Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 23 – 1915

1915 Sep 23 – Recruits for Sewell

The following recruits have enlisted in the 45th Batt. from Dauphin since Aug. 15th, and are now in training at Sewell camp: Bird McKinstry, A. Schoole, Cunningham, J. Brown, F. Storrar, W.H. Johnston, J. Cahill, J. Bartrup, J. Angus, W. Young, A.L. Cocking, W. Rindholm, E. Smith, B.F. Sparks, G. Spoueer, W. Mealing, and J. Hutson.
Sergt. Weeks will be in Dauphin and district until Oct. 15th and expects to get more recruits as the battalion is listed for England at an early date.

1915 Sep 23 – Winnipegosis

There was a most enjoyable dance in the Rex Hall on Thursday evening last in honour of Mr. Barbour and Mr. Burby who are joining the colours to do their bit for their country.
Sam McLean held a bailiff sale of furniture on Saturday, which was well attended and he had no trouble getting bidders, especially on the organ.
Frank and Ben Hechter attended the Jewish services in Dauphin Friday and Saturday.
The Ladies’ baseball team had a practice game on Wednesday when the Browns beat the Blues by 16 runs. Miss Geekie had the misfortune to get hit in the eye by the ball.
D.F. Wilson, of Fork River, passed through here on Friday for South Bay with notices of election for councillor [1 line missing] the army lately.
Quite a number are up north after the ducks. Mr. McInnes took a party across the lake in his gasoline launch Thursday.
Private Walter Munro arrived from Brandon on Saturday to spend a few days leave here with his friends. He reports the boys all well.
Mr. Rutlege, of the Pas, is spending a few days in town.
W.B. Sifton arrived from the north with is gang, having completed his lumber cut.
There was a children’s hour held in the Church of England on Friday evening, which was a great success thanks to Mrs. Bradley.
Constable Clarkson is busy these days rounding up dogs without tags, parties with dogs at large without tags had better keep their eye on the pound.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 9 – 1912

1912 Sep 9 – Fork River

George Sumption, of Dauphin; is spending of short time with Mr. J. Clements on the Chase farm.
Miss Gertrude Cooper, who has been spending her holidays with her parents up the Fork, has returned to Dauphin.
Mrs. T.N. Briggs left for a two motions’ holiday with her friends at Brandon.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, spent a short time here lately taking in the sights.
Professor Gorden Weaver and N.H. Johnston returned from a trip to Winnipegosis on business and after the train run off the track. Misfortunes will happen to the best of regulated railways.
Frank Chase, of Dauphin, was here lately looking after his business interests.
The elevator builders have not arrived yet. We think it will be a mistake to build it on the site picked out. The building would be better if it were moved south on to the street next the cattle chute and
Mr. and Mrs. V.O. Weaver, of Vermont, are visiting their brother Gordon, of East Bay.
Wm. Geekie and son passed through here on their return trip from Strathclair to their home at Winnipegosis.
F. Lacey, of Oak Brae, has returned from a trip to Dauphin.
Will Davis, who has invested heavily in real estate in Texas, strongly advocates the use of drain tiles. Will always was practical, especially on mail days when its raining.
Mrs. C. Bradley is spending a few days with Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Several people from the Lake Town took in the dance in the Orange Hall on Thursday night past. Brother Robinson played the Fisherman’s Horn Pipe and a very pleasant time was spent.
Wm. Williams and Mr. Venables spent the week-end at Dauphin on business.
A meeting of the council will be held at Fork River on Monday, the 23rd inst.

1912 Sep 9 – Sifton

The wet season now appears to be over and all except to get on with the harvest at once.
Wm. Ashmore was a visitor to Dauphin on Tuesday.
Good progress is being made with the Kennedy-Barrie store. Once these gentlemen open they are sure of doing a good business.
Frequent shipments of cattle are being made from here. There’s nothing like mixed farming to bring in the cash between seasons.
Geo. Lampard, wholesale butcher, Dauphin, and W.A. Davis were in town on Monday. These gentlemen brought a number of cattle while here.
This end of the district is open to come under the Drainage Act. It pays at any time to make improvements whether they are drains or building better roads.
Paul Wood’s family are going to reside in Dauphin during the winter so that an opportunity will be afforded the children to go to school.
Now that the Herald is giving interesting personal sketches of prominent men who have resided in the district a long time, I hope the prosperous village of Sifton will not be overlooked. We have several pioneers here who had ouch to do with its development and are will known, viz., Paul Wood, John Kennedy, Coun. Peter Ogrislo, Postmaster Thos. Ramsay, Wm. Ashmore and quite a few others that could be named.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 5 – 1912

1912 Sep 5 – Heavy Rain

A heavy rain set in early this (Thursday) morning and canted for several hours. The rain has put a stop to harvesting operations for this week at least. Indications now point to better weather.

