is spending the weekend with his family at Mowat.
The Fork River Quadrille club got a little mixed up on Friday night. Part went to one house and part to another. They all claim to have had a good time. It’s no trouble to have a good time at Fork River.
John Nowsede, after spending two months with his parents, left for Aberdeen, Sask., to take up his duties as teacher for another term.
Miss Gilanders, who has been some time with her sister, Mrs. J. Lockhart, left on a vacation among friends in the south.
George Butler, assistant to Frank Hechter, of Winnipegosis, was a visitor at Wm. King’s recently.
Fred and Max King have purchased from the Ontario W.E. & Pump Co., Winnipeg, a 18 horse power gasoline engine of the Stickney manufacture, also a J.T. case separator and are taking them to Fishing River among the Ruthenian farmers to finish their threshing before spring opens.
S. Strasdin, of North Lake, paid us a visit overnight on his way to Winnipegosis and says everything is quiet in his district.
J.P. Grenon, manager of the A.T. Co., Winnipegosis, has purchased the west half of 36-29-19 from Morley Snelgrove.
Mr. Rowe, section foreman of Laurier, is visiting with C. Clark for a few days.
Rev. Dr. Page, travelling missionary for this diocese will hold baptismal service and holy communion in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon, March 16th, at 2:45. Lenten service every Thursday night at 8 o’clock during the season.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 29 – 1912

1912 Feb 29 – Part of Head Blown Off

Fifteen Year Old Brother Accidentally Kills His Sister, Mrs. Ludwick Mazurk
A terrible gun accident happened in the Galician settlement in the Riding Mountain, about 15 miles south west of town, on Friday morning last, when Mrs. Ludwick Mazurk, was shot in the head by her 15 year old brother, Mike Tobako. At the time of the accident Mrs. Mazurk and her brother were alone in a room in her father’s house. The boy was examining an old shotgun and in raising it in some manner discharged the gun. Mrs. Mazurk, was only a few feet away and received the entire charge in the head in the vicinity of the ear, blowing part of the top of her head off.
Death was instantaneous.
When the report of the gun was heard Mr. Mazurk, who was in an adjoining room, rushed to where his wife was, only to witness a terrible sight, his wife lying dead on the floor with part of her head blown off and her brains bespattered about.
The brother after the discharge of the gun, and he saw what he had done, almost went wild with grief and fled from the house.
Later in the day Mr. Mazurk came to town and notified Provincial Constable Rooke of the accident, and he and Dr. Harrington, coroner, repaired to the home of Mr. Tobako. After hearing the statement of the young brother it was evident that the shooting was accidental and Dr. Harrington deemed and inquest unnecessary.
Mrs. Mazurk was only 22 years of age and had been married but a month. In the course of a few days, the young couple intended moving to Dauphin to reside. Deceased had been in service in the town for several years and was well thought of by her employers.

1912 Feb 29 – Fork River

Miss Bessie Wilson returned from a visit with friends in Dauphin.
Charles Clark took a trip as far West as Kamsack on business.
Mrs. George Tilt, who has been spending a week on the farm, returned to Dauphin.
Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Miles of Kamsack, are here visiting at Fred Cooper’s and renewing old acquaintances. Mr. Miles report good crops in his country but not all threshed yet.
The agent of the Cockshutt implement firm was here on a business trip.
Mrs. Wm. King and daughter, Mrs. McEachern and soon, are taking a trip to Montenary, California, for a month. Friend Will is in for a month’s batching. Give him a trial.
J.A. Campbell who has been putting in the winter at Pine Creek with the Armstrong Trading Co., is visiting at the home of Wm. King for a short time.
We have been informed that Lake Winnipegosis will not be opened for summer fishing. If this is correct there will be no danger of killing the goose that lays the golden egg at present.
F.F. Hafenbrak is making short work of the wood piles around town with his gasoline sawing outfit.
Our new postmaster his put in a nice lot of lock boxes. All the office needs to make it look up-to-date is to leave the front door open and post up mails at all hours to save the rush as some one sure will get hurt.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 13 – 1913

1913 Feb 13 – Baran Committed For Murder

The adjourned preliminary trial of John Baran, under arrest for the murder of Constable Rooke, was concluded on Saturday. Magistrate Munson remanded the prisoner to Portage la Prairie, to stand his trial at the next criminal court on a charge of murder.
The court was called to order at eleven o’clock, the court house being crowded by a throng who were anxious to hear the outcome of the trial.
The prisoner had to be assisted into the court by two officers and appeared in a very weak condition. Later he fell from his chair to the floor, where he was allowed to lie during the trial.
Dr. Harrington gave evidence as to his attendance on Constable Rooke, and stated death to have been caused by the bullet wound, and resultant weakness.
When the charge was read the prisoner declined to make any statement. Bertram Ryan, for the defence, admitted that Baran had fired the shot which killed Constable Rooke, but pleaded justification on a plea of provocation, claiming Baran could not have known it was an officer of the law who was demanding entrance and then breaking in the door of his house, and that Baran had a right to defend his home and had fired the shot with the intention only of frightening away whoever was forcing his door. He asked to have the charge at least modified to one of manslaughter.
In passing sentence, Magistrate Munson severely criticized the past character of the prisoner and had no hesitation in committing him on a charge of murder to stand his trial at the Portage spring assizes.

1913 Feb 13 – Salt Wells to be Worked

That there is abundance of salt in the Lake Winnipegosis region is well known. For years the springs there have been running freely with brine and thousands of tons of the best salt going to waste each year. It is now proposed to tap the springs and install machinery to reduce the brine and manufacture the output into salt for various uses. The quality of the salt, after it has gone through a purifying process is reported by those who have made experiments with it, to be of the highest grade. It is probable that a salt reducing plant will be built at Winnipegosis town. The salt can be brought down the lake in its raw state and later manufactured into various grades to suit the market demand. During the past three months three entries were made at the Dominion Lands office here for mines and as the capital to develop them is already assured the enterprise will undoubtedly be established.

1913 Feb 13 – Section Foreman Loses His Life

Harry Mushynski, section foreman for the C.N.R. at Pine River lost his life on Saturday in a peculiar manner. The pipes at the water tank froze up and Mushynski and another man descended into the well with a pot of live coals to thaw them out. When the two men got down the well the gas from the pot became too strong for them and Mushynski was overcome and fell into the water and was drowned. His companion managed to get out of the well. Coroner Harrington held an inquest on Mushynski on Sunday and the jury rendered a verdict in accordance with the above facts.
Mushynski was highly spoken of by Supt. Irwin as a faithful employee of the company. He was 28 years of age and leaves a wife and two children.

1913 Feb 13 – Fork River

Howard Armstrong left for a trip up the lake teaming.
Herman Godkin, one of Dauphin’s energetic real estate agents, is spending the weekend at W. Williams.
C.E. Bailey and Wm. King returned from attending the county L.O.L. meeting at Dauphin.
Pat Powers, who has been running a threshing outfit at Winnipegosis, returned and is renewing acquaintances.
Henry Benner left here with a car of cows and young cattle for his ranch at Lloydminster.
Professor G. Weaver of East Bay, passed through here en route to the North Pole to lecture on diversified farming, etc.
Mr. and Mrs. C. White, of Winnipegosis, were visitors at D. Kennedy’s on Sunday.
Mrs. Theo. Johnson is visiting her daughter, Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Mr. and Mrs. Cameron, of Neepawa, returned home after spending a few weeks with A. Cameron at Mowat Centre.
Mrs. Rice, teacher of North Lake School, was in town on business lately.
Sid Howlett and family have returned from the north end of the lake, where he spent the winter fishing and reports fishing good. He is going out on his homestead at Million.
“Say, Pat, it seems too bad the Mowat correspondent cant’s get his proper rest lately.” “What’s the matter now Mike?” “Well, he says the blooming politicians at Ottawa will keep haggling over the $35,000,000 Borden is sending to the dear old mother country after the assistance she has given us financially and otherwise for years. You remember a short time ago in the Press the M.C. wanted and howled for an all-Canadian navy. Now he turns around and poses for peace and spend the money in P.O. and roads.” Pat, “Well, I prefer it in Dreadnoughts as we have had enough of the sort of roads he has been instrumental in dishing up to us the last two or three years. I wonder which way he will jump next.” Mike, “Don’t be too hard on him, chure you know he handled the Liberal cheque book for years and there is a few blank forms left and our friend expected to be Admiral of Sir Wilfy’s dinky navy, but the election knocked that into a cocked hat and the blank cheques are no use now and the P.O. is like the elevator he twitted us about some time ago lost, strayed or stolen. When dear T.A. got licked we lost our telegraph office here and now we are getting the peace racket put up to us. Now someone has got to the end of their rope.” “Say, Pat, did yees notice divil a word does our Liberal friends print or say regarding the dredge contract let by the late Liberal government and that is being looked into by Borden.” “Oh, that’s a horse of another color.” M.C. stop grouching.
Wm. Amos, of Deloraine, travelling agent for the Ontario Wind Engine and Pump Co., was a visitor at Wm. King’s.
Miss Lizzie Clark paid a short visit to her parents here.
J. McAulay, traveller for the Massey-Harris Co., stopped over to see D. Kennedy on business for that firm.
Service will be held in All Saints’ Anglican Church every Thursday evening at 8 o’clock during Lent and next Sunday, Feb. 16, at 3 o’clock, D.D. at 2 o’clock.
Geo. Dickason, of Dauphin, is around soliciting patronage for the Laurentia Milk Co., at Neepawa, and offers these prices till Mar 1st. $2.50 per hundred lbs, of sour cream; thirty-seven cents per pound of butter fat; sweet cream; forty-two cents per pound butter fat.
Our genial friend, Andrew Powers, is wearing a broad smile these days owning to the arrival of a new baby girl and Bob Rowe is also the happy father of a little baby girl. We wish them both the best of luck.
We notice in the correspondence from our Mowat friend in the Press of last week’s issue some very sensational items, more especially the one referring to so much grouching at outside points on account of the high cost of living and would like to say the prices quoted are far from correct. We always were under the impression that our Mowat friend was at all times ready to advertise this district at its truth worth and endeavor to get more land settled up, but by the remarks referred to we are at a loss to know just what is meant by this sarcasm and would refer him to some time ago and his remarks regarding the loss of the late P.O. at Oak Brae to the district and the damage it would do to this part of Manitoba in the way of getting this land settled up. For the benefit of our Mowat friends and the public in general we would like to give the correct prices of the products of the farm and forest at Fork River today. He quotes wheat 50c to 60c, barley 25c, potatoes 35c, pork 9c, beef 6c, seasoned wood $1.65, greed wood, $1.25. Now the correct prices of these are as follows: (Elevator prices), wheat 89c, 88c, ble, according to grades. Barley 32c and 40c being offered by outside parties and refused. Green pole wood $1.75 a cord and season poplar $1.75; butter 30c, eggs 30c, pork 10c, beef 7c and 7 ½ in trade.
Council meets at Winnipegosis on Thursday, the 20th inst.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 6 – 1913