1912 Sep 5 – A Note of Warning

There has been issued, by direction of the Minister of Agriculture at Ottawa, a conspicuous poster calling the attention of potato growers to the importance of examining their crop to ascertain whether or not is infected with potato canker. The hanger shows in natural colours a potato plant the whole yield of which is affected by the ideas. It also shows the appearance of individual tubers in which the canker has started to work. Growers who discover suspicious symptoms of the ideas in their crop are requested to send affected specimens to the Dauphin Botanist, Experimental Farm, Ottawa. The poster is issued as farmers’ circular No. 3 of the Division of Botany and is being distributed by the Publications Branch of the Department of Agricultural.

1912 Sep 5 – Fork River

The crops around this district are now looking excellent and the binders are now busily at work. If only we have good weather from now on we shall have a good average. If this district had a good ditch made to let off the water from the west, the farmers would not have to complain of so much water on their land. Perhaps something will be done one of these days.
Miss Alderton, teacher of Mossey River School, spent a few days in Dauphin last week.
Nat Little and his daughter, Gracie, are taking a little holiday in the States. We all hope they will have a pleasant time.
Wm. King is busy these days finishing off that new stable he has been building. It looks fine.
Mr. H.H. Scrase spent a few days visiting friends in Dauphin. He looks well.
Miss Fredrickson, of Winnipegosis, is now helping at the Armstrong Trading Co. in place of Miss Pearl Wilson resigned.
Mrs. F. Hafenbrak gave birth to a little son last week.
Mr. and Mrs. C. Bradley, of Winnipegosis, came to Fork River, last Sunday and visited Mr. and Mrs. H.H. Scrase.
We are glad to see the ??? ??? the elevator and hope to see ??? this fall.
Mrs. S. Bailey, who spent a month with friends in Ontario, has returned reports having a pleasant time there.
John Stacey, of Snowflake, Man., is visiting at S. Bailey’s and renewing old acquaintances.
S.E. Briggs, who had the misfortune to lose his horse with fever, has purchased another driver.
Hugh Armstrong spent a few days at the Company’s store on his return from the Pas.
Sydney Gower, electrical engineer, was renewing old acquaintances for a few days.
Mrs. A. Snelgrove and family returned home after a visit to her home at Brandon.
Theodore Johnston has returned from the south and is staying a few days with Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Professor John Robinson has returned and is looking well. We expect to see the band out in full force in future.
[1 line is rubbed out] the position of municipal critic. Not at all; we just noted a few remarks that were brought to our notice ??? friend don’t seem to relish ???. Before he ??? into the council ??? [9-10 lines are rubbed out] and all is forgotten ??? ??? ??? then they strike ??? ???. “Anything else Tommy.” “Yes, dad says the taxes amount to a rent and there ain’t no ex-rays powerful enough to discover where they go.” “That will do Tommy, dear; you must have meant beaver instead of municipality, as the beaver’s head looks wise and his tail is to carry the mud. The M.C. goes on to say we should suggest something. What’s the use. Several grants were got for the south road and the M.C. sent a three page letter to the man in charge and stopped the work as laid out by the Government engineer because he was not in the council he was held up and yet the M.C. whines about not getting assistance to overcome these difficulties. Rats, keep quiet M.C. and things will be all right later on and we’ll meet you on the south road with the band.

Today in the Dapuhin Herald – Sep 3 – 1914

1914 Sep 3 – Thousands are Being Killed

LONDON, SEPT. 3RD – While little or no official news has been allowed to pass the censors, it is known for the past three days that tremendous fighting has taken place between the Allies and the Germans. One authority places the number killed at 100 000, seventy percent being Germans.

1914 Sep 3 – Germans will be Licked

If the Germans can’t reach Paris by the end of the week they will not be able to reach it all. Emperor William is urging her generals to take the city at all costs. The English and French troops are being reinforced and there is no fear at headquarters that they will not be able to repulse the invaders and later drive them out of the country.

1914 Sep 3 – Ethelbert

Houses are scarce in our village. There is a good opening here for some enterprising contractor to build a half dozen dwellings.
There is a large supply of wood on hand. Pretty nearly everything else is affected by the war but it is not likely wood will soar. We are thankful for this small favour.
W.H. White, principal of our school returned on Monday from Dauphin. Mr. W. has not moved his family from Dauphin yet being unable tog et a house.
Threshing has commenced. The quality of the grain is good but the yields are on the light sight.