1913 Feb 6 – Baran Fired Fatal Shot

Monday was the most fateful in the life of John Baran. It opened with the death of Provincial Constable Charles Rooke in morning and in the afternoon the coroner’s jury found Baran guilty of the shooting.
Coroner Harrington held an inquest in the afternoon, when the following composed the jury: Geo. King, foreman; H.F. Caldwell, John Cole, A.B. Buie, Nelson Taylor, Stewart Baird, Thos. Shaw, F.J. McDonald, R.G. Ferguson, Thos. Jordan, Frank Beely, and Arch. Esplen. Witnesses examined were Dr. Culbertson, as to immediate cause of death; John Tomaski, the man who drove the sleigh that carried Constable Rooke to Baran’s house where he was shot, and Marie Pelech, the woman who lived with Baran.
The jury, in order to receive the woman’s evidence, proceeded to the hospital and for an hour listened to a well connected and intelligent reciting of the incidents which led up to the shooting.
The woman testified that Baran fired two shots from a rifle through the door when Rooke attempted to force an entrance; that she knew that one of the bullets took effect for she examined the spot where Rooke fell exhausted in the snow, when the man who accompanied him left to secure assistance. She stated that she found a pool of blood. She also testified that Baran forced her to state that she fired two shot through the door. The whole affair was brought home to Baran in a most vivid manner.

THE JURY’S VERDICT

The following is the verdict of the jury:
“We, the jury empanelled to hear the evidence as to the death of Provincial Constable Charles Rooke, find that the said Charles Rooke on Sunday, Jan. 26, 1913, received a bullet in the breast from a rifle in the hands of John Baran and that the said Charles Rooke died on Monday, Feb. 3, 1913, from the effects of this shot.”
The death of Constable Rooke has cast a gloom over the community as he was a good citizen, as well a good officer, unassuming and kind to all.
Marie Pelech, who lived with Baran, is still in the hospital, but is doing as well as can be expected. If she recovers she will have to have her right arm amputated at the shoulder. Her brother, Michael, arrived from Winnipeg Monday morning and was overcome with grief to find his sister in such a pitiable condition. He says he has been looking for her for three years.
Baran appeared before Police Magistrate Munson on Monday on the charge of murder. He was remanded until Friday for trial.
Rooke was born at Redhill, Surrey, England. May 5, 1876, being the son of Inspector-General Rooke, of the Indian army, who was honorary physician to Queen Victoria, and was educated at Willington College. He came to Western Canada in 1895, and served five years with the Northwest Mounted Police. In 1905 the Manitoba government gave him the job of organizing the Manitoba mounted police, a body whose efforts were mainly directed to the suppression of lawlessness along the international boundary line. He made his name a terror to horse thieves, yeggmen and smugglers and soon made the frontier as safe as any other part of the province. Latterly, his headquarters have been here, where he had jurisdiction over much of the north country. In 1909 he married Elizabeth Surrey, who, with one son, survives him.
A brother, E.G. Rooke, news editor of the Nelson News, and former publisher of the Port Hope., Ont. Times, is here to attend the funeral as are also Mr. Geo. Surry, Victoria, B.C., Mrs. Rooke’s brother, and Miss Ellen Surrey, of Galt., Ont., sister of Mrs. Rooke.