1914 Sep 3 – Fork River

Mrs. Minocan and Mrs. Carter returned to Montana, U.S. having spent the summer with Mrs. Nat. Little.
Wm. Howitson, assistant clerk at the A.T. Co. store, received an urgent call to headquarters at Winnipegosis to take charge of the manager’s gold fish emporium. “Scotty’s” all right and will will miss him around here.
E. Thomas, of Veregin, Sask., has arrived here to take charge of the elevator. He reports many elevators have been closed down in Saskatchewan. D. Kennedy will handle the finances.
Mrs. Rice, of North Lake, was in town on Saturday.
We overheard Mrs. Manglewortzel top giving His Majesty hail Columbia because she had not got her Eaton catalog the other day as the T.E. Co. had informed her that several copies had been sent to members of her illustrious family and she wanted them. Strange to say, two hours after two bags of the catalogs were seen on the platform addressed to the express agent. We trust her ladyship received her Sunday reading ere this. Some people are busy looking for imaginary trouble.
Miss M. Bradley, of Winnipegosis, has accepted the position of teacher to the Mossey River School for a time.
The few showery days have put back the harvesting but have put out the fires in most places. We should have a fire guardian here.
W. King, reeve, was a visitor to Dauphin on Monday.

1914 Sep 3 – Winnipegosis

There has been a bad outbreak of diphtheria among the Galicians in this district and already several deaths have occurred. It appears that these people will not obey the instructions of the health officer in regard to quarantine and as a result the disease has spread. The services of Constable Hunking have been required and he will endeavour to reinforce the law. A supply of antitoxin has been secured from Dauphin.
Negotiations have been completed for funds and work has been resumed on the school. What a power the mighty dollar has.
The fishing is very good and the fishermen seem to be fairly satisfied, which counts for something. When you find a satisfied fishermen then the end of the universe is in sight.
The war is likely to do several things for this district. One is that the farmers will bend their efforts to raise more cattle and hogs and another is that a larger area of land will be got ready for crop next year.
J.S. Seiffert has been appointed police magistrate for the district. The office is an important one and if properly filled requires judicial talent. We sure have had a variety of P.M.’s – good, bad and indifferent.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 23 – 1912

1912 May 23 – Drowned at Winnipegosis

Colin McArthur Falls Off Pier and is Drown – Town to Become Summer Resort
A sad drowning accident occurred here on Tuesday morning, when Colin McArthur, fell off the wharf and was drowned in the Mossey River. The particulars are very meagre. Decreased was seen on the wharf a short time before his body was found floating in the river. It is believed that he had an attack of heart failure and fell in and no one being present he was drowned. A strange feature of the accident was that the body continued to float on the water after life had become extinct. Deceased was a mill-wright and had worked at his trade in several parts of Manitoba. He came West from Orillia, Ont. He was about 50 years of age.
Preparations are being madder to make this place a summer resort and there is every prospect of the enterprise being carried out successfully. Our location on the lake and river is ideal and with a fine sandy beach in close proximity there is no better place for boat and fishing.
F. Hechter and J.P. Grenon were passengers to Dauphin on Tuesday.
Mr. Parker, of Sandwich, Ont., is at present in charge of the hatchery.
Postmaster Ketcheson is now fully in the harness and promises to fill this important position in a satisfactory manner.

1912 May 23 – Mail Robbery
Mail Bag Disappears Between Fork River and Sifton
Contains Much Money

A few days ago the postmaster at Fork River, D. Kennedy, gave the mail bag from that point to one of the C.N.R. brakeman on the train on that particular day. This man acknowledges receipt of the bag and states that he placed it in the car in the usual way. It may be stated that there is no mail clerk on the Dauphin-Winnipegosis trains and the mail pouches along the line are taken in charge by the railway employees. This necessarily involves much risk to the bags as the employees are engaged at each station for a considerable time in switching and performing other duties.
The bag in question was not missed until Dauphin was reached and a search made for it when it was found to have disappeared. The postoffice authorities at Winnipeg were at once apprised of the matter and Inspector Hicks sent to investigate. He was here on Tuesday and looked into the matter without being able to solve it. Later, however, two special service men were put on the case and developments are expected.
The theory advanced is that the bad disappeared at Sifton.
The registered mail was particularly heavy on this day and besides cheques and money orders there were several hundred dollars in cash.