1913 Feb 6 – Funeral Today

The funeral of the late Constable Charles Rooke is taking place this afternoon from the family residence 8th Ave., N.E. Vermillion Lodge No, 68, A.F. & A.M., of which deceased was a member having charge of the services. Rev. A.S. Wiley will conduct the service. Interment will be made at Riverside Cemetery.

1913 Feb 6 – Fraser Given Two Months

Wm. Fraser, who attempted suicide last week by cutting his throat, appeared before P.M. Munson on the 30th ult., and was sentenced to two months in jail. He was taken to Portage by Constable McLean.

1913 Feb 6 – Died From Bullet Wound

Fred Bichardson, a Barnardo boy who was working for Arthur Lee, a farmer at Togo, shot himself in the head Friday with a 22 rifle. He was brought to the hospital here on Saturday, but died shortly after his arrival. The remains were interred in Riverside Cemetery.

1913 Feb 6 – Fork River

Henry Benner, of Lloydminster, is visiting his parents up the Fork River. He is wanting a car of young cattle to take back with him. No objections to females being among them.
Howard Armstrong has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Mrs. R. McEachern and son Dony, left for Bayhead, Nova Scotia, for a two months visit among relations and friends.
D. Kennedy’s high flyer got kicked the other day and is out of business for a short time, consequently Dunk had to fall back on the old reliables for a trip to Winnipegosis.
All the threshing outfits got cold feet early this fall except for Fred Cooper and he is on his last job. Fred’s a stayer and there should be no kick from the farmers as there’s no money in it for either this year as far as threshing goes.
We were out the other day looking for a stray heifer and didn’t find her, but came across someone looking for a pig. They did not mention whether it was a live pig, or dead pig or a blind pig and judging from their track a few hours after they must have run across a pig of some kind. Moral, don’t try to carry more pig than you can handle unless you cover up your tracks.
There is considerable kicking being done among the owners of gasoline engines re the poor gasoline sent up here from Dauphin. It not only wastes our time but puts the engines out of order.
We notice in the Press a long rigmarole about compulsory education also an ad for a teacher for Mowat School. We hear there has been several application received. It seems a pity this school should be closed since the summer holidays, it being in the centre of a settlement where there is a large number of children. The parents seem to be anything but delighted to have the kids miss all the nice weather we have had. We bet dollars to doughnuts that the head push has no children to send or we would have heard of it every week for the last five months.
Can anyone tell us what benefit the majority of the ratepayers receive for their taxes in the Municipality. Of course there are some who go on a pilgrimage to all the meetings looking for snaps and they get them, by gum. The clerk has had a rise of fifty. Oh well, I believe he published the minutes of one council meeting since last June. The municipal auditor was around so look out for the statement three inches by four. We received a copy of the Auditor’s report in book form of 47 pages from Ochre River Municipality. Its good reading and looks like business. A few dollars expended like this would be more appreciated by the ratepayers than paying two road commissioners in ward five, as there has been done the last three years to spend two or three hundred dollars.
The new Oak Brae postoffice as officially opened today. It is situated at Janowski schoolhouse and should prove a great boon to the people of that locality as it has been a deeply felt want. Geo. Basham is postmaster and we feel sure he will fill the bill to all satisfactorily. We hear Billy is sore, but we can’t help these things, so Billy, please remember the little saying “No use crying over spilt milk.” Such is life in the Wolly West.
The annual clearance sale started today 1st Feb. at the Armstrong Trading Company’s store and they are sure slaughtering the prices. This has been a poor year for the farmer so now is your chance to buy right.
Wanted, a boarding house right away for the travelling public.

1913 Feb 6 – Sifton

A ball was held in the Kennedy hall in aid of the English church; about forty couples were present, and a very enjoyable time was spent.
Elaborate arrangements were made for a wedding here on the 31st ult. A large number of guests had assembled and everything was in readiness for the ceremony when it was found that the would-be bride was missing. Consternation reigned for a time and great disappointment was felt, especially by the intended groom.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 30 – 1913

1913 Jan 30 – Constable Rooke Shot
CONDITION CRITICAL

Thursday Jan. 30th, 11:30 a.m. – Constable Rooke’s condition critical, but he is holding his own well considering the wound is of such a dangerous character.

Constable Chas. Rooke was seriously shot Sunday by John Baran. A Galician, whom he was attempting to arrest, and is now in the general hospital. Mr. Rooke left early Sunday morning, taking a livery team and driver to arrest John Baran, who lives some twenty miles southwest of town, in the municipality of Gilbert Plains.
Baran has been giving considerable trouble of late and had deserted his wife, who has been a public charge for several years and was living with another woman at his farm in the Riding Mountain.
In driving out Sunday morning Rooke left his team at a neighbour’s a mile from Baran’s, and proceeded on foot accompanied by J. Tomaski, his driver, expecting that he would be able to approach and capture his man without giving him the alarm and perhaps escaping in the woods. After carefully approaching the house he rapped on the door but was told by the woman, who came to a window, that Baran was not at home. Rooke then proceeded to affect a forcible entrance, when three shots were fired in rapid succession through the door, the weapon used being a rifle.
The first shot struck the officer in the left breast over the heart.
His driver attempted to assist him to walk back to where the team was left, but after proceeding a short distance was compelled to leave him and hasten on for his team. Returning, with the assistance of the neighbour, he conveyed the wounded man to this neighbour’s house, but had to leave him there as he could not stand the jolting of the cutter. The driver drove down the mountain about nine miles to the home of H. McCorvie, who has a telephone, and summoned medical aid from town.
Upon receiving advice Dr. W.J. Harrington at once drove out, using all possible haste and getting a fresh team at McCorvie’s. A sleigh was fitted out in which to ring the injured man to the hospital and followed the doctor out.

WAS NOTORIOUS CHARACTER

Baran is a notorious character. He had been sent to jail two years ago for assaulting his wife. Baran deserted her and was living with another woman and his wife has to be supported as a charge on the town. It was only two years ago that Constable Rooke drove thirty-three miles in the coldest day of January, through a storm, in order to rescue Baran’s two little children, who were reported to be destitute and starving to death. These children were committed to the Winnipeg Children’s Aid Society by Magistrate Munson. Baran was summoned to appear before the magistrate for the non-support of his wife and children, and having disobeyed the summon, the magistrate issued a warrant and it was this warrant that Constable Rooke was endeavoring to arrest Baran on when he was shot.

THE INQUEST

The inquest on the death of the Baran baby, who was shot Monday by the police posse which went to the Galician settlement, was held, on Tuesday in the town hall. Evidence was taken from Dr. Ross, Chief of Police Bridle, F. May, W. Evans, W. Knight, E. Turland and Fred Little, members of the posse who did the shooting. The evidence produced showed that the child was killed almost instantly, the bullet passing through the body, causing a shock and hemorrhage.
The following jurymen were empanelled: Geo. King, foreman; Thos. Shaw, N. Taylor, E. Batty, H.F. Caldwell, D. Sutherland, T. Jordan, J.F. Neeley, R.G. Ferguson, F. Copeland, F.J. McDonald, H.R. Morrison.
After viewing the remains of the child and hearing the evidence, they returned the following verdict: –

VERDICT OF JURY

“We, the jury empanelled to take evidence as to the death of the baby Baran, on Jan. 27th, find that the baby came to his death by being shot with a rifle in the hands of one of the posse under Chief Bridle, organized for the purpose of arresting John Baran, suspected of having shot Constable Rooke, and the death of the baby, while regrettable, was purely accidental under the circumstances and we attach no blame to any member of the posse.”

1913 Jan 30 – Woman Placed Under Arrest

Annie Chisyk, who is a patient in the hospital suffering from a bullet wound, was formally placed under arrest on Wednesday, charged with shooting Constable Rooke. Her trial was set for Feb. 4th.