1912 May 23 – Ethelbert

Ethelbert has just had a clean up and looks better for it.
Rev. G. Tymchely, Ruthenian Independent minister, is visiting in Dauphin.
W.A. McPhedran, is starting on his trip to B.C., which had to be delayed owning to the sickness of his little girl. We are glad to say she is getting better but not fit to leave, so Mr. McPhedran has been forced to abandon the holiday trip
Geo. Kolenezuk is leaving the Ruthenian store, and is going back to farming. He visits Dauphin with that end in view.
No cordwood is moving owning to want of cars.

1912 May 23 – Fork River News

Miss Olive Clark of Dauphin, is visiting her parents this week.
Mrs. Paul Wood, of Sifton, and Mrs. Ivor Humphreys, of Dauphin, are the guests of Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
Mr. D. McEachran returned from an extended visit to California and the Western States.
Rev. A.S. Wiley held Communion Service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday and preached an excellent sermon.
The weather, though still cold, has greatly improved since the late rains and farmers are getting to work on the land.
A football club was organized here on Saturday and the following officers elected: E.S. Biggs, chairman; A.H. Culverhouse, captain; Dune Briggs, vice-captain; Harcourt Benner, sec.-treas. The managing committee includes, in addition to those already mentioned, Walter Clark and Edwin King.
Mr. Hicks, post office inspector of Winnipeg, laid off here on his return from transferring the postoffice at Winnipegosis to W. Ketcheson and visited D. Kennedy, P.M.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Cooper left for Kamsack on a visit to their several friends at that point.
Joseph Lockhart is visiting Dauphin on business.
Miss Mabel Shannon left for Winnipegosis, having accepted a position as assistant in the new postoffice there.
John Richardson is moving his family out on his homestead at Mowat.
We have been informed that Colin Inkster has sold his farm to Mrs. Ridd, who purchased the Bellhouse far a short time ago.
The Rev. S. Fyles, of Portage la Prairie, S.S. Field Secretary of the Anglican Church, held holy communion service at Sifton, All Saints’ Fork River; and W. King warden at Fork River, on Church and S.S. business.
Garnet Lacey, of Oak Brae, left for a short vacation south looking for a high spot.
The ninth annual vestry meeting of Fork River Mission was held in All Saints’ Church. The Rev. Mr. Fyles as chairman, Mr. Biggs, as vestry clerk. Wm. King gave his report as warden and sec.-treasurer of the mission, which was accepted and passed. A vote of thanks was tendered the retiring wardens of Fork River. Winnipegosis, Sifton and to the W.A. for services rendered during the year. Officers for the coming year; Wm. King, minister’s warden and sec.-treas. C.E. Bailey, people’s warden, Fork River; C. Bradley, people’s warden, Winnipegosis; J. Reid people’s warden, Sifton; Mr. Biggs, organist, Fork River; H.H. Scarse and D. Kennedy, auditors, Fork River; Mr. Biggs, representative to Synod.
Reading between the lines of the Fork River scribe of May the 9th, signed “Parrot” may i ask why is the original “Parrot” defunct? We feel certain that the one who penned the reply has donned a borrowed plumage and without wishing to give offence it would be more appropriate for him to sign his name C-R-A-N-E in future as a wiseacre like him is out of his class among the “parrots”. The Jackdaw is no more; the M.C. is laid off with the catalogue and circular phobia and the skyscrapers safely under the shadow of his wings, they should rest in peace and as they shamrock is out of business the scribe will let the thistle and the rose have a show as I know they are anxious for the pay. The reply to well-wisher is so disjointed it remands us of the joke of the Governor of North Carolina. “Dry Day”.

1912 May 23 – Sifton

Seeding may be stated as slow.
T. Ramsey is now in charge of his Majesty’s postoffice. Tom and his obliging wife will make good officials. Long may they reign.
No visitor is more anxiously looked for each week than the Dauphin Herald. It certainly has become the people’s paper.
C.A. Jones, who has been carrying on a mercantile business here for a good many years, has sold out to Fred Farion.
Felix Marantz went to Dauphin on Tuesday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 16 – 1912

1912 May 16 – Drowned at Winnipegosis

Colin McArthur Falls Off Pier and is Drown – Town to Become Summer Resort
A sad drowning accident occurred here on Tuesday morning, when Colin McArthur, fell off the wharf and was drowned in the Mossey River. The particulars are very meagre. Decreased was seen on the wharf a short time before his body was found floating in the river. It is believed that he had an attack of heart failure and fell in and no one being present he was drowned. A strange feature of the accident was that the body continued to float on the water after life had become extinct. Deceased was a mill-wright and had worked at his trade in several parts of Manitoba. He came West from Orillia, Ont. He was about 50 years of age.
Preparations are being madder to make this place a summer resort and there is every prospect of the enterprise being carried out successfully. Our location on the lake and river is ideal and with a fine sandy beach in close proximity there is no better place for boat and fishing.
F. Hechter and J.P. Grenon were passengers to Dauphin on Tuesday.
Mr. Parker, of Sandwich, Ont., is at present in charge of the hatchery.
Postmaster Ketcheson is now fully in the harness and promises to fill this important position in a satisfactory manner.