1913 Jan 30 – Fork River

Mr. W. Murray, Municipal Auditor, has been here auditing the books of Mossey River Municipality and it has been a busy week for Clerk Wilson.
Wm. Northam, who has been spending a few months at Weyburn, Sask., returned home last week.
Fred Storrar and William Johnston returned from the north end of the lake and report the fishing not to good lately as some of the men are off work.
Dunk Kennedy and John Richardson attended the Masonic banquet at Dauphin and report a good time.
Fred Cooper has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Wm. King returned from a two weeks’ trip west on business.
The cordwood has been coming in lively of late and the place looks like a wood camp; wood bring piled on all the streets.
At the inter-diocesan examinations of the Church of England Sunday School, Mrs. H.H. Scrase teacher of All Saints’ S.S. was sixth place in first class work, securing a diploma and book. Mrs. C. Bradley, of Winnipegosis, passed with first class diplomas as teacher of Winnipegosis Anglican S.S. We congratulate these ladies.
Wm. Parker was at the Armstrong store on business Thursday and Friday.
Mr. Cockerill of the Peabody Company, was a visitor at Dunk Kennedy’s on Saturday.
Howard Armstrong’s nephew has arrived on a visit from Ontario.
J.W. Johnston has moved up with his family to the hatchery on Lake Winnipegosis and Miss Eva Storrar accompanied them for a visit.
Sandy Munro was a weekend visitor at home on Saturday and Sunday.
Billie Coultas is sporting around with a new cutter these days and seems right in line with the Educational Department in the speeding line and guarantees to take the curves safely.
We must ask our readers to excuse the want of news last week as our correspondent was off for a week’s trip and our motto is while we are alive we will crow.
Service will be held in All Saints’ Anglican Church Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock, February.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 28 – 1915

1915 Jan 28 – Letter From Dauphin Man at Front

Mr. Georges Urion, a French reservist who invested considerable capital in Elm Park and other Dauphin property, writing to Coun. Geo. Johnson from 20th Company, 269 Regiment de Infantry, 70th Division, Secteur Postal 120, France, tells how he is now serving at the front in the great war in France. On January 1, when the letter was written, the French army in which he is in were then holding one half of the houses in a town in Alsace, and the Germans the other half. He is in good health and the spirit of the army is the best, he says. They are confident of success but that it will be no easy task and they expect the war to least six months yet.

1915 Jan 28 – Major Rooke Wounded

Major B. Rooke, of Second Indian Gurhkas, was wounded in a recent engagement in France. The major is a brother of the late Charles Rooke, of Dauphin.

1915 Jan 28 – Tragic Death of Miss Allan

The worst tragedy in the history of Dauphin occurred on Sunday afternoon about 5 o’clock in the Malcolm block, when Miss Florence Allan, a well-known and popular young woman of the town, was burned so badly that her death followed a few hours later.
It appears that Miss Allan and filled a small lamp was methylated spirits and in doing so had spilled some of the liquid on her flannelette gown. At the time she had only her underclothing and gown on. When she attempted to light the lamp the part of the gown on which she had spilled the spirits caught fire and in an instant the blaze spread over the unfortunate woman’s clothing. She had the door of the room locked at the time and in her excitement in looking for the key lost several valuable moments. When she got the door unlocked and rushed out in the hall she was a mass of flame. Mrs. Hooper, wife of the caretaker of the block, was the first to be on the scene, followed by Mr. Hooper. Miss Allan, in her frenzy, grabbed Mrs. Hooper, and begged of her to put out the fire. Mrs. Hooper had difficultly in freeing herself from the burning woman, as it all happened so suddenly, and in doing so had her hands burned. Mr. Hooper, as soon as he realized the situation, procured a rug and threw it about Miss Allan, and this did much to smother the flames. Mr. Hooper had one of his hands quite badly burned while covering the burning woman with the rug. Others came quickly to the rescue and Dr. Culbertson hurried from his home to the block. An examination by the Dr. at once revealed the terrible condition the young woman was in and he at once made arrangements for her removal to the hospital.

BURNED FROM HEAD TO FOOT.

Everything possible was done to alleviate the sufferings of the young woman, but as she was literally burned from head to foot there was no possible hope for her recovery, and on Monday morning she passed away.
Deceased came from Bancroft, Ont., about three years ago to take a position in her brother’s confectionery store, where she remained until a few months ago, when he sold out. She then accepted a position with the Steen-Copeand Co. which she held at the time of her death. She was a young woman of a genial disposition and was liked by all who came in contact with her whether in a business or social way.

BODY TAKEN EAST.

A service was held in the Methodist Church on Monday evening and the building was crowded with sympathizing friends. The pastor, Rev. T.G. Bethell, spoke feelingly of the awful fate that had befallen the young woman and the lesson all should learn of the terrible suddenness with which death comes at times to both young and old. He referred to the esteem and respect the deceased young woman was held and the sympathy all felt for the afflicted family.
Floral tributes, from friends and societies, covered the casket.
At the conclusion of the service the body was taken to the station and from there forwarded to Bancroft, Ont., for interment. The followed acted as pallbearers: J.T. Wright, B. Reid, W.D. Sampson, A.G. Wanless, J. Argue and B. Phillips.
Mr. and Mrs. H.A. Allan and Mr. E. Allan accompanied the remains east.

1915 Jan 28 – Fork River

Mrs. Sam Reid and daughters have returned from a week’s visit with friends at Winnipeg.
Mr. Desroche, of Pine Creek, was a visitor at the A.T. Co. store at Fork River and returned to Winnipegosis by the sleigh route patrolled by our trusted friend Scotty, and he’ll het there sure.
Mr. Flemming Wilson and family, of Dauphin, have taken up their residence on the Shannon homestead, Mr. W. intends farming for a time.
Miss Coomber, of Selkirk, is visiting her parents on the Fork River.
Mr. E. Thomas has returned from Verigen, Sask., and will run the elevator for a short time.
Mr. F.H. Steede, of Bradwardine, Man., will arrive on the 29th to take charge of this mission. He will hold service in All Saints’ on Sunday 31st at 3 o’clock in the afternoon.
A large gathering from all parts attended the pie social and dance at the home of Mr. W. King. A very enjoyable evening was spent by all. It reminded us of ye olden times.
The cold snap seems to be taking liberties with everything green or tender these days. Even the sandwich man is complaining.
Fred King is able to get around again. Try a poplar tree next time, Fred, its easier on the moccasins.
Miss Clara Bradley, of Winnipegosis spent the weekend at this burgh.
Mr. Fair, of Ochre River, is going his rounds and is doing a roaring trade selling slaves and liniments these cold days.
Mr. John Nowsade and family, of Aberdeen, Sask., are spending a short time with his parents in Fork River.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Harnell who have been spending a month at the home of Mr. and Mrs. A. Hunt, left to visit friends at Bradwinie on their way home to Sask. John is a good sport and his many friends here wish them a pleasant trip.

1915 Jan 28 – Sifton

Mr. W. Barry, of Ethelbert, paid us a visit last wee and reports business lively.
Robt. Brewer I again in our midst and is after more prom. It seems as though he thinks hogs are raised and fed up in one week as he claimed he had cleared everything in sight last week. His smile must go a long way when amongst the Galicians.
Wm. Ashmore is a very busy man these days with his team, what with hauling wood and hay. Quite a rustler is “Bill.”
There is a new company formed her which are the proud possessors of a good well, and we are all busy trying to think of a suitable name for it. They had a meeting last week to discuss the matter of taking new shareholders, as there are lots of applicants now that water is scarce. The promoters are deserving of good dividends as they took a big responsibility when they undertook to drill the well.
We are all sorry to hear that m. Green, the Church of England student, is leaving this district to take office in Winnipeg. We all wish him the best of luck.
There has been quite a number of commercial travellers here this week. It seems this must be a good business burgh for them. It certainly makes business good for some people.
The people of Sifton seem somewhat jealous of the fact that their neighbours had the pleasure of seeing an airship last week. We understand that lots of people are taking the mater very seriously and it seems that there is a hot time awaiting the airman next time he shows up.
Wm. Walters visited the surrounding country on business and reports that most of the farmers are busy solving the water problem.
A bunch of Galician farmers are busy loading a car of wheat which seem to be of a fair quality.
Mr. Wm. Taylor, of Valley River, was a visitor to town last week, and informs us that he has purchased a farm and is going to work on it next spring. We all with him luck, although we all know luck is a companion of hard work.

1915 Jan 28 – Sifton Romance
PROFESSOR MATOFF

The following is from a Sifton correspondent: The celebrated Russian violinist, Michael Matoff, has been lingering in this quiet northern village of Manitoba for some months. Although used to the plaudits of great audiences in his world tours, he is now content to stay here, held an unprotesting prisoner by the silken bonds of love.
Some months ago Matoff was journeying westward on the train which passes through here. On the same train was a young Jewish girl, Miss Ida Marantz, whose home is in Sifton. She is a handsome girl and posses a fair education. She assists her father in his general store here.
On the train on that eventful day, Miss Marantz became ill. The virtuoso, Matoff, who was sitting near, noticed the girl’s distress and flew to her assistance. He procured medicine for her and comforted her in every possible way.
When the train arrived at Sifton Miss Marantz got off and Matoff’s chivalry was so great that he, too, left the train and saw her safely to her home.
The grateful parents entertained the musician, who later in the evening favoured the family with some delicious dreamy music from his famous violin.