1912 May 16 – Ethelbert

Ethelbert has just had a clean up and looks better for it.
Rev. G. Tymchely, Ruthenian Independent minister, is visiting in Dauphin.
W.A. McPhedran, is starting on his trip to B.C., which had to be delayed owning to the sickness of his little girl. We are glad to say she is getting better but not fit to leave, so Mr. McPhedran has been forced to abandon the holiday trip
Geo. Kolenezuk is leaving the Ruthenian store, and is going back to farming. He visits Dauphin with that end in view.
No cordwood is moving owning to want of cars.

1912 May 16 – Fork River News

Miss Olive Clark of Dauphin, is visiting her parents this week.
Mrs. Paul Wood, of Sifton, and Mrs. Ivor Humphreys, of Dauphin, are the guests of Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
Mr. D. McEachran returned from an extended visit to California and the Western States.
Rev. A.S. Wiley held Communion Service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday and preached an excellent sermon.
The weather, though still cold, has greatly improved since the late rains and farmers are getting to work on the land.
A football club was organized here on Saturday and the following officers elected: E.S. Biggs, chairman; A.H. Culverhouse, captain; Dune Briggs, vice-captain; Harcourt Benner, sec.-treas. The managing committee includes, in addition to those already mentioned, Walter Clark and Edwin King.
Mr. Hicks, post office inspector of Winnipeg, laid off here on his return from transferring the postoffice at Winnipegosis to W. Ketcheson and visited D. Kennedy, P.M.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Cooper left for Kamsack on a visit to their several friends at that point.
Joseph Lockhart is visiting Dauphin on business.
Miss Mabel Shannon left for Winnipegosis, having accepted a position as assistant in the new postoffice there.
John Richardson is moving his family out on his homestead at Mowat.
We have been informed that Colin Inkster has sold his farm to Mrs. Ridd, who purchased the Bellhouse far a short time ago.
The Rev. S. Fyles, of Portage la Prairie, S.S. Field Secretary of the Anglican Church, held holy communion service at Sifton, All Saints’ Fork River; and W. King warden at Fork River, on Church and S.S. business.
Garnet Lacey, of Oak Brae, left for a short vacation south looking for a high spot.
The ninth annual vestry meeting of Fork River Mission was held in All Saints’ Church. The Rev. Mr. Fyles as chairman, Mr. Biggs, as vestry clerk. Wm. King gave his report as warden and sec.-treasurer of the mission, which was accepted and passed. A vote of thanks was tendered the retiring wardens of Fork River. Winnipegosis, Sifton and to the W.A. for services rendered during the year. Officers for the coming year; Wm. King, minister’s warden and sec.-treas. C.E. Bailey, people’s warden, Fork River; C. Bradley, people’s warden, Winnipegosis; J. Reid people’s warden, Sifton; Mr. Biggs, organist, Fork River; H.H. Scarse and D. Kennedy, auditors, Fork River; Mr. Biggs, representative to Synod.
Reading between the lines of the Fork River scribe of May the 9th, signed “Parrot” may i ask why is the original “Parrot” defunct? We feel certain that the one who penned the reply has donned a borrowed plumage and without wishing to give offence it would be more appropriate for him to sign his name C-R-A-N-E in future as a wiseacre like him is out of his class among the “parrots”. The Jackdaw is no more; the M.C. is laid off with the catalogue and circular phobia and the skyscrapers safely under the shadow of his wings, they should rest in peace and as they shamrock is out of business the scribe will let the thistle and the rose have a show as I know they are anxious for the pay. The reply to well-wisher is so disjointed it remands us of the joke of the Governor of North Carolina. “Dry Day”.

1912 May 16 – Sifton

Seeding may be stated as slow.
T. Ramsey is now in charge of his Majesty’s postoffice. Tom and his obliging wife will make good officials. Long may they reign.
No visitor is more anxiously looked for each week than the Dauphin Herald. It certainly has become the people’s paper.
C.A. Jones, who has been carrying on a mercantile business here for a good many years, has sold out to Fred Farion.
Felix Marantz went to Dauphin on Tuesday.