HOW ROMANCE BEGAN

Under the spell of the witching strains Miss Marantz lost her heart to the musician and Prof. Matoff lost his to the fair listened, if her had not already lost it.
The virtuoso and he village maiden became engaged. The engagement was conducted according to Russian rites and at the observance Matoff played and enraptured all the guests.
The virtuoso has since resided at the Marantz home and whenever he plays on his loved violin knots of villagers linger outside until the last sweet note has died away.
Prof. Matoff’s violin is said to be worth $10,000.
An interesting feature of the romance is that the “eternal triangle” element is said to be not wanting. It is said that prior to the meeting with the virtuoso a village youth had aspired to the hand of the fair Ida and had not been entirely discouraged. With the coming of the distinguished musician, however, this prosaic romance was nipped before it was well budded.

1915 Jan 28 – Winnipegosis

Dr. Medd was a weekend visitor to Dauphin.
It is reported that the fishermen have received notice from the companies to pull up their nets, as the fish market had taken a slump. Six carloads were shipped from this point on Friday.
A large number enjoyed the skating and dancing party given by the young ladies of the town on Wednesday evening last. About 40 couples attended the dance. Lively music was furnished by the Russell orchestra, with Messrs. Johnson and Stevenson giving a help out. Messrs. Bickle and Burrell acted as masters of ceremonies.
Miss Stewart who has been a visitor at the home of B. Hechter, left for her home Winnipeg on Friday.
Miss Clara Bradley is visiting at the home of Mr. Mark Cardiff in Dauphin this week.
Rev. Mr. Green, of the English church, is a Dauphin visitor this week.
Born, Jan. 23rd, to Mr. and Mrs. A. Russell, a son.
It is probably the Rex Theatre will again be open to the public this week.
Mrs. John McArthur and daughter, are visiting at the home of her parents in Fork River.

1915 Jan 28 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. D. Kennedy has been on the sick list but is on the mend.
Mr. F. Hechter returned on Sunday form Crane River.
Mrs. W.D. King returned home on Friday after visiting her mother.
The dance in the Rex Hall, given by the young ladies of the town was sure the best of the season and everybody enjoyed a good time.
Mr. Green, the English rector, preaches his farewell sermon next Sunday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 11 – 1912

1912 Jan 11 – Fatal Accident

A sad accident occurred in the south-western portion of the town on Friday last when Hugh, the seven year old son of Homer G. Dempsey, was struck in the head with the tines of a pitch fork in the hands of his uncle. It appears that the boy was going into the stable just as his uncle was throwing a forkful of hay and received one of the prongs in the forehead, which penetrated the skull. A physician was at once sent for and the wound attended to. The tines of the fork was in a filthy condition and this made the wound dangerous and which afterwards resulted in the boy’s death.
The family have the sympathy of the community in their sad bereavement. The funeral took place on Tuesday to Riverside cemetery.

1912 Jan 11 – Had Part of Ear Bitten off

Two Galicians, Anthony Genik and John Genik, of the Riding Mountain settlement, had a fight last Friday, in which the former had part of his ear chewed off. John, it appears, is married to a young woman, and Anthony thought, had been paying too much attention to his wife when he was away from home. This started the row. Constable Rooke arrested John on Sunday and took him to Gilbert Plains, where he arraigned before magistrate N.B. Nicholson, on Monday on a charge of unlawfully wounding Anthony Genik.
The case was heard on Wednesday, and after hearing the evidence the Magistrate committed the defendant for trial.
He was afterwards released on bail.

1912 Jan 11 – Fork River

The Canadian Northern Ry. Co. is putting in an Express Office at this point with Mr. Nat Little in charge, which will fill a long felt want as every Little helps in this town.
The New Year’s ball held in the Orange Hall by the Nobs of the town was pronounced to be the most successful event of the year.
Miss Gertie Cooper, who has been spending her holidays at home returned to Dauphin this week.
The first meeting of the new council was held in the municipal office on the 2nd.
Fred King was unfortunate enough to have a valuable pair of wolfhounds poisoned last week by some careless or malicious person putting out poison.
Wm. King, county master, left here on Saturday for his annual visit to L.O. Lodges of Dauphin county as far west as Togo.
“Senator” Kennedy and Fred Storrar paid a visit to the Lake Town on business.